LIBRES: Library and Information Science Research
Electronic Journal ISSN 1058-6768
1998 Volume 8 Issue 1; March.
Bi-annual LIBRE8N1 JOURNALS


NEWS FROM OTHER JOURNALS


Contents:




Date: Wed, 18 Mar 1998 21:18:54 -0500
Sender: International Federation of Library Associations mailing list
<IFLA-L@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA>
From: Maureen Donovan <donovan.1@OSU.EDU>
Subject: AsianDOC Electronic Newsletter
Comments: To: asiandoc@lists.acs.ohio-state.edu


**ANNOUNCEMENT**

AsianDOC Electronic Newsletter

Volume 1 Number 1

publication date: March 18, 1998

URL http://asiandoc.lib.ohio-state.edu

Asian Database Online Community Electronic Newsletter

The first two experimental issues (March and June 1998) of the AsianDOC
Electronic Newsletter test the use of a web e-newsletter to support
scholars, librarians, and researchers world-wide who are developing text
and image databases in the various fields of Asian/EurAsian Studies or who
are incorporating materials in Asian languages into larger databases, and
to promote better communication among them. A discussion of AsianDOC will
be on the agenda of the Work Group for Electronic Resource Development at
the Association for Asian Studies annual meeting in Washington, DC on March
28, 7:00-9:00 pm. It will also be discussed at the International Convention
of Asia Scholars in late June.

Maureen Donovan
Editor, AsianDOC
donovan.1@osu.edu



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Approved-By: Gretchen Whitney <gwhitney@UTKUX.UTCC.UTK.EDU>
Date: Fri, 3 Oct 1997 09:20:40 -0400
Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
Subject: October Bulletin TOC (fwd)

---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Thu, 2 Oct 1997 15:46:19 -0400
From: Richard Hill <rhill@ASIS.LIB.INDIANA.EDU>
Reply-To: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
<ASIS-L@ASIS.ORG>,

Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science
Table of Contents
October/November 1997 Volume 24, No. 1

Cover Stories
Organizing Internet Resources: Metadata and the Web

4
Introduction
Efthimis N. Efthimiadis and Allyson Carlyle, guest editors

6
Cataloging Internet Resources: Survey and Prospectus
Erik Jul

9
The Dublin Core: A Simple Content Description Model for Electronic Resources
Stuart Weibel

12
Uniform Resource Identifiers and the Effort to Bring Bibliographic Control
to the Web: An Overview of Current Progress
Ray Schwartz

14
Options for Organizing Electronic Resources: The Coexistence of Metadata
Sherry L. Vellucci

18
Metadata in Australia
Carmel Maguire

21
GEM: Using Metadata to Enhance Internet Retrieval by K-12 Teachers
Stuart A. Sutton and Sam G. Oh

24
From Book Classification to Knowledge Organization: Improving Internet
Resource Description and Discovery
Diane Vizine-Goetz

28
Scorpion Helps Catalog the Web
Keith Shafer

DEPARTMENT
2 Inside ASIS


Richard Hill
Executive Director, American Society for Information Science
8720 Georgia Avenue, Suite 501
Silver Spring, MD 20910
FAX: (301) 495-0810
Voice: (301) 495-0900
rhill@asis.org
http://www.asis.org


xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Date: Mon, 2 Mar 1998 17:24:23 -0500
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
<ASIS-L@asis.org>
From: Abby Goodrum <goodruaa@DUNX1.OCS.DREXEL.EDU>
Subject: Call for Papers

Please excuse cross-posting to multiple lists.

Call for Papers
Special Topic Issue of Computers and the Humanities:
"Digital Images"

The full call can be found at
http://httpsrv.ocs.drexel.edu/faculty/goodruaa/special/

This special issue will address challenges and opportunities in designing,
building, and using digital image collections in the humanities. Topics of
interest include, but are not limited to the following areas:

User and Use:

Images and Their Use in the Humanities.
New Uses for Old Images
Visual Information Needs for Scholars in the Humanities
Visual Anthropology, Visual Sociology, Visual Humanities

Planning, Design and Implementation:

Constraints and Opportunities of Collection as Representation.
Designing a Digital Library for Humanities Scholars
Networking Images: The Scholar's Workstation Revisited

Indexing, Access and Representation:

Analogs to Practice in Other Genres & New Frontiers
The Language of Images: Is the Goal of a Visual Thesaurus Impossible?
Sometimes a Cigar is Just a Cigar: Interdisciplinary Image
Interpretation.

Preservation:

Representation of the Public Knowledge.
Archiving and Digital Images
Platform Standards and Planned Obsolescence
Saving Images That Never Existed: The Line Between Preservation and
Creation

Interface Design and HCI:

Facilitating Scholarly Methods
Design to Support Multiple Users and Uses
Design to Support Multiple Image Types.

Full papers (4 copies) should be submitted to:

Dr. Abby A. Goodrum
College of Information Science and Technology
Drexel University
3141 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104-2875
(215) 895-6627

The deadline for submitting papers for consideration for publication in
this special issue is October 1, 1998. A separate cover page should be
provided with the title, the author(s) names and affiliations, plus
complete contact information (postal, fax, e-mail) for the corresponding
author.

Guest Editors:

Abby Goodrum
Assistant Professor
College of Information Science and Technology
Drexel University
goodruaa@post.drexel.edu

Brian O'Connor
Associate Professor
School of Library and Information Management
Emporia State University
oconnorbe@esumail.emporia.edu

James Turner
Professeur Adjoint
Ecole de bibliotheconomie et des sciences de l'information Universite de
Montreal
turner@ere.umontreal.ca

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx


Date: Thu, 2 Oct 1997 19:12:12 +0000
Reply-To: Solo Librarians Listserv <SOLOLIB-L@LISTSERV.SILVERPLATTER.COM>
From: Gerry Hurley <Gerry_Hurley@SILVERPLATTER.COM>
Subject: Current Cites, Sept. 1997

Current Cites
Volume 8, no. 9
September 1997
The Library
University of California, Berkeley
Edited by Teri Andrews Rinne
Acting Editor: Roy Tennant
ISSN: 1060-2356
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/1997/cc97.8.9.html
Contributors:
Campbell Crabtree, Christof Galli, Kirk Hastings, Terry Huwe,
Margaret Phillips, David Rez, Richard Rinehart,
Teri Rinne, Roy Tennant

DIGITAL LIBRARIES
Fox, Edward A., et. al. Networked Digital Library of Theses and
Dissertations" D-Lib Magazine (September 1997)
(http://www.dlib.org/dlib/september97/theses/09fox.html).
- Fox and companydescribe an interesting project to build a National
Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (NDLTD). The article cites
a good deal of interesting work, and yet I was also eager for more
URLs than were provided. Where, for example, can one find the
"multimedia training materials explaining how to use PDF tools"?
But that is nitpicking with what is overall a very interesting piece that
highlights some very thorny issues related to publishing information
that has a very different (and entrenched) paper publishing stream.
Will we ever have the NDLTD that Fox envisions? After reading this
article, I have my doubts, but at the same time I also want to go out
and help him build it. - RT
Hildreth, Charles R. "The Use and Understanding of Keyword Searching in a
University Online Catalog" Information Technology and Libraries 16(2) (June
1997): 52-62.
- If you're a reference librarian Hildreth's research findings will not
surprise
you. After statistically analyzing searches performed in a university
library
catalog, Hildreth finds that users "search more often by keyword than any
other type of search, their keyword searches fail more often than not, and
a
majority of these users do not understand how the system processes their
keyword searches." He suggests two possible solutions to these problems:
1) educate the user, or 2) improve the design of our catalog systems. As
the
second is more practical and attainable, especially given the fact that
increasingly users of our catalogs do not enter our buildings, Hildreth
asserts
that "it is time to put end-user Boolean retrieval systems...behind us." He
points to probabalistic retrieval theory and hypertextual systems as
providing
sources for improvements. - RT
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY & SOCIETY
Report to the President on the Use of Technology to Strengthen K-12
Education in the United States. President's Committee of Advisors on
Science and Technology, Panel on Educational Technology, March 1997
(http://www.whitehouse.gov/WH/EOP/OSTP/NSTC/PCAST/k-12ed.html).
- This report to President Clinton culminates the two-year work of the
Panel on Educational Technology, which was formed to advise him on
the application of technology in K-12 education. The Executive Summary
lists six main recommendations: 1) Focus on learning with technology, not
about technology, 2) Emphasize content and pedagogy, and not just
hardware, 3) Give special attention to professional development, 4) Engage
in realistic budgeting, 5) Ensure equitable, universal access, and 6)
Initiate a
major program of experimental research. The report also includes a number
of tactical recommendations that target specific needs for improving the
impact of technology on K-12 education. In an introductory letter I
received
with the report, the Panel on Educational Technology highlighted the sixth
recommendation as the most important. This recommendation specifies that
the ind of expenditure required to support the research needed must be
provided largely at the federal level. They acknowledge the difficulty of
obtaining such funding while simultaneously attempting to balance the
federal budget, but this only serves to underscore the importance they
place
on this recommendation. This report is well worth reading for anyone
interested in K-12 education and the present and future of our children. -
RT
MULTIMEDIA & HYPERMEDIA
Avgerakis, George and Becky Waring. "Industrial-Strength Streaming Video"
New Media 7(12) (Sept. 22, 1997): 46-58
(http://www.newmedia.com/NewMedia/97/12/feature/Streaming_Video.html)
- The state of the art of video for the web. Streaming video (playback in
nearly real time instead of download-and-watch-later) has come of age. This
article concentrates on reviewing 7 current video servers for the web, but
it
does mention other server-less options such as plugins for QuickTime and
MPEG formatted video can take advantage of. Perhaps not surprisingly, the
handy list showing numbers of different video formats on the web to date
reveals the server-less formats far outrank the pricier server-based
formats.
Another irony revealed is that QuickTime, until recently authored only on
Macintosh, is the most popular video type on the web, while none of the 7
web servers reviewed even run on Macs. Beyond the review, this article,
with discussions of background, formats, and tips, will be very useful to
bring you up to date on options for serving video from your website for
distance learning, putting film resources online, or just viewing that
oh-so-
cool QuickTime panorama taken from the local university's bell-tower. - RR
NETWORKS & NETWORKING
Hegener, Michiel. "Internet Unwired" OnTheInternet 3(5) (September/October
1997): 23-31 (http://www.iicd.org/articles/sep97/hegene10.htm).
- In the world of satellite connections to the Internet, it's GEOS v. LEOS.
But
don't let the acronyms scare you off. This article is a well-written
overview
of the state of Internet connectivity via satellite. Why would you want a
satellite connection to the Internet? If you're in Manhattan you may not
want
one. But if you're in Niger it may be your only option. Internet satellites
will
soon (finally) make the Internet a truly global network by bringing the
possibility of connection to every corner of the planet. I say possibility,
because as you well know, the pipe is only part of the system. Hegener
mentions some figures regarding estimated "station" costs, but for the most
part the question of affordability by individuals was left largely
unaddressed. Nonetheless, this piece is an excellent and highly readable
overview of the technology and where things stand. - RT
Karpinski, Richard. "A Tangled Web of Standards" InternetWeek 682 (Sept.
22, 1997):1, 75
(http://www.techweb.com/se/directlink.cgi?INW19970922S0001).
- Focusing on the proposed DOM (Document Object Model) standard, this
article reveals the tensions between the marketplace and the world of
standards. The article cites how both Netscape and Microsoft have leapt
ahead of the standards process in attempting to be the first to bring DHTML
(Dynamic HTML) products to market and creating yet another browser-war
and compatibility issue for content providers. Standards groups like the
W3C
(itself made up largely of vendors) are criticized for being too slow in
finalizing standards, and vendors for giving lip service to
"standards-based"
solutions, yet ignoring the standards process for the push to market.
Content
providers such as universities, libraries, and museums are particularly
hard hit
since they often attempt to serve the broadest possible public (and not one
market niche) and so must keep keenly aware of compatibility and access
issues. - RR
Smith, Alastair G. "Testing the Surf: Criteria for Evaluating Internet
Information Resources" The Public-Access Computer Systems Review 8(3)
(1997) (http://info.lib.uh.edu/pr/v8/n3/smit8n3.html).
- While many people have written about how to evaluate the quality of
Internet information resources, Smith has done an excellent job of
distilling
the essential criteria for evaluation. He first briefly considers
evaluation
criteria for print materials, and then continues with a review of previous
articles on Internet resource evaluation. The core of the piece is the
"toolbox" of evaluation criteria, which cover the broad areas of scope,
content, graphic and multimedia design, purpose and audience, reviews,
workability, and cost. Smith then reviews internet evaluation sites to
determine which of his criteria they employ. It perhaps comes as no
surprise
that the sites with the most criteria employed in evaluation have librarian
involvement (for example, the Argus Clearinghouse and the Internet Public
Library). - RT
Radosevich, Lynda. "XML Initiatives Take Shape" InfoWorld, 37 (September
17, 1997):1,24
(http://www.infoworld.com/cgi-bin/displayArchives.pl?97-t02-37.1.htm).
- A brief update on vendor progress in bringing XML compliant applications
to
market. XML (Extensible Markup Language) bridges a gap between two
important standards for information management and sharing: the SGML
standard (Standard Generalized Markup Language) which can provide detailed
structure to documents, allowing them to be parsed, searched, and managed
(but which can be difficult to create programs for), and HTML which
benefits
from it's own simplicity, but is not rich enough to allow documents to be
searched or managed in precise ways. XML allows one to use customized or
standard tags to manage data in forms from databases to webpages.
Microsoft, Arbor, Sybase, and several others are beginning to bring
products
which support XML to the user. - RR
Wehmeyer, Lillian Biermann. "Evaluating Internet Research" Syllabus 11(2)
(September 1997):46-50. - Now that students are citing Internet-based
sources in their schoolwork, instructors must be knowledgeable about how
to evaluate the quality of the cited works. Being a former librarian,
Wehmeyer knows the criteria for evaluating print resources, and she makes
effective use of that background in this article. She points out both print
and
electronic resources that can be used for evaluation, and provides URLs for
the latter. - RT
GENERAL
"Xerox won't duplicate past errors" Businessweek no. 3546 (September 29,
1997): 98-103.
- The mistake they're referring to is Xerox's groud-breaking creation of
all the
icons of modern computing -- graphical user interface, the mouse, Ethernet
technology -- which were popularized by Apple and are now taken for
granted. Some of these features were never even patented, leaving Xerox
completely out of the mammoth revenue stream these products created.
Now, under the leader of John Seely Brown, Xerox PARC (i.e., Palo
Alto Research Center) is researching new applications and planning to take
them to market. This article offers an overview of the products that might
be in your computing future. These include "hyperbolic trees" that reveal
more information as you move the cursor around a full circle of "links",
new
approaches to machine processing of spoken human language, and other
paradigm-breakers. The common denominator to PARC's approach is a
growing realization that social scientists have a place in systems design.
- TH
_________________________________________________________________
Current Cites 8(9) (September 1997) ISSN: 1060-2356 Copyright (c) 1997
by the Library, University of California, Berkeley. All rights reserved.
All product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their
respective holders. Mention of a product in this publication does not
necessarily imply endorsement of the product.
[URL:http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/]
To subscribe, send the message "sub cites [your name]" to
listserv@library.berkeley.edu, replacing "[your name]" with your
name. To unsubscribe, send the message "unsub cites" to the same
address. Copying is permitted for noncommercial use by computerized
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Libraries are authorized to add the journal to their collections at no
cost. An archive site is maintained at ftp.lib.berkeley.edu in
directory /pub/Current.Cites
[URL: ftp://ftp.lib.berkeley.edu/pub/Current.Cites].
This message must appear on copied material. All commercial use
requires permission from the editor, who may be reached in the following
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Date: Fri, 5 Dec 1997 16:39:06 +0000
Reply-To: Solo Librarians Listserv <SOLOLIB-L@LISTSERV.SILVERPLATTER.COM>
From: Gerry Hurley <Gerry_Hurley@SILVERPLATTER.COM>
Subject: Current Cites, November 1997

_Current Cites_
Volume 8, no. 11
November 1997
The Library
University of California, Berkeley
Edited by Teri Andrews Rinne
ISSN: 1060-2356
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/1997/cc97.8.11.html
Contributors:
Christof Galli, Kirk Hastings, Terry Huwe,
Margaret Phillips, Richard Rinehart,
Jim Ronningen, Roy Tennant

DIGITAL LIBRARIES
"Z39.50: Part 1- An Overview" Biblio Tech Review October 1997
(http://www.biblio-tech.com/html/z39.50.html). -- If you're anything
like me, you know vaguely what Z39.50 is about but if someone asked
you to explain it you'd feign deafness. Well, get ready to regain your
hearing. This brief piece will soon have you speaking Z-speak in no
time. After reading this, you should not only be able to understand
why you keep hearing about it, but you will also be able to drop
utterances like "Z-client" and "Z-server" with both abandon and
authority. It may not make you the life of the library cocktail party,
but you will be much sought after if your library wants to link other
databases to your library catalog interface. -- RT
Zamparelli, Roberto. "Copyright and Global Libraries: Going with the
Flow of Technology" First Monday 2(11) (November 3, 1997)
(http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue2_11/zamparelli/) -- Instead of
trying to make Internet users conform to copyright laws by ever more
powerful protections against copying and unauthorized downloading,
Zamparelli proposes a different approach. He argues that a single,
relatively expensive access fee should open the gateway to a "global
library" with unlimited downloading privileges. The system would also
have built-in incentives for profit-sharing by authors, new modes of
advertising, and an array of user benefits. At the heart of his
argument is a belief that "policing" cyberspace may be too
labor-intensive and might in fact chill discourse; instead, he says,
we should build incentives that reward compliance, and see what
happens. -- TH
ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING
Dudrow, Andrea & Joanna Pearlstein. "XML Format May Fortify Web
Content" MacWeek 11(2) (November 3, 1997): 1,7
(http://www.zdnet.com/macweek/mw_1142/nw_xml.html). -- This article
updates readers on the latest companies to announce products
supporting the new XML standard-in-progress. XML, a simplified subset
of SGML, is a method of encoding the structure and content of
documents. XML can be used in conjunction with HTML to offer 3
advantages: its extensibility lets users create their own tags; its
structure can support object-oriented hierarchies; and it can be
validated, so documents can be checked for validity. In addition, XML
will allow web documents to be searched in more precise ways and the
content can be sorted and delivered in pieces instead of only as
entire web pages. The article predicts future adoption by vendors and
that XML will augment rather than replace HTML. -- RR
Grout, Catherine & Tony Gill. "Visual Arts, Museums & Cultural
Heritage Metadata Draft Workshop Report" Visual Arts Data Service &
Arts and Humanities Data Services
(http://vads.ahds.ac.uk/Metadata1.html) -- AHDS and its subset VADS
are UK-based organizations exploring, and thankfully documenting,
issues involved in creating, managing, and delivering arts and
humanities data in electronic environments. This report is the result
of a workshop to "..examine the descriptive information needed to
enable the discovery of visual arts, museums and cultural heritage
resources on the Internet, particularly in the form of digital
images." In particular they wanted to find out if the Dublin Core had
any value as a content discovery tool for such data, and if so, in
what forms and what applications. This report is very detailed;
covering a variety of areas, and reporting on sub-committee break-out
groups. -- RR
Hobohm, Hans-Christoph. "Changing the Galaxy: On the Transformation of
a Printed Journal to the Internet" First Monday 2(11) (November 3,
1997) (http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue2_11/hobohm/) -- Hobom
explores a journal's experience with publishing a web-based edition.
The journal, INSPEL, is published by the International Federation of
Library Associations (IFLA). He lends a concrete, real-world feeling
to the intellectual dilemma facing journal publishers in cyberspace.
How, for example, should markets be segmented? Should access be
limited to certain audiences? How to handle pricing? The answers
aren't always clear, but if you've ever worked with publishing
deadlines and budgets, this analysis will make you think about the
potential, and the pitfalls. -- TH
Powell, Thomas A. "Extend the Web: an XML Primer" Internet Week no.
691 (November 24, 1997): 47-49 -- This primer will be a valuable
resource for anyone involved in authoring, managing, or delivering
web-based content. It is a relatively in-depth look at the emerging
XML standard, covering a bit of history and background, related URLs
for more information, and examples of how XML actually works,
including existing tools and plans for tools to implement XML. The
article takes a realistic view, and makes a good introduction to XML.
-- RR
MULTIMEDIA & HYPERMEDIA
Gibbs, Simon and Gabor Szentivanyi. "Index to Multimedia Information
Sources" German National Research Center for Information Technology
(http://viswiz.gmd.de/MultimediaInfo/) -- This web resource is an
invaluable index of information and tools for multimedia. The site
breaks down resources into categories first by media type (audio,
video, etc.) then by type of resource (FAQs, conference proceedings,
tutorials, newsgroup, articles, tools, etc.) -- RR
NETWORKS & NETWORKING
Danner, David and Paul W. Taylor. "Principle and Practicality: Funding
Electronic Access to Washington State Government Information" Journal
of Government Information 24(5) (Sept/Oct 1997):347-359. -- This
article, written by two policy advisors for the State of Washington
Department of Information Services, argues that electronic access to
government information should be funded by appropriate user fees
allowing for cost recovery. Based on court rulings, the authors
differentiate between the content of public records, which should be
accessible in the least costly format, and the delivery of government
information, which does not have to occur in the most convenient form
(i.e. electronically) to satisfy the public's right to access of
information. The authors also point out that in many cases it is not
individual citizens who are primary users of electronic information,
but commercial users. Thus, providing free electronic access would
constitute a taxpayer subsidy to commercial customers. In addition,
difficult economic circumstances may prevent state legislatures from
providing sufficient or lasting funding to develop an effective
electronic infrastructure. The authors see the development of
cost-recoverable services as a fair and appropriate mode of funding
electronic access systems and recommend that policy makers allow
agencies to recover costs for electronic services. -- CG

GENERAL
Ream, Dan. "Glitch Management for Internet Instruction" Internet Trend
Watch for Libraries 2(11) (November 1997)
(http://www.itwfl.com/glitch.html) - If you do not immediately know
what this article is about from the title, this article is not for
you. If, on the other hand, images of projection bulbs burning out,
computer cables with the wrong connectors, and other such technical
calamities pop into your brain, you're the one that needs to know what
this article has to say. As a long-time Internet instructor, I've seen
my share of technical glitches -- enough to know that what Ream says
in this piece is well worth heeding. In particular, his four
"universal rules" are excellent advice: 1) Always have a plan B, 2)
Know your equipment before it's too late!, 3) Know your technicians on
a first name basis, and 4) Prepare your mind. One thing you can do to
prepare your mind is to read this article. -- RT
_________________________________________________________________
Current Cites 8(11) (November 1997) ISSN: 1060-2356 Copyright &copy;
1997 by the Library, University of California, Berkeley. _All rights
reserved._
All product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their
respective holders. Mention of a product in this publication does not
necessarily imply endorsement of the product.
[URL:http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/]
To subscribe, send the message "sub cites [your name]" to
listserv@library.berkeley.edu, replacing "[your name]" with your
name. To unsubscribe, send the message "unsub cites" to the same
address. Copying is permitted for noncommercial use by computerized
bulletin board/conference systems, individual scholars, and libraries.
Libraries are authorized to add the journal to their collections at no
cost. An archive site is maintained at ftp.lib.berkeley.edu in
directory /pub/Current.Cites [URL:
ftp://ftp.lib.berkeley.edu/pub/Current.Cites]. This message must
appear on copied material. All commercial use requires permission from
the editor, who may be reached in the following ways:
trinne@library.berkeley.edu // (510)642-8173

oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

Date: Thu, 5 Mar 1998 14:34:14 +0000
Sender: Solo Librarians Listserv <SOLOLIB-L@LISTSERV.SILVERPLATTER.COM>
From: Gerry Hurley <Gerry_Hurley@SILVERPLATTER.COM>
Subject: Current Cites, February 1998


_Current Cites_
Volume 9, no. 2
February 1998
The Library
University of California, Berkeley
Edited by Teri Andrews Rinne
ISSN: 1060-2356
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/1998/cc98.9.2.html
Contributors:
Christof Galli, Kirk Hastings, Terry Huey,
Margaret Phillips, Richard Rinehart, Roy Tennant
Jim Ronningen, Lisa Yesson
Digital Libraries
Arms, William Yeo. "Implementing Policies for Access Management" D-Lib
Magazine (February 1998)
[http://www.dlib.org/dlib/february98/arms/02arms.html]. -- Virtually
any digital library will require methods by which it can control
access to content. Whether the content is commercial data for which a
licensing agreement stipulates only certain users may view it, or
internal collections such as electronic reserve material, libraries
will have a need to enforce access policies for digital objects. This
article outlines a sophisticated yet fairly simple architecture for
libraries to stipulate policies that can interact dynamically with
information about a particular user (and that user's _role_) and a
particular digital object (and that object's _attributes_) to derive
an appropriate _operation_ (for example, delivery or denial). This
piece reflects work that the Corporation for National Research
Initiatives [http://www.cnri.reston.va.us/] has been undertaking along
with the Library of Congress [http://www.loc.gov/]. - RT
Lamont, Melissa. "Managing Geospatial Data and Services" The Journal
of Academic Librarianship 23(6) (November 1997):469-473. -- This
article addresses three often neglected aspects of geospatial data
management: collection, description, and access of spatial data. The
author identifies federal, state, and local government agencies as
possible data resorces. Besides appropriate computing facilities,
skilled staff and user-friendly interfaces, the author stresses the
importance of standardized metadata in the successful delivery of GIS
services in libraries. The article emphasizes the ever increasing
importance of web-based geospatial data services. Not only does the
web, as a convenient remote access mechanism, mitigate increased demand
on local resources, it is also evolving into a prime source for
information on GIS as well as for geospatial data sets. Sites such as
the Consortium for International Earth Science Information Network
(CIESN) [http://www.ciesin.org] or Starting the Hunt: Guide to Online
and Mostly Free U.S. Geospatial and Attribute Data
[http://www.cast.uark.edu/local/hunt/index.html] are impressive
repositories for spatial data. Other sites such as GIS WWW Resources
List [http://www.geo.ed.ac.uk/home/giswww.html] or Guide to GIS
Resources on the Internet
[http://library.berkeley.edu/UCBGIS/gisnet.html] provide links to GIS
related web sites. -- CG
Starr, Susan S. "Building the Collections of the California Digital
Library" Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship (Winter 1998)
[http://www.library.ucsb.edu/istl/98-winter/article2.html] -- One of
the most interesting developments in libraries is happening at the
moment in California, but there is presently very little in print
about it. Thus this article is a welcome insight into some early
developments in the University of California's efforts to create a
California Digital Library. There is as of yet no publicly-accessible
Web site to point to, but the Executive Working Group Report
[http://sunsite.Berkeley.EDU/UCDL/title.html] that led to its
formation is available at http://sunsite.Berkeley.EDU/UCDL/title.html.
Also, a brief insight into the thinking of the man who runs the
operation can be found in "Visions and Intersections: A Conversation
with Richard E. Lucier of the University of California"
[http://www.dlib.org/dlib/february98/02editorial.html], which just
came out in D-Lib Magazine. -- RT
Stephens, Denise. "Managing the Web-Enhanced Geographic Information
Service" The Journal of Academic Librarianship 23(6) (November 1997):
498-504. -- This article discusses the development of an
Internet-accessible collection of digital spatial data sets, the
creation of "canned" map images, the implementation of interactive
mapping tools, and the development of a collection of Internet-based
GIS reference materials at the Geographic Information Center (GIC)
[http://www.lib.virginia.edu/gic/] of the University of Virginia
Library (UVA). The Center has assumed the role of "data intermediary",
creating access mechanisms to a variety of geospatial data in many
different formats incompatible with widely used commercial GIS
systems. Aimed at, but not restricted to, a clearly defined primary
clientele consisting of students, faculty, and staff at UVA, GIC
developed not only interactive tools allowing for both the creation of
user-defined maps-on-the-fly (U.S.G.S. Digital Line Graph Data Browser
http://www.lib.virginia.edu/gic/spatial/dlg.browse2.html) and for
querying and retrieving data files mounted on FTP servers (Digital
Resources Catalog [http://www.lib.virginia.edu/gic/catalog/]) but also
a "Reference Desk" [http://www.lib.virginia.edu/gic/reference.html]
web page that assembles links to documents, sites, and databases that
answers to reference queries. The author points out that the
successful implementation of Web-based GIS services is based on UVA's
commitment to innovative service based on advanced technology and that
the Library's "ownership of the development process" was achieved by
building in-house technical expertise to develop web-to-application or
web-to-database interfaces. -- CG
Weibel, Stuart and Juha Hakala. "DC-5: The Helsinki Metadata Workshop"
D-Lib Magazine (February 1998)
[http://www.dlib.org/dlib/february98/02weibel.html] -- Faithful readers
of Current Cites will recognize the Dublin Core, which is probably our
best chance at creating a metadata (can you say "cataloging" boys and
girls?) standard that can serve a diversity of users and purposes.
This article is a report on the Fifth Dublin Core meeting, held in
Helsinki in the fall of 1997. The article also serves to bring us
up-to-date on the current status of the draft standard, in which we
discover that the frozen north served to freeze the 15 elements in
what is being called in typical DC style, the "Finnish finish". There
will be no more elements added or deleted to the core. Don't let that
fool you, though, as much work remains to specify what can be put into
those fields (content) and how (syntax). Those of you who would like
to participate can find everything you need to know at the Dublin Core
Web site [http://purl.org/metadata/dublin_core]. - RT
Young, Jeffrey R. "A Community College Uses Windfall to Create a
Library without Books" Chronicle of Higher Education 64(20) (January
23, 1998) -- The title should be warning enough to seasoned readers:
it's a new library at the Borough of Manhattan Community College in
New York City, but it does have books. However it will also has
computers, lots of them. The new library, which will be a "virtual
library" in concept, is the result an unusually generous gift by
college landlord Miles Fiterman. Fiterman gave the college a building,
which will be designed to maximize the digital benefits-- along with
the print. The article goes on to describe how the campus is planning
to update its library services in the context of the digital
revolution, and it's interesting not only as a guide to the library's
planning process, but also as an analysis of library trends in
general. -- TH
Electronic Publishing
Grothkopf, U. "Bits and Bytes and Still a Lot of Paper: Astronomy
Libraries and Librarians in the Age of Electronic Publishing"
Astrophysics and Space Science 247 (1997):155-174
[http://www.eso.org/libraries/bits-and-bytes/bits-and-bytes.html]. -
This wide ranging article serves as an interesting overview of
technologies and standards that are providing challenges and
opportunities for librarians trying to bring libraries into the new
millennium. Grothkopf touches on networking technology, digital
libraries, electronic publications, copyright and access control,
metadata, addressing, archiving, and the changing role of librarians.
Unfortunately, the addition of the word "Astronomy" may greatly limit
the audience unnecessarily, since there is almost nothing in the piece
that is of interest to only astronomy librarians. -- RT
Mace, Scott, et.al.. "Weaving a Better Web" BYTE 23(3) (March
1998):58-68 [http://www.byte.com/art/9803/sec5/sec5.htm]. -- HTML 4.0
has barely been released, but to some of us it is dead on delivery.
We're already looking past it to XML, the eXtensible Markup Language,
which promises to add much more power, flexibility, and reliability to
the web. This article serves as a great introduction to XML and, to a
lesser degree, Dynamic HTML (DHTML). The online version of the article
links you through to some of the essential documents on XML. If you
are interested in the future of the web, listen up. As the authors of
this article put it: "Although it will require developers and user to
retool, the migration to XML must begin. The future of the Web depends
on it." -- RT
Okerson, Ann. "Copyright or Contract?" Library Journal 122(14)
(September 1, 1997):136-138. -- Uncertainty about making intellectual
property available without infringing copyright has vexed many
information managers. This piece contrasts copyright law, which is
general in nature and open to debate on many points, with licensing
agreements, which are specific in their wording and presumably
acceptable to all parties concerned. The author deftly summarizes the
protections and exceptions in copyright law, and shows how chinks in
this armor became gaping holes in the hail of arrows from digital
storage & transmission. Information owners and customers are turning
to contracts to regain some control. After an initial period of
paranoia, with proposed licenses so strict as to be virtually
unworkable, licensing for information resources has become a viable
way to avoid misunderstandings and courtroom appearances. However, the
wrinkles are not all ironed out yet - see Okerson's list of unresolved
issues. An unabashed advocate for licensing in libraries, she includes
a selection of online licensing resources headed by her LIBLICENSE
[http://www.library.yale.edu/~llicense/index.html] site. -- JR
Time and Bits: Managing Digital Continuity (February 1998)
[http://www.ahip.getty.edu/timeandbits/intro.html] -- This "document"
is actually the website for a conference that took place at the Getty
Information Institute this month. However, the website includes an
exhaustive set of links to related resources and will include the
conference proceedings soon. The conference grappled with the issue of
information preservation in the digital era. Many topics were covered,
from the need, desire, and feasibility of preserving digital
information for decades, centuries and even millenia, to some proposed
technological approaches for implementing such preservation. To be
sure, no one had "the answer", but the discussions and links
themselves will be very informative to anyone involved in information
preservation and access. -- RR
Z39.50 Draft Attribute Architecture (February 18, 1998)
[http://lcweb.loc.gov/z3950/agency/orlando/output/attrarch.html] --
This draft document, hosted on the Library of Congress' website, and
announced by NISO (National Information Standards Organization
http://www.niso.org ) is fairly technical in nature. Nevertheless
anyone interested in the development of network standards for resource
discovery, Z39.50 is one act to follow. This document is the latest
draft of proposed improvments to this standard - including means to
integrate the recent proliferation of different Z39.50 profiles by
different user communities (GILS by the US Governemnt, CIMI by the
Consortium for the Interchange of Museum Information, etc.) -- RR
Networks and Networking
Cobb, David A. and Arlene Olivero. "Online GIS Service" The Journal of
Academic Librarianship 23(6) (November 1997):484-497. -- The present
article reviews a wide range of GIS related web resources in the
following five categories: geographic snapshots, spatial database
catalogs and libraries, map generators, map browsers, and real-time
maps and images. Each category is succinctly defined and reviews of
individual sites include title, URL, and a brief summary of the
services provided. Overall, the reviewed sites constitute a
representative sample of geographic information available on the web.
-- CG
Gould, Cheryl. Searching Smart on the World Wide Web: Tools and
Techniques for Getting Quality Results. Berkeley, California: Library
Solutions Press, 1998. -- Number 8 in Library Solutions Press Internet
Workshop series, this guide like the others in this series, is
designed as both a practical workbook for individuals as well as a
training model to be used by teachers. In this case, Cheryl Gould
takes on web searching. But it's more than about how to find stuff on
the web, it's about how to be a conscious evaluator of the web sites
and how to be "information literate." Taking a wholistic approach,
Gould's philosophy is that searching the web intelligently is not
necessarily a sequential process but requires knowledge of many
concepts that do not necessarily build upon each other. Each of the
eight chapters takes on a different concept -- from a first chapter
that gives an overview of what the Web is to later chapters on the
different types of search tools, how search tools work and how to
assess the quality of your results; depending on your level of web
savviness, you can start from the very beginning or skip around as
necessary. Each chapter includes exercises liked a guided online
excursion through Yahoo! or a mini-quiz that tests your understanding
of Boolean Logic or a worksheet to help you better evaluate web pages.
Included in the workbook is a disk that contains Netscape bookmarks
and Internet Explorer favorites for sites referred to in the volume.
Particularly useful in this guide is the appendix which includes a
grid on that list the search features of the major subject directories
and search engines. -- MP
Kushigian, Nancy. "Researching Women's Lives and Issues: Contemporary
Women's Issues and Women 'R'" Database 20(6) (December 1997):19-26. --
As women's studies programs continue to develop and grow, the activist
and interdisciplinary nature of women's issues has posed difficult
challenges for scholarly research in this area. However, the recent
availability of two CD-ROM (and soon to be online) full-text databases
is good news for those interested in women's studies. In this feature
article, Nancy Kushigan provides a thorough review of Responsive
Database Systems' (RDS) Contemporary Women's Issues (CWI)and Soft Line
Information's Women 'R'. While Women 'R' receives high marks for its
more popular focus and coverage of ethnic and minority media, CWI is
the clear favorite. CWI is recommended for scholarly research as it
offers a greater range, variety and depth of source materials as well
as "beautiful" subject cataloging and a thesaurus - all at an
affordable price. This article also features a nice summary of
Internet-based resources on women's studies. -- LY
Lewis, Janice S. and June Chressanthis. "Internet Resources:
Investments and Personal Finance" College & Research Libraries News
59(2) (February 1998): 90-94 [http://www.ala.org/acrl/resfeb98.html].
-- This month's C&RL News guide to Internet resources is a selective
list of web sites that offer unique, objective data that the authors
consider to be most useful to investors, students, researchers and
individuals interested in personal financial issues. The annotations
are informative and evaluative. Items are listed under broad subject
categories like comprehensive sites (e.g. Invest-o-rama
http://www.investorama.com), Security and Exchange Commission filings
(e.g. U.S, Securities and Exchange Commission http://www.sec.gov),
financial news (e.g Business Wire http://www.businesswire.com), bonds,
retirement, tax information, credit, financial calculators and
associations. -- MP
Lin, Zi-Yu. "How to Use CJK Software to Read Chinese, Japanese and
Korean on the Web" Computers in Libraries 17(10) (Nov/Dec 1997):50-54.
-- We all know about language barriers, but some web masters are
encountering character barriers too. This short article is a primer on
the linguistics, character encoding and application software involved
in reading CJK on the web. There are conflicting and competing
encoding standards, as one might imagine; the explanations here
provide a useful reference when confronted with ISO-2022-GB, Big5, et
al. Knowing about them will be important when choosing application
packages! Four are described: AsiaSurf, Asian Viewer, AsianSuite 97,
and NJWIN CJK Multilingual Support System Version 1.5 for Windows
3.1/95/NT. Downloading and use instructions for each one are given in
sidebars. The author is looking at evaluation versions of shareware,
but plenty of direction is given for anyone who needs to go further
with fonts and functions. Some interesting web sites are suggested,
for the day when your new CJK add-ons are installed and ready to
pounce on some juicy content. -- JR
General
Blumenstyk, Goldie. "Western Governors U. Takes Shape as a New Model
for Higher Education" Chronicle of Higher Education 64(22) (February
6, 1998). -- "WGU" has 21 participating colleges and firms in 16
states (and the U.S. territory of Guam), but California is
conspicuously absent. This article describes the bare-bones structure
that has already taken shape, which has a solid funding base, a board
of directors, and a dream. It sounds like a great idea, but there are
some hurdles to cross. The biggest is how to obtain financial aid
under strict federal guidelines. Following fast on funding questions
is how to keep good fences with member colleges who are themselves
embroiled a swiftly changing educational marketplace. A surprise
issue: college administrators worry that W.G.U. will increase pressure
to invest in technology at a cost to other critical needs, and may
result in more large, impersonal courses. -- TH
Brand, Stewart. "Freeman Dyson's Brain" Wired 6.02 (February 1998):
130-177. -- "How would you build a 10,000 year library?" This question
caught my eye as I scanned Stewart Brand's interview with futurist
Freeman Dyson. As I began reading with great expectations, this
interview quickly evolved into an intellectual sparring match between
Brand (cofounder of Global Business Network and author of The Media
Lab: Inventing the Future at MIT) and Dyson (renowned for his work in
quantum electrodynamics). While their discussion focused more on
historic scientific breakthroughs, biotechnology and cosmic ecology
than libraries, Dyson does offer thought-provoking ideas such as the
abolition of the PhD system and the inevitability of returning to a
village culture. By the end, the most I could extract of Dyson's views
on the 10,000 year library was an appreciation for long term thinking
and the need for patience - this article serves as a good exercise in
both. -- LY
_________________________________________________________________
Current Cites 9(2) (February 1998) ISSN: 1060-2356 Copyright &copy;
1998 by the Library, University of California, Berkeley. _All rights
reserved._
All product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their
respective holders. Mention of a product in this publication does not
necessarily imply endorsement of the product.
[URL:http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/]
To subscribe, send the message "sub cites [your name]" to
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Libraries are authorized to add the journal to their collections at no
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directory /pub/Current.Cites [URL:
ftp://ftp.lib.berkeley.edu/pub/Current.Cites]. This message must
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the editor, who may be reached at trinne@library.berkeley.edu.

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Return-path: <owner-ifla-l@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA>
X-Sender: terry.kuny@nlc-bnc.ca
Date: Mon, 17 Nov 1997 10:56:06 -0500
Subject: [SERIAL] The November issue of D-Lib Magazine is available.

The November issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available at
<http://www.dlib.org>. The UK Office for Library and Information Networking
maintains a mirror site for D-Lib Magazine at:
<http://hosted.ukoln.ac.uk/mirrored/lis-journals/dlib/>, and The Australian
National University Sunsite also maintains a mirror at
<http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib>.

This issue contains stories on the Warwick Framework, a data management and
data visualization system for environmental information, and results of a
user study in Texas in addition to shorter pieces on a proposed preservation
format, conversion of literary texts, one participant's experiences at the
Tilburg Institute on the Digital Library, and developments at the Scout
Project.

CONTENTS

Extending the Warwick Framework: From Metadata Containers to Active
Digital Objects
Ron Daniel, Jr.
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Carl Lagoze
Cornell University

THETIS: Design of a Data Management and Data Visualization System for
Coastal Zone Management of the Mediterranean Sea
Catherine Houstis, Christos Nikolaou, Manolis Marazakis
Institute of Computer Science, FORTH
Nicholas Patrikalakis
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Jakka Sairamesh
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center
Anthony Thomasic
INRIA

Development of the Digital Ranch: A Lot of Bull on the Net!
Amanda Spink, Jane Hicks
University of North Texas

D-Lib Magazine is produced by the Corporation for National Research
Initiatives and is sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects
Agency (DARPA) on behalf of the NSF/DARPA/NASA Digital Libraries Initiative.

William Y. Arms, Vice President
Amy Friedlander, Editor, D-Lib Magazine

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R.E.B. Arnold, Editorial Assistant
Corporation for National Research Initiatives
1895 Preston White Drive, Suite 100
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The Phone: (703) 620-8990
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Approved-By: Terry Kuny <Terry.Kuny@XIST.COM>
Date: Mon, 15 Dec 1997 15:28:00 -0500
Reply-To: International Federation of Library Associations mailing list
<IFLA-L@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA>
Subject: [SERIAL] The December issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available!

Date: Mon, 15 Dec 1997 12:22:04 -0400
From: Rhonda Arnold <reba@cnri.reston.va.us>

The December issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available at
<http://www.dlib.org>. The UK Office for Library and Information Networking
maintains a mirror site for D-Lib Magazine at:
<http://hosted.ukoln.ac.uk/mirrored/lis-journals/dlib/>, and The Australian
National University Sunsite also maintains a mirror at
<http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib>.

In this issue, we continue series on Safeguarding Digital Library Contents
and Users by senior members of IBM's research staff. We are also featuring
stories on multilinguality, quantitative literacy and digital libraries of
statistical data, and users' needs as well as an update from RLG on
metadata. Clips includes two shorter pieces on a recent NSF/ERCIM workshop
on multilingual information access and the organization of a D-Lib working
group on metrics for digital libraries.

CONTENTS

Serving Users in Many Languages: Cross-Language Information Retrieval for
Digital Libraries
Douglas W. Oard
University of Maryland, College Park

Quantitative Literacy: New Website for Federal Statistics Provides Research
Opportunities
Alan R. Tupek
National Science Foundation
Cathryn S. Dippo
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Digital Libraries and Special Libraries: Initial Concerns of Special
Libraries in the Social Welfare Sector
Mark Watson
National Institute for Social Work
David Streatfield
Information Management Associates

Dublin Core Metadata in the RLG Information Landscape
Willy Cromwell-Kessler
Research Libraries Group

Safeguarding Digital Library Contents and Users: Digital Watermarking
Fred Mintzer, Jeffrey Lotspiech, Norishige Morimoto
IBM Research Division

D-Lib Magazine is produced by the Corporation for National Research
Initiatives and is sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects
Agency (DARPA) on behalf of the NSF/DARPA/NASA Digital Libraries Initiative.

William Y. Arms, Vice President
Amy Friedlander, Editor, D-Lib Magazine

~ Rhonda E. Burton-Arnold, Editorial Assistant ~
~ Corporation for National Research Initiatives ~
~ 1895 Preston White Drive, Suite 100 ~
~ Reston, VA 20191-5434 ~
~ 703/620-8990 ~
~ 703/758-5913 (fax) ~
~ reba@cnri.reston.va.us ~
~ http://www.cnri.reston.va.us ~
~ http://www.dlib.org ~
~ http://www.handle.net ~

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Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 12:31:32 -0500
Sender: International Federation of Library Associations mailing list
<IFLA-L@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA>
From: Terry Kuny <Terry.Kuny@xist.com>
Subject: [SERIAL] January 1998 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

The January 1998 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available at
<http://www.dlib.org>. The UK Office for Library and Information Networking
maintains a mirror site for D-Lib Magazine at:
<http://hosted.ukoln.ac.uk/mirrored/lis-journals/dlib/>, and The Australian
National University Sunsite also maintains a mirror at
<http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib>.

In this issue, we continue the series on Safeguarding Digital Library Contents
and Users by senior members of IBM's research staff; this month features a
story on micropayments. We also have a cluster of stories relating to
information access and retrieval: indexing, metadata, and automatic
classification. A story on the Perseus Project describes the history of
this multidisciplinary project and outlines the challenges that humanities
scholarship poses for developing the information technologies. The "Clips"
column includes summaries of the recent International Symposium on
Research, Development, and Practice in Digital Libraries (December 1997) in
Japan and the organization of the Canadian Initiative on Digital Libraries.
Finally, we unveil a new column: Book Reviews.

CONTENTS

Safeguarding Digital Library Contents: Charging for Online Content
Amir Herzberg
IBM Haifa Research Laboratory

Cross-Searching Subject Gateways: The Query Routing and Forward Knowledge
Approach
John Kirriemuir, Dan Brickley
Institute for Learning and Research Technology
University of Bristol
Susan Welsh
Nottingham University, UK
Jon Knight, Martin Hamilton
Loughborough University of Technology

The Dublin Core and Warwick Framework:
A Review of the Literature - March 1995 - September 1997
Harold Thiele
University of Pittsburgh

Using Automated Classification for Summarizing and Selecting Heterogeneous
Information Sources
R. Dolin, D. Agrawal
A. El Abbadi, J. Pearlman
University of California, Santa Barbara

The Perseus Project and Beyond: How Building a Digital Library Challenges
the Humanities and Technology
Gregory Crane
Tufts University

D-Lib Magazine is produced by the Corporation for National Research
Initiatives and is sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects
Agency (DARPA) on behalf of the NSF/DARPA/NASA Digital Libraries Initiative.

William Y. Arms, Vice President
Amy Friedlander, Editor, D-Lib Magazine


Rhonda E. Burton-Arnold, Editorial Assistant ~
~ Corporation for National Research Initiatives ~
~ 1895 Preston White Drive, Suite 100 ~
~ Reston, VA 20191-5434 ~
~ 703/620-8990 ~
~ 703/758-5913 (fax) ~
~ reba@cnri.reston.va.us ~
~ http://www.cnri.reston.va.us ~
~ http://www.dlib.org ~
~ http://www.handle.net ~


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Return-path: <Dominic.Farace@inter.NL.net>
Date: Sat, 27 Dec 1997 09:31:55 +0100 (MET)
From: "Dominic.Farace" <Dominic.Farace@inter.NL.net>
Subject: GreyNet Newsletter Vol.6, No.4, 1997

GREYNET'S NEWSLETTER ------------------------------------------------------

~~~ B e s t W i s h e s f o r 1 9 9 8 ~~~

NewsBriefNews Quarterly Newsletter
Vol. 6, No. 4, 1997 ISSN 0929-0923 (Email Version)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
CONTENT:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Luxembourg Convention . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Curriculum Development and Grey Literature . . . 2
NASA/LaRC Electronic Survey . . . . . . . . . . 3
Utility of GL in Security Studies . . . . . . 4
Coming Events '98 . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Questionnaire Results . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Closing Statement GL'97 . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Pre-Conference Announcement . . . . . . . . . . 8
Special Subscription Offer . . . . . . . . . . . 9


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From: "Dominic.Farace" <Dominic.Farace@inter.nl.net>
To: "Natural Resources Librarians List" <NRLib-L@library.lib.usu.edu>
Subject: GreyNet Newsletter Volume 7, Number 1, 1998
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 1998 12:12:41 +0100 (MET)
Errors-To: <kevbre@ngw.lib.usu.edu>
Reply-To: NRLib-L@library.lib.usu.edu

GREYNET'S NEWSLETTER ------------------------------------------------------

NewsBriefNews Quarterly Newsletter
Vol. 7, No. 1, 1998 ISSN 0929-0923 (Email Version)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
CONTENT: COLUMN:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Newsletter Coverage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
An Eagle's Eye-View of GL Research . . . . . . . . . 2
Grey Literature and Publishing . . . . . . . . . . . 3
GL'99 Reset for Washington D.C. . . . . . . . . . . 4
Book Review: Knowledge Diffusion . . . . . . . . . . 5
Policy on Collection Development . . . . . . . . . . 6
Publication Order Form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

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EDITORIAL ADDRESS:
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TransAtlantic / GreyNet
Grey Literature Network Service
Koninginneweg 201, 1075 CR Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Tel/Fax: 31-20-671.1818
Email: GreyNet@inter.nl.net
Internet: http://www.konbib.nl/infolev/greynet

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What's New! (http://www.nlc-bnc.ca/ifla/I/whatsnew/new.htm)

November (1997)

Statutes of IFLA

IFLA Journal - Volume 23, No. 5/6, 1997

INTERNATIONAL PRESERVATION NEWS - No. 15, August 1997

Section of Libraries for the Blind Newsletter - Fall ‘97


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Date: Thu, 19 Feb 1998 15:59:29 +0000
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
From: TOM WILSON <T.D.Wilson@sheffield.ac.uk>
Subject: Information Research
X-To: lis-link@mailbase.ac.uk, lis-bailer@mailbase.ac.uk
To: Multiple recipients of list JESSE <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>

As a result of a re-design of the Department's web-site, our
electronic journal is now at:

http://www.shef.ac.uk/~is/publications/infres/ircont.html

Remember that we now accept "guest papers" and are willing to accept
papers for refereeing. The following is the editorial for the
current (delayed!) issue:

Remember that you get advance notice of new issues of Information
Research if you sign up.

This issue of Information Research {VOL 3, NO 3, JANUARY 1998]
is a little later than intended, as a result of having to much to do and an attack of 'flu. However, we
have an interesting issue, made up of three papers from the third
International Symposium on Health Information Management Research,
which was held in Sheffield last year. Some of the papers from that
meeting have been published elsewhere, but these three deserved
publication in our view and Information Research was clearly the
appropriate vehicle.

The three papers are on rather different topics: the first, by M. P.
Bradley & J. S. Briggs, of the Department of Information Science,
University of Portsmouth, deals with the development of "An Internet
Information System for GPs" concludes that "GPs want more information
and that hospitals are broadly willing and able to provide it". and
that, "Internet technology could provide a cheap, manageable and
timely means of delivering the information to the GP's surgery." Next,
J. Rolinson, of the Department of Information and Library Studies,
Loughborough University, discusses "Health Information for the Teenage
Years:What do they want to know?" and finds "a shift of emphasis of
the adolescent’s need for information about medical conditions to
information relating to body image and sexuality" as well as an
"apparent lack of a systematic approach to health information
education" and, finally, in a contribution from the Technical
University, Berlin, A. Scheiber, R. Schneemann, & R. Wische report on
"Assessment of Information Needs in Public Health in Germany: Results
of a Nationwide Survey."

Our next issue should be available some time in March, and I would
like to remind readers that we are now open to contributed papers,
which will be refereed, and to suggestions for "guest" papers.

Professor Tom Wilson, Editor and Webmaster


***************************************************
Professor Tom Wilson, Ph.D.
Research Professor in Information Management
Department of Information Studies
University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, U.K.
Tel. +44-114-222-2631 Fax. +44-114-278-0300
Email: T.D.Wilson@Sheffield.ac.uk
http://www.shef.ac.uk/uni/academic/I-M/is/lecturer/tom1.html
***************************************************
"Getting an education was a bit like a communicable sexual disease. It made you unsuitable for a lot of jobs and then you
had the urge to pass it on." Terry Pratchett, "Hogfather".
*****************************************************
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Date: Thu, 16 Oct 1997 15:59:00 -0400
Reply-To: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
<ASIS-L@asis.org>,
Richard Hill <rhill@asis.org>
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
<ASIS-L@asis.org>
From: Richard Hill <rhill@asis.org>
Subject: JASIS November TOC

JASIS (v. 48 #11)
Journal of the American Society for Information Science

VOLUME 48
NUMBER 11
NOVEMBER 1997

Special Topic Issue: Current Research in Human---Computer Interaction
Guest Editor: Andrew Dillon

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

Andrew Dillon
965

Human---Computer Interaction--Whence and Whither?
Brian Shackel
970

Modeling the Human Factors of Scholarly Communities Supported through the
Internet and World Wide Web
Brian R. Gaines, Lee Li-Jen Chen, and Mildred L. G. Shaw
987

Evaluating a Multimedia Authoring Tool
Bonnie E. John and Matthew M. Mashyna
1004

Organizational Usability of Digital Libraries: Case Study of Legal Research
in Civil and Criminal Courts
Margaret Elliott and Rob Kling
1023

An Informal Information-Seeking Environment
David G. Hendry and David J. Harper
1036

Writing with Collaborative Hypertext: Analysis and Modeling
Chaomei Chen
1049

Who's Zooming Whom? Attunement to Animation in the Interface
Michael Chui and Andrew Dillon
1067

The Systemics of Dialogism: On the Prevalence of the Self in HCI Design
Colin T. Schmidt
1073

Cover design: Adrienne Weiss
Illustration: Marc J. Cohen
Richard Hill
Executive Director, American Society for Information Science
8720 Georgia Avenue, Suite 501
Silver Spring, MD 20910
FAX: (301) 495-0810
Voice: (301) 495-0900
rhill@asis.org
http://www.asis.org
ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

Date: Mon, 24 Nov 1997 16:59:32 -0500
Reply-To: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
<ASIS-L@asis.org>,
Richard Hill <rhill@asis.org>
Subject: December '97 JASIS TOC

Journal of the American Society for Information Science
JASIS
VOLUME 48
NUMBER 12
DECEMBER 1997
CONTENTS

EDITORIAL
JASIS Will Be Fourteen in 1998
Donald H. Kraft
1083

In This Issue
Bert R. Boyce
1085

RESEARCH

Experiments with Automatic Indexing and a Relational Thesaurus in a Chinese
Information Retrieval System
Tian-Long Wan, Martha Evens, Yeun-Wen Wan, and Yuen-Yuan Pao
1086
In our first article Wan and others test CIRS (Chinese Information
Retrieval System), which compares vectors by intersection. The number of
ones in the resulting vector is considered a measure of similarity for
ranking. A thesaurus generated by inspecting the terms in the documents
provided assistance in query formulation. A term consisted of one or more
Chinese characters as selected by a human indexer or automatically from the
texts. An evaluator, familiar with the 30 queries used, read 555 document
abstracts and assigned those thought relevant to the proper query. Use of
the thesaurus improved recall and precision measures, and at high recall
levels automatic indexing out-preformed manual indexing.

Discovering Information Behavior in Sense Making
I. Time and Timing
1097
II. The Social
1109
III. The Person
1127
Paul Solomon
In a series of three papers Solomon describes an ethnographic study of
human information behavior (characterized as ``sense making'') in the
context of a work planning process carried out by a public agency on an
annual cycle. Data were collected using direct recorded and informal
observation, participant logs, interviews, and documentary traces. The
process over time consisted of broad patterns of repetitive actions where
time sensitive data collection occurred prior to use.
The agency adapts through a focus on cooperation with members of the
legislature and demonstration of past success. The participants do not
consider information gathering or processing activities as separate from
their work, but rather part and parcel of their regular activities. Very
important cues come from personal interactions within and outside the agency.
Individuals have varied sense making styles but the process terminates
either when a deadline for action, or a point of satisfaction is reached,
unless some other priority diverts attention. Information is sometimes not
shared or pursued for perceived self interest or the possible violation of
a confidence. Style diversity causes delay in the resolution of the
process. It seemed a common practice to use information-seeking to justify
decisions rather than to support a decision making process.

EUROPEAN RESEARCH LETTER

Europe and Information Science
Peter Ingwersen
1139
Ingwersen, in a European research letter, indicates that only 34 of 278
articles in Scientometrics from 1994 to 1996 were produced in the United
States. India contributed 17 articles and the rest were from Europe. A
healthy system of networks and workshops seems to be leading to an
increased interest throughout Europe in this area of research.


BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS

Preliminary Findings on Searcher Performance and Perceptions of Performance
in a Hypertext Bibliographic Retrieval System
Dietmar Wolfram and Alexandra Dimitroff
1142
In the first of two brief communications Wolfram and Dimitroff divide
eighty-three subjects into expert and beginning searchers who are then
randomly assigned to a basic or enhanced version of a prototype hypertext
bibliographic retrieval system, and given two questions. A success measure,
defined as recall (relevant pages visited/relevant pages) times ``browsing
precision'' (relevant pages visited/total pages visited) divided by search
time in hours was used.
Searchers were questioned on their confidence in complete recall.
Confidence values are reported as between 1 and 6 where 1 to 3 was
considered low and 4 to 6 high. A measure termed ``reality check''
decreases below 1 with searcher over confidence and increases above 1 with
under confidence. For the question with a larger answer set, high
confidence searchers searched for a significantly shorter period of time,
and achieved significantly higher recall and success measures. The enhanced
system provides significantly higher recall and success measures for the
question with the smaller answer set. Searchers, by the ``reality check''
measure, are over confident of success.

ISI's Impact Factor as Misnomer: A Proposed New Measure to Assess Journal
Impact
Stephen P. Harter and Thomas E. Nisonger
1146
In our second brief communication Harter and Nisonger suggest that the
traditional ``impact factor'' measure is a misnomer. ``Impact factor''
measures the current impact of a recently published article and offers a
probabilistic estimate of the future impact of a paper published in the
journal in question. This is a measure of journal quality, but it does not
imply that two journals with the same factor have equal impact since the
one that publishes more articles will have more effect on the scholarly
community.
A better term would be ``article impact factor,'' with the not normalized
number of citations received being called ``journal impact factor.'' A high
``article impact factor'' rank indicates that a journal publishes articles
that are more often cited. A ``journal impact factor'' rank indicates the
relative citation impact of the journal as a whole.

BOOK REVIEWS
Bringing Design to Software, edited by Terry Winograd
Robert J. Sandusky
1149

Technology and Copyright Law: A Guidebook for the Library, Research, and
Teaching Professions, by Arlene Bielefield and Lawrence Cheeseman
David Mattison
1150

The Economics of Communication and Information, edited by Donald M. Lamberton
Hal R. Varian
1151

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
1153

AUTHOR INDEX
1157

SUBJECT INDEX
1161

VOLUME CONTENTS
I

Richard Hill
Executive Director, American Society for Information Science
8720 Georgia Avenue, Suite 501
Silver Spring, MD 20910
FAX: (301) 495-0810
Voice: (301) 495-0900
rhill@asis.org
http://www.asis.org

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Approved-By: GWHITNEY@UTKUX.UTCC.UTK.EDU
Approved-By: Richard Hill <rhill@ASIS.ORG>
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 1997 08:16:18 -0500
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
Subject: JASIS Vol. 49, No. 2, Table of Contents (Feb. '98)

JASIS (Journal of the American Society for Information Science)

VOLUME 49, NUMBER 2
FEBRUARY 1998

[Below is Bert R. Boyce's copy for "In This Issue" (a slightly expanded
version compared to what will appear in JASIS) combined with the rest of
the Table of Contents. Bert, Professor & Dean, School of Library &
Information Science, Louisiana State University and a member of the JASIS
Advisory Board, writes the "In this Issue" column in each regular issue of
JASIS.]

IN THIS ISSUE
by Bert R. Boyce
Page 102

Bookstein, A., S.T. Klein, and T. Raita. "Clumping Properties of
Content-Bearing Words," page 102
Passages in text that contain a term of interest and are surprisingly
close (physically adjacent) to other such passages indicate an other than
random distribution of that term in the text. Such a distribution may well
be an indication that the term is content bearing, since randomly
distributed terms are likely to be other than content bearing. Five
measures of such "serial clustering" are presented. Two Condensation
measures, where the distribution of words over textual units is examined to
identify words with other than random distributions, and three Linear
measures, where the textual units containing at least one occurrence of the
word are examined relative to their position relative to on another to
identify other than random patterns. Comparisons of three of these measures
with human expert content word identification in Hebrew, French and English
indicates that a clumping tendency is present in content bearing words.


Wang, Peiling and Dagobert Sorgel. " A Cognitive Model of Document Use
During a Research Project. Study I. Document Selection," page 115
Here "Document Selection" means the choice from a search generated
surrogate list of a particular document for the purpose of further use, and
it is this cognitive process and its sub processes and components that is
the focus of the study. Document Information Elements (DIE's) are the
smallest meaningful components of the bibliographic record and may relate
to particular user selection criteria. Using 25 faculty and graduate
student subjects, participants viewed a retrieved citation printout, and
were recorded reading and thinking aloud as they evaluated the individual
citations. A second pass through the selected citations was then made to
permit further rejection and provide a preference ranking. The recordings
were then coded and analyzed to determine DIE's, document values, and
criteria used.
Epistemic, functional and social values are prominent, and the criteria
of
topicality is the clear leader although orientation, quality and novelty
make strong showings. Title and abstract were the DIE's most used for
topicality and orientation, author and journal for quality, and title and
author for novelty.

Watters, C.R., M.A. Shepherd, and F.J. Burkowski. "The Electronic News
Delivery Project," page 134
After a review of news reading theory and the state of the art in
electronic news provision, including filtering and prediction of user
preferences, it is concluded that effective news packages must provide a
value added layer in editorial and layout activities. This will include
temporal and content linkages, which moves news provision closer to library
processes, as well as significant incorporation of multiple media,
personalization, and interactivity in both content and in advertisement.
A three layer electronic news architecture resting on a digital library
of
truly massive proportions is suggested. The recourse layer stores and
supports access to archived and current news items and consists of multiple
news providers hopefully using a common markup language. The news
management layer links like items and generates packages for individualized
editions. It contains a query manager to accept and process profiles and
requests from the news reader layer which resides on the client machine.
prototypes of the three layers are in place but not discussed in any detail.

Perry, Claudia A. and Ronald E. Rice. "Scholarly Communication in
Developmental Dyslexia: Influence of Network Structure on Change in a
Hybrid Problem Area," page 151
The existence of communication networks of researchers in visual dyslex
ia
and phonological dyslexia is confirmed, and their structures and changes
over time investigated. Using bibliographies, conference attendance lists,
presence on advisory and editorial boards, and principle investigators in
funded research projects over a 20 year period, 924 names were identified
of whom 69 were on four or more lists. Five more were added from the three
source list to bring a target list to 74. Survey forms or CV's were
received from 55, with age being the only significant variable separating
respondents from non respondents. Co-citation data was then collected and
analyzed using the CONCOR algorithm.
In the early years of the sample period researchers with very different
approaches to the problem were grouped together. In the third and final
time period defined blocks corresponding to the alternative perspectives
appeared. However, several distinct lines of research appear to be taking
place within these groups and no pattern of convergence occurs. The social
connections shown by editorial board membership and conference attendance
at best weakly reflect the co-citation based patterns.

He, Shaoyi. "Concept Similarity and Conceptual Information Alteration Vi
a
English-to- Chinese and Chinese-to-English Translation of Medical Article
Titles," page 169
Fifty English to Chinese and 50 Chinese to English translations of paper
s
were selected at random from an existing database and their original texts
paired with the translations. Two bilingual judges identified all the
concepts present in the paired titles generating a list of concept pairs
and concepts without counterparts. Each pair was rated on a scale of one
to five indicating the conceptual similarity of the paired terms. Cohen's
Kappa revealed substantial inter-judge agreement. Concepts with target
language counterparts, without such counterparts and concepts in the target
but not the source were counted. There is a loss of information in the
translation process in both directions.

Khan, kushal, and Craig Locatis. "Searching Through Cyberspace: The
Effects of Link Display and Link Density on Information Retrieval from
Hypertext on the World Wide Web," page 176
Is it better to have a large number of hypertext links on an index type
page, or to lower the link per page density? Should the links appear within
the text of paragraphs, or in lists constructed for that purpose?
Sixty four magnet high school students were divided into expert and novi
ce
classes based on self reported browsing levels. A 15 page document on an
unfamilar topic was structured into nine chapters and linked to 18 related
external documents. Each of four versions of the document had a table of
contents with links to chapters, and each chapter had links to relevant and
irrelevant subchapters, and to the external documents which themselves had
external links. The versions had either high or low density links and
either list or in paragraph link placement.
Six search tasks ranked by difficulty were utilized, with subjects
randomly assigned to the four treatments. Search time and numbers of links
were recorded by observers. Indicating the display in which an answer could
be found was correct completion and accuracy was the percent of tasks
correctly completed. Prioritization was scored by giving points for
completing tasks in order of difficulty.
Results were analyzed by a multivariate analysis of variance to test for
link density interactions and display type effects. The use of lists of
links and low density display produces positive effects upon overall
performance

BOOK REVIEWS
Virtual Individuals, Virtual Groups: Human Dimensions of Groupware and
Computer Networking, by Jo Ann Oravec
Leslie Regan Shade
183

Entertainment Technology and Tomorrow's Information Services, by Tom Kinney
Sue Myburgh
184

Highway of Dreams: A Critical View along the Information Superhighway, by
A. Michael Noll
Donald O. Case
185

Implementation of Organizational Innovation: Studies of Academic and
Research Libraries, by Peter Clayton
Peter G. Underwood
186

Beyond the Library of the Future: More Alternative Futures for the Public
Library, by Bruce A. Shuman
Amy E. Sanidas
187

Culture of the Internet, edited by Sara Kiesler
Thomas A. Peters
188

Gateways to Knowledge: The Role of Academic Libraries in Teaching,
Learning, and Research, edited by Lawrence Dowler
Ebrahim Afshar
190

Richard Hill
Executive Director, American Society for Information Science
8720 Georgia Avenue, Suite 501
Silver Spring, MD 20910
FAX: (301) 495-0810
Voice: (301) 495-0900
rhill@asis.org
http://www.asis.org

ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

Date: Mon, 16 Mar 1998 16:13:37 -0500
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
<ASIS-L@asis.org>
From: Richard Hill <rhill@asis.org>
Subject: JASIS, Vol 49, no.4

Journal of the American Society for Information Science
JASIS
VOLUME 49
NUMBER 4
APRIL 1, 1998

CONTENTS

In This Issue
Bert R. Boyce
303
In this issue we find two bibliometric articles, a study of book review
usage, a study of the search term selection process, and a look at the
relationship between assumptions of user behavior and variations in
performance measures. We begin with a review of information retrieval agents.

RESEARCH
Intelligent Information Agents: Review and Challenges for Distributed
Information Sources
Donna S. Haverkamp and Susan Gauch
304
An information retrieval agent is query processing software that is
autonomous (able to operate without human intervention), social (able to
communicate with other agents and humans), reactive (able to perceive and
react to their environment), and pro-active (able to exhibit goal directed
behavior and initiative). A review of current agent systems by Haverkamp
and Gauch finds they have relatively small domains but that standardization
efforts are underway.

From Translation to Navigation of Different Discourses: A Model of Search
Term Selection during the Pre-Online Stage of the Search Process
Mirja Iivonen and Diane H. Sonnenwald
312
Thirty-two searchers with diverse experience formulated query statements
for 12 written queries each. They were then asked by Iivonen and Sonnenwald
to explain, while being recorded, the process used to formulate the queries
and select the terms. Basic concepts were identified from the analysis of
transcripts.
Search term selection is not effectively modeled by the view that only the
translation of client's words to search terms is involved. Multiple
discourses (ways of thinking about a topic) are involved for any topic and
these may change over time. Beyond the client's search requests, controlled
vocabularies, searcher's experience, indexing practice, the database, and
the domains of the documents are all identified as involved in the
selection process. All searchers do not use all discourses in every query
and they move dynamically from one discourse to another in the term
selection process.

Visualizing a Discipline: An Author Co-Citation Analysis of Information
Science, 1972---1995
Howard D. White and Katherine W. McCain
327
Those authors cited for a 24-year period in 12 journals chosen as defining
information science and library automation provide a corpus from which the
120 most cited were chosen by White and McCain. The co-citation data from
all pairs were then used to provide a categorization of the discipline
through factor analysis. The mean co-citation counts for each author in
each of three 8 year periods and for the 24 year span, two dimensional maps
of the relative position of the top 100 authors in each period, a map of
authors whose relative positions change over time, and a map of those who
remain in the top 100 for all three periods are also provided.
The article devotes considerable time to a justification of Author
Co-citation Analysis and provides sufficient methodological detail to be
used as a cookbook for the application of these statistical data reduction
methods to bibliographic data.

Robustness of Well-Designed Retrieval Performance Measures under Optimal
User Behavior
John R. Conlon and Sumali J. Conlon
356
A probability model of a retrieval system is developed by Conlon and
Conlon to show that if a user is employing a retrieval system optimally,
performance measures based on the user's objective function will be
insensitive to variations in assumptions of user behavior. The use of
Salton and McGill data upholds the theoretical result.

Use of Scholarly Book Reviews: Implications for Electronic Publishing and
Scholarly Communication
Amanda Spink, David Robins, and Linda Schamber
364
At the University of North Texas 997 faculty (186 responding) were
surveyed by Spink, Robins, and Schamber as to their use of book reviews.
Most respondents (both science and humanities groups) read between one and
ten book reviews per month and found most reviews in scholarly journals.
The humanities and social science faculty placed more value on comments by
authoritative reviews while the science and technology faculty valued
content description. Neither group considered time lag in finding reviews a
problem and the humanities and social science group place much more value
on the use of reviews in research and teaching.


BRIEF COMMUNICATION

Citation Indicators of Japanese Journals
Zhang Haiqi and Shigeaki Yamazaki
375
Haiqi finds that fifteen Japanese journals, all English language, had an
impact factor over one in 1994. Japanese journals exhibit a high rate of
self citation, and Japanese scientists contribute their best articles to
other than Japanese journals.

BOOK REVIEWS
Automating the Lexicon: Research and Practice in a Multilingual
Environment, edited by Donald E. Walker, Antonio Zampolli,
and Nicoletta Calzolari
P. ZoŽ Stavri
380

Language and Space, edited by Paul Bloom, Mary A. Peterson,
Lynn Nadel, and Merrill F. Garrett
Bryce Allen
381

The Economics of Information: A Guide to Economic and Cost-Benefit Analysis
for Information Professionals, by Bruce R. Kingma
Herbert Snyder
382

Information Graphics: A Comprehensive Illustrated Reference by Robert L.
Harris
Robert D. Wilson
383

Ergonomics and Safety of Intelligent Driver Interfaces, edited by
Y. Ian Noy
Mark P. Haselkorn
384

Technology and Management in Library and Information Services, by F. W.
Lancaster and Beth Sandore
Michael Buckland
385

Advances in Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining, edited by
Usama M. Fayyad, Gregory Piatetsky-Shapiro, Padraic Smyth,
and Ramasamy Uthurusamy
Frank Exner, Little Bear
386

Borders in Cyberspace: Information Policy and the Global Information
Infrastructure, edited by Brian Kahin
and Charles Nesson
Julian Warner
387

Advanced Database Systems, by Carlo Zaniolo, Stefano Ceri,
Christos Faloutsos, Richard T. Snodgrass, V. S. Subrahmanian,
and Roberto Zicari
Kyle Banerjee
388

The Highwaymen: Warriors of the Information Superhighway, by
Ken Auletta
Donald O. Case
389

Publishing Books, edited by Everette E. Dennis, Craig L. LaMay,
and Edward C. Pease
Richard J. Cox
390

LETTER TO THE EDITOR
392

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JASIS CALL FOR PAPERS

Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 16:44:07 +0000
Reply-To: Chaomei.Chen@brunel.ac.uk
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
<ASIS-L@asis.org>
From: Dr Chaomei Chen <Chaomei.Chen@BRUNEL.AC.UK>
Organization: Brunel University
Subject: Call for papers: JASIS Special Issue on Individual Differences in
Virtual Environments

Call for Papers

JASIS Special Topic Issue

Individual Differences in Virtual Environments



The next Special Topics Issue of the Journal of the American Society for
Information Science (JASIS), to be scheduled for late 1999 (vol. 50),
will be on the topic of Individual Differences in Virtual Environments.
The guest editors for this issue will be Dr. Chaomei Chen of Brunel
University, Dr. Mary Czerwinski of Microsoft Research,and Dr. Robert
Macredie of Brunel University.

The increasingly widespread use of virtual reality, visualisation and
simulation modelling techniques has highlighted the need for a better
understanding of a number of fundamental issues concerning human users
in a virtual environment. There is an urgent need for in-depth empirical
studies and methodologies for assessing the effectiveness and usability
of a wide variety of virtual environments in this context. For example,
what are the predominant human factors concerning the design of a
virtual environment? What is the role of individual differences in the
use of a virtual environment? How do we assess the effectiveness and
usability of a virtual reality application? How do we account for users'
cognitive and behavioural experiences in a virtual world? The aim of
this special issue is to stimulate inter-disciplinary interests in
issues concerning human users in the design, use, and evaluation of a
virtual environment.

Specific topics of interest for this Special Topic Issue include, but
are not limited to, the following:

individual differences in virtual environments,including spatial
ability and cognitive styles;
learning in virtual environments, including cognitive models,
spatial memory, incidental learning, categorisation and abstraction
abilities;
usability and evaluation methodologies;
user preferences and satisfaction;
multi-user virtual environments, 3D interactive systems, spatial
hypermedia;
visualisation and simulation in virtual environments;
analysis and modelling of user behaviour, search strategies and
navigation heuristics;
automated virtual environment generation and transformation;
semantic structures and spatial structures in virtual environments.

Original papers relating to research in, but not restricted to, these
topics are are invited for consideration for the special issue.

Inquiries (by voice, fax, or email) and manuscript submissions (four
copies of full articles) should be addressed to Dr Chen at the address
below or (by email) to the other guest editors at:

marycz@microsoft.com, or
robert.macredie@brunel.ac.uk.

Manuscript submissions (four copies of full articles) should be
addressed to:

Dr Chaomei Chen
Department of Information Systems and Computing
Brunel University
Uxbridge UB8 3PH
UNITED KINGDOM

Voice: (+44) 1895 274-000 ext 2569 or (+44) 1895 203080

Fax: (+44) 1895 251-686

Email: chaomei.chen@brunel.ac.uk

The deadline for accepting manuscripts for consideration for publication
in this special issue is September 30, 1998. All manuscripts will be
reviewed by a select panel of referees, and those accepted will be
published in a special issue of _JASIS_. Original artwork and a signed
copy of the copyright release form will be required for all accepted
papers. A copy of the call for papers will be available on the World
Wide Web, as is further information about _JASIS_, at
http://www.asis.org/.

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JASIS CALL FOR PAPERS (2)

Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 13:41:41 +0200
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
<ASIS-L@asis.org>
From: Zorana Ercegovac <zercegov@UCLA.EDU>
Subject: 2nd CALL FOR PAPERS (JASIS/Metadata)

Call for papers for the Special Topic Issue of the Journal of the
American Society for Information Science, JASIS, is published
in JASIS 48 (11) November 1997 on page [1082].

Title of the JASIS Special Issue is:

"Integrating Multiple Overlapping Metadata Standards"

The deadline for submitting manuscripts for consideration for publication
in this issue is April 30, 1998.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Zorana Ercegovac, Ph. D.
Dept of Library and Information Science
Graduate School of Education & Information Studies
222 GSLIS Bldg
University of California, Los Angeles
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1521
Tel: 1-310-206-9361 Email: zercegov@ucla.edu
http://www.gslis.ucla.edu/LIS/faculty/zercegov/ercegovac.html

An old writer says that there are four sorts of readers:
Sponges, which attract all without distinguishing;
Howre-glasses, which receive and powre out as fast;
Bagges, which retain the degrees of the spices and let the wine escape; and
SIEVES, which retain the best only.
A man wastes a great many years before he reaches the "sieve" stage.

-- Sir William Osler (1849-1919) "Aphorisms"



xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Date: Mon, 19 Jan 1998 15:50:33 +0000
Reply-To: International Federation of Library Associations mailing list
<IFLA-L@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA>
From: Cliff McKnight <C.Mcknight@LBORO.AC.UK>
Subject: JoDI Volume 1(2)
To: IFLA-L@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA

* With apologies for cross-posting *

Volume 1 Issue 2 of the Journal of Digital Information, JoDI, is now online at

http://jodi.ecs.soton.ac.uk/

Issue 2 is a themed issue on Open Hypermedia: Systems, Interoperability and
Standards, edited by Uffe Koch Wiil from the Danish National Centre for IT
Research at Aarhus University.

Access to JoDI is free but there is a one-time registration process before the
full contents can be read. Abstracts and lab reports are available without
registration. Instructions for authors intending to submit articles can also
be found at the site.

Cliff McKnight
c.mcknight@lboro.ac.uk

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 10:47:07 -0500
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
From: Gretchen Whitney <gwhitney@utkux.utcc.utk.edu>
Subject: Library Trends: Professional Associations (fwd)
X-To: jesse <jesse%utkvm1.BITNET@utkvm1.utk.edu>

---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 1998 10:12:26 -0600
From: GSLIS Publications Office <puboff@ALEXIA.LIS.UIUC.EDU>
To: ASIS-L@ASIS.ORG
Subject: Library Trends: Professional Associations

Please consider sharing the following information about the content
and availability of Library Trends 46(2) with your constituents. Thank
you.

Monica Walk
The Publications Office of the
Graduate School of Library and Information Science
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
(217) 333-1359 phone, (217) 244-7329 FAX
puboff@alexia.lis.uiuc.edu
http://edfu.lis.uiuc.edu/puboff

****************************************************
"The Role of Professional Associations"
Edited by Joy Thomas
Library Trends 46(2) Fall 1997

Library associations are found in great abundance and variety, from the
strictly local to the international. Practitioners of most professions
and people of many special interests band together into associations.
Contributors to this issue explore various facets of the relationship of
associations and members, illustrating themes with the achievements of
specific associations.

Because this issue includes articles that focus on many--but by no means
all--aspects of library associations, it is unique in the professional
literature for the multiplicity and depth of association topics discussed.
We hope you enjoy this issue of Library Trends and learn something about
the rich variety that associations offer.

Articles and contributors include:
"International Library Associations," Charlene Baldwin
"Surveying the Role of Ethnic-American Library Associations," Tami
Echavarria and Andrew B. Wertheimer
"The Value of Professional Associations," William Fisher
"Activity in Professional Associations: The Positive Difference in a
Librarian's Career," Donald G. Frank
"Professional Associations: Promoting Leadership in a Career," Barbara
J. Glendenning and James C. Gordon
"Professional Associations or Unions? A Comparative Look," Tina
Maragou Hovekamp
"To Join or Not to Join: How Librarians Make Membership Decisions About
Their Associations," Sue Kamm
"The War on Books and Ideas: The California Library Association and
Anti-Communist Censorship in the 1940s and 1950s," Cindy
Mediavilla
"Paraprofessional Groups and Associations," Linda J. Owen
"Library Association Staff: Roles, Responsibilities, Relationships,"
Jordan M. Scepanski and H. Lea Wells
"The Virtual Association," Edward J. Valauskas

Single copies are $18.50, including postage, and are available, pre-paid,
from GSLIS Publications, 501 E. Daniel Street, Champaign, IL 61820.
Orders can also be made by phone: 217/333-1359, fax: 217/244-7329, or
e-mail: puboff@alexia.lis.uiuc.edu

Subscription rates are Institutional, $75 per volume ($82 for
international subscribers); Personal, $50 per volume ($57 for
international subscribers); and Student, $25 per volume ($32 for
international subscribers). Order from the University of Illinois Press,
Journals Department, 1325 S. Oak Street, Champaign, IL 61820. ISSN
0024-2594

Visit us on the WWW! http://edfu.lis.uiuc.edu/puboff
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From: Scout Project[SMTP:scout@CS.WISC.EDU]
Reply To: The Scout Report
Sent: Saturday, 18 October 1997 1:14AM
To: SCOUT-REPORT@LISTS.INTERNIC.NET
Subject: The Scout Report -- October 17, 1997

======== The Scout Report ==
======== October 17, 1997 ====
======== Volume 4, Number 25 ======
====== Internet Scout Project ========
==== University of Wisconsin ========
== Department of Computer Sciences ========
== I N T H E  S C O U T R E P O R T   T H I S W E E K ========
12. New Library: The People's Network
http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/services/lic/newlibrary/

This document, commissioned by the UK Department of Culture, Media, and
Sport, and published by the Library and Information Commission, "argues
that libraries, long seen as centres of knowledge and learning, must be
repositioned as the communications backbone of the information society if
the UK is to be a dynamic and competitive force into the next millennium."
It posits that major changes in libraries will be stimulated by information
technology. The report enumerates five major points: the new library must
help people in acquiring new skills; it must be a part of a national
education system; it must provide multiple information formats to all
patrons; it must remain central to providing information, as well as
culture to patrons; and it must use the new technology to continue to
facilitate the democratic process. The report is divided into nine chapters
and is arranged in the form of point by point paragraphs relating to the
topics discussed. A summary of recommendations and costs, as well as a
glossary of terms, is included. [JS]

13. _America's New Deficit: The Shortage of Information Technology Workers_
[.pdf, 38p.]
Press Release
http://www.ta.doc.gov/PRel/pr92997.htm
Report
http://www.ta.doc.gov/reports/itsw/itsw.pdf

_America's New Deficit: The Shortage of Information Technology Workers_, a
new US Commerce Department Office of Technology Policy study (available in
Adobe Acrobat [.pdf] format only, suggests that the United States "could
face a growing shortage of information technology workers that would have
severe consequences for U.S. competitiveness, economic growth, and job
creation." It provides evidence that fast growing companies have trouble
finding enough information technology workers for their operations. As a
solution to this problem, the study recommends that the United States
develop its labor force skills to maintain its lead in productivity and
competitiveness. [THN]

Subscription and Contact Information


For information on subscribing to the Scout Report, send email to:
listserv@internic.net
In the body of the message type:
info scout-report

Or visit our web site and subscribe using a web form:
http://rs.internic.net/cgi-bin/lwgate/SCOUT-REPORT/
http://rs.internic.net/cgi-bin/lwgate/SCOUT-REPORT-HTML/

The Scout Report's Web page:
http://scout.cs.wisc.edu/scout/report/
http://rs.internic.net/scout/report/

Adobe Acrobat version of the Scout Report:
http://scout.cs.wisc.edu/scout/report/pdf/

Net Scout team member information:
http://scout.cs.wisc.edu/scout/team.html

Scout Report by gopher:
gopher://ds0.internic.net:70/11/pub/list_archives/scout-report.archive
gopher to: ds0.internic.net
select: Internet Directory and Database Services/InterNIC Database Services
/Mailing Lists Archives/scout-report.archive

FTP archive of past Scout Reports:
ftp://ftp.ds.internic.net/pub/list_archives/scout-report.archive/
ftp to: ds.internic.net
change directory to: pub/list_archives/scout-report.archive



The Scout Report
Brought to You by the Internet Scout Project

The Scout Report (ISSN 1092-3861) is published every Friday of the year
except the last Friday of December by the Internet Scout Project,
located in the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Department of Computer
Sciences.

Managing Editor Susan Calcari
Editor Jack Solock
Production Editor Jeannine Ramsey
Contributors Teri Boomsma
Michael de Nie
Aimee D. Glassel
Kathy Harris
Matthew Livesey
Christopher Lukas
Thiam Hee Ng
Amy Tracy Wells

Copyright Susan Calcari, 1994-1997. Permission is granted to make and
distribute verbatim copies of the Scout Report provided the copyright
notice and this paragraph is preserved on all copies. The InterNIC
provides information about the Internet to the US research and education
community under a cooperative agreement with the National Science
Foundation: NCR-9218742. The Government has certain rights in this
material.

Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in
this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily
reflect the views of the University of Wisconsin - Madison, the National
Science Foundation, AT&T, or Network Solutions, Inc.

SCOUT-REPORT administrivia should be sent to <listserv@lists.internic.net>
To unsubscribe send a message with only one line "SIGNOFF SCOUT-REPORT"
For more help regarding Listserv commands send the one line "HELP"

oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo From: Hamill, Cheryl <Cheryl.Hamill@health.wa.gov.au
To: Health Libraries of Australia List <aliahealth@alianet.alia.org.au>
Subject: edited & redirected FW: The Scout Report -- February 27, 1998
Date: Tuesday, 3 March 1998 12:44
The Scout Report

February 27, 1998

Volume 4, Number 43

Internet Scout Project

University of Wisconsin
Department of Computer Sciences



I N T H E S C O U T R E P O R T T H I S W E E K


3. Digital Libraries Initiative - Phase 2--NSF (NSF 98-63 New)
http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/1998/nsf9863/nsf9863.htm

Eight US institutions are sponsoring this recently-announced initiative
including the National Science Foundation, the Library of Congress, and
the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Phase 2 of the Digital
Libraries Initiative is designed to extend research, accelerate development, and
create new capabilities for digital libraries, as well as investigate
the study of the interaction between people and digital libraries in
various contexts. The initiative is divided into the areas of research, and
testbeds & applications. Further information, along with proposal due
dates and award amounts are available at the site. [JS]


13. Information Please
http://www.infoplease.com/

Information Please LLC provides this site, a cyber-ready reference
library of information derived from its well-known publications, _The
Information Please Almanac_, _The A&E Information Please Entertainment Almanac_,
_The ESPN Information Please Sports Almanac_, _The Information Please Kids'
Almanac_, and _The Information Please Girls' Almanac_, as well as the
_Columbia Encyclopedia_, and the _Random House College Dictionary_.
Users can search or browse by topic. Clicking on "Home" takes users to what
amounts to an Almanac table of contents. Content at the site is current
through 1997, except for the _Columbia Encyclopedia_, which has a 1993
copyright date. [JS]


18. Mozilla.org
http://www.mozilla.org/

This site was created by Netscape Communications Corporation in order

"provide a central point of contact and community for those interested
on using or improving [Netscape] source code," which is due to be made
freely available on March 31, 1998 (discussed in the January 23, 1998 Scout

Report--http://scout.cs.wisc.edu/scout/report/archive/scout-980123.html#16 ). The
site is a work in progress at this time; it contains information about
the mission of the organization and its efforts to provide information for
developers. Current site highlights include free Navigator and free
source
FAQ's. Mozilla.org plans to release technical documentation on the code
in the near future, as well as a list of download site sources. Other
upcoming features include a section for bug reporting and a database of bug
reports
[JS]


21. Volume 1, Number 43, February 24, 1995
http://scout.cs.wisc.edu/scout/report/archive/scout-950224.html
CDC National AIDS Clearinghouse
http://www.cdcnac.org/

The US Centers for Disease Control's National AIDS Clearinghouse was
originally announced in the February 24, 1995 issue as a gopher site.
It has developed into an effective information resource on the topic. The
site features seven searchable databases, covering funding opportunities,
and descriptions of thousands of AIDS-related organizations, educational
resources and abstracts of AIDS-related news and journal articles. The
site has recently added a link to the CDC's _1998 Guidelines for the
Treatment of STD_ (sexually transmitted diseases). [JS]

Subscription and Contact Information ==
For information on subscribing to the Scout Report, send email to:
listserv@cs.wisc.edu
In the body of the message type:
info scout-report

Or visit our web site and subscribe using a web form:
http://scout.cs.wisc.edu/scout/lists/

The Scout Report's Web page:
http://scout.cs.wisc.edu/scout/report/
http://rs.internic.net/scout/report/

Adobe Acrobat version of the Scout Report:
http://scout.cs.wisc.edu/scout/report/pdf/

Net Scout team member information:
http://scout.cs.wisc.edu/scout/team.html

Scout Report by gopher:
gopher://ds0.internic.net:70/11/pub/list_archives/scout-report.archive
gopher to: ds0.internic.net
select: Internet Directory and Database Services/InterNIC Database
Services
/Mailing Lists Archives/scout-report.archive

FTP archive of past Scout Reports:
ftp://ftp.ds.internic.net/pub/list_archives/scout-report.archive/
ftp to: ds.internic.net
change directory to: pub/list_archives/scout-report.archive



The Scout Report
Brought to You by the Internet Scout Project


The Scout Report (ISSN 1092-3861) is published every Friday of the year
except the last Friday of December by the Internet Scout Project,
located in the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Department of Computer
Sciences.
Managing Editor Susan Calcari
Editor Jack Solock [JS]
Production Editor Jeannine Ramsey [JR]
Contributors Teri Boomsma [TB]
Michael de Nie [MD]
David Flaspohler [DF]
Aimee D. Glassel [AG]
Kathy Harris [KH]
Christopher Lukas [CL]
Thiam Hee Ng [THN]
Laura X. Payne [LXP]
Michael Roszkowski [MR]
Amy Tracy Wells [ATW]

Copyright Susan Calcari, 1994-1998. Permission is granted to make and
distribute verbatim copies of the Scout Report provided the copyright
notice and this paragraph is preserved on all copies. The InterNIC
provides information about the Internet to the US research and
education community under a cooperative agreement with the National Science
Foundation: NCR-9218742. The Government has certain rights in this
material.

Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in
this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily
reflect the views of the University of Wisconsin - Madison, the
National Science Foundation, AT&T, or Network Solutions, Inc.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
END


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Volume 8 Issue 1

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