LIBRES: Library and Information Science Research
Electronic Journal ISSN 1058-6768
1998 Volume 8 Issue 2; September.
Bi-annual LIBRE8N2 JOURNALS


NEWS FROM OTHER JOURNALS


Contents:


CURRENT CITES, vol 9, no 4, April 1998

Date: Fri, 8 May 1998 15:33:59 +0000
Sender: Solo Librarians Listserv <SOLOLIB-L@LISTSERV.SILVERPLATTER.COM>
From: Gerry Hurley <Gerry_Hurley@SILVERPLATTER.COM>
Subject: Current Cites, Vol. 9, no. 4, April 1998

Here's the latest issue of Current Cites from our friends
at PACS-L.
--Gerry

Date: Tue May 05, 1998 7:28 pm EST
From: cites
EMS: INTERNET / MCI ID: 376-5414
MBX: cites@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: Current Cites April 1998
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
_Current Cites_
Volume 9, no. 4
April 1998
The Library
University of California, Berkeley
Edited by Teri Andrews Rinne
ISSN: 1060-2356
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/1998/cc98.9.4.html
Contributors:
Christof Galli, Kirk Hastings, Terry Huwe,
Margaret Phillips, Richard Rinehart, Roy Tennant
Jim Ronningen, Lisa Yesson

DIGITAL LIBRARIES
"Taking the Initiative for Digital Libraries" The Electronic Library
(16) 1 (February 1998): 24-27.
[http://info.learned.co.uk/li/publications/tel/contents.htm]
-- If you're still just a bit unclear what exactly is meant by "digital
library", you may be comforted by Electronic Library's interview
with Stephen Griffin of NSF's Digital Library Initiative. Griffin
acknowledges that the meaning of digital library continues to evolve
as technology advances, and believes that this is a good thing as a
more open definition enables a larger set of perspectives to influence
the discourse, research and practices. Griffin uses the concepts of
electronic access vs. intellectual access to help think about digital
libraries. He describes electronic access as access to the raw
electronic data, and intellectual access as access to deeper knowledge
and meaning contained in digital collections. Griffin believes that by
providing intellectual access through intelligent systems, that digital
libraries have the potential to give users "what they want, not merely
what they ask for." He proposes that digital libraries will lead to a
reconsideration of the library as an institution and, in the long term,
offer an entirely new model through which people can interact with
information, beginning, in the nearer term, with scholarly
communication. He also offers some suggestions to library managers
for this transitional period. -- LY



ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING

Curle, David. "Filtered News Services: Solutions in Search of _Your_
Problem?" Online 22(2) March/April 1998.
[http://www.onlineinc.com/onlinemag/OLtocs/OLtocmar3.html]
-- You may remember Wired's big, blue, pushy hand from the March
1997 [www.wired.com/5.03/] issue, shoving yet another "radical
future" at you and announcing the arrival of push media - that is,
electronic information that can be delivered to the user without the
need to "pull" it by requesting it each time it's wanted. Curle's less
prophetic, more practical article deserves a big hand too, with an
index finger pointing to a long list of options for news delivery.
Making smart choices is not easily done in the growing flow of
media which can spew the world's events onto your screen, and
Curle emphasizes that information professionals will have to analyze
user needs in the context of organizational systems to come up with
viable solutions. He suggests several specific questions that are
useful for getting far beyond the obvious filtering issues like whether
to eliminate sports from the news stream. Traditionally, what's news
has been defined by the sender; now the receiver is getting more
power to redefine it, but the sources must still be well-understood.
When he changes his focus from the consumer to the provider, Curle
discusses the merits of various services, and how they (or parts of
them) can fit into appropriate profiles for pushed news. He assesses
the services by category and by product, from the custom pages offered
by many Web guides to the commercial giants like Dow Jones, noting
that most users should be able to get their facts for free in today's
environment. If our options continue to multiply, let's hope for many
more articles like this one, because this kind of advice is what we'll
need to help us get a grip. -- JR
"To Publish and Perish" Policy Perspectives 7(4) (March 1998)
(gain access to the article at
http://www.irhe.upenn.edu/cgi-bin/pp-cat.pl after registering for free).
-- This thoughtful essay is on the problem academic libraries have of
maintaining access to information when both the volume and cost of this
information has increased dramatically over the last several decades. A
brief historical review precedes a set of strategies that libraries,
faculties, and university administrations can undertake to "regain the
initiative" in scholarly publishing. These strategies include: 1) end the
preoccupation with numbers (faculty tenure review should stress quality,
not quantity), 2) be smart shoppers (research libraries must select
wisely), 3) get a handle on property rights (faculty should be encouraged
to retain at least some portion of copyright), 4) invest in electronic
forms of scholarly communication, and 5) decouple publication and
faculty evaluation for the purposes of promotion and tenure. Before
allowing skepticism to persuade you of the futility of succeeding with
any of these strategies, you should know that this essay is based on a
national meeting of presidents, chief academic officers, and librarians
of major research universities across North America. They are in at
least shooting distance of being able to effect some local change if not
systemic change. -- RT


Wagner, Karen I. "Intellectual Property: Copyright Implications for
Higher Education" The Journal of Academic Librarianship 24 (1)
(January 1998): 11-19. -- The university consists of many different
constituencies all of which are serving the larger mission of the
institution which is to educate and promote research and scholarship.
These different constituencies, however, have differing perspectives
on intellectual property issues. As producers of intellectual property,
university presses and faculty are concerned with preserving copyright
protection; as consumers of intellectual property, university libraries
(and, again, faculty) are more concerned with issues of "fair use;"
there are also those constituencies, such as instructional design groups,
who are both producers and consumers. Wagner argues that discussion
among all of these groups will help in the development of a national
policy on intellectual property rights that will be in the best interests
of higher education. The emergence of a digital landscape also poses new
challenges and opportunities and university presses, libraries, university
bookstores and copy centers can take advantage of new technologies to
further enhance the ability of higher education to achieve its mission.
An extensive bibliography accompanies this article. -- MP

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY
Giese, Mark. "Self Without Body: Textual Self-Representation in
an Electronic Community" First Monday 3 (6) (April 6, 1998).
[http://www.firstmonday.dk] -- Giese examines textual modes of
communication and how they combine with the new technologies
of computer-mediated communication (cmc) to produce new
opportunities for social interaction and presentation of self. He
studies these new modes of meta-communication, and how they
interact in ways that promote the liveliness of community in a
text-based electronic environment. He examines one Internet
newsgroup, alt.cyberpunk, which has developed a cooperative
narrative, in which participants make self-presentations that many
would consider "fictional". However, in the community of the list,
these presentations must be accepted at face value. He concludes
that this new form of self-expression is created by the "tightened
feedback loop" that cmc technologies bring to a textual mode of
communication--in other words, a text-based narrative becomes a
"real-time" interaction, with new, and often strange results. -- TH
Hilf, Bill. "Media Lullabies: The Reinvention of the World Wide
Web" First Monday 3 (6) (April 6, 1998) [http://www.firstmonday.dk]
-- Hilf explores the all-too-easy trap that media and cultural critics
fall into when they compare the Web and other Net-based delivery systems
to the mass media. He argues such comparative studies have led to
large-scale misinterpretations of the Internet. Worse yet, in the era of
sound-bite journalism, such misinterpretations rapidly become accepted
as meaningful descriptions (remember the Internet as a "library", only
the "books" haven't been organized yet?). As part of his analysis, he
provides a useful history of the new media. -- TH



NETWORKS AND NETWORKING


Arnold, Judith M. and Elaine Anderson Jayne. "Dangling by a Slender
Thread: The Lessons and Implications of Teaching the World Wide
Web to Freshmen" The Journal of Academic Librarianship 24 (1)
(January 1998): 43-52. -- Based on the authors' own experience of
teaching library skills to a freshmen writing class, this well-researched
article discusses the challenges, problems and implications of teaching
the Web. Their approach to teaching was to focus on resources that are
unique to the Web such as sites that offer current or government
information that is not available elsewhere. Furthermore, they argue that
the Web needs to be taught within an appropriate context of the
information seeking process and as just one of many information sources
along with books, journals and newspapers. Most importantly, the authors
wanted to provide an evaluative framework in their approach to teaching
the Web. Trying to teach students how to evaluate sources when doing
library research is one of the biggest challenges for instruction
librarians. In some ways, the nature of the Web with its largely
free-flowing content gives library instructors a unique opportunity to
introduce critical thinking skills and evaluative tools. -- MP
Payette, Sandra. "Persistent Identifiers on the Digital Terrain" RLG
DigiNews 2(2) 1997.
[http://www.rlg.org/preserv/diginews/diginews22.html#Identifiers]
-- In what has almost become a mythical pursuit similar to the search
for the Holy Grail, those involved with developing standards for the
Web have long sought a solution to the problem of broken URLs.
What is needed is some kind of persistent address that can be resolved
to the actual location of the desired information, even as it moves
from place to place. This overview piece serves as an excellent
introduction to the topic and an overview of current or near-term
solutions. The particular schemes profiled include Persistent URLs
or PURLs (please, no swine jokes), Handles, and Digital Object
Identifiers or DOIs. None of these schemes comes from the Internet
Engineering Task Force (IETF), which has been pondering this
conundrum since the dawn of time (ca. early 1990's on the Web
calendar). Payette includes a strategy for implementing persistent
identifiers for a given project, a brief discussion of implications, and
some pointers (yes, URLs) to further information. -- RT

OPTICAL DISC TECHNOLOGY
Ma, Wei. "The Near Future Trend: Combining Web Access and Local
CD Networks" The Electronic Library 16 (1) (February 1998): 49-54.
[http://info.learned.co.uk/publications/tel/contents.htm]. -- Should
libraries continue expanding and investing in CD-ROM networks?
This article asserts that librarians will continue to see a mix of
CD-ROM based and Internet-based resources in the near term. A mix
will be optimal because the two media have different strengths.
CD-ROM is best for specialized titles that are less used, and for large
amounts of static data. Internet versions are better for sources with
broader appeal, and for databases that require frequent and timely
updates. Drawing from Occidental College's experience, Ma concludes
that the optimal mix should consider the entire community environment,
not just the individual library. Ma also profiles selected equipment that
Occidental used in designing their architecture. -- LY
GENERAL
Ypsilanti, Dimitri, and Louisa Gosling. _Towards a Global Information
Society: Global Information Infrastructure, Global Information Society:
Policy Requirements_. Paris: Organisation for Economic Co-operation
and Development, 1997. Content of this publication is available in pdf
format through the OECD's site for free documents on Information and
Communications Policy [http://www.oecd.org/dsti/sti/it/prod/online.htm]
in the "Information Economy" section. -- The OECD [www.oecd.org] is
the 29-nation organization which has grown from a core group of
Marshall Plan countries to encompass most of what we consider the
industrialized world. For information technology developments, it is
worth watching as a policy-recommending body which is wrestling with
the big issues: privacy, electronic commerce, media convergence,
infrastructure and the gap between the wired and the left behind.
Reading their publications is a refreshing change from those which
reflect only American views. For example, the membership voted down
the Clinton administration's proposed key escrow encryption system
two years ago, and has debated several alternatives, revealing a range of
attitudes about privacy and law enforcement (see the OECD Information
Security and Privacy page
[http://www.oecd.org/dsti/sti/it/secur/index.htm]). _Towards a Global
Information Society_ is recommended as a focal point for the study of
global information issues. Don't be put off by the rather inflated,
abstract tone of the introduction - after all, these are the real "big
picture" people, and the succeeding chapters do get down to specifics
about particular problems and trends and the agencies which can influence
them. I found the attention paid to media content to be particularly
interesting; one aspect was a discussion of consolidated ownership vs.
the preservation of cultural and linguistic diversity (the authors are of
the opinion that policies which encourage the development of a variety of
multimedia services also encourage the proliferation of sources of local
content). References throughout the text are well-documented in an
extensive
bibliography; one citation in particular deserves mention here, the OECD's
own _Information Technology Outlook_
[http://www.oecd.org/dsti/sti/it/prod/itblurb.htm]
which is the source for many of the tables and graphs. -- JR
Current Cites 9(4) (April 1998) ISSN: 1060-2356 Copyright 1998
by the Library, University of California, Berkeley. _All rights reserved._
All product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their
respective holders. Mention of a product in this publication does not
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oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

CURRENT CITES volume 9, no 5, May 1998


Date: Wed, 3 Jun 1998 08:29:12 +0800 (WST)
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Subject: Current Cites May 1998

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[Digital libraries, XML, and much more. One thing I find striking about
Current Cites in general and this issue in particular is how much of
library work consists of administering technical standards -- not just
defining them or building things that use them, but managing work that
conforms to them, managing the transition from one standard to another,
defining best practices for work that is conducted using them, and so
on. Standards these days are too often shaped by competitive strategies
rather than by good engineering, and markets have proven uneven in their
ability to stifle this effect. In this way, librarians are the canaries
in the coalmine -- an unusually well-organized constituency that has
to think through the consequences of putting particular standards into
practice.]

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Date: Mon, 1 Jun 1998 15:10:01 -0700
From: CITES Moderator <citeschk@library.berkeley.edu
To: Multiple recipients of list <cites@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: Current Cites May 1998



_Current Cites_
Volume 9, no. 5
May 1998
The Library
University of California, Berkeley
Edited by Teri Andrews Rinne
ISSN: 1060-2356
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/1998/cc98.9.5.html

Contributors:

Christof Galli, Kirk Hastings, Terry Huwe,
Margaret Phillips, Richard Rinehart, Roy Tennant
Jim Ronningen, Lisa Yesson


Digital Libraries

Fox, Edward A. and Gary Marchionini. "Toward a Worldwide Digital
Library" Communications of the ACM 41(4) (April 1998). -- As they have
done before, (see the April 1995 issue of Current Cites) the
Communications of the ACM has devoted an issue to the topic of digital
libraries. Anyone involved in digital library development probably has
favorite online resources (such as our own Digital Library SunSITE
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/) for diving deep into specific problems,
but this provides a wide scope in one neat package. To quote from the
introduction, "This special section is a snapshot of the current state
of digital library development around the world." The worldwide
digital library theme has been carried out by including articles which
focus upon technical, informational and social interoperability across
national boundaries. The special section is broken up into the
following categories: Interoperability, Special Types of Digital
Libraries, Multilingual Support, National Efforts, and Supporting
Technologies. And there's a related "Legally Speaking" column by
Pamela Samuelson titled "Encoding the Law into Digital Libraries." As
always with CACM, the work is scholarly, well-documented and
foot-noted. -- JR

Hanson, Terry. "The Access Catalogue Gateway to Resources" Ariadne 15
(May 1998) [http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue15/main/]. -- Libraries can
no longer be complacent with merely providing structured access to
their holdings through their library catalog. Users must also be
guided to CD-ROM and Internet resources in a way that makes sense and
that integrates them as much as possible with traditional print
resources. The typical strategies so far include adding electronic and
Internet resources to the library catalog or creating a separate and
parallel catalog to the existing catalog of print materials. Neither
solution is without its problems. In this article Hanson proposes a
new kind of access paradigm that subsumes the library catalog of print
materials beneath an over-arching "Access Catalogue." This catalog
would provide integrated access to the complete breadth of information
resources, from which the user could leap off into the one they feel
is most appropriate to their need -- whether it be the traditional
library catalog, or a CD-ROM database, or a Web site. A number of us
have been slouching toward just such a solution, but it is refreshing
to see it so clearly and openly stated. Although this brief piece is
hardly more than the statement of an idea, it is nonetheless of
potentially much greater impact than a longer and more fully
documented article. Those of us who were using Gopher when Mosaic was
introduced understand the power of the right idea at the right time.
Although I don't want to imply that Hanson's model is as potentially
powerful, I do think it is well worth heeding. -- RT

Jensen, Ann. "Taking Local Resources Global: The NCSTRL Experience at
UC Berkeley Library" Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship 18
(Spring 1998)
[http://www.library.ucsb.edu/istl/98-spring/article1.html]. -- This
piece is a straightforward report on a library project to take over
the management of a repository of computer science technical reports
from a computer science department that had participated in a
ground-breaking digital library project called NCSTRL. Although the
topic may not be as "sexy" as other digital library projects -- being
based on technology that has existed for years -- it nonetheless is an
example of the kind of digital library function that should be a
library's bread-and-butter -- providing long-term, structured, and
usable access to useful information. -- RT

Electronic Publishing

Kelly, Brian. RDF Tools Briefing Sheet (May 1998)
[http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/web-focus/events/seminars/what-is-rdf-may1998/
rdf-briefi ng.html]. -- This summary sheet on RDF tools and resources
is extremely helpful for anyone interesting in the Resource
Description Framework, or RDF. RDF is an emerging standard for
encoding metadata using XML syntax. RDF is likely to be an important
standard for anyone creating, exchanging, or using metadata. This
document is extremely up-to-date as of this writing, but as Kelly
wisely notes, this is a "very volatile area." It is available in Adobe
Acrobat, Word 97, and HTML formats. Our readers in the U.S. should
select the option "shrink to fit" when printing it from Adobe Acrobat,
as it is formatted for A4 paper. It is also designed to be distributed
as a one-page, back-to-back, folded handout. You would be hard-pressed
to find any better RDF summary sheet than this. -- RT

Kelly, Brian. What is XML? Ariadne 15 (May 1998)
[http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue15/what-is/]. -- The question posed by
the article title is on the lips of many individuals these days, and
will be pondered by even more in the days to come. Kelly's piece,
written in the question-and-answer format popularized by net
"Frequently Asked Questions" documents (FAQs), is aimed at answering
only the most basic questions about XML. However, those who know a bit
more than the basics may be pleasantly surprised by up-to-date
pointers to some interesting papers from the Seventh International
World Wide Web Conference. -- RT

Miller, Eric. "An Introduction to the Resource Description Framework"
D-Lib Magazine (May 1998)
[http://www.dlib.org/dlib/may98/miller/05miller.html]. -- Let's not
mince words. The Resource Description Framework, or RDF, is not for
the faint of heart. Anyone who has difficulty with the concept of
_labeled directed graphs_, yours truly included, will find themselves
wishing they had a dentist's appointment they could rush off to when
confronted with RDF syntax. But surely, you think, this preamble is
leading up to something more engaging than having one's teeth pulled,
right? Right. There _is_ a reason to endure such pain. If you've ever
wished for a mechanism by which you could encode, exchange, and use
structured metadata on the Web, then here it is. RDF is an emerging
solution to a variety of problems, from "cataloging" Web pages to
providing browsing of a Web site hierarchy and more. So pull up an
armchair, lean back, and open wide. The doctor is "in." -- RT

Stepanek, Marcia. "From Digits to Dust" Businessweek 3574 (April 20,
1998): 128. -- Librarians will be shocked! Shocked! To learn that
digital preservation is a vital issue. This article covers the growing
awareness among technology managers that digital information, much of
will never appear on paper, is subject to decay and degradation. In
many cases, the actual life span of CD-ROMs and other formats are no
longer than the life span of paper copies, despite the fact digital
copies are far more expensive to develop. Although this article is
very well written and informative, it falls into a very common trap of
business writers: a lack of research on the preservation initiatives
that originate in the library world. Maybe if digital preservation
values and strategies of librarians were more widely known, we
wouldn't be in such a pickle. This article makes it abundantly clear
that consideration of preservation issues must be folded into the
design process for digital formats. -- TH

Multimedia & Hypermedia

Donovan, Kevin. "The Promise of the FlashPix Image File Format" RLG
DigiNews 2(2) (April 15, 1998)
[http://www.rlg.org/preserv/diginews/diginews22.html#FlashPix]. -- One
of the critical questions at the moment for anyone doing serious image
work on the Web is what the next image format will be. It's clear that
the ubiquitous formats of GIF (Compuserve's Graphic Interchange
Format) and JPEG (the Joint Photographic Engineers Group
specification) are sufficient for providing Web eye candy, but they
are clearly deficient for serving high-resolution images. The problem
is that there is no clear winner among several competing formats.
FlashPix is one of these formats, and this article does a decent job
of explaining what it is all about. Can you implement it and be
certain it will be the format of the future? Perhaps, perhaps not. But
with Eastman Kodak, Hewlett-Packard, Live Picture, Inc., and Microsoft
behind it, you can't count it out either. At least with the help of
this article you will know about about your options. -- RT

Gulick, Rebecca. "Adobe Proposes PGML as Web Image Standard" MacWeek
12(15) (April 20, 1998): 1,8 -- Adobe, along with Netscape, IBM, and
other supporters proposed PGML as the new standard for vector-based
images for the Web to the W3C. Vector-based images are not defined as
a fixed set of pixels, but rather as algorithims. One of their
benefits is that a Web site could host a very high-resolution
vector-based image, which when delivered by the intelligent Web server
gets "dumbed down" into a lower-resolution image for the browser for
speed, but the end-user could "zoom" in on the image and request
higher and higher resolutions from the server. This would obviously
enable many uses for which the Web is now impractical, and could
greatly reduce the storage and mangement problems of multiple versions
of image files. PGML is not the only standard being proposed, but the
move toward vector-based images in general should be watched closely.
-- RR

Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language (SMIL) 1.0 Specification
(April 9, 1998) World Wide Web Consortium. -- A new proposal for a Web
based standard for multimedia. the Synchronized Multimedia Integration
Language (or SMIL; thanks Timothy Leary 8-) ) is an XML-based language
for integrating multimedia (audio, video, images) on the Web. Full
approval is pending and the SMIL specification can be found at
http://www.w3.org/TR/PR-smil. -- RR

Networks & Networking

Platt, Nina. "GPO Access - Government At Its Best?" Database 21 (2)
(April/May 1998): 41-43. -- If you've ever been frustrated by trying
to locate U.S. government information you may be pleased to read Nina
Platt's review of recent improvements to GPO Access
[http://www.access.gpo.gov/], the U.S. Government Printing Office's
electronic directory of Federal Government information. GPO Access
includes government information databases (such as The Federal
Register and The Code of Federal Regulation), individual Federal
agency files from the Federal Bulletin Board and tools for finding
government information. GPO Access also provides multiple access
options and general and specialized search pages. Platt acknowledges
that GPO Access has been available since 1994, but only recently has
begun to live up to its promise, by adding more resources and
simplifying the search process. -- LY

Proceedings of the 7th International World Wide Web Conference,
Brisbane, Australia April 14-18, 1998
[http://www7.conf.au/programme/fullprog.html]. -- The International
WWW Conference is the Web conference for academics and researchers.
Unlike conferences such as Internet World or Interop, you won't be
bumping into too many suits in the halls. This is both good and bad,
if you're of a practical bent. If you're looking for Web solutions you
can implement today, you will find few of them here. But if you want
to know where the Web may be heading, discover what technical
possibilities there are, and sample some cutting-edge solutions to Web
problems, this is the place. You will likely find that many of the
papers are of limited interest, but even if you find only one or two
that expands your knowledge about what is possible on the Web, it will
be worth a visit. My guess is you will. -- RT

Udell, Jon. "Effective HTML Forms" BYTE 23(5) (May 1998): 103-106
[http://www.byte.com/art/9805/sec7/art1.htm]. -- I don't normally cite
individual articles on creating Web documents, but this one has such
great advice about a Web structure that is so often done poorly, I
couldn't help myself. Udell, who doubles as the BYTE Web manager, not
only targets the markup with comments like "Mark required elements"
and "Use layout and visual cues to organize elements" (he gives
examples), but also the programs that will process the input: "Accept
all unambiguous inputs" (for example, (XXX) XXX-XXX or XXX-XXX-XXXX
for phone numbers) and "Use short error messages linked to longer
explanations." By the way, it's not absolutely necessary, but it will
help a lot if you know a little Perl, or at least some programming
language. -- RT

Optical Disc Technology

Herther, Nancy K. "CD-ROM to DVD-ROM: Moving Optical Storage Along a
Bumpy Road into the New Century" Database 21 (2) (April/May 1998):
26-36. -- Will the deployment of DVD technology benefit from the
CD-ROM learning curve? This is the question that Nancy Herther
discusses in this overview of the optical storage industry. DVD is the
next generation high density compact disc. While CD-ROMs can store
about 650MB of data or music, DVD discs can store between 4.7 GB to 17
GB - enough for more than a full-length MPEG-2 compressed motion
picture. DVD, if successful, will eventually replace videotapes,
laserdiscs, CD-Audio, CD-ROMs and other video game formats. After
interviewing over 35 industry participants and experts, Herther
concludes that this will depend on the resolution of remaining
standards issues, Win98 support for DVD, the number of available DVD
titles and backward compatibility with current CDs (DVD and DVD-ROM
players must be able to play today's current CDs). She also provides a
brief history of the CD-ROM industry, a helpful summary of the the
various CD and DVD formats (including recordable) and an extensive
list of Web resources for additional background information. -- LY
_________________________________________________________________

Current Cites 9(5) (May 1998) ISSN: 1060-2356 Copyright
1998 by the Library, University of California, Berkeley. _All rights
reserved._

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respective holders. Mention of a product in this publication does not
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CURRENT CITES volume 9, no 6, June 1998


Date: Thu, 2 Jul 1998 10:07:10 +0000
Priority: normal
Subject: (Fwd) Current Cites 9(6) Jun '98
From: "Virginia Cano" <v.cano@mail.qmced.ac.uk>
Sender: lis-fid-request@mailbase.ac.uk
Errors-To: lis-fid-request@mailbase.ac.uk



Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 11:15:35 -0700
From: CITES Moderator <citeschk@library.berkeley.edu>
Subject: Current Cites June 1998



_Current Cites_
Volume 9, no. 6
June 1998
The Library
University of California, Berkeley
Edited by Teri Andrews Rinne
ISSN: 1060-2356
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/1998/cc98.9.6.html

Contributors:

Christof Galli, Kirk Hastings, Terry Huwe,
Margaret Phillips, Richard Rinehart, Roy Tennant
Jim Ronningen, Lisa Yesson

DIGITAL LIBRARIES

Guthrie, Kevin. "JSTOR and the University of Michigan: An Evolving
Collaboration" Library Hi Tech 16 (1) (1998): 9-14. -- This special
issue of Library Hi Tech features the dynamic cultural and
technological changes affecting the University of Michigan library
arena. With the recent attention on scholarly communication and
collaboration, it's timely to take a closer look at Michigan's
relationship with JSTOR (short for Journal STORage, at
http://www.jstor.org/), and their progress in making backfiles of
selected journals available in electronic form. Originally a grant
project of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, with ten test journals and
six test libraries, JSTOR is now an independent, not-for-profit
organization with approximately 250 paying library participants and 70
journals committed to contributing content. Guthrie, JSTOR's
President, chronicles the history of this collaboration and notes that
it provided the flexibility necessary to meet the administrative
structures, organizational processes and physical plant requirements
of a fast-growing entrepreneurial enterprise. While Guthrie
acknowledges the challenges involved in a distributed organizational
model, he believes that the benefits outweigh the costs. He expresses
the organization's commitment to maintaining its close relationship
with the university community to ensure that JSTOR remains responsive
to user needs. Ideally their lessons can be applied not only to other
digital library initiatives, but also to other areas ripe for
self-sustaining enterprises. -- LY

Payette, Sandra D. and Oya Y. Rieger. "Supporting Scholarly Inquiry:
Incorporating Users in the Design of the Digital Library" The Journal
of Academic Librarianship 24(2) (March 1998):121-129. -- Through a
series of questionnaires and interviews with faculty and students, the
Mann Library at Cornell University conducted a study to find out how
users engage in research using its digital Gateway. The study sought
to assess the effectiveness of the existing design, and to develop
principles to be used in developing the next generation of the
Gateway. Users, it seems, do not engage in scholarly research that is
linear, highly structured and logical and therefore digital libraries
need to be designed in a way that minimizes hierarchical, linear
metaphors and that create features that can be customized to an
individual's personal style and technical capabilities. The Gateway
was designed with input from earlier focus groups but, interestingly,
the more recent user survey showed that users were not, in fact,
taking advantage of features developed in response to their expressed
requirements! In addition to describing the experiences at Cornell
University, the article provides an excellent review of the literature
of user studies in the digital library context. -- MP

ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING

Balas, Janet. "Copyright in the Digital Era" Computers in Libraries
18(6) (June 1998) (http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/jun/story2.htm) --
The title doesn't offer a clue that this is a great annotated
collection of sources for researching current issues in copyrighted
information. You may be burying your head in the sand while chanting
the "fair use" mantra (which is pretty hard to do with sand in your
mouth), but aren't you curious what the United States Copyright
Office, the American Library Association, the Digital Future
Coalition, the Creative Incentive Coalition and others have to say
about it? URLs are given for the relevant pages from each
organization, along with commentary about the role each one plays in
shaping copyright policy or depicting the current state of affairs
(which might be analogous to a strobe-lit snapshot of a nighttime mob
scene). Here's a shortcut to one document which is highly relevant for
many of us: "Reproductions of Copyrighted Works by Educators and
Librarians" (http://lcweb.loc.gov/copyright/circs/circ21) which is
U.S. Copyright Office Copyright Information Circular 21. Curl up with
your favorite TV lawyer (surely preoccupied with other things) and
have a good long read. -- JR

Kasdorf, Bill. "SGML and PDF: Why We Need Both" Journal of Electronic
Publishing 3(4) (June 1998)
(http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/03-04/kasdorf.html). -- Discussions
about appropriate digital file formats often degenerate to the level
of a debate, in which advocates of one format slug it out with
proponents of another. Thus this article is a refreshing perspective,
in which the benefits of two very different publication formats are
examined for their utility in different situations. The not
unsurprising conclusion is that one format does not prevent
publication in the other, and publishing in both is often beneficial.
-- RT

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY & SOCIETY

Digital Future Coalition (www.dfc.org) -- This is not an article per
se, but a web resource and organization. DFC is an umbrella lobbying
and information sharing organization concentrating on issues of
intellectual property and copyright legislation and policy worldwide.
Members include the American Library Association and the Society of
American Archivists, etc. Their explicit aim is to lobby for balanced
legislation that protects access to information as well as the ability
to regulate and produce profit from information. Whether one agrees
with their approach or not, the site is a useful place to get the full
text of major new legislation and critical responses to everthing from
the Conference on Fair Use to (U.S.) National Information
Infrastructure (NII) bills to the international WIPO agreement. -- RR

Dyson, Esther. "Privacy Protection: Time to Think and Act Locally and
Globally" First Monday 3 (6) (1998)
(http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue3_6/dyson/) -- Noted social and
technology critic Esther Dyson surveys the current state of privacy on
the Internet, examining the interplay of cyberspace and local
jurisdictions. While various, "non-central" groups advocate new types
of encryption protocols to help us gain a semblance of privacy,
different cultures around the globe--and the laws they
promulgate--have little common ground. Therefore privacy on the Net is
not only a technology issue, but a key issue for global society. -- TH


Williams, Leonard. "Teaching Cyberian Politics" First Monday 3 (6)
(1998) (http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue3_6/williams/) --
Williams describes his experience in teaching a college course on the
"politics of cyberspace"--using Web-based syllabi and other dynamic
tools. The close match between the course subject matter and the
learning process students employed in using the Web was a powerful
combination. Williams argues that the approach he took, with its
emphasis on direct experience, boosted students' critical thinking
skills about technology and society. -- TH

MULTIMEDIA & HYPERMEDIA

National Council on Disability. Access to Multimedia Technology by
People with Sensory Disabilities. Washington: The Council, 1998. 86
p. (http://purl.access.gpo.gov/GPO/LPS764) -- This report focuses on
barriers to the use of computerized multimedia technology by people
who have visual or hearing impairments. It's a good source for an
overview of what types of problems are encountered and what remedies
are in place or coming up. As with most government reports by
committee, there's a bit of a lag regarding new technology, but it
wasn't intended to be a list of what's cutting edge; rather, it's an
attempt to enlighten about the uses of broader categories of
technology, like under what circumstances audio description elements
can be most appropriate. For policy-watchers, the relevant sections of
the Rehabilitation Act and Telecommunications Act are discussed, with
recommendations for specific areas needing stronger enforcement. -- JR


NETWORKS & NETWORKING

Boutin, Paul. "Browser Beware" Wired 6.06 (June 1998): 185.
(http://www.wired.com/wired/6.06/) -- If you're trying to make the
best of a 16-bit Windows computer or are fed up with the memory
demands of your current browser, a 7-person engineering team from
Norway may offer hope with Opera (in Wired's words, "a 1.2-Mbyte
marvel"). Opera puts Microsoft and Netscape in their place when it
comes to speed and HTML standards compliance. It is also adept at
juggling multiple windows, and only requires a 386 with 6 megs of RAM.
So have they built a better mousetrap? Well, there are no non-Windows
versions currently available and Opera is weaker on support for
Unicode 16-bit international character sets, but it does meet the need
for speed. Opera 4.0 (with Java and CSS2 style sheet support) is due
out this summer and for $35 (less for education customers) can be
found at http://www.operasoftware.com/. -- LY

Clark, Kathleen A., Priscilla C. Geahigan, Thomas R. Mirkovich, and
Anita D. Haynes. "Internet Resources: Cruising for Travel Information"
College & Research Libraries News
(http://www.ala.org/acrl/resjun98.html) 59(6) (June 1998): 427-431. --
Just in time for summer, this month's list of Internet resources looks
at travel. Included in the list are addresses for sites that can give
you information (mostly oriented to travel in the United States) about
accommodations, restaurant guides and other mega travel sites (like
Yahoo!'s travel page: http://www.yahoo.com/Recreation/Travel/). Also
handy are sites for traveling abroad like the Centers for Disease
Control (CDC) Travel Information (http://www.cdc.gov/) and the
Intellicast World Weather guide
(http://www.intellicast.com/weather/intl/). -- MP

Khare, Rohit, and Rifkin, Adam. "Trust Management on the World Wide
Web" First Monday 3 (6) (1998)
(http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue3_6/khare/) -- The authors
describe a new concept for managing sensitive information on the
Internet, which encourages open, decentralized systems that span
multiple domains. The system, called "trust management," aims to
disperse decision-making and analysis about how to protect sensitive
data throughout organizations, asking "why" instead of "how." The
basic elements of the system are "principles, principals, and
policies." Document authoring and distribution is used as a concrete
example of how the system would work. -- TH

Mace, Scott. "DSL's Devilish Details" BYTE 23(7) (July 1998): 72-80.
-- As any Internet user knows, you can never have too much speed. This
is certainly true of home connections. Even with a 56K modem, Web
pages never seem to come up fast enough. But now that Asymmetric
Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL), or xDSL, or now simply DSL, is on the
horizon, at least some relief may be at hand. But as this article
points out, what exactly is "at hand" is still very much an open
question. Perhaps the most telling evidence of uncertainty in the
marketplace is depicted in the chart " ADSL Trials and Service
Deployments," which identifies no fewer than 19 companies worldwide
offering or soon to be offering ADSL service to a particular region of
the world. Virtually all of them are offering a different mix of
upstream and downstream speeds, from 9.6 Kbps upstream (this is
progress?) to 5.5 Mbps (Singapore) and 7Mbps (Nova Scotia) downstream.
Hmmm...all of a sudden cable modems are looking real good to me. -- RT

Sowards, Steven W. "A Typology for Ready Reference Web Sites in
Libraries" First Monday 3 (5) (1998)
(http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue3_5/sowards/) -- "Librarians
and non-librarians alike may overlook important lessons about
information management if they misinterpret the lessons of
librarianship as being confined to the realm of paper," the author
argues. He embarks on a tour and analysis of how librarians are
organizing their Web-based reference guides, so be prepared to add
lots of URLs to your bookmark file when you review this article. He
makes several conclusions that will surely influence your own thoughts
about what works -- and what doesn't -- on the Web. Moreover, it's
refreshing to see someone use blunt language to advocate for the
common sense approaches that librarians employ to help people. Here's
an example: "After the difficulties we meet in navigating relatively
large Web sites remind us why libraries -- which deal with truly large
numbers of elements, running into the millions -- rely on redundancy
and alternative methods to manage content." -- TH

GENERAL

Bales, Susan Nall. "Technology and Tradition: The Future's in the
Balance" American Libraries 29(6) (June/July 1998): 82-86. --
Following up on their report Buildings, Books, and Bytes: Libraries
and Communities in the Digital Age (see the December 1996 issue of
Current Cites), the Benton Foundation has conducted and analyzed six
focus groups aimed at the issues identified in that report. Their
findings will be released in a publication scheduled for release in
July 1998 (watch Current Cites for news of its availability).
Meanwhile, Bales shares some of their findings in this article. Among
them are: "1) Libraries must be portrayed as high touch and high tech,
and in that order, 2) Root all discussions of technology in books and
reading, 3) Teach the public that the librarian is an information
navigator, 4) Emphasize that the library you trust can help you make
the transition to technology, and 5) Recognize the powerful
connections Americans make between libraries and effective parenting."
Libraries are at a critical juncture between the past and the future.
How well librarians meld the traditional with the technical and
present themselves to the public will dictate the role of libraries
in modern society for decades to come. My advice is to get the
original Benton report, this article, the new report when it comes
out, read them, and pay close attention. -- RT

DeJesus, Edmund X. "Year 2000 Survival Guide" BYTE 23(7) (July 1998):
52-62. -- In the thorough and authoritative manner in which BYTE
readers have come to expect, DeJesus outlines the good, the bad, and
the downright ugly aspects of the Year 2000 (Y2K) problem. The bad
news is that even if you start right now, your large legacy systems
will probably not be ready for the millennium in time. The good news
is that you if apply triage strategies and contingency plans well
enough, you may just make it. Out of all the press out there on this
problem, this article cuts through the rhetoric with a hot knife and
summarizes key information in tables, diagrams, and timelines. And
it's the timeline that helps provide comic relief amidst the disaster.
Just think, on January 1, 29602 the Microsoft Windows NT file system
will fail. Better start planning now, Bill. - RT

Smith, K. Wayne, ed. OCLC 1967-1997: Thirty Years of Furthering Access
to the World's Information New York: Haworth Press, 1998. -- When
library historians review the major milestones of the profession over
the last thirty years or so, there will be three developments that
will stand head-and-shoulders above the rest: the creation of the
Machine Readable Cataloging (MARC) format, the codification of the
Anglo-American Cataloging Rules, 2nd edition (AACR2), and the rise of
the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC, since changed to the Online
Computer Library Center). OCLC has evolved to become the hub of
library cataloging records, interlibrary loan transactions, and many
other essential services for thousands of libraries across the United
States and beyond. Although anyone not curious about OCLC would
probably not be interested in this volume (simultaneously published as
the Journal of Library Administration, 25 (2/3 - 4) (1998), it serves
as a useful chronicle of a good idea that helped to transform
libraries and library services. -- RT
_________________________________________________________________

Current Cites 9(6) (June 1998) ISSN: 1060-2356
Copyright 1998 by the Library, University of California,
Berkeley. All rights reserved.
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/1998/cc98.9.6.html

Copying is permitted for noncommercial use by computerized bulletin
board/conference systems, individual scholars, and libraries.
Libraries are authorized to add the journal to their collections at no
cost. This message must appear on copied material. All commercial use
requires permission from the editor

All product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their
respective holders. Mention of a product in this publication does not
necessarily imply endorsement of the product.

To subscribe to the Current Cites distribution list, send the message
"sub cites [your name]" to listserv@library.berkeley.edu, replacing
"[your name]" with your name. To unsubscribe, send the message "unsub
cites" to the same address.

Editor: Teri Andrews Rinne, trinne@library.berkeley.edu,
(510) 642-8173


xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx


DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS - CALL FOR PAPERS


Date: Wed, 20 May 1998 08:16:31 -0400
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
<ASIS-L@asis.org>
From: Cassandra Armstrong <brush@LIS.PITT.EDU>
Subject: Call for Papers: Special Issue of DSS (fwd)

---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Tue, 19 May 1998 15:01:47 -0700
From:LYNCH@BPA.Arizona.EDU
To: abishop@uiuc.edu, adwait@unagi.cis.upenn.edu, agrawal@cs.ucsb.edu,
aitao@sims.berkeley.edu, akiba@sis.pitt.edu, alan@nlm.nih.gov,
alex@cs.cmu.edu, allan@cs.umass.edu, alp4g@cs.virginia.edu,
amykir@princeton.edu
Cc: LYNCH@BPA.Arizona.EDU
Subject: Call for Papers: Special Issue of DSS

*** Due Date: October 15, 1998 ***

Special Issue of Decision Support Systems

"From Information Retrieval to Knowledge Management:
Enabling Technologies and Best Practices"

Dr. Hsinchun Chen, The University of Arizona

CALL FOR PAPERS

Decision Support Systems will publish a special issue on "From Information
Retrieval to Knowledge Management: Enabling Technologies and Best Practices"
that will report on original research on the development and use of
effective information management and knowledge management technologies
and practices. Emerging, scaleable systems, techniques, and practices
which are at the intersection of information retrieval, artificial
intelligence, and management information systems are of particular interest.

Topics include, but are not limited to:
* Information retrieval systems and techniques
* Electronic document management systems
* Internet and Intranet search engines
* Information and content management
* Digital library applications and systems
* Groupware and collaboration technologies and case studies
* Knowledge discovery and machine learning techniques and case studies
* Textual knowledge mining
* Advanced, interactive information visualization
* Advanced human-computer interactions
* Single and multiple-agent based systems and architectures
* Information/knowledge management consulting practices
* Case studies and implementations in competitive intelligence, intellectual
capital, knowledge chain, and corporate memory

Send five copies of your manuscript by October 15, 1998 to:

Hsinchun Chen
Professor, Management Information Systems Department
Director, Artificial Intelligence Lab
The University of Arizona
McClelland Hall 430Z
Tucson, AZ 85721
TEL: (520) 621-4153, FAX: (520) 621-2433
email: hchen@bpa.arizona.edu
Web site: http://ai.bpa.arizona.edu

**************************************************************************************


DigiNews volume 2, issue 3

Date: Fri, 19 Jun 1998 12:09:18 -0700 (PDT)
Reply-To: oyr1@cornell.edu
Sender: diglibns@sunsite.berkeley.edu
From: "Oya Y. Rieger" <oyr1@cornell.edu>
Subject: [DIGLIBNS:694] New issue of RLG DigiNews now available!


**This message is being cross-posted, please excuse any duplication**

Volume 2, Issue 3 of RLG DigiNews, the web-based, quarterly
newsletter is now available at:

http://www.rlg.org/preserv/diginews/

The June issue contains a feature article by Anne R. Kenney and Oya
Y. Rieger of Cornell University's Preservation Department.
Their article, "Using Kodak Photo CD Technology for Preservation and
Access: A Guide for Librarians, Archivists, and Curators,"
summarizes the results of a Cornell study that evaluated the use of
Kodak Photo CD technology for preserving and making available a
range of research material. The study, funded by a grant from the
New York State Education Department's Program for the Conservation
and Preservation of Library Research Materials, was inspired by the
strong interest in the use of Kodak Photo CD technology within the
cultural community and was conducted in cooperation with the eleven
New York State comprehensive research libraries.

The issue also contains two technical feature articles. The first,
"The Promise of DVDs for Digital Libraries," is from Steve Gilheany
of Archive Builders. In his piece, Gilheany describes the DVD
(Digital Video Disk or Digital Versatile Disk) and its promise as a
new storage medium. Article specifics include storage capacity, DVD
and multimedia, costs, and backward compatibility issues. The
second technical piece, "Fractal and Wavelet Compression," is by
Steven Puglia of the National Archives and Records Administration
(US). In his article, Puglia discusses two new methods of image
compression which are generating a great deal of interest from
institutions digitizing and providing access to oversized materials
such as maps, architectural plans, and engineering drawings. The
new compression methods, already in use at several US institutions,
offer real advantages for providing access to large, complex images
via the Internet.

As with earlier issues, rounding out this issue is a current
calendar of events, project announcements, highlighted web sites,
and a FAQ about the difference between the optical resolution and
the interpolated resolution of scanners.

Readers can continue to search issues of RLG DigiNews by keyword or
browse the hyperlinked tables of content of available issues.

For more information about RLG or PRESERV, please contact
Robin Dale (bl.rld@rlg.org).



_____________________________________________

Oya Y. Rieger
Digital Projects Librarian
Cornell University Library
701 Olin Library
Ithaca, NY 14853

Email: oyr1@cornell.edu
Phone: (607) 254-5160
D-LIB, June 1998

**************************************************************************************

D-LIB MAGAZINE - JUNE 1998


Date: Tue, 16 Jun 1998 10:50:26 -0400
Sender: International Federation of Library Associations mailing list
<IFLA-L@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA>
From: Terry Kuny <Terry.Kuny@xist.com>
Subject: [SERIAL] June 1998 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

The June 1998 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available at
<http://www.dlib.org>. The UK Office for Library and Information
Networking maintains a mirror site for D-Lib Magazine at:
<http://hosted.ukoln.ac.uk/mirrored/lis-journals/dlib/>, and The
Australian National University Sunsite also maintains a mirror at
<http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib>.

We apologize in advance if you have inadvertently received a copy of
this notice. If you wish to have your e-mail address removed from our
list, please send a message to dlib@cnri.reston.va.us.

In this issue, we feature research stories about implementation projects
in electronic publishing, URN resolution schemes, and distributed
searching of metadata, together with two stories about issues in the
humanities and cultural heritage programs. Clips features program
updates from the NSF, including one on DLI-2; the D-Lib Metrics Working
Group; longer discussions of several new resources; and the usual
selection of meetings and new or newly-identified materials.


CONTENTS

Physical Review Online Archives (PROLA): An Image Archive for the
Journal Physical Review
Timothy Thomas
Los Alamos National Laboratory

A Distributed Architecture for Resource Discovery Using Metadata
Michael Roszkowski and Christopher Lukas
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Resolving DOI Based URNs Using Squid: An Experimental System at UKOLN
Andy Powell
UKOLN

Pass-Through Proxying as a Solution to the Off-Site Web-Access Problem
Richard Goerwitz
Brown University Scholarly Technology Group

Authenticity of Digital Resources: Towards a Statement of Requirements
in the Research Process
David Bearman and Jennifer Trant
Archives & Museum Informatics


Information and Communications Technology in the Cultural Sector: The
Need for National Strategies
Seamus Ross and Maria Economou
HATII, University of Glasgow


D-Lib Magazine is produced by the Corporation for National Research
Initiatives and is sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects
Agency (DARPA) on behalf of the NSF/DARPA/NASA Digital Libraries
Initiative.

William Y. Arms, Vice President
Amy Friedlander, Editor, D-Lib Magazine


*************************************************************************************
GREYNET vol 7, no 2, 1998

Return-path: <Dominic.Farace@inter.NL.net>
Date: Tue, 12 May 1998 21:37:44 +0200 (MET DST)
From: "Dominic.Farace" <Dominic.Farace@inter.NL.net>
To: Kerry Smith <kerry@biblio.curtin.edu.au>
Subject: GreyNet Newsletter Volume 7, Number 2, 1998


GREYNET'S NEWSLETTER ------------------------------------------------------

NewsBriefNews, Vol.7, No.2, 1998. - ISSN 0929-0923 (E-mail Version)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
CONTENTS: COLUMN:

Thematic Approach to Grey Literature 1
Columbia University Survey on Grey Literature 2
Selected Examples of Scientific Grey Literature 3
Field Placement Program, College of Amsterdam 4
GreyNet's Website Statistics 5
Annotated Bibliography on Grey Literature 6
Publication Order Form 7

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
EDITORIAL ADDRESS:

TransAtlantic| Grey Literature Network Service
Koninginneweg 201, 1075 CR Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Tel/Fax: 31-20-671.1818 | Email: GreyNet@inter.nl.net
http://www.konbib.nl/infolev/greynet

Annual subscription: DFL. 40 | US$ 25

oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

GREYNET Vol. 7, No. 3, 1998


Date: Wed, 16 Sep 1998 09:16:23 +0200 (MET DST)
Reply-To: NRLib-L@library.lib.usu.edu
Sender: Maiser@library.lib.usu.edu

GREYNET'S NEWSLETTER ------------------------------------------------------

NewsBriefNews, Vol. 7, No. 3, 1998. - ISSN 0929-0923 (E-mail Version)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
CONTENTS: COLUMN:

Parallel Publishing, A New Paradigm for Grey Literature 1
Observership on Grey Literature 2
New Publications on the topic of Grey Literature 3
Test GL*SSARY to appear on Website 4
Visitors from Turkey and the USA 5
Data Profiles on GreyNet 6
Pre-Call for Papers GL'99 7

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
EDITORIAL ADDRESS:

TransAtlantic|GreyNet, Grey Literature Network Service
Koninginneweg 201, 1075 CR Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Tel/Fax: 31-20-671.1818 | Email: GreyNet@inter.nl.net
http://www.konbib.nl/infolev/greynet

Annual subscription: DFL. 40 | US$ 25

===========================================================================

[1]. P A R A L L E L P U B L I S H I N G, A NEW PARADIGM FOR GL

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Parallel publishing is a term used to denote the relationship
that has developed between the authors and producers of grey and
commercial literature. A development that has been intensified
by the advance of electronic publishing and the Internet.
Until recent, commercial publishers had built a wall around their
publications to ward off the influx of grey literature.
Publications which to them were inferior, without peer-review,
that which was part of the obscure realm. Nevertheless, at times,
commercial publishers would venture out into this grey realm in
order to explore, identify, and capture material, which they
would transform into white or commercial literature.

With the rise of electronic publishing and the internet,
commercial publishers have had to rethink a new paradigm in which
to better understand and deal with grey literature.
No wall can be built high enough to ward-off the expanding
production of electronic grey literature.

What we are now witnessing is the recognition on the part of
commercial publishers that grey literature is also of value, that
most of the grey literature will remain in the grey circuit and
will not obscure their commercial endeavors. This new perspective
on grey literature has caused commercial publishers to go beyond
their periodic ventures into the grey realm, by actively linking
their peer reviewed and commercially published literature to
other sources responsible for their very creation and authorship.

As intermediary, GreyNet seeks to encourage and facilitate both
commercial publishers and corporate authors to identify and link
peripheral data and information -- such as preprints, research
and technical notes, as well as a host of other electronic,
digital, and multimedia grey literature -- to mainstream core
publications. Such endeavors would be widely applauded by the
producers and users of grey literature. Not to mention libraries
and information centers, who would readily tap such new and
innovative resources.
From the Editor
Dominic J. Farace

**************************************************************************************
INFORMATION PROCESSING AND MANAGEMENT - Call for papers

Date: Mon, 27 Jul 1998 16:30:41 -0400Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
From: Gretchen Whitney <gwhitney@utkux.utcc.utk.edu>
Subject: Info Proc & Mgt Call for papers
To: Multiple recipients of list JESSE <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>

Original garbled in transmission. --gw

CALL FOR PAPERS

Special topic issue of the journal Information Processing and Management

Web Research and Information Retrieval

A special topic issue of Information Processing and Management is
scheduled to appear in 1999 on the topic of Web Research and Information
Retrieval. Dr. Amanda Spink of the University of North Texas and Dr. Jian
Qin of the University of Southern Mississippi will be the guest editors.
This special topic issue provides a forum for original research that is
targeted to theories and applications in information organization and
retrieval in the Web environment. Papers in this area are being solicited.
Specific topics of interest include, but are not limted to, the following:

1. Content acquisition and processing in Web-based digital libraries

2. Information retrieval research and its implications on methods and
tools for informatio organization and retrieval on the Web, including
search engines

3. Information retrieval and knowledge discovery in the transition from
conventional systems such as DIALOG and Lexis/Nexis to Web-based systems

4. Interaction between users and Web-based information and search
engines, and design of interfaces

5. Evaluative and comparative study of conventional and Web-based
information organization and retrieval systems

Information about IP&M as well as Instructions to Contributors is
available on
the WWW server
http://www/elsevier.nl/locate/infoproman/

All manuscripts will be reviewed by a select panel of referees. Interested
authors should submit four copies (hard-copy only) of their article by 1
November 1998 to:

Dr. Amanda Spink
School of Library and Information Sciences
University of North Texas
P.O. Box 311068
Denton Texas 76203
Phone: 940-565-2187 Fax: 940-565-3101
E-mail: spink@lis.admin.unt.edu

Dr. Jian Qin
School of Library and Information Science
University of Southern Mississippi
Box 5146
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-5146
Phone: 601-266-4232 Fax: 601-266-5774
E-mail: jqin@ocean.otr.usm.edu

**************************************************************************************

INFORMATION RESEARCH - "new" issue


Approved-By: TOM WILSON <T.D.Wilson@SHEFFIELD.AC.UK>
Date: Wed, 1 Apr 1998 11:51:09 +0100
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
From: TOM WILSON <T.D.Wilson@sheffield.ac.uk>
Subject: Information Research: an electronic journal

A new "issue" of Information Research is available at:

http://www.shef.ac.uk/~is/publications/infres/ircont.html

The following is -

Editorial

This issue of Information Research marks a change in
policy for the journal: a move towards a fully
peer-refereed scholarly journal. The next issue will be
composed almost entirely of refereed papers, but we shall
continue to publish unrefereed papers, if they are of
interest to our audience. In fact, it seems that the
quality of the papers in Information Research has been
such that the lack of a refereeing process has not
bothered those who cite them and refer their students to
them. Does this suggest that quality of Editorial control
is perhaps as important (or, possibly, more important)
than peer reviewing?

Our first refereed paper - from Dr. Elena Maceviciuté of
the Faculty of Communication, Vilnius University,
Lithuania (with apologies for the missing diacritic in her
name - my HTML editor lacks the appropriate special
symbol). Dr. Maceviciuté deals with a topic of great
interest everywhere - the growth of the market for
information professionals - but the topic is especially
pressing in the Baltic states, where educational
programmes are being quickly revised as a consequence of a
newly-gained independence at the height of a technological
revolution.

The second paper, also refereed, is on computer assistance
to human abstractors, by Tim Craven of Western Ontario.
Tim describes the use of software, developed by himself,
for speeding up the process of creating an abstract and
reports upon an evaluation of the software under a Natural
Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada grant.

The third paper is on The public reception of the Research
Assessment Exercise 1996 by Dr. Julian Warner of the
School of Management, The Queen's University of Belfast,
Northern Ireland. Dr. Warner has accomplished the very
interesting task of mapping the response in the various
daily and weekly newspapers to the results of the 1996 RAE
in the UK and his findings suggest that, while the
response may be limited to the "quality" newspapers, the
RAE has made an impact on the public image of research in
UK universities.

Finally, we have a paper from the Editor and a couple of
Master's students, who carried out research under his
direction in 1996 and 1997 into Business use of the World
Wide Web continuing the work that was reported in an
earlier issue.

Prof. Tom Wilson, Editor/Webmaster


***************************************************
Professor Tom Wilson, Ph.D.
Research Professor in Information Management
Department of Information Studies
University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, U.K.
Tel. +44-114-222-2631 Fax. +44-114-278-0300
Email: T.D.Wilson@Sheffield.ac.uk
http://www.shef.ac.uk/uni/academic/I-M/is/lecturer/tom1.html

**************************************************************************************
The INFORMATION SOCIETY - Issue 13, No 4 1997

Date: Wed, 27 May 1998 17:54:13 -0500
From: Rob Kling <kling@INDIANA.EDU>
Subject: The Information Society - 13(4)
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science" <ASIS-L@asis.org>
X-Sender: kling@othello.ucs.indiana.edu

The Information Society
Letter from Rob Kling
Editor-in-Chief
For TIS Issue 13(4) (1997)

Special Issue: "The Construction of Personal Identity on the
Internet."

This issue of The Information Society, 13(4), focusses upon
"The Construction of Personal Identity on the Internet." In the
opening article, "Hyperbole over Cyberspace," Eleanor Wynn
and James Katz critique the recent stream of postmodern studies
that portray Internet technologies as novel liberating media
which liberate people from their everyday social worlds and
physical bodies -- a position that was most famously represented
in the mainstream U.S. media by the New Yorker magazine
cartoon in which a dog at a computer terminal says, "On the
Internet, nobody knows that you're a dog." Some of the
postmodern studies also emphasize the way that the Internet is
organized so that people can develop and explore multiple
selves. Wynn and Katz focus on recent books by Sherry Turkle
and A.R. ("Sandy") Stone about the ways that people construct
numerous playful on-line identities. They develop several lines
of analysis to argue that the "Internet does not (primarily)
radically alter the social bases of identity or conventional
constraints on social interaction" although it provides some
important opportunities for new interactional styles or variations
of older interactional styles. One line of analysis is philosophical
-- and is anchored in Heidigger's phenomenology of self. Wynn
and Katz argue that people's on-line identities don't have
sufficient autonomy to be conceptualized as "selves" -- they are
artifacts that are akin to puppets rather than to significant
personas. A second line of argument examines how interacting
on computer networks can entail boundary shifts that do alter
the practices and perceptions of interaction: boundaries between
the social and the technical, the real and the virtual, and what is
public and private.

In their last section, Wynn and Katz examine a number of
studies of social interaction and work on-line -- as well as
particular episodes in LISTSERV discussions and from personal
home pages. They argue that it is common for people to link
their on-line identities to their identities in the workplaces,
family life, and so on. This is a complex theoretical and
empirical paper with which to open this issue -- but one which
provides some compelling critiques of the increasingly popular
postmodern interpretations of life on-line. (A copy has been
made available on TIS's WWW site
http://www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS/ under "Editorial Letters &
Selected Articles.")

The second article, "Social Dynamics of an On-Line Scholarly
Debate," by Philippe Hert illustrates some of Wynn and Katz's
arguments. Hert examines a vociferous debate that was held on a
science-studies LISTSERV (sci-tech-society) in the Fall of
1994. The debate was stimulated, in part, by an article that was
published in the September 9, 1994 issue of Science -- an
extremely influential scientific magazine. The participants
included Paul Gross, who has been nationally visible for his
talks and writings that critique social studies of science, as well
as prominent scholars who conduct such research, including
Steve Fuller and Sharon Traweek. Steve Fuller organized a
conference at Durham University in December 1994 to resolve
the debates. Both the conference and the on-line debates were
reported in The (London) Times Higher Education Supplement
and some science studies newsletters. These debates have real
stakes in the academic world and beyond; and the participants
were not interested in constructing novel on-line identities.


Hert's main analytical interests differ from those of Wynn and
Katz. He carefully examines the social dynamics of the debates,
and participants' interactional strategies and tactics to gain
relative advantage. In particular, some participants managed
their interactions to create a sense of authority and take on

leadership roles while others positioned themselves as notable
critics. Hert's analysis of the staging of the on-line debates and
the participants multiply layered rhetorics defies a simple
summary, and is an important article for TIS readers who are
interested in the social dynamics of on-line social interactions.

Debora Halbert's article, "Discourses of Danger and the
Computer Hacker" examines how narratives of hackers are
developed by various groups to support specific notions of
private property and government secrecy. Halbert traces the
shifting narratives of hackers' identities -- from those where
hackers seen as harmless young adventurous computer nerds
through those in which hackers are seen as terrorists and thieves.
She links the timing of narrative transitions to larger social
events -- the popularization of the World Wide Web and the
commercialization of the Internet. In short, hackers don't simply
construct their identities through interaction on-line; their
identities are also constructed for them and for us by the staff of
policing agencies and commercial firms as a way of advancing
their own institutional interests.

In "Cyberself: The Emergence of Self in On-line Chat,"
Dennis Waskul and Mark Douglass examine the construction of
personal identity in those on-line spaces that are voluntaristic
and playful. Wynn and Katz are keenly aware that many kinds of
professionals work together on-line, and are concerned that the
playful identity behavior of on-line chat is being wildly
overgeneralized by many post-modern analysts. Waskul and
Douglass carefully focus upon these spaces, which are often
used for recreational and pseudononymous chats. They ask how
people who rely upon handles like SKYHOOK and OSusanna
develop identities when the social cues are minimal. Like Wynn
and Katz, they anchor their analysis in processes that have been
identified by sociologists of face interaction -- Erving Goffman
and Georg Simmel. They do argue that on-line chat is unique in
the way that it challenges the significance of time, space, and
physical location in shaping social relationships. And, they
carefully report the ways that on-line chat spaces can support
people's abilities to create multiple and fluid identities. But they
see much in common between these processes of identity
formationn and those that Georg Simmel identified as taking
place among "strangers" in cities at the turn of the century.

The final article shifts from the processes and politics of
identity formation and focuses on public policies about
telecommunications and industrial development in India. In 'The
Socioeconomic Implications of Telecommunications
Liberalization," Ben Petrazzini and Girija Krishnaswamy
examine the way that India's telecommunications policy
approaches are an unusual mix of central regulation and
privitization. They place India's telecommunications policies in
the context of the privitization approaches that are common in
Latin America and the strong regulatory approaches that are
common elsewhere in Asia. They examine several important
repercussions of this more complex strategy, such as the costs of
services, network growth, the risk of private investments,
universal service, and employment. Petrazzini and
Krishnaswamy illustrate how different countries can organize
the development, access to, and pricing of telecommunications
in very different, but viable, ways. This issue concludes with
David Garson's review of the scholarly anthology, Information
Systems in the Political World edited by Kim Viborg Anderson.

I welcome a new member to TIS's editorial board: Professor
Nancy Baym of Wayne State University. This journal's vitality
owes much to the high quality reviewing of the editorial board.
In particular, Associate Editors Phil Agre, Gary Marx, and Rick
Weingarten played pivotal roles in working with the authors of
the articles about identity formation to make this issue possible.

I have delayed circulating the introductory letter and Table of

Contents of this issue, although it has been out for for some
time. TIS has been undergoing some significant changes in
production. Starting with issue 14(1), TIS will be printed in an
8.5"X11" format, and with a new layout and cover page. The
production changeover, coupled with a consolidation of Taylor
and Francis's offices in Philadelphia has led to some prodiction
delays (some anticipated and others unanticipated). We
anticipate that issue 14(1) will be out within weeks and that we
will soo catch up with our normal publication schedule. I'm also
attaching a copy the Table of Contents of TIS 14(1).

Please check our web site (http://www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS) for
a current list of editorial as well as news on forthcoming issues,
calls for papers, and abstracts of articles from previous issues.


================
TABLE of CONTENTS: The Information Society 13(4)

Contents

Letter from the Editor-in-Chief
Rob Kling

Articles

Wynn, Eleanor & Jim Katz - Hyperbole over Cyberspace

Hert, Phillippe "The Dynamics of On-Line Interaction in a
Scholarly Debate"

Halbert, Debora -- Discourses of Danger and the Computer
Hacker

Waskul Dennis & Mark Douglass - "Cyberself: The Emergence
of Self in On-line Chat
Petrazzini, Ben and Girija Krishnaswamy 'The Socioeconomic
Implications of Telecommunications Liberalization: India
in the International Context'

Book Review

Kim Viborg Anderson. "Information Systems in the Political
World." Reviewed by David Garson

-----------------
TABLE of CONTENTS: The Information Society 14(1)
(to appear)

Contents

Letter from the Editor-in-Chief
Rob Kling

Articles

Petrazzini, Ben A., and Krishnaswamy, Girija. "Socioeconomic
Implications of Telecommunication Liberalization: India in
the International Context."

Tang, Puay. "How Electronic Publishers are Protecting agains
Privacy: Doubts about Technical Systems of Protection."

Shade, Leslie Regan. "A Gendered Perspective on Access to the
Information Infrastructure."

Zelwietro, Joseph P. 1997. "The Politicization of Environmental
Organizations through the Internet."

Forum:

Mosco, Vincent. 1997. "Myth-ing Links: Power and Community
on the Information Highway."

Book Reviews

Reviewed by Peter Asaro:
Technology and the Politics of Knowledge, by A. Feenberg
and A. Hannay (Eds.).

Reviewed by Michael Heim:
Alternative Modernity: The Technical Turn in Philosophy
and Social Theory, by A. Feenberg.
----
Rob Kling http://php.ucs.indiana.edu/~kling
The Information Society (journal) http://www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS
Center for Social Informatics http://www.slis.indiana.edu/CSI
Indiana University
10th & Jordan, Room 005C
Bloomington, IN 47405-1801 812-855-9763 // Fax: 855-6166

Read & contribute to the ....
Social Informatics Home Page --> http://www.slis.indiana.edu/SI
a resource about research, teaching, conferences & journals

**************************************************************************************


ISSUES IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY LIBRARIANSHIP - SPRING 1998


Date: Fri, 15 May 1998 08:52:26 -0500
Sender: GEONET-L Geoscience Librarians & Information Specialists
<GEONET-L@LISTSERV.INDIANA.EDU>
From: Lois Heiser <heiser@indiana.edu>
Subject: Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship (fwd)

---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Thu, 14 May 1998 18:08:34 -0700 (PDT)
From: Andrea Duda <duda@library.ucsb.edu>
To: GEONET-L@LISTSERV.INDIANA.EDU
Subject: Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship

The Spring 1998 issue of Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship is
now available at
http://www.library.ucsb.edu/istl/

The theme of this issue is Using the World Wide Web in Science and
Technology Libraries. The articles in this issue are:

Taking Local Resources Global: The NCSTRL Experience at UC Berkeley
Library
by Ann Jensen, University of California, Berkeley

Selection Criteria for Web-Based Resources in a Science and
Technology Library Collection
by Robert B. McGeachin, Texas A&M University

Delivering the Goods: Web OPACs and the Expanding Role of the
Cataloger
by Norm Medeiros, NYU School of Medicine

Academic Library WebTeam Management: The Role of Leadership &
Authority
by Bill Johnson, Texas Tech University Library

Precision Among Internet Search Engines: An Earth Sciences Case Study
by Lisa Wishard, Pennsylvania State University

The National Research Library Alliance: A Federal Consortium Formed
to Provide Inter-Agency Access to Scientific Information
by Laurie E. Stackpole and Roderick D. Atkinson, Naval Research
Laboratory

Regular features include Science and Technology Sources on the Internet
and Book Reviews. With this issue we also start a new column, "Then and
Now," by Daryl Youngman of Kansas State University. This series aims to
examine the origins and development of various tools and practices as used
in science and technology libraries.

===========================================================
Andrea L. Duda
Networked Information Access Coordinator
Davidson Library, University of California, Santa Barbara
E-mail: duda@library.ucsb.edu
InfoSurf: http://www.library.ucsb.edu
===========================================================

**************************************************************************************
JASIS

Date: Thu, 16 Apr 1998 13:42:09 -0400
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
<ASIS-L@asis.org>
From: Richard Hill <rhill@asis.org>
Subject: Table of Contents, JASIS 49, 6

Journal of the American Society for Information Science
JASIS

VOLUME 49
NUMBER 6
MAY 1, 1998

[Note: below are URLs for viewing contents of JASIS, both as presented here
and full text.]

CONTENTS

In This Issue [The text of "In This Issue" is inserted below each article
reviewed
Bert R. Boyce
485

RESEARCH

Professional Summarizing: No Cognitive Simulation without Observation
Brigitte Endres-Niggemeyer and Elisabeth Neugebauer
486
Endres-Neggemeyer and Neugebauer empirically observe and isolate the work
steps of the document representation process to create a model of the
summarization mechanism. A toolbox of strategies used in summarizing
processes is identified, and used to create a conceptual model which is
projected onto a blackboard design.

Scholarly Communication and Electronic Journals: An Impact Study
Stephen P. Harter
507
Using a database of peer-reviewed electronic journals drawn from two
directories, Harter did cited work searches for 39 ejournals on the three
ISI citation databases. Using DIALOG to create a reasonable collection of
the various forms of the ejournal titles to be found, considerable effort
was devoted to a manual cleanup of the results. Eleven were published in
both print and electronic formats, and citations make no distinction as to
which format was utilized. Fifteen ejournals were not cited and 13 were
cited between one and five times. Eight were cited ten or more times; three
from the sciences and five from the social sciences. Thus overall impact
must be considered low. The top ejournal had 1500 citations in 1994 alone,
but it is available in both formats. The top pure ejournal has 190
citations, and PACS Review, some of whose volumes were published in book
form had 111 citations. These top three, when compared to other journals in
their disciplinary area, ranked high in impact factor, but poorly in total
number of articles published.

A Comparison of Group and Individual Performance among Subject Experts and
Untrained
Workers at the Document Retrieval Task
W. John Wilbur
517
Using a cosine vector approach, the 50 closest documents to 100 query
documents chosen randomly by Wilber were isolated. Judges compared each set
of 50 to the query document assigning relevance on a scale. Using seven
subject expert judges, six were considered a panel and the seventh the
target user, with target user rotated to increase the data points. A panel
of six learned, but other than subject expert judges, was also used. Groups
were more effective than individuals at predicting the judgments of an
unknown user, and other than subject expert groups performed nearly as well
as expert groups. Because some documents are rated high by most judges and
others are rated high by few or only individual judges, only by pooling can
documents of wide appeal be identified. This infers the need for emulation
of group rather than individual judgements in retrieval processes.

Citation Context versus the Frequency Counts of Citation Histories
Sinisa Maricic, Jagoda Spaventi, Leo Pavicic, and Greta Pifat-Mrzljak
530
Maricic et al., selected 219 cited papers and their citing paper. The
physical section of the citing paper where the cited paper occurred was
noted and a point value assigned. The citation's meaningful (high) or
cursory (low) nature was also judged and using these two values a combined
ordinal scale was created. A factor analysis seems to indicate separability
by location. One factor is dominated by the introduction, one by the
results section and the third by an inverse relationship between
methodology and conclusion sections. The time delay of citation has little
effect on this analysis. Cursory citations are found only in the
introduction and meaningful citations are in all sections. The numerical
analysis and the context analysis provide varying results and caution
against evaluation on raw citation counts.

User Satisfaction with Information Seeking on the Internet
Harry Bruce
541
Measures of satisfaction lack clear definition and tend to be multi-variate
constructs based on a combination of the results of rating scales on
several variables providing only ordinal measures. Satisfaction for Bruce
is measured using cross modality matching to achieve an interval scale. Two
hundred e-mail addresses were invited to take part and 37 academics agreed.
After being interviewed concerning past information seeking experiences on
the Internet, satisfaction estimates were solicited and received in terms
of numerical magnitude estimates, a one to six category rating, and in
terms of grip force exerted. The measures for satisfaction have
correlations similar to those for estimates of line length by the same
subjects, and the ratios for line estimation and satisfaction are virtually
identical. Subjects regard themselves as infrequent users, are self taught
and have a high expectation of success in Internet searching. No
relationship was found between Internet training and satisfaction, or
between satisfaction and frequency of use.

Testing the Maximum Entropy Principle for Information Retrieval
Paul B. Kantor and Jung Jin Lee
557
Kantor and Jung Jin Lee test the Maximum Entropy Principle for retrieval
using the TREC5 database and a binary classification based on the presence
or absence of terms in text. MEP performs best with small data sets and
progressively worsens as database size increases. Whereas it's use is
certainly computationally tractable, it seems unlikely that the principle
accurately reflects the distribution of terms across relevant and
non-relevant texts or that it will lead to enhanced retrieval.

BOOK REVIEWS

The Internet Searcher's Handbook: Locating Information, People,
and Software, edited by Peter Morville, Louis Rosenfeld,
and Joseph Janes
Valerie Jaffe
567

Proceedings of the Sixth Conference of the International Society for
Scientometrics and Informetrics, edited by Bluma C. Peritz and
Leo Egghe
Judit Bar-Ilan
568

Information Science: Still an Emerging Discipline, edited by James G.
Williams and Toni Carbo
Charles H. Davis
569

Internet Economics, edited by Lee W. McKnight and Joseph P. Bailey
Christinger Tomer
569

Modern Information Systems for Managers, by Hossein Bidgoli
Yonathan Mizrachi
571

Information Seeking in Context, edited by Pertti Vakkari, Reijo Savolainen,
and Brenda Dervin
Terrence A. Brooks
573

Visual Explanations: Images and Quantities, Evidence and Narrative, by
Edward R. Tufte
Robert J. Skovira
574

Information Services for Secondary Schools, by Dana McDougald and Melvin Bowie
Carol A. Doll
575

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

577

ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

JASIS VOLUME 49, NO 7, MAY 15 1999


Date: Thu, 16 Apr 1998 14:38:37 -0400
Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
From: Richard Hill <rhill@asis.org>
Subject: Table of Contents, JASIS 49, 7

Journal of the American Society for Information Science
JASIS
VOLUME 49
NUMBER 7
MAY 15 1998

[Note: below are URLs for viewing past contents of JASIS, both as presented
here and full text.]

CONTENTS
Special Topic Issue: Artificial Intelligence Techniques for Emerging
Information Systems Applications
Guest Editor: Hsinchun Chen

Introduction
Hsinchun Chen
579

Internet Browsing and Searching: User Evaluations of Category Map and
Concept Space Techniques
Hsinchun Chen, Andrea L. Houston, Robin R. Sewell, and Bruce R. Schatz
582

A Smart Itsy Bitsy Spider for the Web
Hsinchun Chen, Yi-Ming Chung, Marshall Ramsey, and Christopher C. Yang
604

Speech Recognition for a Digital Video Library
Michael J. Witbrock and Alexander G. Hauptmann
619

A Texture Thesaurus for Browsing Large Aerial Photographs
Wei-Ying Ma and B.S. Manjunath
633

Architecture, Design and Development of an HTML/JavaScript Web-Based Group
Support System
Nicholas C. Romano, Jr., Jay F. Nunamaker, Jr., Robert O. Briggs, and
Douglas R. Vogel
649

Book Reviews
Costing and Pricing in the Digital Age: A Practical Guide for Information
Services, by Herbert Snyder and Elisabeth Davenport
Bruce R. Kingma
668

Information Retrieval Systems: Theory and Implementation, by Gerald Kowalski
M. Carl Drott
668

From Print to Electronic: The Transformation of Scientific Communication,
by Susan Y. Crawford, Julie M. Hurd, and Ann C. Weller
Marianne Affifi
670

Knowledge, Concepts, and Categories, edited by Koen Lamberts and David Shanks
Terrence A. Brooks
671

Authoritative Guide to Web Search Engines, by Susan Maze, David Moxley, and
Donna J. Smith
Candy Schwartz
672


-------------------------------------------------------


The full text from 1996 (Volume 47) forward is available at this time at
the "interscience" site..


Richard Hill
Executive Director
American Society for Information Science
8720 Georgia Avenue, Suite 501
Silver Spring, MD 20910
http://www.asis.org
rhill@asis.org

ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

JASIS volume 49, no 12, OCTOBER 1998


Date: Tue, 25 Aug 1998 12:14:40 -0400
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
<ASIS-L@asis.org>
From: Richard Hill <rhill@asis.org>
Subject: JASIS TOC, Volume 49, #12


[Note: below are URLs for viewing past contents of JASIS, both as presented
here and full text.]

Journal of the American Society for Information Science
VOLUME 49 NUMBER 12 OCTOBER 1998

Special Topic Issue: Social Informatics in Information Science
Guest Editors: Rob Kling, Howard Rosenbaum, and Carol Hert

CONTENTS

Social Informatics in Information Science: An Introduction
Rob Kling, Howard Rosenbaum, and Carol Hert
1047

Information Technology, Employment, and the Information Sector:
Trends in Information Employment 1970-1995
Stana B. Martin
1053

Collaborative Information Retrieval: Toward a Social Informatics
View of IR Interaction
Murat Karamuftuoglu
1070

IT and Changing Professional Identity: Micro-Studies and
Macro-Theory
Geoff Walsham
1081

Collaboration and Conflict in the Development of a Computerized
Dispatch Facility
Andrew Clement and Chris Halonen
1090

Work, Friendship, and Media Use for Information Exchange in a
Networked Organization
Caroline Haythornthwaite and Barry Wellman
1101

The Impact of Gender, Occupation, and Presence of Children on
Telecommuting Motivations and Constraints
Patricia L. Mokhtarian, Michael N. Bagley, and Ilan Salomon
1115

Contexts of Uninhibited Online Behavior: Flaming in Social
Newsgroups on Usenet
Joseph M. Kayany
1135

ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

JASIS volume 49, no 13, NOVEMBER 1998


Date: Fri, 25 Sep 1998 11:24:05 -0400
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
From: Richard Hill <rhill@asis.org>
Subject: JASIS Table of Contents, V. 49, #13

Journal of the American Society for Information Science (JASIS)
VOLUME 49, NUMBER 13
November, 1998

[Note: below are URLs for viewing past contents of JASIS (from 1986 to
present), both as presented here and full text. Bert Boyce's "In This
Issue" column has been inserted in this table of contents.]

CONTENTS

In This Issue
Bert R. Boyce
1143

RESEARCH
Topological Aspects of Information Retrieval
Leo Egghe and Ronald Rousseau
1144
We begin with two articles suggesting the possible separation of documen
t
and query vector space. Viewing information retrieval as a topology on a
document space determined by a similarity function between queries and
documents gives what Egghe and Rousseau call a retrieval topology. Such
topologies might use a pseudo metric which measures the distance between
documents independent of the query space, or might make all similarity
functions between documents and queries continuous, called here the
similarity topology. The topological model allows the introduction of
Boolean operators. The inner product is suggested as producing a more
powerful model than the cosine measure.

On the Necessity of Term Dependence in a Query Space for Weighted Retrieval
Peter Bollmann-Sdorra and Vijay V. Raghavan
1161
Bollmann-Sdorra and Raghavan show that if query term weights are to be
useful in retrieval, term independence is an undesirable property in a
query space. Independence remains desirable in document space. It would
appear that the assumptions that documents and queries are elements of the
same space, and that term independence is required, are not warranted.

Optimizing a Library's Loan Policy: An Integer Programming Approach
Hesham K. Al-Fares
1169
Al-Fares presents a new loan policy model which incorporates a
decision variable for maximum books to be borrowed, along with the
traditional loan period, and adds user satisfaction with policies to the
usual book availability satisfaction indicator. Each indicator is defined
as the ratio of satisfied demand to total demand. Number of renewals,
duplications, demand, and reservations are considered to have a very small
effect.

On the Fusion of Documents from Multiple Collection Information Retrieval
Systems
Ronald R. Yager and Alexander Rybalov
1177
Yager and Rybalov assume m retrieval systems without file overlap
each providing a ranked list of texts based upon their varying ranking
criteria, and in response to a common query, and define fusion as the
construction of a single ordered list of the n most relevant texts over all
m system responses. This requires determining the potential of each system
to provide relevant answers to the query.
A previous fusion method which is empirically effective but where
different runs will result in different orderings, uses a random selection
method biased toward the length of the contributing list. Alternatively one
might use the longest remaining list for each choice or take equally from
each collection until the shortest is exhausted, and then continue until
the next shortest is exhausted, and on, until all are exhausted. A
centralized fusion scheme computes a value based upon the number of
documents in a list and the number already removed. The value is
re-computed for each collection after each removal of the top element in
the collection with the highest value. Another possibility is a
proportional approach, where the list value is its remaining number of
elements less one divided by the original number, and a value can be
assigned to each individual document which is the number of elements in the
list less its position in the list, divided by the number of elements in
the list.

Indexing and Access for Digital Libraries and the Internet: Human,
Database, and Domain Factors
Marcia J. Bates
1185
Bates provides a review of what we know and do not know about
indexing and access that will apply to large digital document files.
Particularly she emphasizes that statistical regularities exist in the
subject representation of files and should influence design, that subject
domain should affect system design, and that what we know of human
linguistic and searching behavior must be taken into account for an optimal
information retrieval system.

Software Engineering as Seen through Its Research Literature: A Study in
Co-Word Analysis
Neal Coulter, Ira Monarch, and Suresh Konda
1206
The indexing for 16,691 documents from 1982 to 1994 which were
assigned at least one term from the software engineering category was
collected by Coulter, Monarch, and Konda and a co-occurrence study carried
out to determine the interaction of software engineering areas of study
over time. The association measure was the square of the co-occurrences of
two terms over the product of their occurrences. The threshold value was
varied with the size of the data sets, but the number of links and nodes
was fixed at twenty-four and twenty. For the period 1982 - 1986 15 networks
were generated; for 1987 - 1990 16; and for 1991 - 1994 11. The networks
exhibit considerable change over time although some consistent themes, like
software development and user interfaces, persist.

Information Aspects of New Organizational Designs: Exploring the
Non-Traditional Organization
Bob Travica
1224
To address the role of information technology in non-traditional
organizations Travica treats IT as level of use of several specific
technologies, and non-traditional structure as the level of organization
structure, plus other selected variables. Data came from surveys of a
random stratified sample of employees at twelve local accounting offices
and an interview with the local manager. Information technology correlates
with non-traditional structure. Information technology correlates
negatively with formalization and centralization, and positively with cross
boundary communication. Spatial dispersion is negatively associated with
trust sharing.

-------------------------------------------------------
The ASIS home page <http://www.asis.org> contains the Table of Contents and
brief abstracts as above from January 1993 (Volume 44) to date. The full
text of JASIS from 1986 (Volume 37) forward is available at
<http://www.interscience.wiley.com>. One must register but there is no
charge. This site includes the full text of JASIS and other Wiley
journals. You may also set up a personal home page which allows you to:

Browse the Wiley InterScience collection
Search across the entire content of Wiley InterScience journals
Add your own notes and comments to individual articles
Store sets of search criteria for the searches you perform most often
Go directly to the home page of your favorite Wiley journal
Create and maintain your personal reading list

To view the JASIS articles full text, one must click on the "view articles"
button at the top of the Title/Abstract page.

The complete sequence, after logging on and going to the JASIS page is: 1)
select issue to view; 2) select title of article; 3) select the "view
article" button at the top of the page above the abstract. The article
will then appear in Adobe Acrobat.


American Society for Information Science
8720 Georgia Avenue, Suite 501
Silver Spring, MD 20910
(301) 495-0900 FAX (301) 495-0810
http://www.asis.org

**************************************************************************************

JOURNAL FOR GLOBAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT - Call for papers

Date: Tue, 22 Sep 1998 13:33:07 -0400
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
From: Pattee Fletcher <fletcher@umbc.edu>
Subject: CALL for PAPERS

CALL FOR PAPERS

Special Issue of the JOURNAL for Global Information Management

LIBRARIES AND THE INTERNET:
AN INTERNATIONAL AGENDA.

Patricia Diamond Fletcher, ed.


We are soliciting research papers for a special issue of the Journal for
Global Information Management. The goal of this special issue is to
provide an international picture of the issues to and the responses by
libraries to providing services and information on the Internet and the
World Wide Web. Public, academic, school, business, and other special
libraries will be the subject of the discourse. Current research on
effectiveness of library networks and on the potential directions for
libraries in a networked environment will be presented to share library
best practices, policy, and services. Cross-cultural library issues are
solicited.

Topics can include:

v Development of Internet services in libraries
v Special populations for Internet services
v Budgeting, accounting, and funding Internet services
v Policy issues
v Training and staffing issues
v Global libraries
v Collection development and dissemination
v Providing for the information "have-nots"
v International copyright
v Transborder data flow


Important Deadlines:

January 10, 1999 -- submissions from authors due to editor*****
March 31 -- papers due back to editor from reviewers
April 15 -- papers returned to authors for final editing
June 1 -- papers due to publisher for Fall issue inclusion

Guidelines for submission can be found at the JGIM website:
http://www.idea-group.com/jgim.htm


Direct all inquiries and submissions to:

Patricia Diamond Fletcher, Ph.D.
Department of Information Systems
1000 Hilltop Circle
The University of Maryland Baltimore County
Baltimore, MD, USA 21250
410-455-3154
410-455-1073 (fax)
<fletcher@umbc.edu>



*****SEE ALSO *****
the "Call for Chapters" for World Libraries on the Information
Superhighway (Idea Group Publishing).
Papers submitted for the above special issue of JGIM may also be
considered - if received in time - for inclusion in the book.


CHEERS!
*************************************************************
Patricia Diamond Fletcher, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Department of Information Systems
Director, IFSM Graduate Program
Faculty Associate, MD Institute for Policy Analysis & Research
The University of Maryland, Baltimore County
1000 Hilltop Circle
Baltimore, MD 21250

410-455-3154
410-455-1073 FAX
URL: http://research.umbc.edu/~fletcher

**************************************************************************************

JOURNAL OF SYSTEMS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY - call for papers

Date: Mon, 10 Aug 1998 08:57:03 -0400
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
From: Gretchen Whitney <gwhitney@utkux.utcc.utk.edu>
Subject: CFP: Jo. of Systems and Info Tech

From: Craig Standing <c.standing@cowan.edu.au>
Subject: Call for Papers JoSIT


Call For Papers

The Journal of Systems and Information Technology

The Journal provides an avenue for scholarly work that takes a systemic or
holistic perspective in relation to areas such as information systems
development, information technology and information systems management.

The Journal of Systems and Information Technology fosters primarily,
although not exclusively, interpretive or qualitative research methods
including ethnographic, genealogical, action research and case studies of
various kinds. Research that uses quantitative methods, for example
statistical surveys, will be suitable if they take a broad perspective of
the problems and issues. This means very often that the social and political
aspects will be considered as well as the technical.

Target topics that will be relevant to JoSIT include but are not limited to:

o IS/IT planning that takes a systemic approach

o Innovative Soft Systems approaches used in information systems developme
nt

o The integration of software and/or hardware technologies that provide
holistic solutions to problems. For example, the integration of various
aspects of software engineering paradigms.

o Human Computer Interaction (HCI) problems tackled in an systemic or
integrated way.

o Research papers that promote the development of interpretive or
qualitative research methodologies in relation to Information Systems
through case studies.

o Systems approaches in the management of information systems.

o Holistic approaches in the development of technology policy and technolo
gy
transfer.

o Integrative methods of systems design.

o Systems perspectives in IS/IT evaluation.

o The use of metaphors as an integrative theme for aspects of IT/IS.

o The influence of politics and culture on systems development and the use
of information technology.


Book Reviews

JoSIT will include book reviews and information concerning conferences in
the holistic information systems field.


Publication and Manuscript Guidelines

Researchers as well as Information Systems Professionals are invited to
submit papers for the Journal. All papers will undergo a blind refereeing
process by at least three referees. Papers can be sent in hard or soft copy.
Soft copies should be in Microsoft Word for MAC or PC format. The Journal
will be published twice a year in March and September.

Further details are available upon request. All submissions must be original
works which have not appeared elsewhere and which are not being considered
for publication with another journal. As the reviewing process will be
conducted anonymously, please leave your name(s) off the manuscript. People
are encouraged to send their papers either in by email or hard copy form to:

Dr. Craig Standing, Editor-in-Chief, JoSIT
email: c.standing@cowan.edu.au
Fax: 61 8 9400 5633 Tel: 61 8 9400 5545

School of Management Information Systems
Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia 6027


Editorial Board

Chief Editor: Dr. Craig Standing
Edith Cowan University, Western Australia

Members of the Editorial Board

Rakesh Agrawal
University of Western Sydney, Australia

Robert Flood
University of Hull, UK

James Alleman
University of Colorado, USA

Duncan Langford
University of Kent, UK

Teodosio Perez Amaral
Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain

Chantal Morley
Institute National des Telecommunications, Evry, France

Richard Baskerville
Binghamton University, N.Y., USA

Michael Myers
University of Auckland, NZ

Paul Beynon-Davies
University of Glamorgan, Wales, UK.

Dewald Roode
University of Pretoria, S.A.

Subhash Bhatnagar
Indian Institute of Management

Ross Smith
Swinburne University of Technology, Australia

Bill Doolin
University of Waikato, NZ

Hazel Suchard
Australian Catholic University

Keith Ellis
University of Humberside, UK

Ned Kock
Temple University, USA

*****************************************
Dr Craig Standing
School of Management Information Systems
Edith Cowan University
Joondalup
Western Australia 6027
Te: 61 8 94005545
Fax: 61 8 94005633
Email: c.standing@cowan.edu.au

**************************************************************************************
LIBRARY AND ARCHIVAL SECURITY - Call for papers
Current issue: volume 14, no 2

Date: Thu, 10 Sep 1998 11:40:11 -0400
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
From: "ad6509@wayne.edu" <ad6509@wayne.edu>
Subject: Call for papers - Library and Archival Security

Volume 14 no. 2 of Library and Archival Security has been issued,
and should be reaching libraries within the next few days. The
current issue contains articles on state of the art theft detection
systems, on disaster planning in an urban public library and a
university archives, and on late-night hours in an academic library.
L&AS is a peer-reviewed journal dealing with all aspects of physical
and data security as they apply to libraries and archives, and
accepts articles both from researchers and practitioners.

Articles are currently being sought for upcoming issues. Researchers,
doctoral students, and practitioners, are especially encouraged to
submit book and software/hardware reviews.

Submissions on the following topics would be especially welcome:

- opinionated editorials and responses to previously published
articles,
- substantive research papers, especially ones dealing with
security practices, digital collections, ethical issues,
the security aspects of wide-area networking, disaster
planning, conservation initiatives, and assessments of
electronic threats to libraries, theft and problem
behavior, disaster recovery,
- case studies and sample disaster management plans,
- research reports and summaries of current trends,
- accounts of related conferences,
- book and software/hardware reviews.

L&AS encourages articles originating in the developing nations, the
United States, Canada, Great Britain, Europe, Australia and New Zealand,
and the nations of the Pacific Rim.

Submissions should be addressed to the Editor at the location
given below.

---
Chris Brown-Syed <ad6509@wayne.edu> <http://valinor.purdy.wayne.edu>
Editor, Library & Archival Security. LIS Program, 106 Kresge Library,
Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA, 48202. Ph: +1 313 577-0503.
Fax: +1 313 577-7563.

**************************************************************************************

NEDLIB News sheet issue no 1, July 1998


Date: Wed, 1 Jul 1998 16:08:59 +0200
Sender: International Federation of Library Associations mailing list
<IFLA-L@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA>
From: Titia van der Werf <titia@PYTHON.KONBIB.NL>
Subject: First issue of the NEDLIB News Sheet released
To: IFLA-L@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA

ANNOUNCEMENT
------------

NEDLIB News Sheet, issue n.1, July 1998 has been released.

In this issue you are updated on NEDLIB project results
and you will find special contributions on related topics:

* Lex Sijtsma: "Impressions from the DELOS6 workshop"

* Titia van der Werf: "Some thoughts after the DOI workshop"

and a SPECIAL COVERAGE of the the Multimedia Management System
(MMB-system) developed by CSC PLOENZKE for Die Deutsche Bibliothek in
Germany.

The NEDLIB project News Sheets are issued twice a year.
They are made available through the NEDLIB web-site at:

<http://www.konbib.nl/nedlib/news/newssheet1.html>

They are announced via several discussion-lists.

NEDLIB is a project promoted by the CoBRA+ group and supported by the
Telematics for Libraries Programme of the European Commission. The project
consortium includes nine European national libraries, a National Archive
and three main publishers. The objective of NEDLIB is to ensure that
digital publications of the present can be used now and in the future.
The project started in January 1998. The project will define an
architecture for capturing, preserving and accessing digital
publications. It will develop tools and define standards and procedures
required to implement this architecture in a deposit system of digital
publications. NEDLIB will take account of the requirement of long term
storage and retrieval as well as the terms and conditions applying to the
access of those publications. As a result, the project will define the
technical environment and develop test implementations.


*** (This message has been cross-posted to several international
library-related lists. Apologies if you receive this message more than
once.) ***


Titia
NEDLIB contact point

------------------------------------
Titia van der Werf
Library research
Koninklijke Bibliotheek
National Library of the Netherlands
The Hague
The NETHERLANDS
e-mail: titia@is.konbib.nl
tel : +31 70-3140467
http://www.konbib.nl/persons/titia/
------------------------------------

*************************************************************************************

SCHOLARLY ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING BIBLIOGRAPHY - VERSION 17



Version 17 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography
is now available. This selective bibliography presents over
600 articles, books, electronic documents, and other sources
that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing
efforts on the Internet and other networks.

HTML: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>
Acrobat: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf>
Word: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.doc>

The HTML document is designed for interactive use. Each
major section is a separate file. There are live links to
sources available on the Internet. It can be can be searched,
and it includes a collection of links to related Web sites
that deal with scholarly electronic publishing issues.

The Acrobat and Word files are designed for printing.
Each file is over 170 KB.

(Revised sections in this version are marked with an asterisk.)

Table of Contents

1 Economic Issues*
2 Electronic Books and Texts
2.1 Case Studies and History
2.2 General Works
2.3 Library Issues
3 Electronic Serials
3.1 Case Studies and History
3.2 Critiques
3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals*
3.4 General Works*
3.5 Library Issues*
3.6 Research*
4 General Works
5 Legal Issues
5.1 Intellectual Property Rights
5.2 License Agreements*
5.3 Other Legal Issues
6 Library Issues
6.1 Cataloging, Classification, and Metadata*
6.2 Digital Libraries
6.3 General Works
6.4 Information Conversion, Integrity, and Preservation*
7 New Publishing Models*
8 Publisher Issues
8.1 Electronic Commerce/Copyright Systems*
Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author
Appendix B. About the Author


Best Regards,
Charles

Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Assistant Dean for Systems,
University Libraries, University of Houston, Houston, TX
77204-2091. E-mail: cbailey@uh.edu. Voice: (713) 743-9804.
Fax: (713) 743-9811.

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm>
<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>

ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

SCHOLARLY ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING BIBLIOGRAPHY - VERSION 19


Date: Thu, 18 Jun 1998 12:42:49 CDT
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
From: "Charles W. Bailey, Jr." <LIB3@UHUPVM1.UH.EDU>
Subject: Version 19, Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

Version 19 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography
is now available. This selective bibliography presents over
600 articles, books, electronic documents, and other sources
that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing
efforts on the Internet and other networks.

HTML: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>
Acrobat: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf>
Word: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.doc>

The HTML document is designed for interactive use. Each
major section is a separate file. There are live links to
sources available on the Internet. It can be can be searched,
and it includes a collection of links to related Web sites
that deal with scholarly electronic publishing issues.

The Acrobat and Word files are designed for printing.
Each file is over 190 KB.

(Revised sections in this version are marked with an asterisk.)

Table of Contents

1 Economic Issues*
2 Electronic Books and Texts
2.1 Case Studies and History*
2.2 General Works
2.3 Library Issues
3 Electronic Serials
3.1 Case Studies and History
3.2 Critiques
3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals*
3.4 General Works*
3.5 Library Issues*
3.6 Research
4 General Works
5 Legal Issues
5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*
5.2 License Agreements*
5.3 Other Legal Issues
6 Library Issues
6.1 Cataloging, Classification, and Metadata
6.2 Digital Libraries*
6.3 General Works*
6.4 Information Conversion, Integrity, and Preservation*
7 New Publishing Models
8 Publisher Issues
8.1 Electronic Commerce/Copyright Systems*
Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author
Appendix B. About the Author


Best Regards,
Charles

Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Assistant Dean for Systems,
University Libraries, University of Houston, Houston, TX
77204-2091. E-mail: cbailey@uh.edu. Voice: (713) 743-9804.
Fax: (713) 743-9811.

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm>
<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>
ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

SCHOLARLY ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING BIBLIOGRAPHY - VERSION 20


Date: Wed, 22 Jul 1998 12:55:04 -0400
Sender: International Federation of Library Associations mailing list
<IFLA-L@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA>
From: Terry Kuny <Terry.Kuny@xist.com>
Subject: [DOC] Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography (version 20)
now available

Version 20 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography
is now available. This selective bibliography presents over
800 articles, books, electronic documents, and other sources
that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing
efforts on the Internet and other networks.

HTML: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>
Acrobat: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf>
Word: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.doc>

The HTML document is designed for interactive use. Each
major section is a separate file. There are live links to
sources available on the Internet. It can be can be searched,
and it includes a collection of links to related Web sites
that deal with scholarly electronic publishing issues.

The Acrobat and Word files are designed for printing.
Each file is over 170 KB.

(Revised sections in this version are marked with an asterisk.)

Table of Contents

1 Economic Issues*
2 Electronic Books and Texts
2.1 Case Studies and History*
2.2 General Works
2.3 Library Issues
3 Electronic Serials
3.1 Case Studies and History
3.2 Critiques*
3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals*
3.4 General Works
3.5 Library Issues
3.6 Research*
4 General Works
5 Legal Issues
5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*
5.2 License Agreements*
5.3 Other Legal Issues
6 Library Issues
6.1 Cataloging, Classification, and Metadata*
6.2 Digital Libraries
6.3 General Works
6.4 Information Conversion, Integrity, and Preservation*
7 New Publishing Models
8 Publisher Issues*
8.1 Electronic Commerce/Copyright Systems*
Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author
Appendix B. About the Author


Best Regards,
Charles

Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Assistant Dean for Systems,
University Libraries, University of Houston, Houston, TX
77204-2091. E-mail: cbailey@uh.edu. Voice: (713) 743-9804.
Fax: (713) 743-9811.

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm>
<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>

oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

SCHOLARLY ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING BIBLIOGRAPHY - VERSION 21

Date: Fri, 18 Sep 1998 13:19:43 CDT
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
From: "Charles W. Bailey, Jr." <LIB3@UHUPVM1.UH.EDU>
Subject: Version 21, Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

Version 21 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography
is now available. This selective bibliography presents over
800 articles, books, electronic documents, and other sources
that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing
efforts on the Internet and other networks.

HTML: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>
Acrobat: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf>
Word: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.doc>

The HTML document is designed for interactive use. Each
major section is a separate file. There are live links to
sources available on the Internet. It can be can be searched,
and it includes a collection of links to related Web sites
that deal with scholarly electronic publishing issues.

The Acrobat and Word files are designed for printing.
Each file is over 170 KB.

(Revised sections in this version are marked with an asterisk.)

Table of Contents

1 Economic Issues*
2 Electronic Books and Texts
2.1 Case Studies and History*
2.2 General Works*
2.3 Library Issues
3 Electronic Serials
3.1 Case Studies and History*
3.2 Critiques
3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals
3.4 General Works
3.5 Library Issues
3.6 Research*
4 General Works*
5 Legal Issues
5.1 Intellectual Property Rights
5.2 License Agreements*
5.3 Other Legal Issues
6 Library Issues
6.1 Cataloging, Classification, and Metadata
6.2 Digital Libraries*
6.3 General Works
6.4 Information Conversion, Integrity, and Preservation
7 New Publishing Models*
8 Publisher Issues*
8.1 Electronic Commerce/Copyright Systems*
Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author
Appendix B. About the Author


Best Regards,
Charles

Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Assistant Dean for Systems,
University Libraries, University of Houston, Houston, TX
77204-2091. E-mail: cbailey@uh.edu. Voice: (713) 743-9804.
Fax: (713) 743-9811.

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm>
<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>

LIBRES: Library and Information Science Research
Electronic Journal ISSN 1058-6768
1998 Volume 8 Issue 2; September.
Bi-annual LIBRE8N2 JOURNALS


NEWS FROM OTHER JOURNALS


Contents:


CURRENT CITES, vol 9, no 4, April 1998

Date: Fri, 8 May 1998 15:33:59 +0000
Sender: Solo Librarians Listserv <SOLOLIB-L@LISTSERV.SILVERPLATTER.COM>
From: Gerry Hurley <Gerry_Hurley@SILVERPLATTER.COM>
Subject: Current Cites, Vol. 9, no. 4, April 1998

Here's the latest issue of Current Cites from our friends
at PACS-L.
--Gerry

Date: Tue May 05, 1998 7:28 pm EST
From: cites
EMS: INTERNET / MCI ID: 376-5414
MBX: cites@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: Current Cites April 1998
----------------------------Original message----------------------------
_Current Cites_
Volume 9, no. 4
April 1998
The Library
University of California, Berkeley
Edited by Teri Andrews Rinne
ISSN: 1060-2356
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/1998/cc98.9.4.html
Contributors:
Christof Galli, Kirk Hastings, Terry Huwe,
Margaret Phillips, Richard Rinehart, Roy Tennant
Jim Ronningen, Lisa Yesson

DIGITAL LIBRARIES
"Taking the Initiative for Digital Libraries" The Electronic Library
(16) 1 (February 1998): 24-27.
[http://info.learned.co.uk/li/publications/tel/contents.htm]
-- If you're still just a bit unclear what exactly is meant by "digital
library", you may be comforted by Electronic Library's interview
with Stephen Griffin of NSF's Digital Library Initiative. Griffin
acknowledges that the meaning of digital library continues to evolve
as technology advances, and believes that this is a good thing as a
more open definition enables a larger set of perspectives to influence
the discourse, research and practices. Griffin uses the concepts of
electronic access vs. intellectual access to help think about digital
libraries. He describes electronic access as access to the raw
electronic data, and intellectual access as access to deeper knowledge
and meaning contained in digital collections. Griffin believes that by
providing intellectual access through intelligent systems, that digital
libraries have the potential to give users "what they want, not merely
what they ask for." He proposes that digital libraries will lead to a
reconsideration of the library as an institution and, in the long term,
offer an entirely new model through which people can interact with
information, beginning, in the nearer term, with scholarly
communication. He also offers some suggestions to library managers
for this transitional period. -- LY



ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING

Curle, David. "Filtered News Services: Solutions in Search of _Your_
Problem?" Online 22(2) March/April 1998.
[http://www.onlineinc.com/onlinemag/OLtocs/OLtocmar3.html]
-- You may remember Wired's big, blue, pushy hand from the March
1997 [www.wired.com/5.03/] issue, shoving yet another "radical
future" at you and announcing the arrival of push media - that is,
electronic information that can be delivered to the user without the
need to "pull" it by requesting it each time it's wanted. Curle's less
prophetic, more practical article deserves a big hand too, with an
index finger pointing to a long list of options for news delivery.
Making smart choices is not easily done in the growing flow of
media which can spew the world's events onto your screen, and
Curle emphasizes that information professionals will have to analyze
user needs in the context of organizational systems to come up with
viable solutions. He suggests several specific questions that are
useful for getting far beyond the obvious filtering issues like whether
to eliminate sports from the news stream. Traditionally, what's news
has been defined by the sender; now the receiver is getting more
power to redefine it, but the sources must still be well-understood.
When he changes his focus from the consumer to the provider, Curle
discusses the merits of various services, and how they (or parts of
them) can fit into appropriate profiles for pushed news. He assesses
the services by category and by product, from the custom pages offered
by many Web guides to the commercial giants like Dow Jones, noting
that most users should be able to get their facts for free in today's
environment. If our options continue to multiply, let's hope for many
more articles like this one, because this kind of advice is what we'll
need to help us get a grip. -- JR
"To Publish and Perish" Policy Perspectives 7(4) (March 1998)
(gain access to the article at
http://www.irhe.upenn.edu/cgi-bin/pp-cat.pl after registering for free).
-- This thoughtful essay is on the problem academic libraries have of
maintaining access to information when both the volume and cost of this
information has increased dramatically over the last several decades. A
brief historical review precedes a set of strategies that libraries,
faculties, and university administrations can undertake to "regain the
initiative" in scholarly publishing. These strategies include: 1) end the
preoccupation with numbers (faculty tenure review should stress quality,
not quantity), 2) be smart shoppers (research libraries must select
wisely), 3) get a handle on property rights (faculty should be encouraged
to retain at least some portion of copyright), 4) invest in electronic
forms of scholarly communication, and 5) decouple publication and
faculty evaluation for the purposes of promotion and tenure. Before
allowing skepticism to persuade you of the futility of succeeding with
any of these strategies, you should know that this essay is based on a
national meeting of presidents, chief academic officers, and librarians
of major research universities across North America. They are in at
least shooting distance of being able to effect some local change if not
systemic change. -- RT


Wagner, Karen I. "Intellectual Property: Copyright Implications for
Higher Education" The Journal of Academic Librarianship 24 (1)
(January 1998): 11-19. -- The university consists of many different
constituencies all of which are serving the larger mission of the
institution which is to educate and promote research and scholarship.
These different constituencies, however, have differing perspectives
on intellectual property issues. As producers of intellectual property,
university presses and faculty are concerned with preserving copyright
protection; as consumers of intellectual property, university libraries
(and, again, faculty) are more concerned with issues of "fair use;"
there are also those constituencies, such as instructional design groups,
who are both producers and consumers. Wagner argues that discussion
among all of these groups will help in the development of a national
policy on intellectual property rights that will be in the best interests
of higher education. The emergence of a digital landscape also poses new
challenges and opportunities and university presses, libraries, university
bookstores and copy centers can take advantage of new technologies to
further enhance the ability of higher education to achieve its mission.
An extensive bibliography accompanies this article. -- MP

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY
Giese, Mark. "Self Without Body: Textual Self-Representation in
an Electronic Community" First Monday 3 (6) (April 6, 1998).
[http://www.firstmonday.dk] -- Giese examines textual modes of
communication and how they combine with the new technologies
of computer-mediated communication (cmc) to produce new
opportunities for social interaction and presentation of self. He
studies these new modes of meta-communication, and how they
interact in ways that promote the liveliness of community in a
text-based electronic environment. He examines one Internet
newsgroup, alt.cyberpunk, which has developed a cooperative
narrative, in which participants make self-presentations that many
would consider "fictional". However, in the community of the list,
these presentations must be accepted at face value. He concludes
that this new form of self-expression is created by the "tightened
feedback loop" that cmc technologies bring to a textual mode of
communication--in other words, a text-based narrative becomes a
"real-time" interaction, with new, and often strange results. -- TH
Hilf, Bill. "Media Lullabies: The Reinvention of the World Wide
Web" First Monday 3 (6) (April 6, 1998) [http://www.firstmonday.dk]
-- Hilf explores the all-too-easy trap that media and cultural critics
fall into when they compare the Web and other Net-based delivery systems
to the mass media. He argues such comparative studies have led to
large-scale misinterpretations of the Internet. Worse yet, in the era of
sound-bite journalism, such misinterpretations rapidly become accepted
as meaningful descriptions (remember the Internet as a "library", only
the "books" haven't been organized yet?). As part of his analysis, he
provides a useful history of the new media. -- TH



NETWORKS AND NETWORKING


Arnold, Judith M. and Elaine Anderson Jayne. "Dangling by a Slender
Thread: The Lessons and Implications of Teaching the World Wide
Web to Freshmen" The Journal of Academic Librarianship 24 (1)
(January 1998): 43-52. -- Based on the authors' own experience of
teaching library skills to a freshmen writing class, this well-researched
article discusses the challenges, problems and implications of teaching
the Web. Their approach to teaching was to focus on resources that are
unique to the Web such as sites that offer current or government
information that is not available elsewhere. Furthermore, they argue that
the Web needs to be taught within an appropriate context of the
information seeking process and as just one of many information sources
along with books, journals and newspapers. Most importantly, the authors
wanted to provide an evaluative framework in their approach to teaching
the Web. Trying to teach students how to evaluate sources when doing
library research is one of the biggest challenges for instruction
librarians. In some ways, the nature of the Web with its largely
free-flowing content gives library instructors a unique opportunity to
introduce critical thinking skills and evaluative tools. -- MP
Payette, Sandra. "Persistent Identifiers on the Digital Terrain" RLG
DigiNews 2(2) 1997.
[http://www.rlg.org/preserv/diginews/diginews22.html#Identifiers]
-- In what has almost become a mythical pursuit similar to the search
for the Holy Grail, those involved with developing standards for the
Web have long sought a solution to the problem of broken URLs.
What is needed is some kind of persistent address that can be resolved
to the actual location of the desired information, even as it moves
from place to place. This overview piece serves as an excellent
introduction to the topic and an overview of current or near-term
solutions. The particular schemes profiled include Persistent URLs
or PURLs (please, no swine jokes), Handles, and Digital Object
Identifiers or DOIs. None of these schemes comes from the Internet
Engineering Task Force (IETF), which has been pondering this
conundrum since the dawn of time (ca. early 1990's on the Web
calendar). Payette includes a strategy for implementing persistent
identifiers for a given project, a brief discussion of implications, and
some pointers (yes, URLs) to further information. -- RT

OPTICAL DISC TECHNOLOGY
Ma, Wei. "The Near Future Trend: Combining Web Access and Local
CD Networks" The Electronic Library 16 (1) (February 1998): 49-54.
[http://info.learned.co.uk/publications/tel/contents.htm]. -- Should
libraries continue expanding and investing in CD-ROM networks?
This article asserts that librarians will continue to see a mix of
CD-ROM based and Internet-based resources in the near term. A mix
will be optimal because the two media have different strengths.
CD-ROM is best for specialized titles that are less used, and for large
amounts of static data. Internet versions are better for sources with
broader appeal, and for databases that require frequent and timely
updates. Drawing from Occidental College's experience, Ma concludes
that the optimal mix should consider the entire community environment,
not just the individual library. Ma also profiles selected equipment that
Occidental used in designing their architecture. -- LY
GENERAL
Ypsilanti, Dimitri, and Louisa Gosling. _Towards a Global Information
Society: Global Information Infrastructure, Global Information Society:
Policy Requirements_. Paris: Organisation for Economic Co-operation
and Development, 1997. Content of this publication is available in pdf
format through the OECD's site for free documents on Information and
Communications Policy [http://www.oecd.org/dsti/sti/it/prod/online.htm]
in the "Information Economy" section. -- The OECD [www.oecd.org] is
the 29-nation organization which has grown from a core group of
Marshall Plan countries to encompass most of what we consider the
industrialized world. For information technology developments, it is
worth watching as a policy-recommending body which is wrestling with
the big issues: privacy, electronic commerce, media convergence,
infrastructure and the gap between the wired and the left behind.
Reading their publications is a refreshing change from those which
reflect only American views. For example, the membership voted down
the Clinton administration's proposed key escrow encryption system
two years ago, and has debated several alternatives, revealing a range of
attitudes about privacy and law enforcement (see the OECD Information
Security and Privacy page
[http://www.oecd.org/dsti/sti/it/secur/index.htm]). _Towards a Global
Information Society_ is recommended as a focal point for the study of
global information issues. Don't be put off by the rather inflated,
abstract tone of the introduction - after all, these are the real "big
picture" people, and the succeeding chapters do get down to specifics
about particular problems and trends and the agencies which can influence
them. I found the attention paid to media content to be particularly
interesting; one aspect was a discussion of consolidated ownership vs.
the preservation of cultural and linguistic diversity (the authors are of
the opinion that policies which encourage the development of a variety of
multimedia services also encourage the proliferation of sources of local
content). References throughout the text are well-documented in an
extensive
bibliography; one citation in particular deserves mention here, the OECD's
own _Information Technology Outlook_
[http://www.oecd.org/dsti/sti/it/prod/itblurb.htm]
which is the source for many of the tables and graphs. -- JR
Current Cites 9(4) (April 1998) ISSN: 1060-2356 Copyright 1998
by the Library, University of California, Berkeley. _All rights reserved._
All product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their
respective holders. Mention of a product in this publication does not
necessarily imply endorsement of the product.
[URL:http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/]
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CURRENT CITES volume 9, no 5, May 1998


Date: Wed, 3 Jun 1998 08:29:12 +0800 (WST)
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Subject: Current Cites May 1998

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[Digital libraries, XML, and much more. One thing I find striking about
Current Cites in general and this issue in particular is how much of
library work consists of administering technical standards -- not just
defining them or building things that use them, but managing work that
conforms to them, managing the transition from one standard to another,
defining best practices for work that is conducted using them, and so
on. Standards these days are too often shaped by competitive strategies
rather than by good engineering, and markets have proven uneven in their
ability to stifle this effect. In this way, librarians are the canaries
in the coalmine -- an unusually well-organized constituency that has
to think through the consequences of putting particular standards into
practice.]

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Date: Mon, 1 Jun 1998 15:10:01 -0700
From: CITES Moderator <citeschk@library.berkeley.edu
To: Multiple recipients of list <cites@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: Current Cites May 1998



_Current Cites_
Volume 9, no. 5
May 1998
The Library
University of California, Berkeley
Edited by Teri Andrews Rinne
ISSN: 1060-2356
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/1998/cc98.9.5.html

Contributors:

Christof Galli, Kirk Hastings, Terry Huwe,
Margaret Phillips, Richard Rinehart, Roy Tennant
Jim Ronningen, Lisa Yesson


Digital Libraries

Fox, Edward A. and Gary Marchionini. "Toward a Worldwide Digital
Library" Communications of the ACM 41(4) (April 1998). -- As they have
done before, (see the April 1995 issue of Current Cites) the
Communications of the ACM has devoted an issue to the topic of digital
libraries. Anyone involved in digital library development probably has
favorite online resources (such as our own Digital Library SunSITE
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/) for diving deep into specific problems,
but this provides a wide scope in one neat package. To quote from the
introduction, "This special section is a snapshot of the current state
of digital library development around the world." The worldwide
digital library theme has been carried out by including articles which
focus upon technical, informational and social interoperability across
national boundaries. The special section is broken up into the
following categories: Interoperability, Special Types of Digital
Libraries, Multilingual Support, National Efforts, and Supporting
Technologies. And there's a related "Legally Speaking" column by
Pamela Samuelson titled "Encoding the Law into Digital Libraries." As
always with CACM, the work is scholarly, well-documented and
foot-noted. -- JR

Hanson, Terry. "The Access Catalogue Gateway to Resources" Ariadne 15
(May 1998) [http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue15/main/]. -- Libraries can
no longer be complacent with merely providing structured access to
their holdings through their library catalog. Users must also be
guided to CD-ROM and Internet resources in a way that makes sense and
that integrates them as much as possible with traditional print
resources. The typical strategies so far include adding electronic and
Internet resources to the library catalog or creating a separate and
parallel catalog to the existing catalog of print materials. Neither
solution is without its problems. In this article Hanson proposes a
new kind of access paradigm that subsumes the library catalog of print
materials beneath an over-arching "Access Catalogue." This catalog
would provide integrated access to the complete breadth of information
resources, from which the user could leap off into the one they feel
is most appropriate to their need -- whether it be the traditional
library catalog, or a CD-ROM database, or a Web site. A number of us
have been slouching toward just such a solution, but it is refreshing
to see it so clearly and openly stated. Although this brief piece is
hardly more than the statement of an idea, it is nonetheless of
potentially much greater impact than a longer and more fully
documented article. Those of us who were using Gopher when Mosaic was
introduced understand the power of the right idea at the right time.
Although I don't want to imply that Hanson's model is as potentially
powerful, I do think it is well worth heeding. -- RT

Jensen, Ann. "Taking Local Resources Global: The NCSTRL Experience at
UC Berkeley Library" Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship 18
(Spring 1998)
[http://www.library.ucsb.edu/istl/98-spring/article1.html]. -- This
piece is a straightforward report on a library project to take over
the management of a repository of computer science technical reports
from a computer science department that had participated in a
ground-breaking digital library project called NCSTRL. Although the
topic may not be as "sexy" as other digital library projects -- being
based on technology that has existed for years -- it nonetheless is an
example of the kind of digital library function that should be a
library's bread-and-butter -- providing long-term, structured, and
usable access to useful information. -- RT

Electronic Publishing

Kelly, Brian. RDF Tools Briefing Sheet (May 1998)
[http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/web-focus/events/seminars/what-is-rdf-may1998/
rdf-briefi ng.html]. -- This summary sheet on RDF tools and resources
is extremely helpful for anyone interesting in the Resource
Description Framework, or RDF. RDF is an emerging standard for
encoding metadata using XML syntax. RDF is likely to be an important
standard for anyone creating, exchanging, or using metadata. This
document is extremely up-to-date as of this writing, but as Kelly
wisely notes, this is a "very volatile area." It is available in Adobe
Acrobat, Word 97, and HTML formats. Our readers in the U.S. should
select the option "shrink to fit" when printing it from Adobe Acrobat,
as it is formatted for A4 paper. It is also designed to be distributed
as a one-page, back-to-back, folded handout. You would be hard-pressed
to find any better RDF summary sheet than this. -- RT

Kelly, Brian. What is XML? Ariadne 15 (May 1998)
[http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue15/what-is/]. -- The question posed by
the article title is on the lips of many individuals these days, and
will be pondered by even more in the days to come. Kelly's piece,
written in the question-and-answer format popularized by net
"Frequently Asked Questions" documents (FAQs), is aimed at answering
only the most basic questions about XML. However, those who know a bit
more than the basics may be pleasantly surprised by up-to-date
pointers to some interesting papers from the Seventh International
World Wide Web Conference. -- RT

Miller, Eric. "An Introduction to the Resource Description Framework"
D-Lib Magazine (May 1998)
[http://www.dlib.org/dlib/may98/miller/05miller.html]. -- Let's not
mince words. The Resource Description Framework, or RDF, is not for
the faint of heart. Anyone who has difficulty with the concept of
_labeled directed graphs_, yours truly included, will find themselves
wishing they had a dentist's appointment they could rush off to when
confronted with RDF syntax. But surely, you think, this preamble is
leading up to something more engaging than having one's teeth pulled,
right? Right. There _is_ a reason to endure such pain. If you've ever
wished for a mechanism by which you could encode, exchange, and use
structured metadata on the Web, then here it is. RDF is an emerging
solution to a variety of problems, from "cataloging" Web pages to
providing browsing of a Web site hierarchy and more. So pull up an
armchair, lean back, and open wide. The doctor is "in." -- RT

Stepanek, Marcia. "From Digits to Dust" Businessweek 3574 (April 20,
1998): 128. -- Librarians will be shocked! Shocked! To learn that
digital preservation is a vital issue. This article covers the growing
awareness among technology managers that digital information, much of
will never appear on paper, is subject to decay and degradation. In
many cases, the actual life span of CD-ROMs and other formats are no
longer than the life span of paper copies, despite the fact digital
copies are far more expensive to develop. Although this article is
very well written and informative, it falls into a very common trap of
business writers: a lack of research on the preservation initiatives
that originate in the library world. Maybe if digital preservation
values and strategies of librarians were more widely known, we
wouldn't be in such a pickle. This article makes it abundantly clear
that consideration of preservation issues must be folded into the
design process for digital formats. -- TH

Multimedia & Hypermedia

Donovan, Kevin. "The Promise of the FlashPix Image File Format" RLG
DigiNews 2(2) (April 15, 1998)
[http://www.rlg.org/preserv/diginews/diginews22.html#FlashPix]. -- One
of the critical questions at the moment for anyone doing serious image
work on the Web is what the next image format will be. It's clear that
the ubiquitous formats of GIF (Compuserve's Graphic Interchange
Format) and JPEG (the Joint Photographic Engineers Group
specification) are sufficient for providing Web eye candy, but they
are clearly deficient for serving high-resolution images. The problem
is that there is no clear winner among several competing formats.
FlashPix is one of these formats, and this article does a decent job
of explaining what it is all about. Can you implement it and be
certain it will be the format of the future? Perhaps, perhaps not. But
with Eastman Kodak, Hewlett-Packard, Live Picture, Inc., and Microsoft
behind it, you can't count it out either. At least with the help of
this article you will know about about your options. -- RT

Gulick, Rebecca. "Adobe Proposes PGML as Web Image Standard" MacWeek
12(15) (April 20, 1998): 1,8 -- Adobe, along with Netscape, IBM, and
other supporters proposed PGML as the new standard for vector-based
images for the Web to the W3C. Vector-based images are not defined as
a fixed set of pixels, but rather as algorithims. One of their
benefits is that a Web site could host a very high-resolution
vector-based image, which when delivered by the intelligent Web server
gets "dumbed down" into a lower-resolution image for the browser for
speed, but the end-user could "zoom" in on the image and request
higher and higher resolutions from the server. This would obviously
enable many uses for which the Web is now impractical, and could
greatly reduce the storage and mangement problems of multiple versions
of image files. PGML is not the only standard being proposed, but the
move toward vector-based images in general should be watched closely.
-- RR

Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language (SMIL) 1.0 Specification
(April 9, 1998) World Wide Web Consortium. -- A new proposal for a Web
based standard for multimedia. the Synchronized Multimedia Integration
Language (or SMIL; thanks Timothy Leary 8-) ) is an XML-based language
for integrating multimedia (audio, video, images) on the Web. Full
approval is pending and the SMIL specification can be found at
http://www.w3.org/TR/PR-smil. -- RR

Networks & Networking

Platt, Nina. "GPO Access - Government At Its Best?" Database 21 (2)
(April/May 1998): 41-43. -- If you've ever been frustrated by trying
to locate U.S. government information you may be pleased to read Nina
Platt's review of recent improvements to GPO Access
[http://www.access.gpo.gov/], the U.S. Government Printing Office's
electronic directory of Federal Government information. GPO Access
includes government information databases (such as The Federal
Register and The Code of Federal Regulation), individual Federal
agency files from the Federal Bulletin Board and tools for finding
government information. GPO Access also provides multiple access
options and general and specialized search pages. Platt acknowledges
that GPO Access has been available since 1994, but only recently has
begun to live up to its promise, by adding more resources and
simplifying the search process. -- LY

Proceedings of the 7th International World Wide Web Conference,
Brisbane, Australia April 14-18, 1998
[http://www7.conf.au/programme/fullprog.html]. -- The International
WWW Conference is the Web conference for academics and researchers.
Unlike conferences such as Internet World or Interop, you won't be
bumping into too many suits in the halls. This is both good and bad,
if you're of a practical bent. If you're looking for Web solutions you
can implement today, you will find few of them here. But if you want
to know where the Web may be heading, discover what technical
possibilities there are, and sample some cutting-edge solutions to Web
problems, this is the place. You will likely find that many of the
papers are of limited interest, but even if you find only one or two
that expands your knowledge about what is possible on the Web, it will
be worth a visit. My guess is you will. -- RT

Udell, Jon. "Effective HTML Forms" BYTE 23(5) (May 1998): 103-106
[http://www.byte.com/art/9805/sec7/art1.htm]. -- I don't normally cite
individual articles on creating Web documents, but this one has such
great advice about a Web structure that is so often done poorly, I
couldn't help myself. Udell, who doubles as the BYTE Web manager, not
only targets the markup with comments like "Mark required elements"
and "Use layout and visual cues to organize elements" (he gives
examples), but also the programs that will process the input: "Accept
all unambiguous inputs" (for example, (XXX) XXX-XXX or XXX-XXX-XXXX
for phone numbers) and "Use short error messages linked to longer
explanations." By the way, it's not absolutely necessary, but it will
help a lot if you know a little Perl, or at least some programming
language. -- RT

Optical Disc Technology

Herther, Nancy K. "CD-ROM to DVD-ROM: Moving Optical Storage Along a
Bumpy Road into the New Century" Database 21 (2) (April/May 1998):
26-36. -- Will the deployment of DVD technology benefit from the
CD-ROM learning curve? This is the question that Nancy Herther
discusses in this overview of the optical storage industry. DVD is the
next generation high density compact disc. While CD-ROMs can store
about 650MB of data or music, DVD discs can store between 4.7 GB to 17
GB - enough for more than a full-length MPEG-2 compressed motion
picture. DVD, if successful, will eventually replace videotapes,
laserdiscs, CD-Audio, CD-ROMs and other video game formats. After
interviewing over 35 industry participants and experts, Herther
concludes that this will depend on the resolution of remaining
standards issues, Win98 support for DVD, the number of available DVD
titles and backward compatibility with current CDs (DVD and DVD-ROM
players must be able to play today's current CDs). She also provides a
brief history of the CD-ROM industry, a helpful summary of the the
various CD and DVD formats (including recordable) and an extensive
list of Web resources for additional background information. -- LY
_________________________________________________________________

Current Cites 9(5) (May 1998) ISSN: 1060-2356 Copyright
1998 by the Library, University of California, Berkeley. _All rights
reserved._

All product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their
respective holders. Mention of a product in this publication does not
necessarily imply endorsement of the product.

[URL:http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/]

To subscribe, send the message "sub cites [your name]" to
listserv@library.berkeley.edu, replacing "[your name]" with your
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Libraries are authorized to add the journal to their collections at no
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ftp://ftp.lib.berkeley.edu/pub/Current.Cites].
This message must appear on copied material. All commercial use
requires permission from the editor, who may be reached at
trinne@library.berkeley.edu //

ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

CURRENT CITES volume 9, no 6, June 1998


Date: Thu, 2 Jul 1998 10:07:10 +0000
Priority: normal
Subject: (Fwd) Current Cites 9(6) Jun '98
From: "Virginia Cano" <v.cano@mail.qmced.ac.uk>
Sender: lis-fid-request@mailbase.ac.uk
Errors-To: lis-fid-request@mailbase.ac.uk



Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 11:15:35 -0700
From: CITES Moderator <citeschk@library.berkeley.edu>
Subject: Current Cites June 1998



_Current Cites_
Volume 9, no. 6
June 1998
The Library
University of California, Berkeley
Edited by Teri Andrews Rinne
ISSN: 1060-2356
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/1998/cc98.9.6.html

Contributors:

Christof Galli, Kirk Hastings, Terry Huwe,
Margaret Phillips, Richard Rinehart, Roy Tennant
Jim Ronningen, Lisa Yesson

DIGITAL LIBRARIES

Guthrie, Kevin. "JSTOR and the University of Michigan: An Evolving
Collaboration" Library Hi Tech 16 (1) (1998): 9-14. -- This special
issue of Library Hi Tech features the dynamic cultural and
technological changes affecting the University of Michigan library
arena. With the recent attention on scholarly communication and
collaboration, it's timely to take a closer look at Michigan's
relationship with JSTOR (short for Journal STORage, at
http://www.jstor.org/), and their progress in making backfiles of
selected journals available in electronic form. Originally a grant
project of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, with ten test journals and
six test libraries, JSTOR is now an independent, not-for-profit
organization with approximately 250 paying library participants and 70
journals committed to contributing content. Guthrie, JSTOR's
President, chronicles the history of this collaboration and notes that
it provided the flexibility necessary to meet the administrative
structures, organizational processes and physical plant requirements
of a fast-growing entrepreneurial enterprise. While Guthrie
acknowledges the challenges involved in a distributed organizational
model, he believes that the benefits outweigh the costs. He expresses
the organization's commitment to maintaining its close relationship
with the university community to ensure that JSTOR remains responsive
to user needs. Ideally their lessons can be applied not only to other
digital library initiatives, but also to other areas ripe for
self-sustaining enterprises. -- LY

Payette, Sandra D. and Oya Y. Rieger. "Supporting Scholarly Inquiry:
Incorporating Users in the Design of the Digital Library" The Journal
of Academic Librarianship 24(2) (March 1998):121-129. -- Through a
series of questionnaires and interviews with faculty and students, the
Mann Library at Cornell University conducted a study to find out how
users engage in research using its digital Gateway. The study sought
to assess the effectiveness of the existing design, and to develop
principles to be used in developing the next generation of the
Gateway. Users, it seems, do not engage in scholarly research that is
linear, highly structured and logical and therefore digital libraries
need to be designed in a way that minimizes hierarchical, linear
metaphors and that create features that can be customized to an
individual's personal style and technical capabilities. The Gateway
was designed with input from earlier focus groups but, interestingly,
the more recent user survey showed that users were not, in fact,
taking advantage of features developed in response to their expressed
requirements! In addition to describing the experiences at Cornell
University, the article provides an excellent review of the literature
of user studies in the digital library context. -- MP

ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING

Balas, Janet. "Copyright in the Digital Era" Computers in Libraries
18(6) (June 1998) (http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/jun/story2.htm) --
The title doesn't offer a clue that this is a great annotated
collection of sources for researching current issues in copyrighted
information. You may be burying your head in the sand while chanting
the "fair use" mantra (which is pretty hard to do with sand in your
mouth), but aren't you curious what the United States Copyright
Office, the American Library Association, the Digital Future
Coalition, the Creative Incentive Coalition and others have to say
about it? URLs are given for the relevant pages from each
organization, along with commentary about the role each one plays in
shaping copyright policy or depicting the current state of affairs
(which might be analogous to a strobe-lit snapshot of a nighttime mob
scene). Here's a shortcut to one document which is highly relevant for
many of us: "Reproductions of Copyrighted Works by Educators and
Librarians" (http://lcweb.loc.gov/copyright/circs/circ21) which is
U.S. Copyright Office Copyright Information Circular 21. Curl up with
your favorite TV lawyer (surely preoccupied with other things) and
have a good long read. -- JR

Kasdorf, Bill. "SGML and PDF: Why We Need Both" Journal of Electronic
Publishing 3(4) (June 1998)
(http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/03-04/kasdorf.html). -- Discussions
about appropriate digital file formats often degenerate to the level
of a debate, in which advocates of one format slug it out with
proponents of another. Thus this article is a refreshing perspective,
in which the benefits of two very different publication formats are
examined for their utility in different situations. The not
unsurprising conclusion is that one format does not prevent
publication in the other, and publishing in both is often beneficial.
-- RT

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY & SOCIETY

Digital Future Coalition (www.dfc.org) -- This is not an article per
se, but a web resource and organization. DFC is an umbrella lobbying
and information sharing organization concentrating on issues of
intellectual property and copyright legislation and policy worldwide.
Members include the American Library Association and the Society of
American Archivists, etc. Their explicit aim is to lobby for balanced
legislation that protects access to information as well as the ability
to regulate and produce profit from information. Whether one agrees
with their approach or not, the site is a useful place to get the full
text of major new legislation and critical responses to everthing from
the Conference on Fair Use to (U.S.) National Information
Infrastructure (NII) bills to the international WIPO agreement. -- RR

Dyson, Esther. "Privacy Protection: Time to Think and Act Locally and
Globally" First Monday 3 (6) (1998)
(http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue3_6/dyson/) -- Noted social and
technology critic Esther Dyson surveys the current state of privacy on
the Internet, examining the interplay of cyberspace and local
jurisdictions. While various, "non-central" groups advocate new types
of encryption protocols to help us gain a semblance of privacy,
different cultures around the globe--and the laws they
promulgate--have little common ground. Therefore privacy on the Net is
not only a technology issue, but a key issue for global society. -- TH


Williams, Leonard. "Teaching Cyberian Politics" First Monday 3 (6)
(1998) (http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue3_6/williams/) --
Williams describes his experience in teaching a college course on the
"politics of cyberspace"--using Web-based syllabi and other dynamic
tools. The close match between the course subject matter and the
learning process students employed in using the Web was a powerful
combination. Williams argues that the approach he took, with its
emphasis on direct experience, boosted students' critical thinking
skills about technology and society. -- TH

MULTIMEDIA & HYPERMEDIA

National Council on Disability. Access to Multimedia Technology by
People with Sensory Disabilities. Washington: The Council, 1998. 86
p. (http://purl.access.gpo.gov/GPO/LPS764) -- This report focuses on
barriers to the use of computerized multimedia technology by people
who have visual or hearing impairments. It's a good source for an
overview of what types of problems are encountered and what remedies
are in place or coming up. As with most government reports by
committee, there's a bit of a lag regarding new technology, but it
wasn't intended to be a list of what's cutting edge; rather, it's an
attempt to enlighten about the uses of broader categories of
technology, like under what circumstances audio description elements
can be most appropriate. For policy-watchers, the relevant sections of
the Rehabilitation Act and Telecommunications Act are discussed, with
recommendations for specific areas needing stronger enforcement. -- JR


NETWORKS & NETWORKING

Boutin, Paul. "Browser Beware" Wired 6.06 (June 1998): 185.
(http://www.wired.com/wired/6.06/) -- If you're trying to make the
best of a 16-bit Windows computer or are fed up with the memory
demands of your current browser, a 7-person engineering team from
Norway may offer hope with Opera (in Wired's words, "a 1.2-Mbyte
marvel"). Opera puts Microsoft and Netscape in their place when it
comes to speed and HTML standards compliance. It is also adept at
juggling multiple windows, and only requires a 386 with 6 megs of RAM.
So have they built a better mousetrap? Well, there are no non-Windows
versions currently available and Opera is weaker on support for
Unicode 16-bit international character sets, but it does meet the need
for speed. Opera 4.0 (with Java and CSS2 style sheet support) is due
out this summer and for $35 (less for education customers) can be
found at http://www.operasoftware.com/. -- LY

Clark, Kathleen A., Priscilla C. Geahigan, Thomas R. Mirkovich, and
Anita D. Haynes. "Internet Resources: Cruising for Travel Information"
College & Research Libraries News
(http://www.ala.org/acrl/resjun98.html) 59(6) (June 1998): 427-431. --
Just in time for summer, this month's list of Internet resources looks
at travel. Included in the list are addresses for sites that can give
you information (mostly oriented to travel in the United States) about
accommodations, restaurant guides and other mega travel sites (like
Yahoo!'s travel page: http://www.yahoo.com/Recreation/Travel/). Also
handy are sites for traveling abroad like the Centers for Disease
Control (CDC) Travel Information (http://www.cdc.gov/) and the
Intellicast World Weather guide
(http://www.intellicast.com/weather/intl/). -- MP

Khare, Rohit, and Rifkin, Adam. "Trust Management on the World Wide
Web" First Monday 3 (6) (1998)
(http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue3_6/khare/) -- The authors
describe a new concept for managing sensitive information on the
Internet, which encourages open, decentralized systems that span
multiple domains. The system, called "trust management," aims to
disperse decision-making and analysis about how to protect sensitive
data throughout organizations, asking "why" instead of "how." The
basic elements of the system are "principles, principals, and
policies." Document authoring and distribution is used as a concrete
example of how the system would work. -- TH

Mace, Scott. "DSL's Devilish Details" BYTE 23(7) (July 1998): 72-80.
-- As any Internet user knows, you can never have too much speed. This
is certainly true of home connections. Even with a 56K modem, Web
pages never seem to come up fast enough. But now that Asymmetric
Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL), or xDSL, or now simply DSL, is on the
horizon, at least some relief may be at hand. But as this article
points out, what exactly is "at hand" is still very much an open
question. Perhaps the most telling evidence of uncertainty in the
marketplace is depicted in the chart " ADSL Trials and Service
Deployments," which identifies no fewer than 19 companies worldwide
offering or soon to be offering ADSL service to a particular region of
the world. Virtually all of them are offering a different mix of
upstream and downstream speeds, from 9.6 Kbps upstream (this is
progress?) to 5.5 Mbps (Singapore) and 7Mbps (Nova Scotia) downstream.
Hmmm...all of a sudden cable modems are looking real good to me. -- RT

Sowards, Steven W. "A Typology for Ready Reference Web Sites in
Libraries" First Monday 3 (5) (1998)
(http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue3_5/sowards/) -- "Librarians
and non-librarians alike may overlook important lessons about
information management if they misinterpret the lessons of
librarianship as being confined to the realm of paper," the author
argues. He embarks on a tour and analysis of how librarians are
organizing their Web-based reference guides, so be prepared to add
lots of URLs to your bookmark file when you review this article. He
makes several conclusions that will surely influence your own thoughts
about what works -- and what doesn't -- on the Web. Moreover, it's
refreshing to see someone use blunt language to advocate for the
common sense approaches that librarians employ to help people. Here's
an example: "After the difficulties we meet in navigating relatively
large Web sites remind us why libraries -- which deal with truly large
numbers of elements, running into the millions -- rely on redundancy
and alternative methods to manage content." -- TH

GENERAL

Bales, Susan Nall. "Technology and Tradition: The Future's in the
Balance" American Libraries 29(6) (June/July 1998): 82-86. --
Following up on their report Buildings, Books, and Bytes: Libraries
and Communities in the Digital Age (see the December 1996 issue of
Current Cites), the Benton Foundation has conducted and analyzed six
focus groups aimed at the issues identified in that report. Their
findings will be released in a publication scheduled for release in
July 1998 (watch Current Cites for news of its availability).
Meanwhile, Bales shares some of their findings in this article. Among
them are: "1) Libraries must be portrayed as high touch and high tech,
and in that order, 2) Root all discussions of technology in books and
reading, 3) Teach the public that the librarian is an information
navigator, 4) Emphasize that the library you trust can help you make
the transition to technology, and 5) Recognize the powerful
connections Americans make between libraries and effective parenting."
Libraries are at a critical juncture between the past and the future.
How well librarians meld the traditional with the technical and
present themselves to the public will dictate the role of libraries
in modern society for decades to come. My advice is to get the
original Benton report, this article, the new report when it comes
out, read them, and pay close attention. -- RT

DeJesus, Edmund X. "Year 2000 Survival Guide" BYTE 23(7) (July 1998):
52-62. -- In the thorough and authoritative manner in which BYTE
readers have come to expect, DeJesus outlines the good, the bad, and
the downright ugly aspects of the Year 2000 (Y2K) problem. The bad
news is that even if you start right now, your large legacy systems
will probably not be ready for the millennium in time. The good news
is that you if apply triage strategies and contingency plans well
enough, you may just make it. Out of all the press out there on this
problem, this article cuts through the rhetoric with a hot knife and
summarizes key information in tables, diagrams, and timelines. And
it's the timeline that helps provide comic relief amidst the disaster.
Just think, on January 1, 29602 the Microsoft Windows NT file system
will fail. Better start planning now, Bill. - RT

Smith, K. Wayne, ed. OCLC 1967-1997: Thirty Years of Furthering Access
to the World's Information New York: Haworth Press, 1998. -- When
library historians review the major milestones of the profession over
the last thirty years or so, there will be three developments that
will stand head-and-shoulders above the rest: the creation of the
Machine Readable Cataloging (MARC) format, the codification of the
Anglo-American Cataloging Rules, 2nd edition (AACR2), and the rise of
the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC, since changed to the Online
Computer Library Center). OCLC has evolved to become the hub of
library cataloging records, interlibrary loan transactions, and many
other essential services for thousands of libraries across the United
States and beyond. Although anyone not curious about OCLC would
probably not be interested in this volume (simultaneously published as
the Journal of Library Administration, 25 (2/3 - 4) (1998), it serves
as a useful chronicle of a good idea that helped to transform
libraries and library services. -- RT
_________________________________________________________________

Current Cites 9(6) (June 1998) ISSN: 1060-2356
Copyright 1998 by the Library, University of California,
Berkeley. All rights reserved.
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/1998/cc98.9.6.html

Copying is permitted for noncommercial use by computerized bulletin
board/conference systems, individual scholars, and libraries.
Libraries are authorized to add the journal to their collections at no
cost. This message must appear on copied material. All commercial use
requires permission from the editor

All product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their
respective holders. Mention of a product in this publication does not
necessarily imply endorsement of the product.

To subscribe to the Current Cites distribution list, send the message
"sub cites [your name]" to listserv@library.berkeley.edu, replacing
"[your name]" with your name. To unsubscribe, send the message "unsub
cites" to the same address.

Editor: Teri Andrews Rinne, trinne@library.berkeley.edu,
(510) 642-8173


xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx


DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS - CALL FOR PAPERS


Date: Wed, 20 May 1998 08:16:31 -0400
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
<ASIS-L@asis.org>
From: Cassandra Armstrong <brush@LIS.PITT.EDU>
Subject: Call for Papers: Special Issue of DSS (fwd)

---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Tue, 19 May 1998 15:01:47 -0700
From:LYNCH@BPA.Arizona.EDU
To: abishop@uiuc.edu, adwait@unagi.cis.upenn.edu, agrawal@cs.ucsb.edu,
aitao@sims.berkeley.edu, akiba@sis.pitt.edu, alan@nlm.nih.gov,
alex@cs.cmu.edu, allan@cs.umass.edu, alp4g@cs.virginia.edu,
amykir@princeton.edu
Cc: LYNCH@BPA.Arizona.EDU
Subject: Call for Papers: Special Issue of DSS

*** Due Date: October 15, 1998 ***

Special Issue of Decision Support Systems

"From Information Retrieval to Knowledge Management:
Enabling Technologies and Best Practices"

Dr. Hsinchun Chen, The University of Arizona

CALL FOR PAPERS

Decision Support Systems will publish a special issue on "From Information
Retrieval to Knowledge Management: Enabling Technologies and Best Practices"
that will report on original research on the development and use of
effective information management and knowledge management technologies
and practices. Emerging, scaleable systems, techniques, and practices
which are at the intersection of information retrieval, artificial
intelligence, and management information systems are of particular interest.

Topics include, but are not limited to:
* Information retrieval systems and techniques
* Electronic document management systems
* Internet and Intranet search engines
* Information and content management
* Digital library applications and systems
* Groupware and collaboration technologies and case studies
* Knowledge discovery and machine learning techniques and case studies
* Textual knowledge mining
* Advanced, interactive information visualization
* Advanced human-computer interactions
* Single and multiple-agent based systems and architectures
* Information/knowledge management consulting practices
* Case studies and implementations in competitive intelligence, intellectual
capital, knowledge chain, and corporate memory

Send five copies of your manuscript by October 15, 1998 to:

Hsinchun Chen
Professor, Management Information Systems Department
Director, Artificial Intelligence Lab
The University of Arizona
McClelland Hall 430Z
Tucson, AZ 85721
TEL: (520) 621-4153, FAX: (520) 621-2433
email: hchen@bpa.arizona.edu
Web site: http://ai.bpa.arizona.edu

**************************************************************************************


DigiNews volume 2, issue 3

Date: Fri, 19 Jun 1998 12:09:18 -0700 (PDT)
Reply-To: oyr1@cornell.edu
Sender: diglibns@sunsite.berkeley.edu
From: "Oya Y. Rieger" <oyr1@cornell.edu>
Subject: [DIGLIBNS:694] New issue of RLG DigiNews now available!


**This message is being cross-posted, please excuse any duplication**

Volume 2, Issue 3 of RLG DigiNews, the web-based, quarterly
newsletter is now available at:

http://www.rlg.org/preserv/diginews/

The June issue contains a feature article by Anne R. Kenney and Oya
Y. Rieger of Cornell University's Preservation Department.
Their article, "Using Kodak Photo CD Technology for Preservation and
Access: A Guide for Librarians, Archivists, and Curators,"
summarizes the results of a Cornell study that evaluated the use of
Kodak Photo CD technology for preserving and making available a
range of research material. The study, funded by a grant from the
New York State Education Department's Program for the Conservation
and Preservation of Library Research Materials, was inspired by the
strong interest in the use of Kodak Photo CD technology within the
cultural community and was conducted in cooperation with the eleven
New York State comprehensive research libraries.

The issue also contains two technical feature articles. The first,
"The Promise of DVDs for Digital Libraries," is from Steve Gilheany
of Archive Builders. In his piece, Gilheany describes the DVD
(Digital Video Disk or Digital Versatile Disk) and its promise as a
new storage medium. Article specifics include storage capacity, DVD
and multimedia, costs, and backward compatibility issues. The
second technical piece, "Fractal and Wavelet Compression," is by
Steven Puglia of the National Archives and Records Administration
(US). In his article, Puglia discusses two new methods of image
compression which are generating a great deal of interest from
institutions digitizing and providing access to oversized materials
such as maps, architectural plans, and engineering drawings. The
new compression methods, already in use at several US institutions,
offer real advantages for providing access to large, complex images
via the Internet.

As with earlier issues, rounding out this issue is a current
calendar of events, project announcements, highlighted web sites,
and a FAQ about the difference between the optical resolution and
the interpolated resolution of scanners.

Readers can continue to search issues of RLG DigiNews by keyword or
browse the hyperlinked tables of content of available issues.

For more information about RLG or PRESERV, please contact
Robin Dale (bl.rld@rlg.org).



_____________________________________________

Oya Y. Rieger
Digital Projects Librarian
Cornell University Library
701 Olin Library
Ithaca, NY 14853

Email: oyr1@cornell.edu
Phone: (607) 254-5160
D-LIB, June 1998

**************************************************************************************

D-LIB MAGAZINE - JUNE 1998


Date: Tue, 16 Jun 1998 10:50:26 -0400
Sender: International Federation of Library Associations mailing list
<IFLA-L@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA>
From: Terry Kuny <Terry.Kuny@xist.com>
Subject: [SERIAL] June 1998 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

The June 1998 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available at
<http://www.dlib.org>. The UK Office for Library and Information
Networking maintains a mirror site for D-Lib Magazine at:
<http://hosted.ukoln.ac.uk/mirrored/lis-journals/dlib/>, and The
Australian National University Sunsite also maintains a mirror at
<http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib>.

We apologize in advance if you have inadvertently received a copy of
this notice. If you wish to have your e-mail address removed from our
list, please send a message to dlib@cnri.reston.va.us.

In this issue, we feature research stories about implementation projects
in electronic publishing, URN resolution schemes, and distributed
searching of metadata, together with two stories about issues in the
humanities and cultural heritage programs. Clips features program
updates from the NSF, including one on DLI-2; the D-Lib Metrics Working
Group; longer discussions of several new resources; and the usual
selection of meetings and new or newly-identified materials.


CONTENTS

Physical Review Online Archives (PROLA): An Image Archive for the
Journal Physical Review
Timothy Thomas
Los Alamos National Laboratory

A Distributed Architecture for Resource Discovery Using Metadata
Michael Roszkowski and Christopher Lukas
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Resolving DOI Based URNs Using Squid: An Experimental System at UKOLN
Andy Powell
UKOLN

Pass-Through Proxying as a Solution to the Off-Site Web-Access Problem
Richard Goerwitz
Brown University Scholarly Technology Group

Authenticity of Digital Resources: Towards a Statement of Requirements
in the Research Process
David Bearman and Jennifer Trant
Archives & Museum Informatics


Information and Communications Technology in the Cultural Sector: The
Need for National Strategies
Seamus Ross and Maria Economou
HATII, University of Glasgow


D-Lib Magazine is produced by the Corporation for National Research
Initiatives and is sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects
Agency (DARPA) on behalf of the NSF/DARPA/NASA Digital Libraries
Initiative.

William Y. Arms, Vice President
Amy Friedlander, Editor, D-Lib Magazine


*************************************************************************************
GREYNET vol 7, no 2, 1998

Return-path: <Dominic.Farace@inter.NL.net>
Date: Tue, 12 May 1998 21:37:44 +0200 (MET DST)
From: "Dominic.Farace" <Dominic.Farace@inter.NL.net>
To: Kerry Smith <kerry@biblio.curtin.edu.au>
Subject: GreyNet Newsletter Volume 7, Number 2, 1998


GREYNET'S NEWSLETTER ------------------------------------------------------

NewsBriefNews, Vol.7, No.2, 1998. - ISSN 0929-0923 (E-mail Version)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
CONTENTS: COLUMN:

Thematic Approach to Grey Literature 1
Columbia University Survey on Grey Literature 2
Selected Examples of Scientific Grey Literature 3
Field Placement Program, College of Amsterdam 4
GreyNet's Website Statistics 5
Annotated Bibliography on Grey Literature 6
Publication Order Form 7

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
EDITORIAL ADDRESS:

TransAtlantic| Grey Literature Network Service
Koninginneweg 201, 1075 CR Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Tel/Fax: 31-20-671.1818 | Email: GreyNet@inter.nl.net
http://www.konbib.nl/infolev/greynet

Annual subscription: DFL. 40 | US$ 25

oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

GREYNET Vol. 7, No. 3, 1998


Date: Wed, 16 Sep 1998 09:16:23 +0200 (MET DST)
Reply-To: NRLib-L@library.lib.usu.edu
Sender: Maiser@library.lib.usu.edu

GREYNET'S NEWSLETTER ------------------------------------------------------

NewsBriefNews, Vol. 7, No. 3, 1998. - ISSN 0929-0923 (E-mail Version)

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
CONTENTS: COLUMN:

Parallel Publishing, A New Paradigm for Grey Literature 1
Observership on Grey Literature 2
New Publications on the topic of Grey Literature 3
Test GL*SSARY to appear on Website 4
Visitors from Turkey and the USA 5
Data Profiles on GreyNet 6
Pre-Call for Papers GL'99 7

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
EDITORIAL ADDRESS:

TransAtlantic|GreyNet, Grey Literature Network Service
Koninginneweg 201, 1075 CR Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Tel/Fax: 31-20-671.1818 | Email: GreyNet@inter.nl.net
http://www.konbib.nl/infolev/greynet

Annual subscription: DFL. 40 | US$ 25

===========================================================================

[1]. P A R A L L E L P U B L I S H I N G, A NEW PARADIGM FOR GL

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Parallel publishing is a term used to denote the relationship
that has developed between the authors and producers of grey and
commercial literature. A development that has been intensified
by the advance of electronic publishing and the Internet.
Until recent, commercial publishers had built a wall around their
publications to ward off the influx of grey literature.
Publications which to them were inferior, without peer-review,
that which was part of the obscure realm. Nevertheless, at times,
commercial publishers would venture out into this grey realm in
order to explore, identify, and capture material, which they
would transform into white or commercial literature.

With the rise of electronic publishing and the internet,
commercial publishers have had to rethink a new paradigm in which
to better understand and deal with grey literature.
No wall can be built high enough to ward-off the expanding
production of electronic grey literature.

What we are now witnessing is the recognition on the part of
commercial publishers that grey literature is also of value, that
most of the grey literature will remain in the grey circuit and
will not obscure their commercial endeavors. This new perspective
on grey literature has caused commercial publishers to go beyond
their periodic ventures into the grey realm, by actively linking
their peer reviewed and commercially published literature to
other sources responsible for their very creation and authorship.

As intermediary, GreyNet seeks to encourage and facilitate both
commercial publishers and corporate authors to identify and link
peripheral data and information -- such as preprints, research
and technical notes, as well as a host of other electronic,
digital, and multimedia grey literature -- to mainstream core
publications. Such endeavors would be widely applauded by the
producers and users of grey literature. Not to mention libraries
and information centers, who would readily tap such new and
innovative resources.
From the Editor
Dominic J. Farace

**************************************************************************************
INFORMATION PROCESSING AND MANAGEMENT - Call for papers

Date: Mon, 27 Jul 1998 16:30:41 -0400Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
From: Gretchen Whitney <gwhitney@utkux.utcc.utk.edu>
Subject: Info Proc & Mgt Call for papers
To: Multiple recipients of list JESSE <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>

Original garbled in transmission. --gw

CALL FOR PAPERS

Special topic issue of the journal Information Processing and Management

Web Research and Information Retrieval

A special topic issue of Information Processing and Management is
scheduled to appear in 1999 on the topic of Web Research and Information
Retrieval. Dr. Amanda Spink of the University of North Texas and Dr. Jian
Qin of the University of Southern Mississippi will be the guest editors.
This special topic issue provides a forum for original research that is
targeted to theories and applications in information organization and
retrieval in the Web environment. Papers in this area are being solicited.
Specific topics of interest include, but are not limted to, the following:

1. Content acquisition and processing in Web-based digital libraries

2. Information retrieval research and its implications on methods and
tools for informatio organization and retrieval on the Web, including
search engines

3. Information retrieval and knowledge discovery in the transition from
conventional systems such as DIALOG and Lexis/Nexis to Web-based systems

4. Interaction between users and Web-based information and search
engines, and design of interfaces

5. Evaluative and comparative study of conventional and Web-based
information organization and retrieval systems

Information about IP&M as well as Instructions to Contributors is
available on
the WWW server
http://www/elsevier.nl/locate/infoproman/

All manuscripts will be reviewed by a select panel of referees. Interested
authors should submit four copies (hard-copy only) of their article by 1
November 1998 to:

Dr. Amanda Spink
School of Library and Information Sciences
University of North Texas
P.O. Box 311068
Denton Texas 76203
Phone: 940-565-2187 Fax: 940-565-3101
E-mail: spink@lis.admin.unt.edu

Dr. Jian Qin
School of Library and Information Science
University of Southern Mississippi
Box 5146
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-5146
Phone: 601-266-4232 Fax: 601-266-5774
E-mail: jqin@ocean.otr.usm.edu

**************************************************************************************

INFORMATION RESEARCH - "new" issue


Approved-By: TOM WILSON <T.D.Wilson@SHEFFIELD.AC.UK>
Date: Wed, 1 Apr 1998 11:51:09 +0100
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
From: TOM WILSON <T.D.Wilson@sheffield.ac.uk>
Subject: Information Research: an electronic journal

A new "issue" of Information Research is available at:

http://www.shef.ac.uk/~is/publications/infres/ircont.html

The following is -

Editorial

This issue of Information Research marks a change in
policy for the journal: a move towards a fully
peer-refereed scholarly journal. The next issue will be
composed almost entirely of refereed papers, but we shall
continue to publish unrefereed papers, if they are of
interest to our audience. In fact, it seems that the
quality of the papers in Information Research has been
such that the lack of a refereeing process has not
bothered those who cite them and refer their students to
them. Does this suggest that quality of Editorial control
is perhaps as important (or, possibly, more important)
than peer reviewing?

Our first refereed paper - from Dr. Elena Maceviciuté of
the Faculty of Communication, Vilnius University,
Lithuania (with apologies for the missing diacritic in her
name - my HTML editor lacks the appropriate special
symbol). Dr. Maceviciuté deals with a topic of great
interest everywhere - the growth of the market for
information professionals - but the topic is especially
pressing in the Baltic states, where educational
programmes are being quickly revised as a consequence of a
newly-gained independence at the height of a technological
revolution.

The second paper, also refereed, is on computer assistance
to human abstractors, by Tim Craven of Western Ontario.
Tim describes the use of software, developed by himself,
for speeding up the process of creating an abstract and
reports upon an evaluation of the software under a Natural
Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada grant.

The third paper is on The public reception of the Research
Assessment Exercise 1996 by Dr. Julian Warner of the
School of Management, The Queen's University of Belfast,
Northern Ireland. Dr. Warner has accomplished the very
interesting task of mapping the response in the various
daily and weekly newspapers to the results of the 1996 RAE
in the UK and his findings suggest that, while the
response may be limited to the "quality" newspapers, the
RAE has made an impact on the public image of research in
UK universities.

Finally, we have a paper from the Editor and a couple of
Master's students, who carried out research under his
direction in 1996 and 1997 into Business use of the World
Wide Web continuing the work that was reported in an
earlier issue.

Prof. Tom Wilson, Editor/Webmaster


***************************************************
Professor Tom Wilson, Ph.D.
Research Professor in Information Management
Department of Information Studies
University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, U.K.
Tel. +44-114-222-2631 Fax. +44-114-278-0300
Email: T.D.Wilson@Sheffield.ac.uk
http://www.shef.ac.uk/uni/academic/I-M/is/lecturer/tom1.html

**************************************************************************************
The INFORMATION SOCIETY - Issue 13, No 4 1997

Date: Wed, 27 May 1998 17:54:13 -0500
From: Rob Kling <kling@INDIANA.EDU>
Subject: The Information Society - 13(4)
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science" <ASIS-L@asis.org>
X-Sender: kling@othello.ucs.indiana.edu

The Information Society
Letter from Rob Kling
Editor-in-Chief
For TIS Issue 13(4) (1997)

Special Issue: "The Construction of Personal Identity on the
Internet."

This issue of The Information Society, 13(4), focusses upon
"The Construction of Personal Identity on the Internet." In the
opening article, "Hyperbole over Cyberspace," Eleanor Wynn
and James Katz critique the recent stream of postmodern studies
that portray Internet technologies as novel liberating media
which liberate people from their everyday social worlds and
physical bodies -- a position that was most famously represented
in the mainstream U.S. media by the New Yorker magazine
cartoon in which a dog at a computer terminal says, "On the
Internet, nobody knows that you're a dog." Some of the
postmodern studies also emphasize the way that the Internet is
organized so that people can develop and explore multiple
selves. Wynn and Katz focus on recent books by Sherry Turkle
and A.R. ("Sandy") Stone about the ways that people construct
numerous playful on-line identities. They develop several lines
of analysis to argue that the "Internet does not (primarily)
radically alter the social bases of identity or conventional
constraints on social interaction" although it provides some
important opportunities for new interactional styles or variations
of older interactional styles. One line of analysis is philosophical
-- and is anchored in Heidigger's phenomenology of self. Wynn
and Katz argue that people's on-line identities don't have
sufficient autonomy to be conceptualized as "selves" -- they are
artifacts that are akin to puppets rather than to significant
personas. A second line of argument examines how interacting
on computer networks can entail boundary shifts that do alter
the practices and perceptions of interaction: boundaries between
the social and the technical, the real and the virtual, and what is
public and private.

In their last section, Wynn and Katz examine a number of
studies of social interaction and work on-line -- as well as
particular episodes in LISTSERV discussions and from personal
home pages. They argue that it is common for people to link
their on-line identities to their identities in the workplaces,
family life, and so on. This is a complex theoretical and
empirical paper with which to open this issue -- but one which
provides some compelling critiques of the increasingly popular
postmodern interpretations of life on-line. (A copy has been
made available on TIS's WWW site
http://www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS/ under "Editorial Letters &
Selected Articles.")

The second article, "Social Dynamics of an On-Line Scholarly
Debate," by Philippe Hert illustrates some of Wynn and Katz's
arguments. Hert examines a vociferous debate that was held on a
science-studies LISTSERV (sci-tech-society) in the Fall of
1994. The debate was stimulated, in part, by an article that was
published in the September 9, 1994 issue of Science -- an
extremely influential scientific magazine. The participants
included Paul Gross, who has been nationally visible for his
talks and writings that critique social studies of science, as well
as prominent scholars who conduct such research, including
Steve Fuller and Sharon Traweek. Steve Fuller organized a
conference at Durham University in December 1994 to resolve
the debates. Both the conference and the on-line debates were
reported in The (London) Times Higher Education Supplement
and some science studies newsletters. These debates have real
stakes in the academic world and beyond; and the participants
were not interested in constructing novel on-line identities.


Hert's main analytical interests differ from those of Wynn and
Katz. He carefully examines the social dynamics of the debates,
and participants' interactional strategies and tactics to gain
relative advantage. In particular, some participants managed
their interactions to create a sense of authority and take on

leadership roles while others positioned themselves as notable
critics. Hert's analysis of the staging of the on-line debates and
the participants multiply layered rhetorics defies a simple
summary, and is an important article for TIS readers who are
interested in the social dynamics of on-line social interactions.

Debora Halbert's article, "Discourses of Danger and the
Computer Hacker" examines how narratives of hackers are
developed by various groups to support specific notions of
private property and government secrecy. Halbert traces the
shifting narratives of hackers' identities -- from those where
hackers seen as harmless young adventurous computer nerds
through those in which hackers are seen as terrorists and thieves.
She links the timing of narrative transitions to larger social
events -- the popularization of the World Wide Web and the
commercialization of the Internet. In short, hackers don't simply
construct their identities through interaction on-line; their
identities are also constructed for them and for us by the staff of
policing agencies and commercial firms as a way of advancing
their own institutional interests.

In "Cyberself: The Emergence of Self in On-line Chat,"
Dennis Waskul and Mark Douglass examine the construction of
personal identity in those on-line spaces that are voluntaristic
and playful. Wynn and Katz are keenly aware that many kinds of
professionals work together on-line, and are concerned that the
playful identity behavior of on-line chat is being wildly
overgeneralized by many post-modern analysts. Waskul and
Douglass carefully focus upon these spaces, which are often
used for recreational and pseudononymous chats. They ask how
people who rely upon handles like SKYHOOK and OSusanna
develop identities when the social cues are minimal. Like Wynn
and Katz, they anchor their analysis in processes that have been
identified by sociologists of face interaction -- Erving Goffman
and Georg Simmel. They do argue that on-line chat is unique in
the way that it challenges the significance of time, space, and
physical location in shaping social relationships. And, they
carefully report the ways that on-line chat spaces can support
people's abilities to create multiple and fluid identities. But they
see much in common between these processes of identity
formationn and those that Georg Simmel identified as taking
place among "strangers" in cities at the turn of the century.

The final article shifts from the processes and politics of
identity formation and focuses on public policies about
telecommunications and industrial development in India. In 'The
Socioeconomic Implications of Telecommunications
Liberalization," Ben Petrazzini and Girija Krishnaswamy
examine the way that India's telecommunications policy
approaches are an unusual mix of central regulation and
privitization. They place India's telecommunications policies in
the context of the privitization approaches that are common in
Latin America and the strong regulatory approaches that are
common elsewhere in Asia. They examine several important
repercussions of this more complex strategy, such as the costs of
services, network growth, the risk of private investments,
universal service, and employment. Petrazzini and
Krishnaswamy illustrate how different countries can organize
the development, access to, and pricing of telecommunications
in very different, but viable, ways. This issue concludes with
David Garson's review of the scholarly anthology, Information
Systems in the Political World edited by Kim Viborg Anderson.

I welcome a new member to TIS's editorial board: Professor
Nancy Baym of Wayne State University. This journal's vitality
owes much to the high quality reviewing of the editorial board.
In particular, Associate Editors Phil Agre, Gary Marx, and Rick
Weingarten played pivotal roles in working with the authors of
the articles about identity formation to make this issue possible.

I have delayed circulating the introductory letter and Table of

Contents of this issue, although it has been out for for some
time. TIS has been undergoing some significant changes in
production. Starting with issue 14(1), TIS will be printed in an
8.5"X11" format, and with a new layout and cover page. The
production changeover, coupled with a consolidation of Taylor
and Francis's offices in Philadelphia has led to some prodiction
delays (some anticipated and others unanticipated). We
anticipate that issue 14(1) will be out within weeks and that we
will soo catch up with our normal publication schedule. I'm also
attaching a copy the Table of Contents of TIS 14(1).

Please check our web site (http://www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS) for
a current list of editorial as well as news on forthcoming issues,
calls for papers, and abstracts of articles from previous issues.


================
TABLE of CONTENTS: The Information Society 13(4)

Contents

Letter from the Editor-in-Chief
Rob Kling

Articles

Wynn, Eleanor & Jim Katz - Hyperbole over Cyberspace

Hert, Phillippe "The Dynamics of On-Line Interaction in a
Scholarly Debate"

Halbert, Debora -- Discourses of Danger and the Computer
Hacker

Waskul Dennis & Mark Douglass - "Cyberself: The Emergence
of Self in On-line Chat
Petrazzini, Ben and Girija Krishnaswamy 'The Socioeconomic
Implications of Telecommunications Liberalization: India
in the International Context'

Book Review

Kim Viborg Anderson. "Information Systems in the Political
World." Reviewed by David Garson

-----------------
TABLE of CONTENTS: The Information Society 14(1)
(to appear)

Contents

Letter from the Editor-in-Chief
Rob Kling

Articles

Petrazzini, Ben A., and Krishnaswamy, Girija. "Socioeconomic
Implications of Telecommunication Liberalization: India in
the International Context."

Tang, Puay. "How Electronic Publishers are Protecting agains
Privacy: Doubts about Technical Systems of Protection."

Shade, Leslie Regan. "A Gendered Perspective on Access to the
Information Infrastructure."

Zelwietro, Joseph P. 1997. "The Politicization of Environmental
Organizations through the Internet."

Forum:

Mosco, Vincent. 1997. "Myth-ing Links: Power and Community
on the Information Highway."

Book Reviews

Reviewed by Peter Asaro:
Technology and the Politics of Knowledge, by A. Feenberg
and A. Hannay (Eds.).

Reviewed by Michael Heim:
Alternative Modernity: The Technical Turn in Philosophy
and Social Theory, by A. Feenberg.
----
Rob Kling http://php.ucs.indiana.edu/~kling
The Information Society (journal) http://www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS
Center for Social Informatics http://www.slis.indiana.edu/CSI
Indiana University
10th & Jordan, Room 005C
Bloomington, IN 47405-1801 812-855-9763 // Fax: 855-6166

Read & contribute to the ....
Social Informatics Home Page --> http://www.slis.indiana.edu/SI
a resource about research, teaching, conferences & journals

**************************************************************************************


ISSUES IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY LIBRARIANSHIP - SPRING 1998


Date: Fri, 15 May 1998 08:52:26 -0500
Sender: GEONET-L Geoscience Librarians & Information Specialists
<GEONET-L@LISTSERV.INDIANA.EDU>
From: Lois Heiser <heiser@indiana.edu>
Subject: Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship (fwd)

---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Thu, 14 May 1998 18:08:34 -0700 (PDT)
From: Andrea Duda <duda@library.ucsb.edu>
To: GEONET-L@LISTSERV.INDIANA.EDU
Subject: Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship

The Spring 1998 issue of Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship is
now available at
http://www.library.ucsb.edu/istl/

The theme of this issue is Using the World Wide Web in Science and
Technology Libraries. The articles in this issue are:

Taking Local Resources Global: The NCSTRL Experience at UC Berkeley
Library
by Ann Jensen, University of California, Berkeley

Selection Criteria for Web-Based Resources in a Science and
Technology Library Collection
by Robert B. McGeachin, Texas A&M University

Delivering the Goods: Web OPACs and the Expanding Role of the
Cataloger
by Norm Medeiros, NYU School of Medicine

Academic Library WebTeam Management: The Role of Leadership &
Authority
by Bill Johnson, Texas Tech University Library

Precision Among Internet Search Engines: An Earth Sciences Case Study
by Lisa Wishard, Pennsylvania State University

The National Research Library Alliance: A Federal Consortium Formed
to Provide Inter-Agency Access to Scientific Information
by Laurie E. Stackpole and Roderick D. Atkinson, Naval Research
Laboratory

Regular features include Science and Technology Sources on the Internet
and Book Reviews. With this issue we also start a new column, "Then and
Now," by Daryl Youngman of Kansas State University. This series aims to
examine the origins and development of various tools and practices as used
in science and technology libraries.

===========================================================
Andrea L. Duda
Networked Information Access Coordinator
Davidson Library, University of California, Santa Barbara
E-mail: duda@library.ucsb.edu
InfoSurf: http://www.library.ucsb.edu
===========================================================

**************************************************************************************
JASIS

Date: Thu, 16 Apr 1998 13:42:09 -0400
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
<ASIS-L@asis.org>
From: Richard Hill <rhill@asis.org>
Subject: Table of Contents, JASIS 49, 6

Journal of the American Society for Information Science
JASIS

VOLUME 49
NUMBER 6
MAY 1, 1998

[Note: below are URLs for viewing contents of JASIS, both as presented here
and full text.]

CONTENTS

In This Issue [The text of "In This Issue" is inserted below each article
reviewed
Bert R. Boyce
485

RESEARCH

Professional Summarizing: No Cognitive Simulation without Observation
Brigitte Endres-Niggemeyer and Elisabeth Neugebauer
486
Endres-Neggemeyer and Neugebauer empirically observe and isolate the work
steps of the document representation process to create a model of the
summarization mechanism. A toolbox of strategies used in summarizing
processes is identified, and used to create a conceptual model which is
projected onto a blackboard design.

Scholarly Communication and Electronic Journals: An Impact Study
Stephen P. Harter
507
Using a database of peer-reviewed electronic journals drawn from two
directories, Harter did cited work searches for 39 ejournals on the three
ISI citation databases. Using DIALOG to create a reasonable collection of
the various forms of the ejournal titles to be found, considerable effort
was devoted to a manual cleanup of the results. Eleven were published in
both print and electronic formats, and citations make no distinction as to
which format was utilized. Fifteen ejournals were not cited and 13 were
cited between one and five times. Eight were cited ten or more times; three
from the sciences and five from the social sciences. Thus overall impact
must be considered low. The top ejournal had 1500 citations in 1994 alone,
but it is available in both formats. The top pure ejournal has 190
citations, and PACS Review, some of whose volumes were published in book
form had 111 citations. These top three, when compared to other journals in
their disciplinary area, ranked high in impact factor, but poorly in total
number of articles published.

A Comparison of Group and Individual Performance among Subject Experts and
Untrained
Workers at the Document Retrieval Task
W. John Wilbur
517
Using a cosine vector approach, the 50 closest documents to 100 query
documents chosen randomly by Wilber were isolated. Judges compared each set
of 50 to the query document assigning relevance on a scale. Using seven
subject expert judges, six were considered a panel and the seventh the
target user, with target user rotated to increase the data points. A panel
of six learned, but other than subject expert judges, was also used. Groups
were more effective than individuals at predicting the judgments of an
unknown user, and other than subject expert groups performed nearly as well
as expert groups. Because some documents are rated high by most judges and
others are rated high by few or only individual judges, only by pooling can
documents of wide appeal be identified. This infers the need for emulation
of group rather than individual judgements in retrieval processes.

Citation Context versus the Frequency Counts of Citation Histories
Sinisa Maricic, Jagoda Spaventi, Leo Pavicic, and Greta Pifat-Mrzljak
530
Maricic et al., selected 219 cited papers and their citing paper. The
physical section of the citing paper where the cited paper occurred was
noted and a point value assigned. The citation's meaningful (high) or
cursory (low) nature was also judged and using these two values a combined
ordinal scale was created. A factor analysis seems to indicate separability
by location. One factor is dominated by the introduction, one by the
results section and the third by an inverse relationship between
methodology and conclusion sections. The time delay of citation has little
effect on this analysis. Cursory citations are found only in the
introduction and meaningful citations are in all sections. The numerical
analysis and the context analysis provide varying results and caution
against evaluation on raw citation counts.

User Satisfaction with Information Seeking on the Internet
Harry Bruce
541
Measures of satisfaction lack clear definition and tend to be multi-variate
constructs based on a combination of the results of rating scales on
several variables providing only ordinal measures. Satisfaction for Bruce
is measured using cross modality matching to achieve an interval scale. Two
hundred e-mail addresses were invited to take part and 37 academics agreed.
After being interviewed concerning past information seeking experiences on
the Internet, satisfaction estimates were solicited and received in terms
of numerical magnitude estimates, a one to six category rating, and in
terms of grip force exerted. The measures for satisfaction have
correlations similar to those for estimates of line length by the same
subjects, and the ratios for line estimation and satisfaction are virtually
identical. Subjects regard themselves as infrequent users, are self taught
and have a high expectation of success in Internet searching. No
relationship was found between Internet training and satisfaction, or
between satisfaction and frequency of use.

Testing the Maximum Entropy Principle for Information Retrieval
Paul B. Kantor and Jung Jin Lee
557
Kantor and Jung Jin Lee test the Maximum Entropy Principle for retrieval
using the TREC5 database and a binary classification based on the presence
or absence of terms in text. MEP performs best with small data sets and
progressively worsens as database size increases. Whereas it's use is
certainly computationally tractable, it seems unlikely that the principle
accurately reflects the distribution of terms across relevant and
non-relevant texts or that it will lead to enhanced retrieval.

BOOK REVIEWS

The Internet Searcher's Handbook: Locating Information, People,
and Software, edited by Peter Morville, Louis Rosenfeld,
and Joseph Janes
Valerie Jaffe
567

Proceedings of the Sixth Conference of the International Society for
Scientometrics and Informetrics, edited by Bluma C. Peritz and
Leo Egghe
Judit Bar-Ilan
568

Information Science: Still an Emerging Discipline, edited by James G.
Williams and Toni Carbo
Charles H. Davis
569

Internet Economics, edited by Lee W. McKnight and Joseph P. Bailey
Christinger Tomer
569

Modern Information Systems for Managers, by Hossein Bidgoli
Yonathan Mizrachi
571

Information Seeking in Context, edited by Pertti Vakkari, Reijo Savolainen,
and Brenda Dervin
Terrence A. Brooks
573

Visual Explanations: Images and Quantities, Evidence and Narrative, by
Edward R. Tufte
Robert J. Skovira
574

Information Services for Secondary Schools, by Dana McDougald and Melvin Bowie
Carol A. Doll
575

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

577

ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

JASIS VOLUME 49, NO 7, MAY 15 1999


Date: Thu, 16 Apr 1998 14:38:37 -0400
Reply-To: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
From: Richard Hill <rhill@asis.org>
Subject: Table of Contents, JASIS 49, 7

Journal of the American Society for Information Science
JASIS
VOLUME 49
NUMBER 7
MAY 15 1998

[Note: below are URLs for viewing past contents of JASIS, both as presented
here and full text.]

CONTENTS
Special Topic Issue: Artificial Intelligence Techniques for Emerging
Information Systems Applications
Guest Editor: Hsinchun Chen

Introduction
Hsinchun Chen
579

Internet Browsing and Searching: User Evaluations of Category Map and
Concept Space Techniques
Hsinchun Chen, Andrea L. Houston, Robin R. Sewell, and Bruce R. Schatz
582

A Smart Itsy Bitsy Spider for the Web
Hsinchun Chen, Yi-Ming Chung, Marshall Ramsey, and Christopher C. Yang
604

Speech Recognition for a Digital Video Library
Michael J. Witbrock and Alexander G. Hauptmann
619

A Texture Thesaurus for Browsing Large Aerial Photographs
Wei-Ying Ma and B.S. Manjunath
633

Architecture, Design and Development of an HTML/JavaScript Web-Based Group
Support System
Nicholas C. Romano, Jr., Jay F. Nunamaker, Jr., Robert O. Briggs, and
Douglas R. Vogel
649

Book Reviews
Costing and Pricing in the Digital Age: A Practical Guide for Information
Services, by Herbert Snyder and Elisabeth Davenport
Bruce R. Kingma
668

Information Retrieval Systems: Theory and Implementation, by Gerald Kowalski
M. Carl Drott
668

From Print to Electronic: The Transformation of Scientific Communication,
by Susan Y. Crawford, Julie M. Hurd, and Ann C. Weller
Marianne Affifi
670

Knowledge, Concepts, and Categories, edited by Koen Lamberts and David Shanks
Terrence A. Brooks
671

Authoritative Guide to Web Search Engines, by Susan Maze, David Moxley, and
Donna J. Smith
Candy Schwartz
672


-------------------------------------------------------


The full text from 1996 (Volume 47) forward is available at this time at
the "interscience" site..


Richard Hill
Executive Director
American Society for Information Science
8720 Georgia Avenue, Suite 501
Silver Spring, MD 20910
http://www.asis.org
rhill@asis.org

ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

JASIS volume 49, no 12, OCTOBER 1998


Date: Tue, 25 Aug 1998 12:14:40 -0400
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
<ASIS-L@asis.org>
From: Richard Hill <rhill@asis.org>
Subject: JASIS TOC, Volume 49, #12


[Note: below are URLs for viewing past contents of JASIS, both as presented
here and full text.]

Journal of the American Society for Information Science
VOLUME 49 NUMBER 12 OCTOBER 1998

Special Topic Issue: Social Informatics in Information Science
Guest Editors: Rob Kling, Howard Rosenbaum, and Carol Hert

CONTENTS

Social Informatics in Information Science: An Introduction
Rob Kling, Howard Rosenbaum, and Carol Hert
1047

Information Technology, Employment, and the Information Sector:
Trends in Information Employment 1970-1995
Stana B. Martin
1053

Collaborative Information Retrieval: Toward a Social Informatics
View of IR Interaction
Murat Karamuftuoglu
1070

IT and Changing Professional Identity: Micro-Studies and
Macro-Theory
Geoff Walsham
1081

Collaboration and Conflict in the Development of a Computerized
Dispatch Facility
Andrew Clement and Chris Halonen
1090

Work, Friendship, and Media Use for Information Exchange in a
Networked Organization
Caroline Haythornthwaite and Barry Wellman
1101

The Impact of Gender, Occupation, and Presence of Children on
Telecommuting Motivations and Constraints
Patricia L. Mokhtarian, Michael N. Bagley, and Ilan Salomon
1115

Contexts of Uninhibited Online Behavior: Flaming in Social
Newsgroups on Usenet
Joseph M. Kayany
1135

ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

JASIS volume 49, no 13, NOVEMBER 1998


Date: Fri, 25 Sep 1998 11:24:05 -0400
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
From: Richard Hill <rhill@asis.org>
Subject: JASIS Table of Contents, V. 49, #13

Journal of the American Society for Information Science (JASIS)
VOLUME 49, NUMBER 13
November, 1998

[Note: below are URLs for viewing past contents of JASIS (from 1986 to
present), both as presented here and full text. Bert Boyce's "In This
Issue" column has been inserted in this table of contents.]

CONTENTS

In This Issue
Bert R. Boyce
1143

RESEARCH
Topological Aspects of Information Retrieval
Leo Egghe and Ronald Rousseau
1144
We begin with two articles suggesting the possible separation of documen
t
and query vector space. Viewing information retrieval as a topology on a
document space determined by a similarity function between queries and
documents gives what Egghe and Rousseau call a retrieval topology. Such
topologies might use a pseudo metric which measures the distance between
documents independent of the query space, or might make all similarity
functions between documents and queries continuous, called here the
similarity topology. The topological model allows the introduction of
Boolean operators. The inner product is suggested as producing a more
powerful model than the cosine measure.

On the Necessity of Term Dependence in a Query Space for Weighted Retrieval
Peter Bollmann-Sdorra and Vijay V. Raghavan
1161
Bollmann-Sdorra and Raghavan show that if query term weights are to be
useful in retrieval, term independence is an undesirable property in a
query space. Independence remains desirable in document space. It would
appear that the assumptions that documents and queries are elements of the
same space, and that term independence is required, are not warranted.

Optimizing a Library's Loan Policy: An Integer Programming Approach
Hesham K. Al-Fares
1169
Al-Fares presents a new loan policy model which incorporates a
decision variable for maximum books to be borrowed, along with the
traditional loan period, and adds user satisfaction with policies to the
usual book availability satisfaction indicator. Each indicator is defined
as the ratio of satisfied demand to total demand. Number of renewals,
duplications, demand, and reservations are considered to have a very small
effect.

On the Fusion of Documents from Multiple Collection Information Retrieval
Systems
Ronald R. Yager and Alexander Rybalov
1177
Yager and Rybalov assume m retrieval systems without file overlap
each providing a ranked list of texts based upon their varying ranking
criteria, and in response to a common query, and define fusion as the
construction of a single ordered list of the n most relevant texts over all
m system responses. This requires determining the potential of each system
to provide relevant answers to the query.
A previous fusion method which is empirically effective but where
different runs will result in different orderings, uses a random selection
method biased toward the length of the contributing list. Alternatively one
might use the longest remaining list for each choice or take equally from
each collection until the shortest is exhausted, and then continue until
the next shortest is exhausted, and on, until all are exhausted. A
centralized fusion scheme computes a value based upon the number of
documents in a list and the number already removed. The value is
re-computed for each collection after each removal of the top element in
the collection with the highest value. Another possibility is a
proportional approach, where the list value is its remaining number of
elements less one divided by the original number, and a value can be
assigned to each individual document which is the number of elements in the
list less its position in the list, divided by the number of elements in
the list.

Indexing and Access for Digital Libraries and the Internet: Human,
Database, and Domain Factors
Marcia J. Bates
1185
Bates provides a review of what we know and do not know about
indexing and access that will apply to large digital document files.
Particularly she emphasizes that statistical regularities exist in the
subject representation of files and should influence design, that subject
domain should affect system design, and that what we know of human
linguistic and searching behavior must be taken into account for an optimal
information retrieval system.

Software Engineering as Seen through Its Research Literature: A Study in
Co-Word Analysis
Neal Coulter, Ira Monarch, and Suresh Konda
1206
The indexing for 16,691 documents from 1982 to 1994 which were
assigned at least one term from the software engineering category was
collected by Coulter, Monarch, and Konda and a co-occurrence study carried
out to determine the interaction of software engineering areas of study
over time. The association measure was the square of the co-occurrences of
two terms over the product of their occurrences. The threshold value was
varied with the size of the data sets, but the number of links and nodes
was fixed at twenty-four and twenty. For the period 1982 - 1986 15 networks
were generated; for 1987 - 1990 16; and for 1991 - 1994 11. The networks
exhibit considerable change over time although some consistent themes, like
software development and user interfaces, persist.

Information Aspects of New Organizational Designs: Exploring the
Non-Traditional Organization
Bob Travica
1224
To address the role of information technology in non-traditional
organizations Travica treats IT as level of use of several specific
technologies, and non-traditional structure as the level of organization
structure, plus other selected variables. Data came from surveys of a
random stratified sample of employees at twelve local accounting offices
and an interview with the local manager. Information technology correlates
with non-traditional structure. Information technology correlates
negatively with formalization and centralization, and positively with cross
boundary communication. Spatial dispersion is negatively associated with
trust sharing.

-------------------------------------------------------
The ASIS home page <http://www.asis.org> contains the Table of Contents and
brief abstracts as above from January 1993 (Volume 44) to date. The full
text of JASIS from 1986 (Volume 37) forward is available at
<http://www.interscience.wiley.com>. One must register but there is no
charge. This site includes the full text of JASIS and other Wiley
journals. You may also set up a personal home page which allows you to:

Browse the Wiley InterScience collection
Search across the entire content of Wiley InterScience journals
Add your own notes and comments to individual articles
Store sets of search criteria for the searches you perform most often
Go directly to the home page of your favorite Wiley journal
Create and maintain your personal reading list

To view the JASIS articles full text, one must click on the "view articles"
button at the top of the Title/Abstract page.

The complete sequence, after logging on and going to the JASIS page is: 1)
select issue to view; 2) select title of article; 3) select the "view
article" button at the top of the page above the abstract. The article
will then appear in Adobe Acrobat.


American Society for Information Science
8720 Georgia Avenue, Suite 501
Silver Spring, MD 20910
(301) 495-0900 FAX (301) 495-0810
http://www.asis.org

**************************************************************************************

JOURNAL FOR GLOBAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT - Call for papers

Date: Tue, 22 Sep 1998 13:33:07 -0400
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
From: Pattee Fletcher <fletcher@umbc.edu>
Subject: CALL for PAPERS

CALL FOR PAPERS

Special Issue of the JOURNAL for Global Information Management

LIBRARIES AND THE INTERNET:
AN INTERNATIONAL AGENDA.

Patricia Diamond Fletcher, ed.


We are soliciting research papers for a special issue of the Journal for
Global Information Management. The goal of this special issue is to
provide an international picture of the issues to and the responses by
libraries to providing services and information on the Internet and the
World Wide Web. Public, academic, school, business, and other special
libraries will be the subject of the discourse. Current research on
effectiveness of library networks and on the potential directions for
libraries in a networked environment will be presented to share library
best practices, policy, and services. Cross-cultural library issues are
solicited.

Topics can include:

v Development of Internet services in libraries
v Special populations for Internet services
v Budgeting, accounting, and funding Internet services
v Policy issues
v Training and staffing issues
v Global libraries
v Collection development and dissemination
v Providing for the information "have-nots"
v International copyright
v Transborder data flow


Important Deadlines:

January 10, 1999 -- submissions from authors due to editor*****
March 31 -- papers due back to editor from reviewers
April 15 -- papers returned to authors for final editing
June 1 -- papers due to publisher for Fall issue inclusion

Guidelines for submission can be found at the JGIM website:
http://www.idea-group.com/jgim.htm


Direct all inquiries and submissions to:

Patricia Diamond Fletcher, Ph.D.
Department of Information Systems
1000 Hilltop Circle
The University of Maryland Baltimore County
Baltimore, MD, USA 21250
410-455-3154
410-455-1073 (fax)
<fletcher@umbc.edu>



*****SEE ALSO *****
the "Call for Chapters" for World Libraries on the Information
Superhighway (Idea Group Publishing).
Papers submitted for the above special issue of JGIM may also be
considered - if received in time - for inclusion in the book.


CHEERS!
*************************************************************
Patricia Diamond Fletcher, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Department of Information Systems
Director, IFSM Graduate Program
Faculty Associate, MD Institute for Policy Analysis & Research
The University of Maryland, Baltimore County
1000 Hilltop Circle
Baltimore, MD 21250

410-455-3154
410-455-1073 FAX
URL: http://research.umbc.edu/~fletcher

**************************************************************************************

JOURNAL OF SYSTEMS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY - call for papers

Date: Mon, 10 Aug 1998 08:57:03 -0400
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
From: Gretchen Whitney <gwhitney@utkux.utcc.utk.edu>
Subject: CFP: Jo. of Systems and Info Tech

From: Craig Standing <c.standing@cowan.edu.au>
Subject: Call for Papers JoSIT


Call For Papers

The Journal of Systems and Information Technology

The Journal provides an avenue for scholarly work that takes a systemic or
holistic perspective in relation to areas such as information systems
development, information technology and information systems management.

The Journal of Systems and Information Technology fosters primarily,
although not exclusively, interpretive or qualitative research methods
including ethnographic, genealogical, action research and case studies of
various kinds. Research that uses quantitative methods, for example
statistical surveys, will be suitable if they take a broad perspective of
the problems and issues. This means very often that the social and political
aspects will be considered as well as the technical.

Target topics that will be relevant to JoSIT include but are not limited to:

o IS/IT planning that takes a systemic approach

o Innovative Soft Systems approaches used in information systems developme
nt

o The integration of software and/or hardware technologies that provide
holistic solutions to problems. For example, the integration of various
aspects of software engineering paradigms.

o Human Computer Interaction (HCI) problems tackled in an systemic or
integrated way.

o Research papers that promote the development of interpretive or
qualitative research methodologies in relation to Information Systems
through case studies.

o Systems approaches in the management of information systems.

o Holistic approaches in the development of technology policy and technolo
gy
transfer.

o Integrative methods of systems design.

o Systems perspectives in IS/IT evaluation.

o The use of metaphors as an integrative theme for aspects of IT/IS.

o The influence of politics and culture on systems development and the use
of information technology.


Book Reviews

JoSIT will include book reviews and information concerning conferences in
the holistic information systems field.


Publication and Manuscript Guidelines

Researchers as well as Information Systems Professionals are invited to
submit papers for the Journal. All papers will undergo a blind refereeing
process by at least three referees. Papers can be sent in hard or soft copy.
Soft copies should be in Microsoft Word for MAC or PC format. The Journal
will be published twice a year in March and September.

Further details are available upon request. All submissions must be original
works which have not appeared elsewhere and which are not being considered
for publication with another journal. As the reviewing process will be
conducted anonymously, please leave your name(s) off the manuscript. People
are encouraged to send their papers either in by email or hard copy form to:

Dr. Craig Standing, Editor-in-Chief, JoSIT
email: c.standing@cowan.edu.au
Fax: 61 8 9400 5633 Tel: 61 8 9400 5545

School of Management Information Systems
Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia 6027


Editorial Board

Chief Editor: Dr. Craig Standing
Edith Cowan University, Western Australia

Members of the Editorial Board

Rakesh Agrawal
University of Western Sydney, Australia

Robert Flood
University of Hull, UK

James Alleman
University of Colorado, USA

Duncan Langford
University of Kent, UK

Teodosio Perez Amaral
Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain

Chantal Morley
Institute National des Telecommunications, Evry, France

Richard Baskerville
Binghamton University, N.Y., USA

Michael Myers
University of Auckland, NZ

Paul Beynon-Davies
University of Glamorgan, Wales, UK.

Dewald Roode
University of Pretoria, S.A.

Subhash Bhatnagar
Indian Institute of Management

Ross Smith
Swinburne University of Technology, Australia

Bill Doolin
University of Waikato, NZ

Hazel Suchard
Australian Catholic University

Keith Ellis
University of Humberside, UK

Ned Kock
Temple University, USA

*****************************************
Dr Craig Standing
School of Management Information Systems
Edith Cowan University
Joondalup
Western Australia 6027
Te: 61 8 94005545
Fax: 61 8 94005633
Email: c.standing@cowan.edu.au

**************************************************************************************
LIBRARY AND ARCHIVAL SECURITY - Call for papers
Current issue: volume 14, no 2

Date: Thu, 10 Sep 1998 11:40:11 -0400
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
From: "ad6509@wayne.edu" <ad6509@wayne.edu>
Subject: Call for papers - Library and Archival Security

Volume 14 no. 2 of Library and Archival Security has been issued,
and should be reaching libraries within the next few days. The
current issue contains articles on state of the art theft detection
systems, on disaster planning in an urban public library and a
university archives, and on late-night hours in an academic library.
L&AS is a peer-reviewed journal dealing with all aspects of physical
and data security as they apply to libraries and archives, and
accepts articles both from researchers and practitioners.

Articles are currently being sought for upcoming issues. Researchers,
doctoral students, and practitioners, are especially encouraged to
submit book and software/hardware reviews.

Submissions on the following topics would be especially welcome:

- opinionated editorials and responses to previously published
articles,
- substantive research papers, especially ones dealing with
security practices, digital collections, ethical issues,
the security aspects of wide-area networking, disaster
planning, conservation initiatives, and assessments of
electronic threats to libraries, theft and problem
behavior, disaster recovery,
- case studies and sample disaster management plans,
- research reports and summaries of current trends,
- accounts of related conferences,
- book and software/hardware reviews.

L&AS encourages articles originating in the developing nations, the
United States, Canada, Great Britain, Europe, Australia and New Zealand,
and the nations of the Pacific Rim.

Submissions should be addressed to the Editor at the location
given below.

---
Chris Brown-Syed <ad6509@wayne.edu> <http://valinor.purdy.wayne.edu>
Editor, Library & Archival Security. LIS Program, 106 Kresge Library,
Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA, 48202. Ph: +1 313 577-0503.
Fax: +1 313 577-7563.

**************************************************************************************

NEDLIB News sheet issue no 1, July 1998


Date: Wed, 1 Jul 1998 16:08:59 +0200
Sender: International Federation of Library Associations mailing list
<IFLA-L@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA>
From: Titia van der Werf <titia@PYTHON.KONBIB.NL>
Subject: First issue of the NEDLIB News Sheet released
To: IFLA-L@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA

ANNOUNCEMENT
------------

NEDLIB News Sheet, issue n.1, July 1998 has been released.

In this issue you are updated on NEDLIB project results
and you will find special contributions on related topics:

* Lex Sijtsma: "Impressions from the DELOS6 workshop"

* Titia van der Werf: "Some thoughts after the DOI workshop"

and a SPECIAL COVERAGE of the the Multimedia Management System
(MMB-system) developed by CSC PLOENZKE for Die Deutsche Bibliothek in
Germany.

The NEDLIB project News Sheets are issued twice a year.
They are made available through the NEDLIB web-site at:

<http://www.konbib.nl/nedlib/news/newssheet1.html>

They are announced via several discussion-lists.

NEDLIB is a project promoted by the CoBRA+ group and supported by the
Telematics for Libraries Programme of the European Commission. The project
consortium includes nine European national libraries, a National Archive
and three main publishers. The objective of NEDLIB is to ensure that
digital publications of the present can be used now and in the future.
The project started in January 1998. The project will define an
architecture for capturing, preserving and accessing digital
publications. It will develop tools and define standards and procedures
required to implement this architecture in a deposit system of digital
publications. NEDLIB will take account of the requirement of long term
storage and retrieval as well as the terms and conditions applying to the
access of those publications. As a result, the project will define the
technical environment and develop test implementations.


*** (This message has been cross-posted to several international
library-related lists. Apologies if you receive this message more than
once.) ***


Titia
NEDLIB contact point

------------------------------------
Titia van der Werf
Library research
Koninklijke Bibliotheek
National Library of the Netherlands
The Hague
The NETHERLANDS
e-mail: titia@is.konbib.nl
tel : +31 70-3140467
http://www.konbib.nl/persons/titia/
------------------------------------

*************************************************************************************

SCHOLARLY ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING BIBLIOGRAPHY - VERSION 17



Version 17 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography
is now available. This selective bibliography presents over
600 articles, books, electronic documents, and other sources
that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing
efforts on the Internet and other networks.

HTML: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>
Acrobat: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf>
Word: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.doc>

The HTML document is designed for interactive use. Each
major section is a separate file. There are live links to
sources available on the Internet. It can be can be searched,
and it includes a collection of links to related Web sites
that deal with scholarly electronic publishing issues.

The Acrobat and Word files are designed for printing.
Each file is over 170 KB.

(Revised sections in this version are marked with an asterisk.)

Table of Contents

1 Economic Issues*
2 Electronic Books and Texts
2.1 Case Studies and History
2.2 General Works
2.3 Library Issues
3 Electronic Serials
3.1 Case Studies and History
3.2 Critiques
3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals*
3.4 General Works*
3.5 Library Issues*
3.6 Research*
4 General Works
5 Legal Issues
5.1 Intellectual Property Rights
5.2 License Agreements*
5.3 Other Legal Issues
6 Library Issues
6.1 Cataloging, Classification, and Metadata*
6.2 Digital Libraries
6.3 General Works
6.4 Information Conversion, Integrity, and Preservation*
7 New Publishing Models*
8 Publisher Issues
8.1 Electronic Commerce/Copyright Systems*
Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author
Appendix B. About the Author


Best Regards,
Charles

Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Assistant Dean for Systems,
University Libraries, University of Houston, Houston, TX
77204-2091. E-mail: cbailey@uh.edu. Voice: (713) 743-9804.
Fax: (713) 743-9811.

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm>
<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>

ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

SCHOLARLY ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING BIBLIOGRAPHY - VERSION 19


Date: Thu, 18 Jun 1998 12:42:49 CDT
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
From: "Charles W. Bailey, Jr." <LIB3@UHUPVM1.UH.EDU>
Subject: Version 19, Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

Version 19 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography
is now available. This selective bibliography presents over
600 articles, books, electronic documents, and other sources
that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing
efforts on the Internet and other networks.

HTML: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>
Acrobat: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf>
Word: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.doc>

The HTML document is designed for interactive use. Each
major section is a separate file. There are live links to
sources available on the Internet. It can be can be searched,
and it includes a collection of links to related Web sites
that deal with scholarly electronic publishing issues.

The Acrobat and Word files are designed for printing.
Each file is over 190 KB.

(Revised sections in this version are marked with an asterisk.)

Table of Contents

1 Economic Issues*
2 Electronic Books and Texts
2.1 Case Studies and History*
2.2 General Works
2.3 Library Issues
3 Electronic Serials
3.1 Case Studies and History
3.2 Critiques
3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals*
3.4 General Works*
3.5 Library Issues*
3.6 Research
4 General Works
5 Legal Issues
5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*
5.2 License Agreements*
5.3 Other Legal Issues
6 Library Issues
6.1 Cataloging, Classification, and Metadata
6.2 Digital Libraries*
6.3 General Works*
6.4 Information Conversion, Integrity, and Preservation*
7 New Publishing Models
8 Publisher Issues
8.1 Electronic Commerce/Copyright Systems*
Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author
Appendix B. About the Author


Best Regards,
Charles

Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Assistant Dean for Systems,
University Libraries, University of Houston, Houston, TX
77204-2091. E-mail: cbailey@uh.edu. Voice: (713) 743-9804.
Fax: (713) 743-9811.

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm>
<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>
ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

SCHOLARLY ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING BIBLIOGRAPHY - VERSION 20


Date: Wed, 22 Jul 1998 12:55:04 -0400
Sender: International Federation of Library Associations mailing list
<IFLA-L@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA>
From: Terry Kuny <Terry.Kuny@xist.com>
Subject: [DOC] Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography (version 20)
now available

Version 20 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography
is now available. This selective bibliography presents over
800 articles, books, electronic documents, and other sources
that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing
efforts on the Internet and other networks.

HTML: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>
Acrobat: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf>
Word: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.doc>

The HTML document is designed for interactive use. Each
major section is a separate file. There are live links to
sources available on the Internet. It can be can be searched,
and it includes a collection of links to related Web sites
that deal with scholarly electronic publishing issues.

The Acrobat and Word files are designed for printing.
Each file is over 170 KB.

(Revised sections in this version are marked with an asterisk.)

Table of Contents

1 Economic Issues*
2 Electronic Books and Texts
2.1 Case Studies and History*
2.2 General Works
2.3 Library Issues
3 Electronic Serials
3.1 Case Studies and History
3.2 Critiques*
3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals*
3.4 General Works
3.5 Library Issues
3.6 Research*
4 General Works
5 Legal Issues
5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*
5.2 License Agreements*
5.3 Other Legal Issues
6 Library Issues
6.1 Cataloging, Classification, and Metadata*
6.2 Digital Libraries
6.3 General Works
6.4 Information Conversion, Integrity, and Preservation*
7 New Publishing Models
8 Publisher Issues*
8.1 Electronic Commerce/Copyright Systems*
Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author
Appendix B. About the Author


Best Regards,
Charles

Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Assistant Dean for Systems,
University Libraries, University of Houston, Houston, TX
77204-2091. E-mail: cbailey@uh.edu. Voice: (713) 743-9804.
Fax: (713) 743-9811.

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm>
<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>

oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

SCHOLARLY ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING BIBLIOGRAPHY - VERSION 21

Date: Fri, 18 Sep 1998 13:19:43 CDT
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@UTKVM1.UTK.EDU>
From: "Charles W. Bailey, Jr." <LIB3@UHUPVM1.UH.EDU>
Subject: Version 21, Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

Version 21 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography
is now available. This selective bibliography presents over
800 articles, books, electronic documents, and other sources
that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing
efforts on the Internet and other networks.

HTML: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>
Acrobat: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf>
Word: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.doc>

The HTML document is designed for interactive use. Each
major section is a separate file. There are live links to
sources available on the Internet. It can be can be searched,
and it includes a collection of links to related Web sites
that deal with scholarly electronic publishing issues.

The Acrobat and Word files are designed for printing.
Each file is over 170 KB.

(Revised sections in this version are marked with an asterisk.)

Table of Contents

1 Economic Issues*
2 Electronic Books and Texts
2.1 Case Studies and History*
2.2 General Works*
2.3 Library Issues
3 Electronic Serials
3.1 Case Studies and History*
3.2 Critiques
3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals
3.4 General Works
3.5 Library Issues
3.6 Research*
4 General Works*
5 Legal Issues
5.1 Intellectual Property Rights
5.2 License Agreements*
5.3 Other Legal Issues
6 Library Issues
6.1 Cataloging, Classification, and Metadata
6.2 Digital Libraries*
6.3 General Works
6.4 Information Conversion, Integrity, and Preservation
7 New Publishing Models*
8 Publisher Issues*
8.1 Electronic Commerce/Copyright Systems*
Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author
Appendix B. About the Author


Best Regards,
Charles

Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Assistant Dean for Systems,
University Libraries, University of Houston, Houston, TX
77204-2091. E-mail: cbailey@uh.edu. Voice: (713) 743-9804.
Fax: (713) 743-9811.

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm>
<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>


This document may be circulated freely
with the following statement included in its entirety:

This article was originally published in
_LIBRES: Library and Information Science
Electronic Journal_ (ISSN 1058-6768) September, 1998
Volume 8 Issue 2.
For any commercial use, or publication
(including electronic journals), you must obtain
the permission of the Editor-in-Chief:
Kerry Smith
Curtin University of Technology, Western Australia
E-mail: kerry@biblio.curtin.edu.au

------

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