LIBRES: Library and Information Science Research
Electronic Journal ISSN 1058-6768
1997 Volume 7 Issue 2; September.
Bi-annual LIBRE7N2 JOURNALS


NEWS FROM OTHER JOURNALS


1. ARIADNE

Issue 10 of Ariadne is now available from:

http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue10/

This issue contains:

* Dublin Core Management: Andy Powell presents three models for the way in which metadata can be managed across a Web-site and describes some of the tools that are beginning to be used at UKOLN to embed Dublin Core metadata into Web pages.

* Search Engines Corner - Keyword Spamming: Cheat Your Way To The Top: Tracey Stanley shows how metadata can be abused to enhance the search engine ranking of Web pages.

* Metadata: to be, or not to be (catalogued): Gordon Dunsire thinks that all is not rosy in the garden that is metadata, and wonders how it can assist cataloguing in a real-world sense.

* Clifford Lynch, the new Executive Director of CNI (Coalition for Networked Information), was recently interviewed by Ariadne. Clifford shares some views on mirroring, caching, metadata and Z39.50 and how he sees his role in CNI.

* A conference report from the Working Meeting on Electronic Records Research.

* ...and many other articles, features and reports.

John Kirriemuir

+++ Ariadne Web Editor eLib Web Information Officer +++ Tel: 01225 826354 (live) 01225 465064 (messages) Fax: 01225 826838

[from: Return-path: <owner-ifla-l@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA> X-Sender: terry.kuny@nlc-bnc.ca Date: Wed, 16 Jul 1997 11:45:09 -0400]
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2. CURRENT CITES

Subject: Current Cites, April 1997

Reposted from the PACS-L listserv

_Current Cites_ Volume 8, no. 4 April 1997 The Library University of California, Berkeley Edited by Teri Andrews Rinne Acting Editor: Roy Tennant

ISSN: 1060-2356 http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/1997/cc97.8.4.html

Contributors:

Campbell Crabtree, Christof Galli, Kirk Hastings, Terry Huwe, Margaret Phillips, David Rez, Richard Rinehart, Teri Rinne, Roy Tennant

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY & SOCIETY

Agada, John "Information Professionals in a Globally Networked Society: An agenda for social skills." FID News Bulletin 46(12) (December, 1996): 366-375. The author says that "...evaluation of information repackaging services is based on the resolution of client needs, rather than [just] on retrieval of documents...." . Indeed, the importance of good communications skills is well-known in reference and document delivery service, especially as the ever-shrinking globe and its multitude of cultures offer us plenty of opportunities for miscommunication. Agada argues that in order to respond, librarians need to focus more on users and less on systems, and they need to build new interpersonal skills to do so. - TH

Woodward, Jeannette "Retraining the Profession, or, Over the Hill at 40" American Libraries 28(4) (April 1997): 32-34. - There is probably no greater challenge facing today's libraries than the need to retrain the profession in the latest information technologies. This article talks about this need, but more importantly, the personal and institutional barriers to doing so. Woodward focuses her attention on the large complement of older workers, whom she asserts the institution may tend to pass over for training and who also may be less motivated to learn. While she suggests some strategies for overcoming these barriers, this is a war that can only be won by individual battles in libraries across the land. What is at stake is nothing less than the future of the profession. - RT

NETWORKS AND NETWORKING

Andrews, Whit. "Planning for Push" Internet World 8(5) (May 1997:45-52. Internet "push" technologies are getting a lot of press these days, and it takes only a cursory explanation to understand why. What would be better, from an advertising or publishing point of view, then to have your message or publication automatically delivered to your customer's desktop the instant it's ready? This article explains push technology, discusses the major products, and compares them in a sidebar. Although the commercial applications are obvious enough, one wonders whether libraries or other organizations could use them to provide current awareness services. - RT

Cortese, Amy. "Where the CyberAction Is: Your Hometown" Businessweek, (3522) (April 14, 1997): 95-98. In an interesting twist, web service providers are discovering a market for "city guides" that sell ad space on the Internet. The hook is the simple fact that people do most of their living, working and playing within fifteen miles of their own homes, and they like web services that help them find the stuff they want -- nearby. Billions of advertising dollars are spent on local markets because of this, and geography-specific web sites are a hot new medium that are giving the local paper a run for the money. But don't write off the local paper just yet: many major dailies have developed popular web sites and are in a position to keep city-guide web services in their pocket. - TH

Engst, Tonya "The Internet Robot's Guide to a Web Site" BYTE 22(5) (May 1997): 63-64. - If you manage a Web site, you need to know what is in this article. Many of you may already know about and use a robot exclusion file which limits the depths to which search engine robots, crawlers, or spiders can plumb, but if you don't this article is a quick and easy explanation of it. Engst also explains another technique you can try if you are not the server administrator but would like to limit robot access to your pages. - RT

Genesereth, Michael R. and Anna Patterson, editors. Proceedings for the Sixth International World Wide Web Conference, April 7-11, 1997, Santa Clara, California. Out of all the conferences related to the World Wide Web, this is the one most oriented to research. Therefore most of the papers are highly technical and somewhat speculative. Some papers may describe the kernels of tomorrow's technology, while others will remain only as evidence that some graduate students did indeed stay off the streets and out of trouble for a time. How do you tell the difference? I'll be darned if I know, but it sure can be entertaining trying to figure it out! - RT Hayes, Brian. "The Infrastructure of the Information Infrastructure" American Scientist 85(3) (May-June 1997):214-218. -- Have you been wondering where exactly in cyberspace those recent "router problems" occur that have had you drumming your fingers while trying to download the latest patch for your software? Then the present article may be right on target. It describes how messages sent over the Internet are broken up into packages and how they work their way through the layers of the application, transport (Transport Control Protocol or TCP), network (Internet Protocol or IP), data-link, and physical layers of the "protocol stack". It examines how routers have to quickly move these packages on and at the same time calculate the shortest route to other nodes. Packages sent across networks go through "peering points" called Network Access Points (NAP) or Metropolitan Area Exchanges (MAE). In these NAP's and MAE's, which are owned by telephone companies such as Sprint and Worldcom, state-of-the-art routers handle traffic coming in from up to 100 networks over powerful data transmission channels. The article concludes that the growing bandwidth of these channels (soon 2.5 gigabits per second) will require changes in the way routers process packages. - CG

Jenkins, Fred W. and Nancy Courtney "Internet Resources for Classical Studies" College & Research Library News 58(4) (April 1997): 255-259. Classicists were among the first scholars to take advantage of new information technologies, and this month's C&RL News list of Internet resources lists some of the important electronic resources the they have developed. Most of the items on the list are Web-based (including specialized and general web sites, association homepages, directories, electronic journals, and electronic text repositories). There is, however, an extensive list of discussion groups and listservs. - MP

McGraw, Gary and Edward Felten "Avoiding Hostile Applets" BYTE 22(5) (May 1997): 89-92. If you use the Web then you are open to possible attacks from sites that serve malicious Javascript, ActiveX, or Java code. This article discusses the four classes of attacks and how Java tries to prevent such shenanigans. Even if you aren't curious about the internal workings of Java, the page on strategies you can take to protect yourself from hostile attacks is well worth your time. - RT

Wang, Chih "Global networking, Internet and the Global Information Infrastructure (GII)" FID News Bulletin 46(12) (December 1996): 356-363. Wang, a professor at the University of Guam, summarizes the development of wide area networks in the United States, and then provides an overview of networking initiatives around the globe. He devotes special sections to major nations (like Russia) and areas (like Asia, Africa and Europe). He then proposes a general plan for a "global information infrastructure" which would address cultural, economic and social issues in various regions. FID, the International Federation for Information and Documentation is sponsoring dialogue about global networking, and Wang references the "Tokyo Resolution of 1994" that FID drafted to improve coordination. - TH

GENERAL

Hurwicz, Mike "Cheaper Computer, Part 2: PCs Strike Back" BYTE 22(5) (May 1997): 81-88. "Thin clients," "network computers," (NCs) "Java stations" or whatever you want to call them have been getting a lot of press lately. In this "less is more" world, computer users would have minimalist workstations that run only the pieces of code they need for specific tasks, which would be delivered via the network to their desktop as they need it. Since such machines can do just fine, thank you, without Microsoft Windows or Intel processors, it was only inevitable that those companies would come up with their solution to the problem that NCs were designed to solve. The solution from their perspective is a "NetPC" that is much like today's PC but with some flexibility removed. Ignore the sidebar "PCs vs. NCs," as it is stacked to make NetPCs look good and NCs not (why, for example, did they not compare price, which is likely to be one of the most important of criteria for comparison?). - RT

Young, Jeffrey R. "New Metaphors For Organizing Data Could Change the Nature of Computers." Chronicle of Higher Education 63(30) (April 4, 1997): A19-A20. Ever felt like you were at odds with computer operating systems, that in fact, they seem to make information retrieval harder? You're not alone. This article profiles interesting new research at Yale and other universities that tries to take advantage of human memory patterns. The Yale program, "lifestreams", stores documents of every type in a searchable "stream" according to when they were created or received. It turns out that this makes intuitive retrieval much easier for people. Interestingly, the on-screen program looks very similar to a Macintosh Hypercard "stack". The various researchers profiled here believe that the desktop is way overdue for improvement, and that the information-space we use should break free of the page metaphor. If you're interested, take a look at the Yale program, which is on the Web at http://www.cs.yale.edu/homes/freeman/lifestreams.html. - TH

_________________________________________________________________

Current Cites 8(4) (April 1997) ISSN: 1060-2356 Copyright (C) 1997 by the Library, University of California, Berkeley. All rights reserved. All product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders. Mention of a product in this publication does not necessarily imply endorsement of the product.

[URL:http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/]

To subscribe, send the message "sub cites [your name]" to listserv@library.berkeley.edu, replacing "[your name]" with your name. Copying is permitted for noncommercial use by computerized bulletin board/conference systems, individual scholars, and libraries. Libraries are authorized to add the journal to their collections at no cost. An archive site is maintained at ftp.lib.berkeley.edu in directory /pub/Current.Cites [URL: ftp://ftp.lib.berkeley.edu/pub/Current.Cites]. This message must appear on copied material. All commercial use requires permission from the editor, who may be reached in the following ways:

trinne@library.berkeley.edu // (510)642-8173

[from: : <owner-sololib-l@LISTSERV.SILVERPLATTER.COM> Date: Fri, 9 May 1997 13:43:32 -0300 From: Gerry Hurley Gerry_Hurley@SILVERPLATTER.COM
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3. D-LIB MAGAZINE

MAY 1997 ISSUE

The May issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available at <http://www.dlib.org>. The UK Office for Library and Information Networking maintains a mirror site for D-Lib Magazine at: <http://hosted.ukoln.ac.uk/mirrored/lis-journals/dlib/>, and The Australian National University Sunsite also maintains a mirror at <http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib>.

In addition to our usual collection of notices and announcements, we are pleased to feature the following stories:

CONTENTS

The New Zealand Digital Library MELody inDEX Rodger J. McNab, Lloyd A. Smith David Bainbridge and Ian H. Witten University of Waikato

Across Languages, Across Cultures: Issues in Multilinguality and Digital Libraries Carol Peters Eugenio Picchi Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche

Just-in-Time Conversion, Just-in-Case Collections: Effectively Leveraging Rich Document Formats for the WWW John Price-Wilkin Digital Library Production Service University of Michigan

Safeguarding Digital Library Contents and Users: Assuring Convenient Security and Data Quality Henry M. Gladney J. B. Lotspiech IBM Almaden Research Center

Data Modeling for News Clip Archive: A Prototype Solution Robert C. Plotkin Michael S. Schwartz IBM T.J. Watson Research Center

D-Lib Magazine is produced by the Corporation for National Research Initiatives and is sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) on behalf of the NSF/DARPA/NASA Digital Libraries Initiative.

William Y. Arms, Vice President Amy Friedlander, Editor, D-Lib Magazine

[from: Return-path: <owner-link@charlotte.anu.edu.au> Date: Fri, 16 May 1997 11:57:36 +1000 To: link@charlotte.anu.edu.au, syslibs@library.adelaide.edu.au From: tony@ningaui.anu.edu.au (Tony Barry) Subject: May issue of D-Lib Magazine at <http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib>]

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D-LIB MAGAZINE - JULY/AUGUST 1997 DOUBLE ISSUE

The July/August double issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available at <http://www.dlib.org>. The UK Office for Library and Information Networking maintains a mirror site for D-Lib Magazine at: <http://hosted.ukoln.ac.uk/mirrored/lis-journals/dlib/>, and The Australian National University Sunsite also maintains a mirror at <http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib>. We apologize in advance if you have inadvertently received a copy of this notice. If you wish to have your e-mail address removed from our list, please send a message to dlib@cnri.reston.va.us.

This issue is devoted to stories about conversion, preservation, and archiving. This is construed broadly to include the role of users, project management, multilinguality, and issues that arise in cultural heritage, fine arts, and corporate programs.

CONTENTS

The User Community as Responsibility and Resource: Building a Sustainable Digital Library David Seaman University of Virginia

JSTOR: From Project to Independent Organization Kevin M. Guthrie JSTOR

The Digital Library Research Agenda: What's Missing -- and How Humanities Textbase Projects Can Help Allen Renear Brown University

The Model Editions Partnership: "Smart Text" and Beyond David R. Chesnutt University of South Carolina

SGML Creation and Delivery: The Humanities Text Initiative Christina Kelleher Powell Nigel Kerr University of Michigan

Making of America: Online Searching and Page Presentation at the University of Michigan Elizabeth J. Shaw Sarr Blumson University of Michigan

Markup and Conversion of Japanese Classical Texts Using SGML in the National Institute of Japanese Literature Shoichiro Hara Hisashi Yasunaga National Institute of Japanese Literature

Safeguarding Digital Library Contents and Users: Digital Images of Treasured Antiquities Henry M. Gladney, F.C. Mintzer, and F. Schiattarella IBM Research Division and IBM Italy

Beyond Word and Image: Networking Moving Images -- More Than Just the "Movies" The first of a two-part examination of networking cultural heritage materials David Green National Initiative for a Networked Cultural Heritage

Electronic Records Research Working Meeting, May 28-30, 1997: A Report from the Archives Community David Bearman and Jennifer Trant Archives & Museum Informatics

D-Lib Magazine is produced by the Corporation for National Research Initiatives and is sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) on behalf of the NSF/DARPA/NASA Digital Libraries Initiative.

William Y. Arms, Vice President Amy Friedlander, Editor, D-Lib Magazine

[from: Date: Tue, 15 Jul 1997 16:18:00 -0400 Reply-To: International Federation of Library Associations mailing list <IFLA-L@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA>]

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4. INFORMATION RESEARCH

NEW ISSUE (no date)

A new issue of Information Research: an electronic journal is now available at:

http://www.shef.ac.uk/~is/lecturer/ircont.html

You'll see that we now have an ISSN for those who like that kind of thing.

As the Editorial notes:

This issue of Information Research News contains three papers. The first is a "guest paper" from Sirje Virkus of the Tallin Pedagogical University, Estonia. Sirje gives an account of the potential for distance learning in the field of information studies in Estonia. In the second paper, Correia and Wilson report the main results of an investigation of the information-scanning activities of managers in the Portuguese chemical industry; finally, O'Rourke et al. discuss the application of methods that were originally developed for automatic spelling correction to the identification of word variants in historical French texts.

In this issue we introduce a new feature - reviews of books and software - publishers please note that we are always ready to receive books for review.

[from: Date: Wed, 2 Apr 1997 14:58:46 +0100 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU> From: TOM WILSON <T.D.Wilson@SHEFFIELD.AC.UK>]

----------------------------------------

NEW ISSUE (no date)

A new issue of Information Research: an electronic journal is now available at:

http://www.shef.ac.uk/~is/lecturer/ircont.html

This issue is devoted totally to the recent 2nd International Symposium on Networked Learner Support - a departure from the usual composition of Information Research.

There are also new book reviews.

Colleagues will also find that my "World list..." has also received a good deal of updating in recent months - take a look at:

http://www.shef.ac.uk/~is/lecturer/tom2a.html

and put in a link to both on your own pages.

[from: Date: Fri, 1 Aug 1997 11:54:44 +0100 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU> From: TOM WILSON <T.D.Wilson@SHEFFIELD.AC.UK>]

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A NOTICE

Colleagues who read Information Research, located at:

http://www.shef.ac.uk/~is/lecturer/ircont.html

will have seen that we publish working papers from the Department and occasional "guest papers". In future, guest papers will be called "submitted papers" and will be refereed before acceptance. We would not expect to publish more than two such papers in an "issue" at present.

If you have a paper that is ready for publication - perhaps in the form of a working draft - consider submitting it to Information Research. You will find the instructions to authors at:

http://www.shef.ac.uk/~is/lecturer/author1.html

Copyright of papers published in Information Research remains with the author - we do not ask authors to assign their copyright to the journal or to the Department or to the University of Sheffield.

[from: Date: Mon, 15 Sep 1997 08:46:14 -0400 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU> Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU> From: Gretchen Whitney <gwhitney@utkux.utcc.utk.edu>]

USAGE FIGURES

For those interested in the use of electronic journals.

The first issue of Information Research: an electronic journal went 'live' in April 1995 - the published papers up to Vol.2 no. 3 have had a total of 8,933 hits. The three most popular papers are:

Mistry and Usherwood, Vol. 1 no. 3 - 1,474 hits David Allen, Vol. 1 no. 1 - 1,126 hits Cockburn and Wilson, Vol. 1 no. 2 - 1,089 hits

One of these days I shall have to try to discover how many of those hits turn into users who actually read the papers! Has anyone any bright ideas on how I might do that?

Information Research is at:

http://www.shef.ac.uk/~is/lecturer/ircont.html

Return-path: <@uga.cc.uga.edu:owner-jesse@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>

[from: Date: Wed, 2 Apr 1997 15:23:36 +0100 Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU> From: TOM WILSON T.D.Wilson@SHEFFIELD.AC.UK
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5. THE INFORMATION SOCIETY

ISSUE 13 (1), Jan - March 1997

The Information Society Letter from Rob Kling Editor-in-Chief For TIS Issue 13(1) (Jan -March, 1997)

Issue 13(1) of The Information Society, 13(1) focusses on electronic commerce. Before describing the issue, I am pleased to welcome two strong scholars to TIS's editorial board: Dr. James Katz of Bellcore and Professor George Trubow of the John Marshall Law School. In addition, Ms. Anna Martinson and Ms. Dorothy Day have become TIS's book review editors. I appreciate the help of TIS's previous book review editors, Mr. Wayne Lutters and Dr. Lisa Covi in significantly increasing the number of books that we review each year tenfold! As part of TIS's move with me to Indiana University, Ms. Carolyn Cheung has retired from TIS after doing a superb job as managing editor and Mr. Kevin Bishop is now playing that role here.

Professor Rolf Wigand of Syracuse University organized this special electronic commerce issue of TIS. This issue opens with Rolf's overview of electronic commerce in "Electronic Commerce: Definition, Theory, and Context." He notes the way that electronic commerce is used to refer to many different aspects of sales, marketing, and related business activities. He defines electronic commerce in terms of the ways that information and communication technologies support the complete value chain of an organization -- from the creation of a good or service through its sale. he goes on to analyze electronic commerce in terms of five theoretical conceptual approaches., from transaction cost theory in economics to the strategic creation of organizational networks. These five theoretical approaches undergird the debates I the field and the articles in this TIS issue.

Linda Garcia examines certain public policy issues of electronic commerce in "Networked Commerce." She defines electronic commerce in terms of the use of IT to reduce transaction costs or to gain strategic advantage -- a conception that differs a bit from Wigand's. Garcia is specially sensitive to the various ways that people and organizations can face relatively high transaction costs such as in learning new skills to do business or finding reliable access in rural areas. She also notes that while access to the Internet broadens to tens of millions of people, the scarce resource becomes "visibility" for sellers and others who want attention. This concern becomes the basis for an interesting non-egalitarian scenario and a policy concern that certain kinds of competition can diminish the value of the Internet in supporting electronic commerce . In particular, she is critical of competition through competing communication standards that can close off who sections of the Internet to some participants. This kind of standards competition - now seen in battles over standards for high speed modems -- differs from competition on criteria that enable broader access -- such as on the price, reliability, or convenience of a communications service or technology.

In the US, electronic commerce is becoming identified with business on the Internet. Richard Hill broadens this view by examining the character of electronic commerce in different communication media -- the WWW, the French Minitel and Electronic data Exchange. These media differ in the nature of mix of important services, and also in social characteristics -- such as the nature of the contracts between buyers and sellers and regulations about the nature of a transaction. Hill's paper helps us better conceptualize more diverse possibilities of electronic commerce that go beyond contemporary Internet-centered conventions.

Donna Hoffman and Thomas Novak further examine alternative conceptions of electronic commerce in "A New Marketing Paradigm for Electronic Commerce." Their paper develop the idea of a "marketing concept" to help characterize alternatives to conceptualizing marketing communications between an organizations and its clients or patrons in one-to-many broadcast terms. They provide rich examples of marketing approaches that make better use of symmetrical electronic communications -- allowing potential buyers to test products, to talk with sellers, and even for buyers to advertise on par with sellers.

Pat Auger and John Gallaugher follow with an empirical study, "Factors Affecting the Adoption of an Internet-based Sales Presence for Small Business". They surveyed about 350 firms that had established sites on a WWW shopping mall to learn how owners and managers conceptualized the advantages of electronic commerce . One of their intriguing findings is that perceptions of the Internet as a medium of cheap advertising was a dominant concern, while reducing transaction costs was a fourth-order consideration. This study raises questions about theories of electronic commerce that locate reduced service costs as one of the central driving issues.

Jonathan Palmer's empirical study of shopping across retail formats including the WWW, in-store visits, mail order catalogs and television is reported in "Electronic Commerce in Retailing." Palmer examines these four channels for differences in pricing, shopping time, ability to understand the product, etc. He reports that the WWW and television require more time for a purchase decision than either in-store shopping or mail order catalogs. Palmer's results contradict important cultural models of in-store shopping and WWW shopping, and also raise serious questions about the transactions costs for consumers in WWW shopping. This study raise serious questions about the rate of adoption of WWW shopping if consumer search time (and costs) are higher than through traditional formats. Conversely, if electronic shopping grows rapidly, this data raise questions about the role of transaction costs in people's choice of shopping formats.

Nabil Kamel, Murali Mohan and Kranti Toraskar examine the psychological dimensions of information flows as well as their economic dimensions in their modeling study, "An Approach to the Value-based Modeling of Information Flows." They model multiparty commercial transactions, and characterize informational flows in terms such as their fairness and the monopoly market structure.

Arnold Picot, Christine Bortenlanger and Heiner Rohrl's "The Organization of Electronic Markets," concluded the electronic commerce section with a theoretical inquiry based on the new institutional economics. They show how this branch of economic analysis offers three theoretical approaches that shed light on markets organized around electronic commerce -- transaction-cost theory, principle-agent theory, and property-rights theory. They make the traditional argument that reduced transaction costs will lead to electronic markets; but they also argue that such markets will not be completely transparent for participants because of property rights. Their paper is a provocative examination of the market structures, buyer-seller relations and stratgeies for deal making under electronic commerce arrangements.

The last research article in TIS 13(1), Erran Carmel's "American Software Hegemony," is not about electronic commerce , but about commerce in electronics. He sysematically examines different explanations for the US dominance of the global market in packaged software. Carmel advances the idea that US superiority rests on a "culture of software" that rests on individualism in software exploration, entrepreneurialsim, and an innovation-driven development environment. He carefully contrasts software development in Western Europe and Japan with the US in advancing his cultural interpretation of the global patterns of software markets.

TIS 13(1) concludes with Rob Kling's review of Public Access to the Internet edited by Brian Kahin and James Keller. This collection examines the meanings of the public having access to the Internet for a variety of purposes that go well beyond electronic commerce , including entertainment, telecommuting, education, and participating in the social life of their communities. But the book is also keenly relevant to people who are interested in electronic commerce .

TIS 13(2) will be a special issue on privacy issues and electronic media in Canada, edited by Jeffrey Shallit of the University of Waterloo. TIS 13(3) will be a special issue edited by Magid Igbarria on Virtual Societies: The Prospects and Dilemmas of Scaling Up Life On-Line. Please check our web site (http://www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS) for news on forthcoming issues and calls for papers. We are also hoping to create a searchable index of TIS abstracts by the Summer, 1997.

------------------------------------------------------------- ================ TABLE of CONTENTS: The Information Society 13(1)

Letter from the Editor-in-Chief

"Electronic Commerce: Definition, Theory, and Context" by Rolf Wigand

"Networked Commerce: Public Policy Issues in a Deregulated Environment," by Linda Garcia.

"Electronic Commerce, World Wide Web, Minitel and EDI", by Richard Hill.

"A New Marketing Paradigm for Electronic Commerce," by Donna L. Hoffman and Thomas P. Novak.

"Factors Affecting the Adoption of an Internet-based Sales Presence for Small Business", by Pat Auger and John M. Gallaugher.

"Electronic Commerce in Retailing: Differences Across Retail Formats," by Jonathan W. Palmer.

"An Approach to the Value-based Modeling of Information Flows," by Nabil Kamel, Murali Mohan and Kranti Toraskar.

"The Organization of Electronic Markets," by Arnold Picot, Christine Bortenlanger and Heiner Rohrl.

"American Software Hegemony," by Erran Carmel.

Book Reviews

Rob Kling -- Public Access to the Internet. Brian Kahin and James Keller (eds).

==========

Anyone wanting a single issue of TIS 13(1) can order it from Taylor & Francis direct for $19 (US$).

North America:

Taylor & Francis 1900 Frost Road Suite 101 Bristol, PA 19007-1598 Tel: 1-800-821-8312 (within the US) or fax: 1-215-785-5515

Europe:

Taylor & Francis 1 Gunpowder Square London EC4A 3DE UK Tel: 0171 583 0490 Fax: 0171 583 0585 Email: info@tandf.co.uk

---- Rob Kling http://php.ucs.indiana.edu/~kling The Information Society (journal) http://www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS Center for Social Informatics http://www.slis.indiana.edu/CSI Indiana University 10th & Jordan, Room 005C Bloomington, IN 47405-1801 812-855-9763 // Fax: 855-6166

Read & contribute to the .... Social Informatics Home Page --> http://www.slis.indiana.edu/SI a resource about research, teaching, conferences & journals

[from: Return-path: <owner-asis-l@asis.org> Approved-By: SARAH.PROWN@YALE.EDU Approved-By: Rob Kling <kling@INDIANA.EDU> Date: Sat, 3 May 1997 18:17:55 -0500]

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ISSUE 13 (2) July - Sept 1997

The Information Society Letter from Rob Kling Editor-in-Chief For TIS Issue 13(2) (July-Sept, 1997)

This issue of The Information Society, 13(2), is devoted to "Free Speech and Privacy in Canada's Information Society." The vast majority of articles about free speech, privacy and censorship that cross my desk focus on the United States or Western Europe. As I write this letter, the United States Supreme Court is reviewing the constitutionality of the "Communications Decency Act" -- a national law that can be problematic to enforce with international communication systems. The issues of free speech, privacy and censorship are worked out within a different legal system in Canada -- and one that is not well understood in the United States and Western Europe.

In 1991 and 1992, for example, Canadian citizens were shocked by the gruesome murders of two teenage girls; the subsequent trial of Karla Homolka and Paula Teale attracted Canadians' interest in a way that was similar to U.S. residents' fascination with the murder accusations against O.J. Simpson. But Homolka's 1993-1994 trial did not become a media circus like O.J. Simpson's trial, because a Canadian judge closed the courtroom to the public and prohibited reporters from publishing the evidence against her.

However, the judge's action sparked a prolonged public debate in Canada about the openness of trials and the extent to which new communications technologies undermine national censorship efforts. Residents of Southern Ontario (which includes Toronto) who had television antennas were able to pick up television broadcasts about the trial from nearby Buffalo New York (although Canadian authorities blacked out cable broadcasts about the trial). Canadian Customs also tried to seize newspapers that reported about the trial at border checkpoints.

Despite seizing newspapers and intercepting television signals, the Canadian government could not totally block Canadians' access to news about the trial. The U.S.-based Washington Post published a lengthy story on the Teale-Homolka case that was available in Canada through computerized information services - such as CompuServe. Such news stories were subsequently reposted on the Internet. Canadians shared photocopies of these stories, and government officials had embarrassingly little control over the effective spread of news about the trial. Issues such as the flow of information across national borders complicates efforts at national censorship.

This TIS issue includes five articles that examine matters such as these in a Canadian context. They were originally given at a conference entitled "Free Speech and Privacy in the Information Age" that was held at the University of Waterloo, in November 1994. TIS Associate Editor Mark Poster, conference organizer Professor Jeffrey Shallit and I selected the five best of the conference papers for possible publication in TIS. These five papers were reviewed and revised for TIS. The revised versions appear here, along with an essay by Jeffrey Shallit and Harriet Lyons, that places each of them in context.

One noteworthy paper" Content Analysis of Pornographic Images Available on the Internet" by Michael D. Mehta and Dwaine Plaza, is a systematic study of Usenet postings. Mehta and Plaza expected most pornographic images to be posted by individuals (amateurs); they were surprised to find that commercial services were the most frequent posters of pornographic images, and they used free pornographic pictures to advertise their fee-based services. A second paper of special note is by John Sopinka, a member of the Canadian Supreme Court, in which he lucidly explains the most relevant section of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms in light of advances in electronic media.

The issue ends with Robert Sandusky's review of Hirschheim, Klein, and Lyytinen's Information Systems Development and Data Modeling: Conceptual and Philosophical Foundations.

TIS continues to evolve in content and scope with an active editorial board. The book review editors, Anna Martinson and Dorothy Day, have commissioned a lively set of reviews that will appear in the next few issues. I also welcome four new members to TIS's editorial board:

Dr. Chrisanthi Avgerou (Information Systems, London School of Economics),

Dr. Elizabeth Davenport (Communication and Information Studies, Queen Margaret College-Edinburgh);

Professor Rohan Samarajiva (Communications, Ohio State University);

Professor George Turbow (John Marshall Law School).

Please check our web site (http://www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS) for news on forthcoming issues, calls for papers, and abstracts of articles from previous issues. ================

TABLE of CONTENTS: The Information Society 13(2)

Special Issue: Privacy (The Waterloo Conference) Guest Editors: Jeffrey Shallit and Harriet Lyons Contents

Letter from the Editor-in-Chief Rob Kling

Articles

Introiduction to Social Issues of Networking in Canada's Information Society: Jeffrey Shallit and Harriet Lyons

Content Analysis of Pornographic Images Available on the Internet Michael D. Mehta and Dwaine Plaza

Age of Uncontrolled Information Flow Henry Spencer

Freedom of Speech and Privacy in the Information Age John Sopinka

Perceptual Differences in Approaches to Censorship: Information Intermediaries and the Implementation of Law Margaret Ann Wilkinson

Old Freedoms and New Technologies: The Evolution of Community Networking Jay Weston

Book Review

Hirschheim, Klein, and Lyytinen. Information Systems Development and Data Modeling: Conceptual and Philosophical Foundations. Robert J. Sandusky (reviewer) ------ Rob Kling http://php.ucs.indiana.edu/~kling The Information Society (journal) http://www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS Center for Social Informatics http://www.slis.indiana.edu/CSI Indiana University 10th & Jordan, Room 005C Bloomington, IN 47405-1801 812-855-9763 // Fax: 855-6166

Read & contribute to the .... Social Informatics Home Page --> http://www.slis.indiana.edu/SI a resource about research, teaching, conferences & journals

[from: Return-path: <owner-asis-l@asis.org> Approved-By: millarj@LIB.MUOHIO.EDU Date: Mon, 29 Sep 1997 21:22:27 -0500 Reply-To: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science" <ASIS-L@asis.org>, Rob Kling <kling@INDIANA.EDU>]

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CALL FOR PAPERS

Universal Service: New Conceptions for a New Age

A Special Issue of The Information Society (An International Journal)

Edited by Harmeet Sawhney Indiana University, Bloomington

There is a new wave of innovation in telecommunications services, including information services on computer networks and wireless telephony. Discussions of who will be served by these services -- especially computer networks (and the Internet) have raised new questions and analyses of universal service.

The meanings of universal telephone service have changed over time. As Mueller points out, when Theodore Vail, the architect of the Bell System, first talked about universal service he did not harbor any egalitarian notions of extending telephone service to everyone. He was merely advocating the creation of a "universal" integrated system which would allow any subscriber to talk to any other and thereby eliminate one of the biggest problems of the day -- lack of interconnection between fragmented networks owned by competing companies. The universal service idea has evolved in an interesting way since then.

In the 1970s, the Bell System started justifying its monopoly against the competitive inroads of MCI and others in the U.S. by arguing that the preservation of an integrated system was essential for that of universal service -- provision of telephone service to everyone. Even so, young low-income families constitute a major portion of the 3.5 million households without telephones in the U.S.

Now as more advanced services, such as Internet access and cellular phones become commonplace among the U.S. middle class, what should universal service mean?

Before the divestiture of AT&T in 1984, universal service, for the most part, was a quasi-technical issue handled by a small group of technocrats far removed from the public eye. Today, it is a central issue in a highly charged public policy debate. Not only are there many more voices yearning to be heard, but also the choices offered by technological developments have greatly increased. Therefore, it is widely accepted that the concept of universal service developed during the POTS era is no longer relevant, and it needs to be reformulated for a radically different environment characterized by telephone-computer convergence. However, divergent voices and technological uncertainties have stymied any sustained movement in a new direction.

What we need are new frameworks which cut through the clutter and provide conceptual clarity for an issue that beckons sagacious choices. This special issue of TIS aims to advance discussion by calling for papers which help us conceptualize universal service in new ways. Since the very purpose of this issue is to foster innovative ideas which break the traditional mold, we do not specify the topics in advance. The questions mentioned below are provided to give you a flavor of what we have in mind rather than to curtail your own imagination.

Is our thinking too dominated by the wireline telephony model? What would universal service mean when wireless phones (cellular, PCS, and satellite) are as common as transistor radios? Would broadcasting or even post office provide a more appropriate framework for thinking about universal service? Are universal service policies too narrowly focused on subsidies which inevitably dampen innovations by artificially lowering the cost of an entrenched technology? Should their scope be expanded to include initiatives for the development of cost reducing technological alternatives? How about a hypothetical Universal Service Foundation that awards grants for such efforts?

Should the concept of universal service which has been rooted in telephony be broadened to include other media? Do we need to develop a vocabulary which goes beyond local loops, cross subsidies, and other telephony-based concepts? Would it be possible to develop a framework that looks at the question of universal service independent of any particular media? Should the concept of universal service also include access to information? If yes, how can we "ration" information when it is so context dependent? Should we in general move away from a prescriptive mode of thinking where experts decide what should be provided to one where the intended beneficiaries of universal service policies make their own selections according to their needs?

Should we abandon the notion of an overarching framework for everyone? Would it be better to develop context sensitive micro-solutions for specific population groups such as rural population, the urban poor, the elderly, and people with disabilities? Does universal service have to be uniform service to everybody? Do we need one framework or multiple frameworks?

We are open to ideas that provide new insights in a conceptually powerful way. Papers from diverse research traditions -- social science, cultural studies, or legal research -- which employ either quantitative or qualitative methodologies are welcome.

Authors are invited to nominate up to four reviewers who are knowledgeable about the topic (authors, however, should avoid any nominations that involve a conflict of interest). Nominations should include: name, complete address, telephone, fax, and electronic mail address.

FIVE COPIES OF THE PAPER PREPARED ACCORDING TO THE TIS GUIDELINES SHOULD BE SUBMITTED BY MARCH 15, 1998.

We encourage prospective authors to become familiar with TIS and to discuss possible articles with the Special Issue editor. Manuscript guidelines and a list of the titles and abstracts of articles published in TIS can be found on the journal's web site: http://www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS

Please send your manuscript to:

Harmeet Sawhney Dept. of Telecommunications Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47405

ph: (812) 855 - 0954 fax: (812) 855 - 7955 e-mail: hsawhney@indiana.edu

Feel free to correspond with the special issue editor if you have any questions or are planning to submit an article.

--------------------

_The Information Society_ is a quarterly, refereed journal devoted to studies of information technology and social change, information policy, and related topics and is edited by Rob Kling of Indiana University. Please see the journal's WWW site at http://www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS to learn more about the journal's scope and recent issues.

[from: Return-path: <owner-asis-l@asis.org> Approved-By: millarj@LIB.MUOHIO.EDU Date: Tue, 23 Sep 1997 12:38:12 -0500 Reply-To: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science" <ASIS-L@asis.org>, Rob Kling kling@INDIANA.EDU]
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6. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL ON DIGITAL LIBRARIES

CALL FOR PAPERS

International Journal on Digital Libraries Special Issue on User Interfaces for Digital Libraries Guest Editors: Joseph Busch and Isabel Cruz

As digital libraries reach an increasingly wide variety of users that need to locate, extract, display, and summarize information, there is a growing need to provide effective user interfaces that can support these activities.

This special issue addresses the challenges in designing and building user interfaces for digital libraries. These challenges relate to the multimedia nature of the information, the amount of the information to be accessed and processed for presentation, the distinct functionalities expected by users ranging from naive to sophisticated, and the diversity of the applications and of the capabilities of the output devices. Topics of interest, include, but are not limited to:

New Interface Capabilities: * Interfaces for searching, browsing, and filtering information * Access to multimedia colections such as image, audio, and video archives * Interfaces for information retrieval, clustering, classification, and data mining of large collections * Information visualization * Web-based interfaces * Tailorable user interfaces * Spatial and temporal layout of information

Applications: * Scaling to very large collections * Interfaces for education, geographical information systems, art collections, and medicine * Bibliographic and classification system based interfaces * Interfaces for collection development and maintenance * Collaborative interfaces and interfaces which support group work

User Studies: * Field studies of working systems * Methodology and evaluation techniques * User models, plan recognition, and task support * Educational and social impact of interfaces to digital libraries

We invite the submission to the special issue of manuscripts describing new and original research. The deadline for submission is December 15, 1997. Electronic submissions (in the form indicated below) or hard copy submissions (five copies) can be sent to one of the editors:

Joseph A. Busch Standards and Research Projects Getty Information Institute 1200 Getty Center Dr., Suite 300 Los Angeles, CA 90049 USA jbusch@getty.edu Tel: +(310) 440-6343 Fax: +(310) 440-7715 http://www.gii.getty.edu/ Formats: PDF, MS Word, or HTML

Isabel F. Cruz Computer Science Department Worcester Polytechnic Institute 100 Institute Rd. Worcester, MA 01609-2280 USA ifc@cs.wpi.edu Tel: +(508) 831-5357 Fax: +(508) 831-5776 http://www.cs.wpi.edu/People/faculty/ifc.html Formats: Postscript or HTML

[from: Return-path: <owner-asis-l@asis.org> Approved-By: millarj@LIB.MUOHIO.EDU Date: Sun, 28 Sep 1997 16:58:10 -0800 Reply-To: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science" <ASIS-L@asis.org>, Joseph Busch JBusch@GETTY.EDU]
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7. ISSUES IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY LIBRARIANSHIP

(no date)

The latest issue of ISSUES IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY LIBRARIANSHIP is now available on the web:

http://www.library.ucsb.edu/istl/

Articles in this issue include:

Electronic Publishing Programs in Science and Technology Part 2: Abstracting and Indexing Services

Information at Your Fingertips: Use of the Internet at the Life Sciences Reference Desk

In Distance Learning, Is There a Role?

Columns:

Science and Technology Sources on the Internet: Internet Resources on Plant Genetics

Book Reviews Online Searching: A Scientist's Perspective

ALA Midwinter Discussion Groups: Publisher/Vendor Relations Discussion Group Heads of Science and Technology Libraries Discussion Group

---------------------- Andrea L. Duda Networked Information Access Coordinator Davidson Library, University of California, Santa Barbara duda@library.ucsb.edu

[from: Return-path: <@uga.cc.uga.edu:owner-sts-l@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU> Approved-By: STS-L <mpc@AZTEC.LIB.UTK.EDU> Date: Wed, 21 May 1997 09:52:05 -0400
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8. JOURNAL FOR THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE (JASIS)

VOL 48, NO 7, July 1997

Journal of the American Society for Information Science VOLUME 48, NUMBER 7, JULY 1997

CONTENTS

IN THIS ISSUE Bert R. Boyce 577

SPECIAL TOPIC ISSUE: STRUCTURED INFORMATION/STANDARDS FOR DOCUMENT ARCHITECTURES GUEST EDITORS: ELISABETH LOGAN AND MARVIN POLLARD

Introduction Elisabeth Logan and Marvin Pollard 581

IN MEMORIAM A Tribute to Yuri Rubinsky, August 2, 1952---January 21, 1996 Stuart Weibel 583

Why SGML? Why Now? Yves Marcoux and Martin Sévigny 584

SGML and Related Standards: New Directions as the Second Decade Begins James David Mason 593

The ``ABCs'' of DSSSL Sharon C. Adler 597

Application of HyTime Hyperlinks and Finite Coordinate Spaces to Historical Writing, Analysis, and Presentation W. Eliot Kimber and Julia A. Woods 603

W[h]ither the Web? The Extension or Replacement of HTML Peter Flynn 614

The Text Encoding Initiative: Flexible and Extensible Document Encoding David T. Barnard and Nancy M. Ide 622

Extending SGML to Accommodate Database Functions: A Methodological Overview Arijit Sengupta and Andrew Dillon 629

All My Data Is in SGML. Now What? Jon Fausey and Keith Shafer 638

Towards a Methodology for Document Analysis Airi Salminen, Katri Kauppinen, and Merja Lehtovaara 644

SGML: The Reason Why and the First Published Hint Charles F. Goldfarb 656

BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS More Authors, More Institutions, and More Funding Sources: Hot Papers in Biology from 1991 to 1993 Zhang Haiqi 662 Haiqi, using 16 issues of Science Watch from 1993 to 1995, identifies 71 highly cited ``hot'' biology papers. Several papers were excluded, some for having too many authors. 153 papers were then selected from Nature, 139 from Cell, and 124 from Science. It seems likely that these papers were those to be found in issues of these journals that contained at least one of the previously selected ``hot papers.'' Papers with 22 or more authors were apparently excluded from this set as well. Authors, unique author affiliations, and funding sources were identified and counted for each paper. None of the 27 ``hot'' papers in Nature had less than 3 authors, and only one of the ``hot'' papers in both Cell and in Science had less than 3 authors. In the whole Nature sample only 45 of 153 papers had less than 3 authors; 27 of 139 in Cell and 38 of 124 in Science had less than 3 authors. The mean number of authors per ``hot'' paper is 6.54 in Nature, 6.62 in Cell, and 7.71 in Science. The mean numbers of authors per paper in these journals were 4.34, 4.55, and 4.41, respectively. The mean number of institutions per paper is 2.06 for Science, 1.91 for Nature, and 1.62 for Cell. In Nature 59% of papers are multi-institutional, 58% in Science, and 45% in Cell. At least two nations shared authorship in 32% of papers published in Nature, 21% in Science, and 18% in Cell. The mean number of funding sources per paper is 3.78 for Science, 3.43 for Cell, and 3.25 for Nature, and the mean number of funding sources is higher for the ``hot'' papers. Big science as a cooperative enterprise seems alive and well in Biology.

Qualitative Exploration of Learners' Information-Seeking Processes Using Perseus Hypermedia System Shu Ching Yang 667 Six subjects from different disciplines were interviewed by Yang after they performed tasks on an interactive hypermedia database on Greek history. The tasks involved writing interpretative essays on assigned topics which could be approached by way of the system. The subjects were asked to verbalize their thought process as they worked on the assignment, were observed doing so, and subjected to a post-task interview about their decision processes. The result is a model incorporating five activities and a series of general statements about observed behaviors.

BOOK REVIEWS The Art of Abstracting (2nd ed.), by Edward T. Cremmins Carol A. Bean 670

Ethics and Computing: Living Responsibly in a Computerized World, by Kevin W. Bowyer Robert L. Battenfeld 671

Richard Hill Executive Director, American Society for Information Science 8720 Georgia Avenue, Suite 501 Silver Spring, MD 20910 FAX: (301) 495-0810 Voice: (301) 495-0900 rhill@asis.org http://www.asis.org

[from: Return-path: <owner-asis-l@asis.org> Approved-By: SARAH.PROWN@YALE.EDU X-Sender: dick@mail.asis.org Approved-By: Richard Hill <rhill@ASIS.LIB.INDIANA.EDU> Date: Tue, 27 May 1997 10:05:01 -0400]

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VOLUME 48 NUMBER 8 AUGUST 1997

Journal of the American Society for Information Science JASIS

VOLUME 48 NUMBER 8 AUGUST 1997

CONTENTS

IN THIS ISSUE Bert R. Boyce 673

RESEARCH

Information-Seeking Behavior of Securities Analysts: Individual and Institutional Influences, Information Sources and Channels, and Outcomes Nancy Sadler Baldwin and Ronald E. Rice 674 Baldwin and Rice begin with a broad review of the user study literature. Studies of security industry research habits are then examined. A random sample of security analysts were interviewed by telephone using a pretested instrument. Individual characteristics do not influence use of sources. Greater institutional resources lead to greater use of sources. Individual characteristics appear to influence measures of success. Greater institutional resources lead to higher measures of success. Use of information sources does not significantly effect measures of analyst success.

A Classification Approach to Boolean Query Reformulation James C. French, Donald E. Brown, and Nam-Ho Kim 694 Using a partitioned set of relevant and non-relevant documents from a boolean query, French et al. set a threshold for an ``impurity function'' which reflects the ratio of relevant documents to the total in the set. If the ratio falls below the threshold, a terminal node of a tree has been identified. If it is above, the term that occurs in the document generating the highest impurity function is used as a splitting criterion with documents with the term going to one child node and the remainder to another. Iteration occurs until the new sets for each node fall below the threshold. The tree can then be transformed into a disjunctive normal form Boolean query and iterated to produce new retrieved sets until no significant changes occur or no relevant documents are retrieved. The tree appears to outperform Salton's DNF, and to run somewhat faster.

The Enacted Fate of Undiscovered Public Knowledge Mark A. Spasser 707 Spasser's review of the text surrounding the citing point of 33 citations to Swanson's ``undiscovered public knowledge'' papers, finds 21 of the citing papers in the Library and Information Science literature where the references were key points in the arguments presented, and 12 in the medical literature where rhetorically dismissive qualifications were the norm.

Information Technology and Social Relations: Portrayals of Gender Roles in High Tech Product Advertisements Juris Dilevko and Roma M. Harris 718 Using three high impact journals each in business, library and information science, and computer science, Dilevko and Harris reviewed their full page advertisements to select the 3001 for computer based products in which the gender identifiable human figure could be categorized. Men not working with the product was the most common categorization, with men alone four times as common as women alone and three times as common as both sexes present. In the Library and Information Science sample, however, men alone and women alone are about equal. The more traditional library journals, but not the newer ones, show women working with a product, with men and children as bystanders.

Information Science: A Third Feedback Framework Amanda Spink 728 Spink's general review of the feedback concept in communication and information retrieval leads to the conclusion that a model more reflective of the human oriented approach to the study of information retrieval is required. Such a model would include magnitude feedback and strategy feedback and would explicate the interactive process of the retrieval event beyond the possibilities of the traditional relevance feedback model.

Interaction in Information Retrieval: Selection and Effectiveness of Search Terms Amanda Spink and Tefko Saracevic 741 Spink and Saracevic address search term choice in the context of the user, intermediary, and their system interaction. Data are from forty users, with four intermediaries doing ten searches each, using videotapes and transaction logs. Five sources of search terms are identified: Question statement, user interaction, thesauri, intermediaries, and term relevance feedback. If such a term appeared in an item judged relevant it was credited as producing relevant items and called a relevant term. Users were responsible for only 61% of terms, and 23% of these were generated in interaction. Nineteen percent of terms were first identified in a thesaurus, and 11% in term relevance feedback. Relevant items were retrieved by 64% of the terms used. Question statement terms were most productive at 49% of relevant terms. User interaction supplies 19%, feedback 12%, thesauri 14%, and intermediaries 6%. Sixty percent of the terms retrieved both relevant and not relevant items. Terms that produce no retrieval or only not relevant retrieval are at 36%, and negative effectiveness is a significant problem. Question statement terms had the highest positive and lowest negative effectiveness arguing strongly for rewritten questions. Relevance feedback terms were also highly effective. When term weighting is used, the effectiveness of question statement terms and intermediary terms increases significantly while other categories remain little changed.

BOOK REVIEWS Design Rationale: Concepts, Techniques, and Use, edited by Thomas P. Moran and John M. Carroll Andrew Dillon 762

Information and Business Performance: A Study of Information Systems and Services in High Performing Companies, by Ian Owens and Tom Wilson with Angela Abell Alison M. Keyes 763

High Noon on the Electronic Frontier: Conceptual Issues in Cyberspace, edited by Peter Ludlow Leslie Regan Shade 764

Internet Dreams: Archetypes, Myths, and Metaphors for Inventing the Net, edited by Mark Stefik Martha Montague Smith 767

LETTER TO THE EDITOR 770

Richard Hill Executive Director, American Society for Information Science 8720 Georgia Avenue, Suite 501 Silver Spring, MD 20910 FAX: (301) 495-0810 Voice: (301) 495-0900 rhill@asis.org http://www.asis.org

[from: Return-path: <owner-asis-l@asis.org> Approved-By: brush@LIS.PITT.EDU X-Sender: dick@mail.asis.org Date: Thu, 14 Aug 1997 16:49:46 -0400]

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CALL FOR PAPERS

This notice is being posted to several lists and newsgroups. Please forgive the duplication.

CALL FOR PAPERS Special Topic Issue of _JASIS_ "Integrating Multiple Overlapping Metadata Standards"

The next Special Topics Issue of the Journal of the American Society for Information Science (JASIS) is scheduled to come out in 1999 on the topic of Integrating Multiple Overlapping Metadata Standards. The guest editor for this special issue will be Zorana Ercegovac who is with the Department of the Library and Information Science, Graduate School of Education & Information Studies, University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) and the InfoEN Associates (www.lainet.com/infoen/).

As more heterogeneous objects, including text, become available electronically, people have just started to look at different metadata standards that had independently evolved to identify and describe these objects (e.g., geospatial data such as imagery archives and remotely-sensed datasets; museum and cultural information repositories). These metadata standards (e.g., TEI, FGDC, AACR2) come from different disciplines and reflect different perspectives and traditional cultures. Only recently have we started to "mesh" these different content metadata standards and converge into superstandard schemes.

Example is the collaboration between Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) Metadata and Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules (AACR 2nd ed.) standards. Both standards have a capability to describe cartographic materials but from different perspectives: while, for example, FGDC focuses on coordinate access points, projection, and other spatial, temporal, security, and data quality attributes, AACR2 is entering maps under the author main heading. Similar differences exist in the areas of visual and archival representation.

Specific topics of interest, but are not limited to, the following:

-- Metadata elements for the representation of digital repositories including networked resources; for example, which elements should be included in a metadata record for images and spatial datasets in general? Which data elements should be included at different levels of detail?

-- Federal metadata standards for data-intensive application areas

-- Integrating multiple overlapping metadata standards (e.g., AACR2, FGDC)

-- Designing a superstandard scheme, or a catalog, of metadata entries

-- Multiple levels of metadata for multiple user needs

-- Integration of data and its metadata

-- Economic implications for the integration of metadata standards for multimedia and heterogeneous digital datasets

-- Application-apecific metadata projects from academia, research laboratories, governmental organizations, and industry

Inquiries may be made to the guest editor at zercegov@ucla.edu

Manuscript submission (four copies of full articles) should be addressed to:

Zorana Ercegovac, Ph. D. Department of Library and Information Science Graduate School of Education & Information Studies 222 GSLIS Building University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA 90095-1521 (310)206-9361 (work) (310)391-3923 (fax/voice) zercegov@ucla.edu http://www/gslis.ucla.edu/LIS/faculty/zercegov/ercegovac.html

The deadline for sumbitting manuscripts for consideration for publication in this special issue is April 30, 1998. All manuscripts will be reviewed by a select panel of referees, and those accepted will be published in a special issue of _JASIS_. Original artwork and a single copy of the copyright release form will be required for all accepted papers.

A copy of the call for papers will be available on the World Wide Web as is further information about _JASIS_, at http://www.asis.org/.

Zorana Ercegovac, Ph. D. Dept of Library and Information Science Graduate School of Education & Information Studies 222 GSLIS Bldg University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA 90095-1521 Tel: 1-310-206-9361 Email: zercegov@ucla.edu http://www.gslis.ucla.edu/LIS/faculty/zercegov/ercegovac.html

[from: Return-path: <owner-asis-l@asis.org> Approved-By: brush@LIS.PITT.EDU X-Sender: zercegov@pop.ben2.ucla.edu Date: Mon, 11 Aug 1997 14:34:42 +0100]
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9. JOURNAL OF ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING

Judith A. Turner wrote:

Journal of Electronic Publishing

<http://www.press.umich.edu/jep>

ISSN 1080-2711

The Journal of Electronic Publishing is a quarterly electronic-only publication from the University of Michigan Press that covers all aspects - -- both scholarly and experiential -- of the growing field of online publishing. Since 1994 JEP has been collecting and archiving writings that help us understand this new and exciting medium.

JEP is offering free access to the site through the end of 1997.

In September JEP will start quarterly publication with a format designed to go beyond the traditional scholarly journal: it will combine the best scholarly articles with the best essays from practitioners in this field. Scholarship without experience is pedantry; experience without analysis is gossip. Together scholars and practitioners can widen our understanding of the emerging electronic-publishing field, and allow us to apply that understanding to our ventures in e-pub.

JEP will have two sections: invited essays by the people on the front lines, those who read, write for, edit, and publish in the electronic environment; and new or reprinted peer-reviewed papers from scholars who rigorously study and analyze issues in this discipline. JEP will also offer reviews and critiques of books, Web sites, and other electronic-publishing endeavors; news of people in the field; and reports on meetings, conferences, and seminars (both online and RL).

JEP invites your submission of scholarly papers and your application to be a regular contributor to the journal as a reporter or critic. In addition, we are looking for essayists. Future issues will cover the impact of e-pub in the third world, whether anyone can make money online, the effect of e-pub on tenure, the growth of e-pub conventions (e.g. left frame, bottom navigation; searching; META text, etc.), and the trials of publishing both on paper and electronically. If you have something to say, this is the place to say it.

For the September issue, JEP is seeking essays by those who read e-journals and by those who do not, explaining their biases in a thoughtful, provocative, and readable way. Do not argue both sides of the issue. Only opinionated writers will be considered.

Please send all applications, articles, and questions (in ascii, tagged ascii, SGML, HTML, CGI, Java, or any major word-processing format, but not by fax, postal mail, or FedEx) to Judith Axler Turner, Editor <mailto:judith@turner.net>.

Judith Axler Turner Editor The Journal of Electronic Publishing http://www.press.umich.edu/jep (202) 986-3463

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End of newjour-digest V1 #357 *****************************

[From: owner-newjour@ccat.sas.upenn.edu Date: Wed, 4 Jun 1997 20:37:54 GMT Subject: Journal of Electronic Publishing]
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10. JOURNAL OF LIBRARY AND ARCHIVAL SECURITY

CALL FOR PAPERS

This notice is being posted to several lists and newsgroups. Please forgive the duplication.

Library and Archival Security is a quarterly, refereed journal, devoted to all aspects of security in libraries, archives, and other information centers. Submissions should apply to "libraries and archives" broadly defined to include special libraries and information centers, as well as "virtual" or "digital" collections.

The Journal welcomes submissions of theoretical or practical importance, including full length articles, book and software reviews, and reports. Submissions may be devoted to problems of physical security, including theft detection and prevention, related inventory methods, disaster prevention and recovery, security systems and equipment, issues of access to collections and incidents involving public behavior and safety in libraries.

As well, articles dealing with network and communication security, the security, integrity, and confidentiality of electronic records, library Internet sites, local library automation systems, and on the legal and ethical implications of library record keeping are especially welcome.

Papers dealing with recovery methods, such as deacidification, salvage of fire and water-damaged materials, and the conservation & preservation of library and archival materials will also be considered.

Authors are requested to submit printed copies of any item for consideration, single-sided, double-spaced, either on standard Letter-sized or A4 paper. Electronic copies should be submitted on 3.5 inch floppy diskette copies, clearly labeled "for DOS/Windows", "for Macintosh", or "for UNIX" computers, and should be accompanied by printed versions. Documents set using Microsoft Word are preferred.

Those wishing to submit items for immediate consideration using electronic mail are asked to send plain ASCII text copies as part of the body of the email message (not as attachments). While email submissions are welcome, authors are asked to forward properly typeset printed and diskette copies by mail.

Submissions and queries about content should be directed to the Editor:

Christopher Brown-Syed, PhD. Library and Information Science Program, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, 48202-3939, USA. Phone: +1 (313) 577-0503 Fax: +1 (313) 577-7563 Email: csyed@lisp.purdy.wayne.edu

The Journal of Library and Archival Security is undergoing editorial changes. Detailed instructions for authors, together with information regarding the Journal's Editorial Board, Editor, and Publisher, will shortly be made available via the World Wide Web. Library and Archival Security is a publication of the Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street, Binghamton, New York, 13904-9981, USA, to whom all subscription queries should be addressed.

[from: Return-path: <owner-asis-l@asis.org> Approved-By: brush@LIS.PITT.EDU Date: Thu, 7 Aug 1997 06:56:17 -0400 Reply-To: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science" <ASIS-L@asis.org>, Chris Brown-Syed <csyed@WWW.LIB.WAYNE.EDU>]
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11. JOURNAL OF LIBRARY SERVICES FOR DISTANCE EDUCATION

The first issue of the Journal of Library Services for Distance Education, which is devoted to considerations on the future of library services to distance education, is now available at http://www.westga.edu/library/jlsde/

Contents:

Welcome from the Editor

Book Review: Slade, Alexander L. and Marie A. Kascus. Library Services for Off-Campus and Distance Education: the Second Annotated Bibliography.

Articles: Maine College Cyber-Programs Offered Internationally, by Thomas E. Abbott

The Future of Library Services for Distance Education, by Chris Adams

Off-Campus Library Services: a Model for the Future, by Peter Brophy

Library Services for Off-Campus Students: at the Crossroads? by Tony Cavanagh

I Have Seen the Future, and It is Us! by Carol Goodson

High Five for the Next Five: Librarians and Distance Education, by Maryhelen Jones

Converging Vision of Library Service for Off-Campus/Distance Education, by Marie Kascus

After the Millennium: Library Services to Distance Education, by Gloria Lebowitz

New Opportunities for Remote Students, by Debbie Orr and Margaret Appleton

Some Observations on the Future of Library Services for Off-Campus and Distance Education, by Alexander L. Slade

The Heart of the Matter: Libraries, Distance Education and Independent Thinking, by Kate Stephens and Lorna Unwin

Due to our uncertainty about the number of potential users who lack WWW access, e-mail retrieval of articles in ASCII text form has not yet been enabled. If you are unable to access the Journal on the WWW, using software such as Netscape, MS Explorer, lynx, etc. please contact cgoodson@westga.edu with the titles of articles you wish to read, and we will gladly send them to you.

[from:Return-path: <collibs@is.su.edu.au> Date: Wed, 20 Aug 1997 10:24:58 +1000 Originator: collibs@is.su.edu.au Sender: collibs@is.su.edu.au From: Carol Goodson cgoodson@westga.edu]
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12. LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE RESEARCH

VOLUME 19, NO 1, 1997

Library & Information Science Research Vol. 19, no. 1; 1997 ISSN: 0740-8188

Editorial:

Assessing Networked Information Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Charles R. McClure

Articles:

Writing a Research Proposal: The Role of Library Anxiety, Statistics Anxiety, and Composition Anxiety Anthony J. Onwuegbuzie . . 5

The Interpretations of Library Use in the Age of Digital Libraries: Virtualizing the Name Zorana Ercegovac . . 35

Work Sampling: The Application of an Industrial Research Technique to School Library Media Centers Nancy Everhart . .53

Information Seeking as Problem-Solving to Uncover the Novice Learners’ Information-Seeking Processes in a Perseus Hypertext Shu Ching Yang . .71

About the Authors . . 95

Reviews (Debora Shaw, Review Editor): . 97

Transcribed by Candy Schwartz May 7, 1997

[from: Return-path: <cschwartz@vmsvax.simmons.edu> Date: Wed, 07 May 1997 11:06:14 -0400 From: Candy Schwartz <cschwartz@vmsvax.simmons.edu>]

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VOLUME 19, NO 2, 1997

Vol. 19, no. 2; 1997 ISSN: 0740-8188

Editorial: Library Research Seminar I: Partners and Paradigms by Arthur P. Young page 107

Letter to the Editor: Regarding Peter Hiatt's Review of Reclaiming the American Library Pas by Christine Jenkins and Cheryl Knott Malone page 109

Letter to the Editor: Response by Peter Hiatt page 109

Articles:

OPACs: A Research Review by Andrew Large and Jamshid Beheshti page 111

Improving Reference Service Cost Studies by Eileen G. Abels page 135

The Research Activity Timeline: A Qualitative Tool for Information Research by Christine A. Barry page 153

The Feminist and the Emporer's New Clothes: Feminist Deconstruction as a Critical Methodology for Library and Information Studies by Hope A. Olson page 181

About the Authors page 199

Reviews (Debora Shaw, Review Editor) page 201

Transcribed by Candy Schwartz June 20, 1997

[from: Return-path: <cschwartz@vmsvax.simmons.edu> Date: Fri, 20 Jun 1997 10:02:40 -0400 From: Candy Schwartz <cschwartz@vmsvax.simmons.edu>]

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VOLUME 19, NO 3, 1997

Library &; Information Science Research

ISSN: 0740-8188

Index

Volume 19 Number 3

1997

Contents

Editorial: The Research Agenda Beyond 2000

by Mary Burke, Min-min Chang, Charles H. Davis, Peter Hernon, Gary Marchionini, Paul Nicholls, Candy Schwartz, Debora Shaw, Alastair Smith, Stephen E. Wiberley, Jr., & Ann Wolpert ..page 209

Conversation in Information-Seeking Contexts: A Test of an Analytical Framework

by Paul Solomon ..page 217

Internetworking an Urban Community: A Longtitudinal Study of Approaches to Introducing Adult New Users to Electronic Information Resources

by Judith J. Senkevitch, & Dietmar Wolfram..page 249

Technology, Power, and Structure: Developing a Model of the Effects of Automation on Liberal Arts College Libraries

by Gregory A. Crawford, & Ronald Rice...page 265

Innovation Diffusion: Proposal of an Organizing Theory on Which to Base Research into School Library Development

by Rebecca Knuth....page 301

About the Authors...page 315

Reviews (Debora Shaw, Review Editor)...page 317

Transcribed by Candy Schwartz, 27 August 1997

[from: Return-path: <cschwartz@vmsvax.simmons.edu> Date: Thu, 28 Aug 1997 16:05:16 -0400 From: Candy Schwartz <cschwartz@vmsvax.simmons.edu>]

Candy Schwartz, Professor, Graduate School of Library & Information Science, Simmons College, 300 The Fenway Boston MA 02115-5898 (617) 521-2849, FAX (617) 521-3192 <cschwartz@simmons.edu> http://www.simmons.edu/~schwartz/
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13. PACS REVIEW

VOLUME 8 NO 1 (1997)

+ Page 1 +

----------------------------------------------------------------- The Public-Access Computer Systems Review

Volume 8, Number 1 (1997) ISSN 1048-6542 -----------------------------------------------------------------

EDITORIAL

REFEREED ARTICLES

Patricia Fravel Vander Meer, Howard Poole, and Thomas Van Valey, Are Library Users Also Computer Users? A Survey of Faculty and Implications for Services

Over 300 faculty members at Western Michigan University answered a survey which was conducted to explore the relationship between faculty use of university libraries and faculty use of computers. Faculty who are regular library users were found to be the same faculty who are using common computer applications. Conversely, it appears that faculty who do not use the library regularly are, for the most part, not using computers. Implications for libraries are discussed in relation to the findings--in the areas of computer databases, faculty assistance, collaboration with computing staff, and marketing of electronic services.

o HTML file

World Wide Web:

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/pr/v8/n1/vand8n1.html>

o ASCII file

World Wide Web:

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/pr/v8/n1/vanderme.8n1>

List Server:

Send the email message GET VANDERME PRV8N1 F=MAIL to listserv@uhupvm1.uh.edu.

+ Page 2 +

-----------------------------------------------------------------

Editors-in-Chief

Pat Ensor and Thomas C. Wilson University Libraries University of Houston Houston, TX 77204-2091 (713) 743-9762 and 743-9673 plensor@uh.edu and twilson@uh.edu

Associate Editor, Columns

Leslie Dillon, OCLC

Associate Editor, Communications

Dana Rooks, University of Houston

Associate Editor, Production

Ann Thornton, New York Public Library

Associate Editor, Technical Support

Robert Spragg, University of Houston

Editorial Board

Ralph Alberico, University of Texas, Austin George H. Brett II Priscilla Caplan, University of Chicago Steve Cisler, Apple Computer, Inc. Walt Crawford, Research Libraries Group Lorcan Dempsey, University of Bath Nancy Evans, Pennsylvania State University, Ogontz Stephen P. Harter, Indiana University Charles Hildreth, University of Oklahoma Ronald Larsen, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Clifford Lynch, Division of Library Automation, University of California David R. McDonald, Tufts University R. Bruce Miller, University of California, San Diego Mike Ridley, University of Guelph Peggy Seiden, Skidmore College Peter Stone John E. Ulmschneider, North Carolina State University

+ Page 3 +

List Server Technical Support

List server technical support is provided by the Information Technology Division, University of Houston. Tahereh Jafari is the primary support person.

Publication Information

The Public-Access Computer Systems Review is an electronic journal that is distributed on the Internet and on other computer networks. It is published on an irregular basis by the University Libraries, University of Houston. There is no subscription fee.

To subscribe, send an email message to listserv@uhupvm1.uh.edu that says: SUBSCRIBE PACS-P First Name Last Name.

Circulation

PACS-L@UHUPVM1.UH.EDU: 10,893 subscribers in 73 countries (PACS-L is estimated to have 10,000 additional USENET subscribers). PACS-P@UHUPVM1.UH.EDU: 3,828 subscribers in 66 countries.

Electronic Distribution

Each article is initially distributed in both ASCII and HTML formats.

ASCII files are paginated. They are available from the following servers:

o List Server:

Send the email message GET INDEX PR F=MAIL to listserv@uhupvm1.uh.edu.

o World Wide Web:

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/pacsrev.html>

HTML files are not paginated. HTML files may have linked GIF files. HTML files may have internal links, external links, or both. The editors do not maintain external links.

+ Page 4 +

HTML files are available from the following server:

o World Wide Web:

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/pacsrev.html>

In consultation with article authors, the editors determine whether an article is updated, whether both ASCII and HTML files are created for updated articles, and whether all prior versions of an article are retained.

Print Distribution

The first five volumes of The Public-Access Computer Systems Review are also available in book form from the American Library Association's Library and Information Technology Association (LITA).

Copyright

The Public-Access Computer Systems Review is Copyright (C) 1997 by the University Libraries, University of Houston. All Rights Reserved.

Copying is permitted for noncommercial, educational use by academic computer centers, individual scholars, and libraries. This message must appear on all copied material. All commercial use requires permission.

+ Page 5 +

---------------------------------------------------------------- Editorial ----------------------------------------------------------------

By Pat Ensor and Thomas C. Wilson

Welcome to the first issue of Public-Access Computer Systems Review for the year 1997. And welcome to the first issue edited by Pat Ensor and Tom Wilson. The founder of the PACS Review and a pioneer in electronic journal publication, Charles Bailey has decided to pass responsibility for the journal to us, and in this, he does us a great honor. We hope to continue in an outstanding tradition by maintaining a vital scholarly electronic journal which contributes to the literature of library and information science. PACS Review is published by the University of Houston Libraries, where Pat Ensor is the Head of Information Services and Tom Wilson is the Head of Systems. Rob Spragg, Systems Librarian at University of Houston Libraries, has recently become Associate Editor for Technical Production. The editorial team does not plan profound changes in a very successful publication. In the next couple of years, we plan to make intellectual access to information on the Internet a theme, and we want to bring you new columnists. The aim of PACS Review continues to be to publish articles about "end-user computer systems in libraries." We hope that you continue to read, to respond, and to submit articles; we welcome your input. The beginning of a different era in the publication of PACS Review comes to us mixed with profound sadness and loss at the death of Paul Evan Peters, a longtime member of the PACS Review Editorial Board. Not only a pillar of the library and information science communities, Paul also touched many lives personally and deeply. This issue is dedicated to him.

[from: Return-path: <owner-LIBADMIN@list.ab.umd.edu> Date: Fri, 04 Apr 1997 11:29:02 -0600 (CST) Sender: owner-libadmin@list.ab.umd.edu From: PLEnsor@UH.EDU (Pat Ensor)]

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VOLUME 8 NO 2, (1997)

+ Page 1 +

----------------------------------------------------------------- The Public-Access Computer Systems Review

Volume 8, Number 2 (1997) ISSN 1048-6542 -----------------------------------------------------------------

COMMUNICATIONS

Bruce Morgan, Is the Journal as We Know It an Article of Faith? An Open Letter to the Faculty

The Dean of Libraries of Montana State University explains his conclusion that "the specialized paper-based journal no longer is effective in the wide or timely dissemination of scholarship." He notes, "We need to explore how we might achieve scholarly communication that is more effective and that will still adhere to the academic values (well-thought-out, well-written, well-researched, well-documented articles) that we have always deemed important." He makes unique use of Thomas Kuhn's ideas about scientific revolutions and paradigm shifts to call for a move from paper to electronic scholarly journals.

o HTML file

World Wide Web:

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/pr/v8/n2/mort8n2.html>

o ASCII file

World Wide Web:

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/pr/v8/n2/morton.8n2>

+ Page 2 +

COLUMNS

Casting the Net

Priscilla Caplan, Will the Real Internet Please Stand Up?

NGI, Internet2, IPv6, IPng--who can make sense out of it any more? Priscilla Caplan untangles the web of current Internet initiatives, relating what's what, what's new, what's old, and who's doing what. She also provides a look at what difference this makes to Internet users.

o HTML file

World Wide Web:

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/pr/v8/n2/capl8n2.html>

o ASCII file

World Wide Web:

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/pr/v8/n2/caplan.8n2>

+ Page 3 +

-----------------------------------------------------------------

Editors-in-Chief

Pat Ensor and Thomas C. Wilson University Libraries University of Houston Houston, TX 77204-2091 (713) 743-9762 and 743-9673 plensor@uh.edu and twilson@uh.edu

Associate Editor, Columns

Leslie Dillon, OCLC

Associate Editor, Communications

Andrea Bean Hough, University of Houston

Associate Editor, Production

Ann Thornton, New York Public Library

Associate Editor, Technical Support

Robert Spragg, University of Houston

Editorial Board

Ralph Alberico, University of Texas, Austin George H. Brett II Priscilla Caplan, University of Chicago Steve Cisler, Apple Computer, Inc. Walt Crawford, Research Libraries Group Lorcan Dempsey, University of Bath Nancy Evans, Pennsylvania State University, Ogontz Stephen P. Harter, Indiana University Charles Hildreth, University of Oklahoma Ronald Larsen, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Clifford Lynch, Division of Library Automation, University of California David R. McDonald, Tufts University R. Bruce Miller, University of California, San Diego Ann Okerson, Yale University Mike Ridley, University of Guelph Peggy Seiden, Skidmore College Peter Stone John E. Ulmschneider, North Carolina State University

+ Page 4 +

List Server Technical Support

List server technical support is provided by the Information Technology Division, University of Houston. Tahereh Jafari is the primary support person.

Publication Information

The Public-Access Computer Systems Review is an electronic journal that is distributed on the Internet. It is published on an irregular basis by the University Libraries, University of Houston. There is no subscription fee.

To subscribe, send an email message to listserv@listserv.uh.edu that says: SUBSCRIBE PACS-P First Name Last Name.

Circulation

PACS-L@LISTSERV.UH.EDU: 10,912 subscribers in 72 countries (PACS-L is estimated to have 10,000 additional USENET subscribers). PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU: 3,848 subscribers in 68 countries.

Electronic Distribution

Each article is initially distributed in both ASCII and HTML formats.

ASCII files are paginated. HTML files are not paginated. HTML files may have linked GIF files. HTML files may have internal links, external links, or both. The editors do not maintain external links. ASCII and HTML files are available from the following server:

o World Wide Web:

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/pacsrev.html>

+ Page 5 +

In consultation with article authors, the editors determine whether an article is updated, whether both ASCII and HTML files are created for updated articles, and whether all prior versions of an article are retained.

Print Distribution

The first five volumes of The Public-Access Computer Systems Review are also available in book form from the American Library Association's Library and Information Technology Association (LITA).

Copyright

The Public-Access Computer Systems Review is Copyright (C) 1997 by the University Libraries, University of Houston. All Rights Reserved.

Copying is permitted for noncommercial, educational use by academic computer centers, individual scholars, and libraries. This message must appear on all copied material. All commercial use requires permission.

[from: Return-path: <owner-asis-l@asis.org> Approved-By: aa327@CLEVELAND.FREENET.EDU Date: Fri, 11 Jul 1997 13:22:09 -0500 Reply-To: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science" <ASIS-L@asis.org>, Pat Ensor <PLEnsor@UH.EDU>]

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END

 

This document may be circulated freely with the following statement included in its entirety:

This article was originally published in
_LIBRES: Library and Information Science
Electronic Journal_ (ISSN 1058-6768) September 1997
Volume 7 Issue 2

For any commercial use, or publication (including electronic journals), you must obtain the permission of the Editor-In-Chief:
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Curtin University of Technology, Western Australia
E-mail: kerry@biblio.curtin.edu.au

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