LIBRES: Library and Information Science Research
Electronic Journal ISSN 1058-6768
1999 Volume 9 Issue 2; September.
Bi-annual LIBRE9N2 JOURNALS


NEWS FROM OTHER JOURNALS


Editorial note:

This section contains items culled from various Internet news services, discussion lists and other announcements. Unless specifically noted, I have not visited the sites, used any of the software, reviewed the literature, or written the news items. I present this digest to you in good faith but cannot vouch for the accuracy of its content.

Kerry Smith



1.             ASIA LIBRARY NEWS

CALL FOR PAPERS

Date: Thu, 08 Jul 1999 14:13:59 +0700
To: Kerry Smith <kerry@biblio.curtin.edu.au>
From: jyee@ksc5.th.com
Subject: Asia Library News--Call for Papers
X-MIME-Autoconverted: from 8bit to quoted-printable by ksc15.th.com id PAA10222

Asia Library News (ALN) is the official journal of ALIVA (Asia Library and Information Association <www.aliva.org>) co-founded by Jaffe Yee Yeow-fei, founding publisher/editor of Asian Libraries, and a group of prominent library and information professionals

ALN is distributed free of charge to all core members in East Asia. It is entirely  supported by advertisers and sponsors. The publishing activities of ALN are fully undertaken and underwritten by InfoMedia Asia Limited.

ALN publishes original feature articles on all aspects of library and information  services related to Asia. It also publishes news, announcements, reports, library profiles and interviews. ALN now invites library and information professionals to contribute articles to appear in future issues.

GUIDELINES

A prospective author should contact the editor <editor@aliva.org> first on an idea for a proposed article by providing an abstract of about 200-300 words with the author’s name, affiliation and contacts (phone/fax/email). The author will only proceed with the writing after the editor has agreed to the idea and has commissioned the article.

Finished articles should be about 3,000 words and double spaces and can be sent via email in an attached file (preferably in MS word v6.0/Win95) or on a computer disk with one hard copy. Figures, graphs, tables and diagrams should be computer generated. Any other illustrations, photographs or other materials can be sent by post or courier.

Articles accepted for publication are subject to copy-editing to eliminate ambiguity, redundancy, and errors of grammar and syntax. The manuscripts  will be returned to the author for approval only if extensive editing has been required and there is a possibility of altered meaning.

PAYMENT

ALN pays between US dollars 100 to 200 for each commissioned feature article and US dollars 150 for library profile and interview.


InfoMedia Asia Limited
1350/102 Phatthanakarn Road, Bangkok 10250, Thailand
Postal Address: GPO Box 701, Bangkok 10501, Thailand
Phone: +66-2-7193688    Fax: +66-2-7193689
Email: editor@aliva.org   URL: <http://www.aliva.org/>www.aliva.org

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

2.             THE BOTTOM LINE: MANAGING LIBRARY FINANCES
               
CALL FOR PAPERS

Date:         Mon, 26 Apr 1999 13:12:59 -0400
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@utkux.utcc.utk.edu>
From: "James H. Walther" <waltherj@GWIS2.CIRC.GWU.EDU>
Subject:      Call for Papers

Messages to jESSE: [reply, or jESSE@listserv.utk.edu]
         to Moderator: [gwhitney@utk.edu]
         to Sender: [take e-mail address from message below]
Info on jESSE: [http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/jesse.html]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Call for Papers

The Bottom Line: Managing Library Finances provides librarians, library trustees, and others concerned with library management, with current information related to the financial aspects of library operations.  The journal focuses on cost measurement and containment, fundraising, development, fiscal policies and procedures, and the financial implications of technological change.  The journal seeks to provide current, practical information that can be applied in all types of libraries.  The Editor welcomes submissions which discuss budgeting, economic trends affecting libraries, endowments, leasing, outsourcing, insurance, grantsmanship, resource allocation, cost analysis, funding technological innovation and alternative sources of revenue.  Authors should:

Prepare articles that are specific enough for readers to apply to their local situations
Report on experiences or the results of research
Include facts and pertinent examples
Employ a simple, readable style, even when the subject matter is complex

Article Presentation

Articles should be between 2000 and 4000 words in length, although shorter communications dealing with more immediate issues, responding to points raised in articles and raising new issues for discussion will also be included.  Such items should be up to 1000 words in length.  Articles should be typed with wide margins and double spacing.  Two copies should be sent to the Editor together with a brief autobiographical note, 1-6 keywords, an abstract of approximately 150 words and a suggested title.

Submission of articles

All manuscripts and editorial communications should be sent to the Editor:

James H. Walther
The Catholic University of America
School of Library & Information Science
Washington Square Station
POB 65304
Washington, DC 20035

Phone: 202-841-6567
Fax: 202-508-6200
Email: waltherj@gwu.edu


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3.                CURRENT CITES,

Volume 10, No 3, March 1999

Date:         Mon, 12 Apr 1999 18:55:01 +0000
Sender:       Solo Librarians Listserv <SOLOLIB-L@LISTSERV.SILVERPLATTER.COM>
From:         Gerry Hurley <Gerry_Hurley@SILVERPLATTER.COM>
Subject:      Current Cites, March 1999

Here's the March issue of Current Cites, resposted from
the PACS-L list.
--Gerry Hurley
  SOLOLIB-L List Owner
:
                     _Current Cites_
                     Volume 10, no. 3
                        March 1999
                       The Library
            University of California, Berkeley
                Edited by Teri Andrews Rinne
                     ISSN: 1060-2356
:
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/1999/cc99.10.3.html
:
                        Contributors
                 Terry Huwe, Margaret Phillips,
             Roy Tennant, Jim Ronningen, Lisa Yesson
:
Ellis, Steven, ed. "A Special Theme: Digital Libraries" Library HiTech 16(3-4) (1998):12-62. - Since all but two of the seven articles are specifically on electronic text centers, the theme title is more than a little misleading. E-text centers, as important as they may be, do not comprise anywhere near the totality of digital libraries. However, if one takes this error into account, the collection of articles can serve as a useful overview of a number of electronic text center projects. - RT
:
Floyd, Bianca. "Digital Storytelling Updates an Ancient Art by Adding Technology" Chronicle of Higher Education, March 18, 1999 (http://www.chronicle.com/daily/99/03/99031801t.htm). - This article describes the new art of digital storytelling as pioneered at UC Berkeley's Center for Digital Storytelling. Participants claim that digital storytelling merging together text, images, sound and animation will emerge as a new art form that will be pursued by large numbers of people who have access to technology. Amateur practitioners may be the pioneers of this art form, because basic manipulation of digital formats can be learned with relative dispatch. Moreover, it may resemble independent film-making and other forms of expression that do not rely on corporate sponsors. - TH
:
Fourie, Ian. "Should We Take Disintermediation Seriously?" The Electronic Library 17(1)(February, 1999): 9-16 (http://www.learned.co.uk/tel/focus1.asp). - Does the growing volume of electronic information available to end-users spell the end of intermediaries as we know them? Well, perhaps as we know some of them today. While end-users may be increasingly less dependent on information specialists, Fourie argues that end-user empowerment does not necessarily imply disintermediation or "the finding of information by an end-user without the need for a third party." Fourie discusses the implications of disintermediation on the future of information specialists in nearly excruciating detail. While his conclusion that information specialists will continue to have a role in improving society's access to quality information is not surprising, he does offer some valuable points for information specialists to consider in keeping their skills effective and relevant. - LY
:
Hegener, Michiel. "The Internet, Satellites, and Human Rights" OnTheInternet 5(2) (March/April 1999):20-29; 40 (http://www.isoc.org/isoc/publications/oti/interim.html). - In a previous article on Internet satellite technology in OnTheInternet, Hegener focused on issues of capability and implementation.  This piece focuses on its possible impact on global human rights.  Not surprisingly, what may happen is far from clear and will be the result of a complex interplay of technical, political, economic, and human realities. Hegener understands these issues and does not fall into the trap of overlooking their complexity in order to deliver a strong conclusion. It is not yet clear what, if any, impact satellite communication may have on the ability of people to "get the word out" to the rest of the world about the violation of their human rights. One might imagine, however, that every new method of communication would threaten the power of oppressors to create and sustain their oppression. - RT
:
Huwe, Terence K. "New Search Tools for Multidisciplinary Digital Libraries" Online 23(2) (March/April 1999):67-74 (http://www.onlineinc.com/onlinemag/OL1999/huwe3.html). - This article is not just for librarians who "have" a digital library, because any information service is becoming more about remote access and less about collection ownership. Online searchers and librarians of all stripes should take a look. Current Cites contributor Terry Huwe sees the migration of many online services to the Web environment as a stimulus for the creation of  better search utilities which can ease the task of multidisciplinary searches. He argues that "the current challenge is to develop new search tools that deliver multidisciplinary results, but that also preserve the metadata and finding aids of the discrete databases." The tools highlighted include the KnowledgeCite Library by Silverplatter Information (http://www.silverplatter.com/KC/kcintro.html), UC San Diego's Database Advisor  http://scilib.ucsd.edu/Proj/dba/), Ameritech's Pharos system for the California State University System http://uias.calstate.edu), and Northern Light (http://www.northernlight.com/). These critiques are written from the point of view that a huge information  utility's sheer size can become a curse, if it turns the utility into a sea of  bytes devoid of context and meaning. - JR
:
Kelley, Tina. "Whales in the Minnesota River?" The New York Times (March 4, 1999): D1-D8. - The Web is largely unregulated and unchecked so it is wise to be skeptical when using web-based resources. Talk about stating the obvious.  Nonetheless, it is encouraging to see the Times "Circuits" section illustrating some dramatic cases of bogus data found on the Web: the Amnesty International site on human rights in Tunisia (www.amnesty.org/tunisia) versus a site sponsored by the Tunisian government on human rights in that country (www.amnesty-tunisia.org). The article describes the efforts of some librarians to teach students how to evaulate the Web. Included are references to some Web sites that tell you what to look for when seeking reliable information online including: Thinking Critically About World Wide Web Resources (www.library.ucla.edu/libraries/college/instruct/web/critical.htm) and Practical Steps in Evaluating Internet Resources (milton.mse.jhu.edu/research/education/practical.html). A sidebar on "How to Separate Good Data From Bad" provides a checklist of what to look for including things that are second nature to information professionals like: "beware of sites with lots of spelling and grammatical errors" and notice when the site was last updated. - MP
:
Ober, John. "The California Digital Library" D-Lib Magazine (March 1999) (http://www.dlib.org/dlib/march99/03ober.html). - The California Digital Library is a recent invention of the University of California, and so far very little has been publicly available on what it's all about. This piece fills in a lot of holes, and provides some key URLs for finding out more. Ober does a good job of both recounting the recent history that led to its creation as well as describing its present and charting its future. - RT
:
Puglia, Steven. "Creating Permanent and Durable Information: Physical Media and Storage Standards" CRM: Cultural Resource Management 22(2)(1999): 25-27 (http://tps.cr.nps.gov/crm/archive/22-2/22-02-10.pdf).  - This "laundry list" of preservation standards, media, and guidelines is a useful reference to the key materials regarding the current preservation state-of-the-art. Life expectancy as applied to preservation media is defined, environmental requirements for long-term storage are noted, and digitization guidelines are described. This is not an article, but a reference piece dense with data. - RT
:
Vogt-O'Connor, Diane. "Is the Record of the 20th Century at Risk?" CRM: Cultural Resource Management 22(2) (1999): 21-24 (http://tps.cr.nps.gov/crm/archive/22-2/22-02-9.pdf). - I don't recall ever reading a better articulated description of the digital preservation problem. Vogt-O'Connor has penned a thorough, interesting and compelling description of the challenges that face anyone with digital material they wish to preserve. The works cited are useful and very up-to-date, with most barely six months to a year old. If we are to avert a "digital dark age of information loss," we should heed what Vogt-O'Connor has to say. - RT
:
:
   Current Cites 10(3) (March 1999) ISSN: 1060-2356
   Copyright 1999 by the Library, University of California,
   Berkeley. All rights reserved.
   http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/1999/cc99.10.3.html
:
   Copying is permitted for noncommercial use by    computerized bulletin board/conference systems,    individual scholars, and libraries.    Libraries are authorized to add the journal to their    collections at no cost. This message must appear on copied    material. All commercial use requires permission from the    editor.
:
   All product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders. Mention of a product in this publication does not necessarily imply endorsement of the product.
:
   To subscribe to the Current Cites distribution list, send the message "sub cites [your name]" to    listserv@library.berkeley.edu, replacing   "[your name]" with your name. To unsubscribe, send the    message "unsub cites" to the same address.
:
   Editor: Teri Andrews Rinne, trinne@library.berkeley.edu


*****************************

Volume 10, No 4, April 1999


Date:       Fri, 30 Apr 1999 14:41:30 -1000
From:      Liz Bryson <bryson@cfht.hawaii.edu>
Organization: Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corporation

                      
                                                _Current Cites_
                          Volume 10, no. 4
                             April 1999
                             The Library
                   University of California, Berkeley
                      Edited by Teri Andrews Rinne
                            ISSN: 1060-2356

       http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/1999/cc99.10.4.html

                              Contributors:

                        Terry Huwe, Margaret Phillips,
                   Roy Tennant, Jim Ronningen, Lisa Yesson


   Bilal, Dania, Jeff Barry & W. David Penniman. "A Balancing Act"    Library Journal 124(6) (April 1, 1999): 45-54. - This article is LJ's    annual picture of the automated systems marketplace. 1998 is depicted    as a year of partnerships, and the authors describe the ways in which    vendors and customers are working together to address such problems as    planning for new interfaces while living with old closed systems,    checking for Y2K readiness, and creating Web-based services. After the    overview, 27 vendors are profiled. Tables include microcomputer system    sales, server-based system sales, academic, school and public library    system sales and others. - JR

   Coffman, Steve. "Building Earth's Largest Library: Driving Into the     Future" Searcher 7(3) (March 1999)    (http://www.infotoday.com/searcher/mar/coffman.htm). - Every once in a    while an article comes along that sparks your imagination, or provides    the missing piece to a puzzle, or spurs a moment of "ah-ha!" insight.    For me, this is just such a piece. In this article Coffman paints a    compelling vision of a library catalog system that is accessible,    convenient, personal, and _huge_. Using Amazon.com as his inspiration,    Coffman wonders why libraries can't band together and do something    similar, only better. I can't help thinking the same thing. Sorry,    patient Current Cites readers, you're going to have to read this one    yourself. I really can't do it justice in one paragraph, and frankly I    can't think of any librarian who shouldn't read this. If you think you    are such a person, drop me a line. I'd like to know why. - RT     Hedstrom, Margaret and Sheon Montgomery. _Digital Preservation Needs    and Requirements in RLG Member Institutions_, Mountain View, CA:   Research Libraries Group, December 1998    (http://www.rlg.org/preserv/digpres.html). - This study commissioned    by the Research Libraries Group (RLG) was to determine the status of    digital archiving at its member institutions. Fifty-four libraries    responded, and fifteen participated in supplementary interviews. While    fully 98% of the responding libraries expect to be preserving digital    material by 2001 if they are not doing so already, almost half lack    "the capacity to mount, read, or access files on some of the storage    media they hold." The service most libraries look to consortia to    provide is the development of standards and best practices;    third-party vendors, on the other hand, are expected to provide    migration and conversion services. The report ends with    recommendations based on the findings of the survey for RLG, member    institutions, and service providers. - RT

   Kiernan, Vincent. "An Ambitious Plan to Sell Electronic Books:
   University Librarians and Press Officials See Promise and Possible    Pitfalls in the Concept" Chronicle of Higher Education 65(32) (April    16, 1999): A27. - A Colorado-based firm is embarking on a venture to    sell electronic books to university libraries, and some university    press officials say the new program is "the most promising experiment    with e-books yet." The product is called netLibrary    (http://www.netlibrary.com), and it already has 2,000 titles on its    list. Library officials are quoted in more cautionary tones, but    powerful agencies like CARL and OhioLink are charter customers. - TH

   Kiernan, Vincent. "Two Big Libraries Abandon Home-Grown Software for    Commercial Products" Chronicle of Higher Education April 14, 1999. -    This article describes recent developments at the Library of Congress    and National Library of Medicine in cataloging policy. Both libraries    are shifting their cataloging activity to commercial products, hoping    to cut overhead and streamline work processes. Current arrangements at    LC can involve searches in as many as three databases to confirm    holdings and veracity, so the library is also trying to solve legacy    system challenges at the same time it is updating work practices. –TH

   Seadle, Michael. "The Raw and the Cooked Among Librarians" Library    HiTech 16 (3-4) (1998): 7-11. - In this introduction to Library Hi    Tech's special issue on digital libraries, Seadle posits how    librarians can use anthropological methods and theories to examine    library systems in fresh, new ways. He notes that as our language has    yet to catch up to modern technology, we tend to gravitate towards    physical metaphors to describe digital artifacts, such as "electronic    library." While helpful in their familiarity, these metaphors can skew    user expectations and conceal new technology-based capabilities.    Seadle's observations are insightful and foreshadow the organizational    themes which dominate the electronic text and information technology    center profiles in this article series. - LY

   Stokes, John R. "Imaging Pictorial Collections at the Library of    Congress" RLG DigiNews 3(2) (April 15, 1999)    (http://www.rlg.org/preserv/diginews/diginews3-2.html). - The Library    of Congress is one of the few institutions that has the resources to    outsource the digitization of a quarter of a million images. But    nonetheless, this account of such a project will likely be fascinating    to anyone who digitizes pictorial material. Judging from the    accompanying photographs, a phenomenal amount of work was accomplished    in what appears to be a space not much larger than an elongated    closet. But what is most fascinating are the decisions that were made    along the way and the reasons for them. There is little enough of this    kind of nitty-gritty information around, so digital librarians (and    those who aspire) should take a good look. - RT

   Stubbs, Walter and Eric Wettstein. "U.S. GPO CD-ROMS: Blessing or    Curse?" Journal of Government Information 26(2) (March/April 1999):    131-163. - Federal legislators see it as a painless method of    streamlining government, and librarians know what headaches it can    cause: the push for a more electronic Depository Library System has    resulted in a Tower of Babel of Government Printing Office CD-ROMs.    The authors surveyed 205 federal depository libraries in 1996, with a    lengthy questionnaire about 156 CD-ROM titles. The statistics derived    can't be seen as overwhelmingly conclusive about much of anything,    because only 70 usable responses were received, and a lot has changed    in three years. However, this study sheds light on what librarians    found useful, why some disks were avoided like the plague, and if and    when the Web was preferred. Particular attention is paid to the    advantages and disadvantages of the many varieties of enabling    software required to run these disks. Comments from depository    librarians are included. - JR

   Weibel, Stuart. "The State of the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative,    April 1999" D-Lib Magazine 5(4) (April 1999)    (http://www.dlib.org/dlib/april99/04weibel.html). - The effort to    define a basic set of metadata elements for Internet resource    discovery has been ongoing for years. In this report, the leader of    the Dublin Core effort describes the current state of affairs and    identifies six areas where participants are currently focusing their    efforts. The six areas are: formalization of a process for the Dublin    Core, standardization, HTML encoding, qualification mechanisms, the    role of RDF, and relationships to other metadata models. For those    wanting to follow this effort, either as an observer or a participant,    the references for this piece point to some essential current    resources. - RT

   Young, Jeffrey R. "Three Research Libraries Plan Vast New Facility to    Store Little-Used Books" Chronicle of Higher Education April 6, 1999.    - Columbia, The New York Public Library and Princeton are pooling    resources to build a single off-site storage facility in the Bronx,    and it will be a big one. This article describes the project, which is    cast as a defining moment in inter-university collaboration on a very    large scale. Princeton's provost makes several insightful comments    about library planning, to wit, "In the past, [collection development]    has been an area where many universities sought to compete, rather    than cooperate with each other to provide the very best service."    Other joint initiatives, such as digitization of material, may follow    in time. - TH
     _________________________________________________________________

   Current Cites 10(4) (April 1999) ISSN: 1060-2356
   Copyright 1999 by the Library, University of California,
   Berkeley. All rights reserved.
   http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/1999/cc99.10.4.html

   Copying is permitted for noncommercial use by computerized bulletin board/conference systems, individual scholars, and libraries. Libraries are authorized to add the journal to their collections at no    cost. This message must appear on copied material. All commercial use requires permission from the editor.

   All product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders. Mention of a product in this publication does not necessarily imply endorsement of the product.

   To subscribe to the Current Cites distribution list, send the message  "sub cites [your name]" to listserv@library.berkeley.edu, replacing  "[your name]" with your name. To unsubscribe, send the message "unsub cites" to the same address.

   Editor: Teri Andrews Rinne, trinne@library.berkeley.edu

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

4.                DIGINEWS

Volume 3, No. 2, April 1999


Date:         Tue, 20 Apr 1999 15:46:29 -0400
Sender:       International Federation of Library Associations mailing list
              <IFLA-L@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA>
From:         "Oya Y. Rieger" <oyr1@CORNELL.EDU>
Subject:      April 1999 issue of RLG DigiNews available

The April 1999 issue of RLG DigiNews is now available at:

http://www.rlg.org/preserv/diginews/  (from all points other than Europe)
        or
http://www.thames.rlg.org/preserv/diginews/  (from Europe).

In addition to announcements, a highlighted web site and a current calendar
of events, the following is covered in the new April 1999 issue:

Volume 3, Issue 2: CONTENTS

_Feature Article_
Imaging Pictorial Collections at the Library of Congress
     by John R. Stokes

_Technical Feature_
DoD-NARA Scanned Images Standards Conference
     by Sue MacTavish

_FAQ_
JPEG Compression Methods

_RLG News_
RLG to Publish Moving Theory into Practice: Digital Imaging for Libraries and Archives

Papers from the Joint RLG/NPO Preservation Conference: Guidelines for Digital Imaging Now Available

Upcoming RLG Forum: Aspects of Digital Preservation and Archiving, Emory University

_____________________________________________
Oya Y. Rieger
Digital Projects Librarian
Cornell University Library
701 Olin Library
Ithaca, NY 14853

Email: oyr1@cornell.edu
Phone: (607) 254-5160
Fax:  (607) 254-7493

*********************************
Vol 3, no 3, June 1999


Date:         Mon, 21 Jun 1999 10:57:40 -0400
Sender:       International Federation of Library Associations mailing list
              <IFLA-L@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA>
From:         "Barbara Berger Eden (by way of IFLA Administration
              <ifla@nlc-bnc.ca>)" <beb1@CORNELL.EDU>
Subject:      June RLG DigiNews Now Available

The June 1999 issue of RLG DigiNews is now available at
http://www.rlg.org/preserv/diginews/

In addition to announcements, a highlighted web site and a current calendar of events, the following is covered in the new June 1999 issue:
Volume 3, Issue 3
CONTENTS
_Feature Article_
The Cedars Project: Implementing a Model for Distributed Digital Archives
by Kelly Russell and Derek Sergeant
_Technical Feature_
Tools and Techniques in Evaluating Digital Imaging Projects
by Robert Rieger and Geri Gay
_FAQ_
I have heard of a consortial activity that is attempting to develop
metadata standards for digital images. Does such an initiative
exist?
_RLG News_
Aspects of Digital Preservation and Archiving Forum
e18, the Eighteenth Century Digitization Project

For more information about RLG or PRESERV, please contact
Robin Dale (Robin_Dale@notes.rlg.org).


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5.             D-LIB MAGAZINE

MAY 1999


Date:         Tue, 18 May 1999 12:54:43 -0400
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
              <ASIS-L@asis.org>
From: Richard Hill <rhill@asis.org>
Subject:      The D-Lib Magazine May 1999 Issue Is Now Available
To: ASIS-L@asis.lib.indiana.edu

The May 1999 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available at:

http://www.dlib.org/

The stories for May include:

DOI: Current Status and Outlook May 1999
Norman Paskin, International DOI Foundation

The Virtual Naval Hospital: Lessons Learned in Creating and Operating a Digital Health Sciences Library for Nomadic Patrons
Michael P. D'Alessandro, M.D., Donna M. D'Alessandro, M.D., and Mary J.C. Hendrix, Ph.D. University of Iowa College of Medicine; CAPT Richard S. Bakalar, MC, USN and LT Denis E. Ashley, MC, USNR


Interoperability for Digital Objects and Repositories: The Cornell/CNRI Experiments
Sandra Payette, Cornell University; Christophe Blanchi, The Corporation for National Research Initiatives; Carl Lagoze, Cornell University; and Edward A. Overly, The Corporation for National Research Initiatives

Education for Digital Libraries
Amanda Spink, University of North Texas and Colleen Cool, Queens College
-  City University of New York

Bonnie Wilson
Managing Editor
D-Lib Magazine


************************************

SEPTEMBER 1999

Date:         Thu, 16 Sep 1999 16:08:36 -0400
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
              <ASIS-L@asis.org>
From: Richard Hill <rhill@asis.org>
Subject:      The September 1999 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available.

The September 1999 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available at
http://www.dlib.org/

You will note a change in the structure and appearance of the home page at http://www.dlib.org/ this month.  This change reflects the current structure of the D-Lib Forum and its constituent activities, including D-Lib Magazine.  For an explanation of this change, follow the link to "A Note from D-Lib Forum".  Please note that your entry point to D-Lib Magazine has not changed, and you can continue to use http://www.dlib.org/ to reach the magazine.

Other changes this month include the addition of a new column entitled "In Brief" and a new section in Clips & Pointers, "Calls for Participation".

Stories in the September 1999 issue of D-Lib Magazine include:

e-Skeletons: The Digital Library as a Platform for Studying Anatomical Form and Function
John Kappelman, Timothy Ryan, and Myriam Zylstra, University of Texas, Austin

Canonicalization: A Fundamental Tool to Facilitate Preservation and Management of Digital Information

Clifford Lynch, Coalition for Networked Information
The ISI Web of Science - Links and Electronic Journals: How links work today in the Web of Science, and the challenges posed by electronic journals
Helen Atkins, Institute for Scientific Information

MPEG-7: Behind the Scenes
Jane Hunter, Distributed Systems Technology Centre

Long-term Preservation of Electronic Publications: The NEDLIB project
Titia van der Werf-Davelaar, Koninklijke Bibliotheek, National Library of the Netherlands

LIB-LICENSE Project
Ann Okerson, Yale University

The "In Brief" column includes pieces about DL'99: The Fourth ACM Conference on Digital Libraries, by Roxanne Missingham; news about a new IFLA/OCLC fellowship, by Erik Jul; and a press release about a UK project at the National Electronic Library for Health (NeLH) from Andrew Cox.

Bonnie Wilson
Managing Editor
D-Lib Magazine

---------------
Richard Hill
American Society for Information Science
8720 Georgia Avenue, Suite 501
Silver Spring, MD  20910
(301) 495-0900
FAX: (301) 495-0810
http://www.asis.org

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx



3.                CURRENT CITES,

Volume 10, No 3, March 1999

Date:         Mon, 12 Apr 1999 18:55:01 +0000
Sender:       Solo Librarians Listserv <SOLOLIB-L@LISTSERV.SILVERPLATTER.COM>
From:         Gerry Hurley <Gerry_Hurley@SILVERPLATTER.COM>
Subject:      Current Cites, March 1999

Here's the March issue of Current Cites, resposted from
the PACS-L list.
--Gerry Hurley
  SOLOLIB-L List Owner
:
                     _Current Cites_
                     Volume 10, no. 3
                        March 1999
                       The Library
            University of California, Berkeley
                Edited by Teri Andrews Rinne
                     ISSN: 1060-2356
:
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/1999/cc99.10.3.html
:
                        Contributors
                 Terry Huwe, Margaret Phillips,
             Roy Tennant, Jim Ronningen, Lisa Yesson
:
Ellis, Steven, ed. "A Special Theme: Digital Libraries" Library HiTech 16(3-4) (1998):12-62. - Since all but two of the seven articles are specifically on electronic text centers, the theme title is more than a little misleading. E-text centers, as important as they may be, do not comprise anywhere near the totality of digital libraries. However, if one takes this error into account, the collection of articles can serve as a useful overview of a number of electronic text center projects. - RT
:
Floyd, Bianca. "Digital Storytelling Updates an Ancient Art by Adding Technology" Chronicle of Higher Education, March 18, 1999 (http://www.chronicle.com/daily/99/03/99031801t.htm). - This article describes the new art of digital storytelling as pioneered at UC Berkeley's Center for Digital Storytelling. Participants claim that digital storytelling merging together text, images, sound and animation will emerge as a new art form that will be pursued by large numbers of people who have access to technology. Amateur practitioners may be the pioneers of this art form, because basic manipulation of digital formats can be learned with relative dispatch. Moreover, it may resemble independent film-making and other forms of expression that do not rely on corporate sponsors. - TH
:
Fourie, Ian. "Should We Take Disintermediation Seriously?" The Electronic Library 17(1)(February, 1999): 9-16 (http://www.learned.co.uk/tel/focus1.asp). - Does the growing volume of electronic information available to end-users spell the end of intermediaries as we know them? Well, perhaps as we know some of them today. While end-users may be increasingly less dependent on information specialists, Fourie argues that end-user empowerment does not necessarily imply disintermediation or "the finding of information by an end-user without the need for a third party." Fourie discusses the implications of disintermediation on the future of information specialists in nearly excruciating detail. While his conclusion that information specialists will continue to have a role in improving society's access to quality information is not surprising, he does offer some valuable points for information specialists to consider in keeping their skills effective and relevant. - LY
:
Hegener, Michiel. "The Internet, Satellites, and Human Rights" OnTheInternet 5(2) (March/April 1999):20-29; 40 (http://www.isoc.org/isoc/publications/oti/interim.html). - In a previous article on Internet satellite technology in OnTheInternet, Hegener focused on issues of capability and implementation.  This piece focuses on its possible impact on global human rights.  Not surprisingly, what may happen is far from clear and will be the result of a complex interplay of technical, political, economic, and human realities. Hegener understands these issues and does not fall into the trap of overlooking their complexity in order to deliver a strong conclusion. It is not yet clear what, if any, impact satellite communication may have on the ability of people to "get the word out" to the rest of the world about the violation of their human rights. One might imagine, however, that every new method of communication would threaten the power of oppressors to create and sustain their oppression. - RT
:
Huwe, Terence K. "New Search Tools for Multidisciplinary Digital Libraries" Online 23(2) (March/April 1999):67-74 (http://www.onlineinc.com/onlinemag/OL1999/huwe3.html). - This article is not just for librarians who "have" a digital library, because any information service is becoming more about remote access and less about collection ownership. Online searchers and librarians of all stripes should take a look. Current Cites contributor Terry Huwe sees the migration of many online services to the Web environment as a stimulus for the creation of  better search utilities which can ease the task of multidisciplinary searches. He argues that "the current challenge is to develop new search tools that deliver multidisciplinary results, but that also preserve the metadata and finding aids of the discrete databases." The tools highlighted include the KnowledgeCite Library by Silverplatter Information (http://www.silverplatter.com/KC/kcintro.html), UC San Diego's Database Advisor  http://scilib.ucsd.edu/Proj/dba/), Ameritech's Pharos system for the California State University System http://uias.calstate.edu), and Northern Light (http://www.northernlight.com/). These critiques are written from the point of view that a huge information  utility's sheer size can become a curse, if it turns the utility into a sea of  bytes devoid of context and meaning. - JR
:
Kelley, Tina. "Whales in the Minnesota River?" The New York Times (March 4, 1999): D1-D8. - The Web is largely unregulated and unchecked so it is wise to be skeptical when using web-based resources. Talk about stating the obvious.  Nonetheless, it is encouraging to see the Times "Circuits" section illustrating some dramatic cases of bogus data found on the Web: the Amnesty International site on human rights in Tunisia (www.amnesty.org/tunisia) versus a site sponsored by the Tunisian government on human rights in that country (www.amnesty-tunisia.org). The article describes the efforts of some librarians to teach students how to evaulate the Web. Included are references to some Web sites that tell you what to look for when seeking reliable information online including: Thinking Critically About World Wide Web Resources (www.library.ucla.edu/libraries/college/instruct/web/critical.htm) and Practical Steps in Evaluating Internet Resources (milton.mse.jhu.edu/research/education/practical.html). A sidebar on "How to Separate Good Data From Bad" provides a checklist of what to look for including things that are second nature to information professionals like: "beware of sites with lots of spelling and grammatical errors" and notice when the site was last updated. - MP
:
Ober, John. "The California Digital Library" D-Lib Magazine (March 1999) (http://www.dlib.org/dlib/march99/03ober.html). - The California Digital Library is a recent invention of the University of California, and so far very little has been publicly available on what it's all about. This piece fills in a lot of holes, and provides some key URLs for finding out more. Ober does a good job of both recounting the recent history that led to its creation as well as describing its present and charting its future. - RT
:
Puglia, Steven. "Creating Permanent and Durable Information: Physical Media and Storage Standards" CRM: Cultural Resource Management 22(2)(1999): 25-27 (http://tps.cr.nps.gov/crm/archive/22-2/22-02-10.pdf).  - This "laundry list" of preservation standards, media, and guidelines is a useful reference to the key materials regarding the current preservation state-of-the-art. Life expectancy as applied to preservation media is defined, environmental requirements for long-term storage are noted, and digitization guidelines are described. This is not an article, but a reference piece dense with data. - RT
:
Vogt-O'Connor, Diane. "Is the Record of the 20th Century at Risk?" CRM: Cultural Resource Management 22(2) (1999): 21-24 (http://tps.cr.nps.gov/crm/archive/22-2/22-02-9.pdf). - I don't recall ever reading a better articulated description of the digital preservation problem. Vogt-O'Connor has penned a thorough, interesting and compelling description of the challenges that face anyone with digital material they wish to preserve. The works cited are useful and very up-to-date, with most barely six months to a year old. If we are to avert a "digital dark age of information loss," we should heed what Vogt-O'Connor has to say. - RT
:
:
   Current Cites 10(3) (March 1999) ISSN: 1060-2356
   Copyright 1999 by the Library, University of California,
   Berkeley. All rights reserved.
   http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/1999/cc99.10.3.html
:
   Copying is permitted for noncommercial use by    computerized bulletin board/conference systems,    individual scholars, and libraries.    Libraries are authorized to add the journal to their    collections at no cost. This message must appear on copied    material. All commercial use requires permission from the    editor.
:
   All product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders. Mention of a product in this publication does not necessarily imply endorsement of the product.
:
   To subscribe to the Current Cites distribution list, send the message "sub cites [your name]" to    listserv@library.berkeley.edu, replacing   "[your name]" with your name. To unsubscribe, send the    message "unsub cites" to the same address.
:
   Editor: Teri Andrews Rinne, trinne@library.berkeley.edu


*****************************

Volume 10, No 4, April 1999


Date:       Fri, 30 Apr 1999 14:41:30 -1000
From:      Liz Bryson <bryson@cfht.hawaii.edu>
Organization: Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corporation

                      
                                                _Current Cites_
                          Volume 10, no. 4
                             April 1999
                             The Library
                   University of California, Berkeley
                      Edited by Teri Andrews Rinne
                            ISSN: 1060-2356

       http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/1999/cc99.10.4.html

                              Contributors:

                        Terry Huwe, Margaret Phillips,
                   Roy Tennant, Jim Ronningen, Lisa Yesson


   Bilal, Dania, Jeff Barry & W. David Penniman. "A Balancing Act"    Library Journal 124(6) (April 1, 1999): 45-54. - This article is LJ's    annual picture of the automated systems marketplace. 1998 is depicted    as a year of partnerships, and the authors describe the ways in which    vendors and customers are working together to address such problems as    planning for new interfaces while living with old closed systems,    checking for Y2K readiness, and creating Web-based services. After the    overview, 27 vendors are profiled. Tables include microcomputer system    sales, server-based system sales, academic, school and public library    system sales and others. - JR

   Coffman, Steve. "Building Earth's Largest Library: Driving Into the     Future" Searcher 7(3) (March 1999)    (http://www.infotoday.com/searcher/mar/coffman.htm). - Every once in a    while an article comes along that sparks your imagination, or provides    the missing piece to a puzzle, or spurs a moment of "ah-ha!" insight.    For me, this is just such a piece. In this article Coffman paints a    compelling vision of a library catalog system that is accessible,    convenient, personal, and _huge_. Using Amazon.com as his inspiration,    Coffman wonders why libraries can't band together and do something    similar, only better. I can't help thinking the same thing. Sorry,    patient Current Cites readers, you're going to have to read this one    yourself. I really can't do it justice in one paragraph, and frankly I    can't think of any librarian who shouldn't read this. If you think you    are such a person, drop me a line. I'd like to know why. - RT     Hedstrom, Margaret and Sheon Montgomery. _Digital Preservation Needs    and Requirements in RLG Member Institutions_, Mountain View, CA:   Research Libraries Group, December 1998    (http://www.rlg.org/preserv/digpres.html). - This study commissioned    by the Research Libraries Group (RLG) was to determine the status of    digital archiving at its member institutions. Fifty-four libraries    responded, and fifteen participated in supplementary interviews. While    fully 98% of the responding libraries expect to be preserving digital    material by 2001 if they are not doing so already, almost half lack    "the capacity to mount, read, or access files on some of the storage    media they hold." The service most libraries look to consortia to    provide is the development of standards and best practices;    third-party vendors, on the other hand, are expected to provide    migration and conversion services. The report ends with    recommendations based on the findings of the survey for RLG, member    institutions, and service providers. - RT


   Kiernan, Vincent. "An Ambitious Plan to Sell Electronic Books:
   University Librarians and Press Officials See Promise and Possible    Pitfalls in the Concept" Chronicle of Higher Education 65(32) (April    16, 1999): A27. - A Colorado-based firm is embarking on a venture to    sell electronic books to university libraries, and some university    press officials say the new program is "the most promising experiment    with e-books yet." The product is called netLibrary    (http://www.netlibrary.com), and it already has 2,000 titles on its    list. Library officials are quoted in more cautionary tones, but    powerful agencies like CARL and OhioLink are charter customers. - TH

   Kiernan, Vincent. "Two Big Libraries Abandon Home-Grown Software for    Commercial Products" Chronicle of Higher Education April 14, 1999. -    This article describes recent developments at the Library of Congress    and National Library of Medicine in cataloging policy. Both libraries    are shifting their cataloging activity to commercial products, hoping    to cut overhead and streamline work processes. Current arrangements at    LC can involve searches in as many as three databases to confirm    holdings and veracity, so the library is also trying to solve legacy    system challenges at the same time it is updating work practices. –TH

   Seadle, Michael. "The Raw and the Cooked Among Librarians" Library    HiTech 16 (3-4) (1998): 7-11. - In this introduction to Library Hi    Tech's special issue on digital libraries, Seadle posits how    librarians can use anthropological methods and theories to examine    library systems in fresh, new ways. He notes that as our language has    yet to catch up to modern technology, we tend to gravitate towards    physical metaphors to describe digital artifacts, such as "electronic    library." While helpful in their familiarity, these metaphors can skew    user expectations and conceal new technology-based capabilities.    Seadle's observations are insightful and foreshadow the organizational    themes which dominate the electronic text and information technology    center profiles in this article series. - LY

   Stokes, John R. "Imaging Pictorial Collections at the Library of    Congress" RLG DigiNews 3(2) (April 15, 1999)    (http://www.rlg.org/preserv/diginews/diginews3-2.html). - The Library    of Congress is one of the few institutions that has the resources to    outsource the digitization of a quarter of a million images. But    nonetheless, this account of such a project will likely be fascinating    to anyone who digitizes pictorial material. Judging from the    accompanying photographs, a phenomenal amount of work was accomplished    in what appears to be a space not much larger than an elongated    closet. But what is most fascinating are the decisions that were made    along the way and the reasons for them. There is little enough of this    kind of nitty-gritty information around, so digital librarians (and    those who aspire) should take a good look. - RT

   Stubbs, Walter and Eric Wettstein. "U.S. GPO CD-ROMS: Blessing or    Curse?" Journal of Government Information 26(2) (March/April 1999):    131-163. - Federal legislators see it as a painless method of    streamlining government, and librarians know what headaches it can    cause: the push for a more electronic Depository Library System has    resulted in a Tower of Babel of Government Printing Office CD-ROMs.    The authors surveyed 205 federal depository libraries in 1996, with a    lengthy questionnaire about 156 CD-ROM titles. The statistics derived    can't be seen as overwhelmingly conclusive about much of anything,    because only 70 usable responses were received, and a lot has changed    in three years. However, this study sheds light on what librarians    found useful, why some disks were avoided like the plague, and if and    when the Web was preferred. Particular attention is paid to the    advantages and disadvantages of the many varieties of enabling    software required to run these disks. Comments from depository    librarians are included. - JR

   Weibel, Stuart. "The State of the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative,    April 1999" D-Lib Magazine 5(4) (April 1999)    (http://www.dlib.org/dlib/april99/04weibel.html). - The effort to    define a basic set of metadata elements for Internet resource    discovery has been ongoing for years. In this report, the leader of    the Dublin Core effort describes the current state of affairs and    identifies six areas where participants are currently focusing their    efforts. The six areas are: formalization of a process for the Dublin    Core, standardization, HTML encoding, qualification mechanisms, the    role of RDF, and relationships to other metadata models. For those    wanting to follow this effort, either as an observer or a participant,    the references for this piece point to some essential current    resources. - RT

   Young, Jeffrey R. "Three Research Libraries Plan Vast New Facility to    Store Little-Used Books" Chronicle of Higher Education April 6, 1999.    - Columbia, The New York Public Library and Princeton are pooling    resources to build a single off-site storage facility in the Bronx,    and it will be a big one. This article describes the project, which is    cast as a defining moment in inter-university collaboration on a very    large scale. Princeton's provost makes several insightful comments    about library planning, to wit, "In the past, [collection development]    has been an area where many universities sought to compete, rather    than cooperate with each other to provide the very best service."    Other joint initiatives, such as digitization of material, may follow    in time. - TH
     _________________________________________________________________

   Current Cites 10(4) (April 1999) ISSN: 1060-2356
   Copyright 1999 by the Library, University of California,
   Berkeley. All rights reserved.
   http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/1999/cc99.10.4.html

   Copying is permitted for noncommercial use by computerized bulletin board/conference systems, individual scholars, and libraries. Libraries are authorized to add the journal to their collections at no    cost. This message must appear on copied material. All commercial use requires permission from the editor.

   All product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders. Mention of a product in this publication does not necessarily imply endorsement of the product.

   To subscribe to the Current Cites distribution list, send the message  "sub cites [your name]" to listserv@library.berkeley.edu, replacing  "[your name]" with your name. To unsubscribe, send the message "unsub cites" to the same address.

   Editor: Teri Andrews Rinne, trinne@library.berkeley.edu

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

4.                DIGINEWS

Volume 3, No. 2, April 1999


Date:         Tue, 20 Apr 1999 15:46:29 -0400
Sender:       International Federation of Library Associations mailing list
              <IFLA-L@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA>
From:         "Oya Y. Rieger" <oyr1@CORNELL.EDU>
Subject:      April 1999 issue of RLG DigiNews available

The April 1999 issue of RLG DigiNews is now available at:

http://www.rlg.org/preserv/diginews/  (from all points other than Europe)
        or
http://www.thames.rlg.org/preserv/diginews/  (from Europe).

In addition to announcements, a highlighted web site and a current calendar
of events, the following is covered in the new April 1999 issue:

Volume 3, Issue 2: CONTENTS

_Feature Article_
Imaging Pictorial Collections at the Library of Congress
     by John R. Stokes

_Technical Feature_
DoD-NARA Scanned Images Standards Conference
     by Sue MacTavish

_FAQ_
JPEG Compression Methods

_RLG News_
RLG to Publish Moving Theory into Practice: Digital Imaging for Libraries and Archives

Papers from the Joint RLG/NPO Preservation Conference: Guidelines for Digital Imaging Now Available

Upcoming RLG Forum: Aspects of Digital Preservation and Archiving, Emory University

_____________________________________________
Oya Y. Rieger
Digital Projects Librarian
Cornell University Library
701 Olin Library
Ithaca, NY 14853

Email: oyr1@cornell.edu
Phone: (607) 254-5160
Fax:  (607) 254-7493

*********************************
Vol 3, no 3, June 1999


Date:         Mon, 21 Jun 1999 10:57:40 -0400
Sender:       International Federation of Library Associations mailing list
              <IFLA-L@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA>
From:         "Barbara Berger Eden (by way of IFLA Administration
              <ifla@nlc-bnc.ca>)" <beb1@CORNELL.EDU>
Subject:      June RLG DigiNews Now Available

The June 1999 issue of RLG DigiNews is now available at
http://www.rlg.org/preserv/diginews/

In addition to announcements, a highlighted web site and a current calendar of events, the following is covered in the new June 1999 issue:
Volume 3, Issue 3
CONTENTS
_Feature Article_
The Cedars Project: Implementing a Model for Distributed Digital Archives
by Kelly Russell and Derek Sergeant
_Technical Feature_
Tools and Techniques in Evaluating Digital Imaging Projects
by Robert Rieger and Geri Gay
_FAQ_
I have heard of a consortial activity that is attempting to develop
metadata standards for digital images. Does such an initiative
exist?
_RLG News_
Aspects of Digital Preservation and Archiving Forum
e18, the Eighteenth Century Digitization Project

For more information about RLG or PRESERV, please contact
Robin Dale (Robin_Dale@notes.rlg.org).



xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
5.             D-LIB MAGAZINE

MAY 1999


Date:         Tue, 18 May 1999 12:54:43 -0400
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
              <ASIS-L@asis.org>
From: Richard Hill <rhill@asis.org>
Subject:      The D-Lib Magazine May 1999 Issue Is Now Available
To: ASIS-L@asis.lib.indiana.edu

The May 1999 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available at:

http://www.dlib.org/

The stories for May include:

DOI: Current Status and Outlook May 1999
Norman Paskin, International DOI Foundation

The Virtual Naval Hospital: Lessons Learned in Creating and Operating a Digital Health Sciences Library for Nomadic Patrons
Michael P. D'Alessandro, M.D., Donna M. D'Alessandro, M.D., and Mary J.C. Hendrix, Ph.D. University of Iowa College of Medicine; CAPT Richard S. Bakalar, MC, USN and LT Denis E. Ashley, MC, USNR


Interoperability for Digital Objects and Repositories: The Cornell/CNRI Experiments
Sandra Payette, Cornell University; Christophe Blanchi, The Corporation for National Research Initiatives; Carl Lagoze, Cornell University; and Edward A. Overly, The Corporation for National Research Initiatives

Education for Digital Libraries
Amanda Spink, University of North Texas and Colleen Cool, Queens College
-  City University of New York

Bonnie Wilson
Managing Editor
D-Lib Magazine


************************************

SEPTEMBER 1999

Date:         Thu, 16 Sep 1999 16:08:36 -0400
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
              <ASIS-L@asis.org>
From: Richard Hill <rhill@asis.org>
Subject:      The September 1999 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available.

The September 1999 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available at
http://www.dlib.org/

You will note a change in the structure and appearance of the home page at http://www.dlib.org/ this month.  This change reflects the current structure of the D-Lib Forum and its constituent activities, including D-Lib Magazine.  For an explanation of this change, follow the link to "A Note from D-Lib Forum".  Please note that your entry point to D-Lib Magazine has not changed, and you can continue to use http://www.dlib.org/ to reach the magazine.

Other changes this month include the addition of a new column entitled "In Brief" and a new section in Clips & Pointers, "Calls for Participation".

Stories in the September 1999 issue of D-Lib Magazine include:

e-Skeletons: The Digital Library as a Platform for Studying Anatomical Form and Function
John Kappelman, Timothy Ryan, and Myriam Zylstra, University of Texas, Austin

Canonicalization: A Fundamental Tool to Facilitate Preservation and Management of Digital Information

Clifford Lynch, Coalition for Networked Information
The ISI Web of Science - Links and Electronic Journals: How links work today in the Web of Science, and the challenges posed by electronic journals
Helen Atkins, Institute for Scientific Information

MPEG-7: Behind the Scenes
Jane Hunter, Distributed Systems Technology Centre

Long-term Preservation of Electronic Publications: The NEDLIB project
Titia van der Werf-Davelaar, Koninklijke Bibliotheek, National Library of the Netherlands

LIB-LICENSE Project
Ann Okerson, Yale University

The "In Brief" column includes pieces about DL'99: The Fourth ACM Conference on Digital Libraries, by Roxanne Missingham; news about a new IFLA/OCLC fellowship, by Erik Jul; and a press release about a UK project at the National Electronic Library for Health (NeLH) from Andrew Cox.

Bonnie Wilson
Managing Editor
D-Lib Magazine

---------------
Richard Hill
American Society for Information Science
8720 Georgia Avenue, Suite 501
Silver Spring, MD  20910
(301) 495-0900
FAX: (301) 495-0810
http://www.asis.org

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx


6.                GREYNET NEWSLETTER

Volume 8, no. 2, 1999


Return-path: <kevbre@ngw.lib.usu.edu>
From: GreyNet <Dominic.Farace@inter.NL.net>
To: "Natural Resources Librarians List" <NRLib-L@library.lib.usu.edu>
Subject: GreyNet Newsletter Vol. 8, No. 2, 1999
Date: Wed, 12 May 1999 12:45:42 +0200 (MET DST)

                          N e w s B r i e f N e w s
__________________________________________________________________________

GreyNet Quarterly Newsletter
Vol. 8, No. 2, 1999

ISSN 1389-1804 (Print)
ISSN 1389-1812 (Email)

__________________________________________________________________________
                                   
CONTENTS:                                                          COLUMN:

Consequences of Networked Grey Literature. . . . . . . . . . . . . .  1
NOM & ALA'99, Home to GreyNet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  2
GL'99 Pre-Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
IJGL Homepage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
Award for Outstanding Achievement in Grey Literature . . . . . . . .  5
Website Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
GreyNet Express Voucher. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
_________________________________________________________________________

Editorial Address:

GreyNet, Grey Literature Network Service
Koninginneweg 201, 1075 CR Amsterdam,
The Netherlands
Tel/Fax: 31-20-671.1818
Email: GreyNet@inter.nl.net
URL: http://www.konbib.nl/infolev/greynet

Annual Subscription  : NLG. 40  |  US$ 25

________________________________________________________________


*************************
Volume 8, no. 3, 1999


Return-path: <Dominic.Farace@inter.NL.net>
Date: Fri, 27 Aug 1999 16:52:23 +0200 (MET DST)
From: GreyNet <Dominic.Farace@inter.NL.net>
To: Kerry Smith <kerry@biblio.curtin.edu.au>
Subject: GreyNet Newsletter Volume 8, Number 3, 1999

                          N e w s B r i e f N e w s
__________________________________________________________________________

GreyNet Quarterly Newsletter
Vol. 8, No. 3, 1999

ISSN 1389-1804 (Print)
ISSN 1389-1812 (Email)

__________________________________________________________________________
                                   
CONTENTS:                                                          COLUMN:

GL'99 Virtual Discussion now on the Net. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  1                         
The GL-Compendium Project. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  2
IJGL - Forthcoming Articles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
Announcement CRIS 2000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
Editors Note . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
GL'99 Registration Form. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
_________________________________________________________________________

Editorial Address:

GreyNet, Grey Literature Network Service
Koninginneweg 201, 1075 CR Amsterdam,
The Netherlands
Tel/Fax: 31-20-671.1818
Email: GreyNet@inter.nl.net
URL: http://www.konbib.nl/infolev/greynet

Annual Subscription  : NLG. 40  |  US$ 25

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

7.             iMP

THE MAGAZINE ON INFORMATION IMPACTS
June 1999


Date:         Fri, 9 Jul 1999 15:22:13 -0400
Sender:       International Federation of Library Associations mailing list
              <IFLA-L@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA>
From:         Terry Kuny <Terry.Kuny@xist.com>
Subject:      [SERIAL] iMP: The Magazine on Information Impacts

From: "Friedlander, Amy" <AMY.E.FRIEDLANDER@cpmx.saic.com>
Subject: iMP:  The Magazine on Information Impacts
Date: Fri, 9 Jul 1999 12:42:49 -0400

The June issue of iMP: The Magazine on Information Impacts, which is published on the web by the Center for Information Strategy and Policy (CISP) of Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), has been posted.  You can find the magazine at:

 http://www.cisp.org/ [follow "visit imp"] or

http://www.cisp.org/imp/june_99/06_99contents.htm

In this issue, we are featuring stories and editorials on the theme of IT and education, several of which have digital library connections.  Our contributors include:

Stretching the Zero Sum Paradigm with a National Digital Library for Science Education, Frank Wattenberg

Education at a Distance: How Demography and Technology Are Creating a Worldwide Learning Revolution in Higher Education, Claudine SchWeber

E-Learning: A Catalyst for Competition in Higher Education, Walter Baer

Cyberspace, Deviance, and Children, Terry Gudaitis
It Takes an (Extended Internet) Community to Teach a Child, Daniel Bobrow
Schools Don't Want Technology, Schools Want Curriculum, Elliot Soloway and Cathleen Norris

Broadband Networking and the Future of Graduate Education, Clifford Lynch.

Wattenberg, SchWeber, and Lynch address the contributions of digital libraries to more equitable resource distribution, and digital library technologies are implicit in nearly all of the other stories.

Of more general interest are our columns, "What's Happening" and "Calendar", in which we identify new reports, journals, funding opportunities, upcoming conferences, and developments on the Hill and in the courts. The scope is primarily USA but we attempt to cover the major international developments, as well, and expect to broaden our focus as this new magazine matures.

We have an opt-in policy. If you wish to receive notices of each new release, please let us know via the subscribe page at the site [http://www.cisp.org/imp/june_99/subscribe.html] or by sending us a message to subscribe@cisp.org.  We apologize for any cross-postings or multiple mailings that you may have received. Joining our subscription list only provides you with notices of new iMP releases (10 per year).  Information provided to us will neither be given nor sold for use by any third parties. We encourage you to review our terms and conditions statement, which includes our policy on privacy.

We encourage you to forward this notice to others who may be interested in iMP. Our double summer issue (release date:  July 22, 1999) will be devoted to Y2K.  In September, we will resume publication with an issue on infrastructure protection followed by one on IT and the environment.

iMP is an adventure.  We hope that you will read it, share it with your friends, and tell us what you think.

Amy Friedlander
Editor, iMP Magazine
AMY.E.FRIEDLANDER@cpmx.saic.com



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8.                INFORMATION RESEARCH

Volume 4, no 4, June 1999

From: t.d.wilson@sheffield.ac.uk
To: "Inf Res List" <t.d.wilson@sheffield.ac.uk>
Date: Fri, 2 Jul 1999 16:12:40 +0100
Subject: New issue of Information Research

A new issue of Information Research has been published.  Here is the Editorial (apologies for the table - you'll have to check it out at the site):

Go to the top page for the journal:
http://www.shef.ac.uk/~is/publications/infres/ircont.html

First a Call for Papers for the next issue of the journal, which will be Volume 5 Number 1 - in other words we  are entering our fifth year of publication - having lasted rather longer than many people imagined when we  began. That issue will appear in late September/early October and papers (refereed or working) should be sent  to our Regional Editors or to myself. We have some new features on the "cover page" of this issue - first, a link to a page I've  set up, which covers free electronic resources in the fields covered by the journal; and  secondly, a search capability, added to the manual author and subject indexes. Needless  to say, I'll be very happy to hear of any other free resources that anyone knows of, as well  as to receive feedback on everything in the journal. As hoped last time, I have managed to  update the list of student dissertations to cover 1997/98 instead of 1996/97.  We have one Refereed Paper in this issue - and an interesting one at that (although, of  course, everything that appears here is interesting!): it is by Wallace Koehler of the  University of Oklahoma, and deals with the phenomenon of page persistence on the  World Wide Web. Page persistence deals with the life-cycles of Web pages and Koehler  reports that nearly 22% of a sample of pages was unstable over a twenty-two month  period. We've all experienced this phenomenon and, of course, find it very annoying when  we discover that a regularly used source has disappeared, or when search engine output  proves to be too full of dead pages. We then have two, very different Working Papers. Bali and colleagues present a paper on  a new conceptual model for the implementation of management information systems in  small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), while Julian Warner of the Queen's University  of Belfast asks, "...whether the central principle embodied in the practice and theory of  classification and indexing can yield more satisfying design and evaluative criteria for  information retrieval systems than those which have been characteristically assumed in  information retrieval research." Read on to discover how he answers the question.


Since the 1st April 1998, we have had 21,289 'hits' on the 'cover page' of the journal - an  average of more than 1,400 a month.  We also have 576 registered readers from all over the world and this, perhaps, is a better  indicator of readership than hits, although the fact that readers do not have to register  suggests that there may be many regular readers who do not bother to register. Perhaps  we'll get round, one of these days, to asking everyone to register before they use the  journal - any views on that? Remember that, although we now have Regional Editors, we are willing to consider papers  from anywhere in the world, not simply those from the regions indicated. I act as General  Editor and will accept submissions from Western Europe, the Middle and Far East, and  Australasia. I hope that by Volume 5 No. 1, I will be able to announce an international Editorial Board  for the journal: good progress is being made in attracting key researchers in various parts of the world to the Board.


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9.             THE INFORMATION SOCIETY

CALL FOR PAPERS

Date:         Wed, 11 Aug 1999 12:49:43 -0500
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
              <ASIS-L@asis.org>
From: Rob Kling <kling@INDIANA.EDU>
Subject:      CFP: The Information Society (journal)
To: ASIS-L@asis.lib.indiana.edu

                   Call for Papers:

               THE INFORMATION SOCIETY
       (Information Policy and Social Informatics )
                    ISSN 0197-2243
            http://www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS

Do you conduct research on the impacts, policies, systems concepts, methodologies or cultural change related to the rapidly emerging information society?

Are you looking for an outlet for your work on any of the following topics?

        The expanding Virtual communities
        Electronic Data interchange
        Trends in E-commerce
        International Outsourcing of Information
        Changing National Information Infrastructures
        Implications of Electronic Democracy
        Cultural changes in Cyberspace
        Structure of Information Industries
        Gender Issues related to New Technologies
        Ethical implications of Online communications
        Role of place and space in Digital libraries and Electronic
                forums
        Universal Access issues for information services

The Information Society journal (TIS), published by Taylor & Francis since 1981, is a key forum for thoughtful analysis of the impacts, policies, system concepts, methodologies and cultural change and new social forms related to information technologies.  It is a refereed journal that publishes scholarly articles, position papers, debates, short communications, review essays and book reviews.

TIS is a multidisciplinary journal whose audiences include policy-and decision-makers and researchers in government, industry and education; managers concerned with the effects of the information revolution on individuals, organizations and society; as well as scholars with an interest in the relationship between information technologies, social/organizational life, and social change. TIS's web server includes article abstracts and tables of contents.

TIS's Editor in Chief, Rob Kling, is soliciting individual articles and proposals from people who wish to organize and edit special issues. He is interested in provocative analytical articles or empirical studies that are written to advance our understanding of the relationships between information technology, related social practices and policies, and social change.  TIS articles are typically 4,000-8,000 words long, and are written vividly with coherent analyses and minimal jargon. TIS also publishes shorter "position statements" of up to 4,000 words and debates in a section, called "The Forum.".

TIS will be publishing special issues in 1999-2000, including:

*       Anonymous Communication on the Internet (Dr. Al Teich and Mark Frankel). v. 15(2)
*       Rhethoric of Gender in Computer-Mediated Communication (Prof. Laura Gurak). v. 15(3)
*       Public choices and social learning: new multimedia technologies in Europe (Robin Williams) v.16(2)
*       Universal Access (Prof. Harmeet Sawhney) v. 16(4)

Please see TIS's home page for CFPs and instructions for authors,  subscription information and sample copies, tables of contents and descriptions of recent issues. (http://www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS/). Individual can subscribe for $76/year. In 1999 Taylor and Francis offers TIS institutional subscriptions for $153 with online subscription access at no extra charge. (See http://www.tandf.co.uk/JNLS/TIS.HTM)

TIS's Interdisciplinary and International Editorial  Board:

Editor in Chief: Rob Kling  (kling@indiana.edu Tel: 812-855- 9763)
Deputy Editor: Chris Ogan       (ogan@indiana.edu)  Tel: 812-855-1699
Managing Editor: David  Bricker     (tisj@indiana.edu  Tel: 812-856-5657   Fax: 812-855-6166)

The Information Society, School of Library and Information Science, 10th and Jordan, Room 012. Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405-1801

Associate Editors: Phil Agre, Chrisanthi Avgerou, Nancy Baym, Christine Borgman, Geoffrey Bowker, Karen Coyle, Mary Culnan, Bo Dahlbom, Elisabeth Davenport, Linda Garcia, Stephen Griffin, Suzanne Iacono, Toru Ishida, Pertti Jarvinen, James Katz, Douglas Kellner, Kenneth Kraemer, Herbert Kubichek, Robin Mansell, Gary T. Marx, Richard O. Mason, Vincent Mosco, W. Russell Neuman, Mark Poster, Rohan Samarajiva, Harmeet Sawhney, Jorge Schement, Doug Schuler, George Trubow, Rick Weingarten, Rolf Wigand. Book Review Editor: Chris Ferguson

Taylor & Francis (Publishers), Inc. 325 Chestnut St., 8th Floor, Philadelphia PA 19106 toll free: 1-800-821-8312  or fax: 1-215-785-5515

----
Rob
Kling                                         http://www.slis.indiana.edu/kling
The Information Society (journal)       http://www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS
Center for Social Informatics             http://www.slis.indiana.edu/CSI
Indiana University
1320 E 10th Street,  Room 005C
Bloomington, IN 47405-3907             812-855-9763 // Fax: 855-6166

  Read & contribute to the ....
  Social Informatics Home Page --> http://www.slis.indiana.edu/SI
  a resource about research, teaching, conferences & journals

Read:
"What is Social Informatics and Why Does it Matter?"
D-Lib Magazine    January 1999  Volume 5 Number 1
at http://www.dlib.org:80/dlib/january99/kling/01kling.html

You can learn about our Scholarly Communication & IT Project at:
         http://www.slis.indiana.edu/SCIT


Volume 14, No 4

Date:         Fri, 2 Apr 1999 16:57:20 -0500
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
              <ASIS-L@asis.org>
From: Rob Kling <kling@INDIANA.EDU>
Subject:      Social Construction of Privacy:The Information Society,
              14(4) (EiC letter)


        Letter from Rob Kling         Editor-in-Chief         For TIS Issue 14(4) 
This issue of The Information Society, 14(4), includes a  special section about the Social Construction of Privacy  that organized and  edited by by Dr. Christine Hine and Prof. James Katz. It also includes a new feature for The  Information Society -- a section devoted to Review  Essays -  as well as two Forum articles and two book  reviews
 
The Social Construction of Privacy section includes  three articles that examine the ways that people  formulate privacy issues in their daily lives. In the  opening article, "Privacy in the Marketplace," Christine Hine and Juliet Eve report on study of the views of UK  consumers views' of the collection and use of personal  information by commercial organizations in connection  with shopping. Their informants could not identify any  single type of information, such as age, that counted as  personal in all situations. Rather, they formulated a  view of "privacy infringements" that depended upon the situation.  Hine and Eve found that "situated privacy"  depended upon: the visibility of a mediating technology;  the perceived legitimacy of information requests; the  representation of intrusion or disruption of legitimate  activity; perceived imbalances of power and control; and  representations of the social context. By focusing on the  daily activity  --  shopping -  instead of asking direct  questions about privacy, they found that privacy  concerns were rarely independently raised by their  informants as an important feature in making decisions  about purchasing. However, most of their informants  were cognizant about uses and misuses of personal  information when they were asked about privacy issues  in relation to shopping.

"The Distribution of Privacy Risks: Who Needs  Protection?" by Charles D. Raab and Colin J. Bennett  examines the what should know, do know, and can  learn about the  risks of privacy privacy problems.  They examine  whether and how these risks can be  measured, and how they vary across social groups and  the sectors in which personal data are used.  They  argue that systematic knowledge about these risks is  critical for understanding the societal effects of  information technology. Systems will remain deficient,  and we will have limited abilities to make and  implement  policies for privacy protection, that enable more equitable distributions of risk and protection.  Their article examines conventional paradigms in data  protection, including the standard procedural view that  treats individuals alike as abstract 'data subjects.' Raab  and Bennett argue that, in practice, this view helps to  legitimate extensive surveillance systems.  They  formulate a socially richer view of people as situated in  specific human contexts, and differentiated (at  minimum) by such categories as their age, gender,  ethnicity and social roles. They examine several privacy  surveys and the ways in which perceptions of risk  varies with personal characteristics such as these. For  example, low-income low-education and minority racial  groups have keener concerns about privacy risks than  do  better-educated and middle class respondents. The  article ends by examining some  theoretical issues of  risk, and raises questions about the objectivity and   perception in assessing the risks of privacy invasion.

In the last privacy article, "Places and Spaces: The  Historical Interaction of Technology, Home, and  Privacy," Stuart Shapiro examines shifting view of  public and private behavior in our homelives. Like Raab  and Bennett, he is interested in enriching the  conventional conceptions of data users, data subjects  and fixed norms about privacy issues. His historical  account reaches back to medieval Europe where there  was much less of a boundary between the public and  private than in contemporary societies. His analysis  contrasts privacy norms across time, and also across  places (ie., England versus New England). He explores  how different technologies, including structural  elements, have affected and reflected over time the  boundary represented by the home and how that  boundary has helped shape the construction of privacy  in the West. This illustrates how privacy can be  conceptualized as a social condition arising from the  interaction of various boundaries, including the  principal one separating the public and the private.

This issue includes two Forum articles. The Forum is a  section of The Information Society devoted to "position  statements." These articles can take strong points of  view, and need not be argued with the same scholarly  support as normal articles. They are also normally  shorter than normal article (usually up to 4,000 words).  Last, they differ from op-ed article because they can  (and often do) include footnotes and citations.

In the first Forum article, "The Meaning of the Web" Jim Falk argues that understanding the meaning of the  Internet challenges many of the categories within which  we have grown used to thinking about the shape and  meaning of society and its future. For individuals and  local communities, the promises, hopes and fears  associated with the growth of the web have particular  poignancy as they face  the challenge of establishing  and asserting their identity in a ever more complicated  and interdependent world, and through that, finding a  strategy for achieving the sort of future they would like  to live. Falk examines the traditional theoretical tools  which we have available to understand these issues.   He addresses some of the central difficulties and  possibilities in re-thinking identity, exploring the new  promising cultural potential of the Internet in a more  integrated and simultaneously fragmenting world.

In the second Forum article, "Information Access in  Africa: Problems with Every Channel," William Wresch  argues that every information channel within Africa is  restricted relative to industrial societies. In his bleak  assessment, he observes that African television stations  produce few of their own shows and fill airtime with  relatively inexpensive American imports, even though  they  advance cultural values that often conflict with  local cultural values.  Book production is also limited by costs that are high relative to the incomes of most  Africans. Unfortunately the Internet does not seem to  be a promising alternative  since relatively high phone charges limit people's network access.
This issue of The Information Society inaugurates a  new format, the Review Essay which is an integrated  analytical review of a closely related set of books. This  issue's Review Essay by Felix Stalder examines the  monumental work of  Manuel Castells's trilogy, The  Information Age.  (Stalder's review is available on-line at <http://www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS/tismat1.html>http://www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS/tismat1.html).

This issue ends with the review of two books ---Milton  Mueller's Universal Service: Competition,  Interconnection, and Monopoly in the Making of the  American Telephone System and Carl Couch's  Information Technologies and Social Orders.

Please check our Indiana University-Bloomington  web  site  (<http://www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS>www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS) for news on  forthcoming issues, calls for papers, and abstracts of  articles from previous issues. 

Prospective authors may reach us via email at  tisj@indiana.edu.  The Information Society publishes  articles in a variety of genres, including scholarly  studies, position statements, interpretive/perspective  articles, book reviews and integrated book review  essays. We are interested in a broad range of topics (see  <http://www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS/tistopic.html>http://www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS/tistopic.html).  We are also interested in proposals for special issues.
....
TABLE OF CONTENTS -- Volume 14, Number 4
Special Section: Social Construction of Privacy   
Guest  editors: Christine Hine and James Katz
Privacy in the Marketplace, by Christine Hine and  Juliet Eve
The Distribution of Privacy Risks: Who Needs Protection?,         by Charles D. Raab and Colin J. Bennett 
Places and Spaces: The Historical Interaction of Technology, Home, and Privacy,      by Stuart Shapiro
Forum:
The Meaning of the Web,         by Jim Falk
Information Access in Africa: Problems with Every Channel, by William Wresch
Review Essay:
The Network Paradigm: Social Formations in the Age of   Information, by Felix Stalder         Review of Manuel Castells. The Information Age: Economy, Society and  Culture, Vols. I-III

Book reviews:
Milton L. Mueller, Jr. Universal Service: Competition,  Interconnection, and Monopoly in the Making of the  American Telephone System, (by Harmeet Sawhney)
Carl J. Couch. Information Technologies and Social  Orders, by (Mary E. Virnoche)
----
Rob Kling                                         <http://www.slis.indiana.edu/kling>http://www.slis.indiana.edu/kling
The Information Society (journal)       <http://www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS>http://www.slis.indiana.edu/TIS
Center for Social Informatics             <http://www.slis.indiana.edu/CSI>http://www.slis.indiana.edu/CSI
Indiana University
1320 E 10th Street,  Room 005C
Bloomington, IN 47405-3907             812-855-9763 // Fax: 855-6166

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10.                INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL ON GREY LITERATURE

CALL FOR PAPERS

Date:         Fri, 21 May 1999 08:15:53 +0000
Sender:       Solo Librarians Listserv <SOLOLIB-L@LISTSERV.SILVERPLATTER.COM>
From:         Chris Keenan <ckeenan@MCB.CO.UK>
Subject:      Call for Papers - International Journal of Grey Literature

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL ON GREY LITERATURE
http://www.mcb.co.uk/ijgl.htm
Produced by all levels of government, academia, business and industry in print and electronic formats.  Not controlled by academic publishers -------Call for Papers-------- The Editor invites prospective authors to submit original manuscripts for possible publication in this international journal. -Editorial aims and objectives- The International Journal on Grey Literature (IJGL) is a forum for discussion of, and dissemination of knowledge about, the theory, practice, distribution channels, unique attributes, access and control of grey literature in a global context. The journal reflects the changes in grey literature due to the alternative press movements; options for electronic publishing and archiving; emerging multidisciplinary research patterns; convergence of new contributors, information users and products; and issues related to the identification, selection, acquisition, bibliographic control, access, use, and archiving of grey literature in all subject areas.  The journal will be of interest to librarians, academics, government analysts, information industry professionals and publishers.
-Scope and topicality-
By definition, Grey Literature is the information and resources that do not categorically fall into what is available via standard traditional or commercial publishing channels.  Grey Literature has emerged in scope and importance in recent years due to the proliferation of critical information now readily available to organize and access from electronic publishing ventures.  The journal will present new material on how grey literature has surfaced in a variety of disciplines and environments allowing for increased visibility, legitimacy and success in many research environments.  To promote grey literature in academic and research settings, libraries and government information centres, this journal provides insights and describes methodologies to share its value and contribution to information use, delivery and exchange.

The following illustrates some possible journal topics:  Examples of trends and specific works of grey literature that have an increased presence in usefulness among readership, such as electronic initiatives and collaboratories of theses, dissertations, preprint and working paper series, technical report literature, oral histories, genealogies, critiques, scientific findings, visual arts, reviews and critiques; international publishing directives; geospatial information, metadata, demographic and statistical data, scientific visualization and new content areas of significance. The role of grey literature in relation to retention, holdings, authentication, legitimation, archivability, and its use in different settings and how to properly cite or reference it.  The institutional concerns of grey literature and how to organize, describe, promote, preserve and care for it. Copyright and intellectual property concerns, licensing, access and ownership issues; costs and resource sharing, security and integrity of content, finding aids for grey literature, institutional liability. Articles are also being sought on the applications of grey literature for example, in distance learning, records management, archival and museum studies, mixed media collaborations, and other practices.  On occasion, thematic issues will be prepared. Each issue will offer highlights of relevant international conferences and meetings, new examples of grey literature released from around the world, introductions to contributors, authors, and creators of grey literature, interviews with people connected to grey literature, and other appropriate columns. Volunteers to be prospective editors of such sections of the journal should contact the Journal Editor.
-Article Presentation-
Articles should be between 3000 and 4500 words in length, although shortercommunications dealing with more immediate issues, responding to points raised in recent articles, conference proceedings, publications and other venues and raising new issues for discussion are encouraged and will be included. Such items should be up to 1000 words in length. Graphics, images and illustrative material can be included.  Articles should be typed with wide margins and double spaced. Two copies of each submission should be sent to the Editor together with a brief autobiographical note, 1-6 keywords, an abstract of approximately 150 words and a suggested title.
The submission should follow the guidelines in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (4th edition, 1994), Name-Year System of the Council of Biological Editors
(http://www.wisc.edu/writing/Handbook/DocCBENameYear.html#reference), or the Columbia Guide to Online Style (1998).
-Submission of disks-
Once an article has been accepted for inclusion within the journal, disks should be supplied with manuscript whenever possible. Contributors in a position to comply with this request should submit any 3.5" disk prepared on a PC or Macintosh system in WORD format. -Copyright- Authors submitting articles for publication warrant that the work in not an infringement of any existing copyright and will indemnify the publisher against any breach of such warranty. -Review Procedure- Each paper submitted is subject to the following review procedures: It is reviewed by the Editor for general suitability for publication If it is judged suitable, a blind review process takes place by distributing to several referees. Based on reviewer recommendations, the Editor then decides whether the particular article should be accepted as is, revised or rejected. -How to Submit- Manuscripts or outlines of proposed articles should be submitted to the Editor:
Julia Gelfand
Applied Sciences Librarian
University of California, Irvine
Science Library 228
Irvine, CA 92623-9556 USA
phone: 949-824-4971
fax: 949-824-3114
email: jgelfand@uci.edu
Please circulate this call for papers among your colleagues
For more information on the International Journal on Grey Literature see
the
journal homepage at http://www.mcb.co.uk/ijgl.htm.
Sent to: SOLOLIB-L


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11.           ISSUES IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY LIBRARIANSHIP (ISTL)

EDITORIAL POSITION VACANT

Date:         Wed, 7 Jul 1999 10:07:59 -0500
Reply-To:     David Atkins <atkins@aztec.lib.utk.edu>
From:         "Carolyn J. Laffoon" <carolyn@purdue.edu>
Subject:      Announcement: ISTL Editorial Board Position
To:           GEONET-L@LISTSERV.INDIANA.EDU

Subject:
        Announcement: ISTL Editorial Board Position
   Date:
        Tue, 6 Jul 1999 09:21:51 -0400 (EDT)
   From:
        David Atkins <atkins@aztec.lib.utk.edu>

****This announcement is posted to several listservs****

ISTL Editorial Board Position Available

The editors of Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship, a quarterly
publication of the Science & Technology Section (STS) of the Association
of College and Research Libraries, announce a vacancy on the
publication's
editorial board.

Each volunteer member is responsible for one or more of the following
activities:

   *  Solicit and review articles and abstracts submitted for ISTL,
   *  Edit one section/column for ISTL; includes soliciting submissions, reviewing and editing submissions, and preparing them for publication.
   *  Edit and proof the pre-release version of ISTL.
   *  Publicize ISTL
   *  Attendance at editorial board meetings at Midwinter and Annual conferences preferred.

Appointments are three years in length and renewable.  This term will begin March 2000.  Membership in the STS is required.

About ISTL (http://www.library.ucsb.edu/istl):  ISTL publishes substantive material of interest to science and technology librarians. It serves as a vehicle for sci-tech librarians to share details of successful programs, materials for the delivery of in formation services, background information and opinions on topics of current interest, to publish research and bibliographies on issues in science and technology libraries, and to communicate in more depth than the STS-L mailing list.

ISTL is indexed in INSPEC and Library Literature and selectively indexed by Current Index to Journals in Education.

Applications should include cover letter, vita and publications bibliography.  Research and writing samples are welcomed.

Submit applications to:
        Andrea L. Duda
        ISTL Editor
        Davidson Library
        University of California, Santa Barbara
        93106-9010
        duda@library.ucsb.edu

Review of applications will begin September 15, 1999.  Applicants will be informed of the results of their candidacies after ALA Midwinter Meeting, January 14-19, 2000.

Please contact Andrea Duda for more information.

************************************************

CALL FOR PAPERS

Date:         Thu, 2 Sep 1999 08:19:05 -0400
Sender: "STS-L (Science and Technology Section, ACRL)"
              <STS-L@listserv.utk.edu>
From: STS-L Listserv <gbsts@scholar.lib.utk.edu>
Subject:      Call for Papers: Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship

Date: Wed, 01 Sep 1999 15:01:15 -0700
From: Andrea Duda <duda@library.ucsb.edu>
To: sts-l@utkvm1.utk.edu
Subject: Call for Papers: Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship

Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship (ISTL) is published by the Science and Technology Section of ACRL. The journal publishes substantive material of interest to science and technology librarians. It serves as a vehicle for sci-tech librarians to share details of successful programs, materials for the delivery of information services, background information and opinions on topics of current interest, and to publish research and bibliographies on issues in science and technology libraries. ISTL is available on the web at http://www.library.ucsb.edu/istl/

We invite your article proposals for the Fall 1999 issue of ISTL.

Theme: Staffing Issues (e.g., how jobs and expectations are changing as a result of the Internet; doing more with fewer people; changing skill sets) Deadline for article receipt: October 15 1999

We are also accepting proposals for future issues. See http://www.library.ucsb.edu/istl/call.html for themes and deadlines.

Send your abstract or outline to duda@library.ucsb.edu for consideration by the editorial board. Please contact me if you have any questions.

**********************

Spring 1999


Date:         Wed, 2 Jun 1999 08:07:39 -0400
Sender: "STS-L (Science and Technology Section, ACRL)"
              <STS-L@listserv.utk.edu>
From: STS-L Listserv <gbsts@scholar.lib.utk.edu>
Subject:      Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, Spring 1999

Date: Tue, 1 Jun 1999 13:07:30 -0700 (PDT)
From: Andrea Duda <duda@library.ucsb.edu>
To: STS-L@utkvm1.utk.edu
Subject: Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, Spring 1999

The Spring 1999 edition of Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship is now available at:

http://www.library.ucsb.edu/istl/

This issues theme is Electronic Journals in Science and Technology Libraries.

Contents:

   Electronic Journals as a Component of the Digital Library
     by Laurie E. Stackpole and Richard James King, Naval Research
     Laboratory, Washington, D.C.

   SPARC: The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition
     by Alison Buckholtz, Association of Research Libraries

   You Can't Get There from Here: Issues in Remote Access to Electronic Journals for a Health Sciences Library
     by Dennis Krieb, Saint Louis University Health Sciences Center      Library

   Electronic Publishing of Scholarly Journals: A Bibliographic Essay of Current Issues
     by the STS Subject and Bibliograhic Access Committee

   Consortia Building and Electronic Licensing as Vehicles for Re-Engineering Academic Library Services: The Case of the Technical Knowledge Center and Library of Denmark (DTV)
     by Lars Bjoernshauge, Technical Knowledge Center and Library of Denmark

Book Reviews
   Basic HPLC and CE of Biomolecules by Robert L. Cunico, Karen M. Gooding, and Tim Wehr
     Reviewed by Venkat Raman, Chemical Abstracts Service

Science and Technology Sources on the Internet Resources for Archaeological Lithic Analysts
     by Hugh W. Jarvis, University at Buffalo

          ===========================================================
                                Andrea L. Duda
                    Networked Information Access Coordinator
           Davidson Library, University of California, Santa Barbara
                         E-mail: duda@library.ucsb.edu
                     InfoSurf: http://www.library.ucsb.edu
          ===========================================================

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

12.           JASIS

Volume 10, No. 6

Date:         Mon, 5 Apr 1999 14:21:14 -0400
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
              <ASIS-L@asis.org>
From: Richard Hill <rhill@asis.org>
Subject:      JASIS TOC, Volume 50, Number 6

Journal of the American Society for Information Science
JASIS
VOLUME 50, NUMBER 6

[Note: below are URLs for viewing contents of JASIS from past issues. Below the contents of Bert Boyce's "In This Issue" has been cut into the Table of Contents as well as material from the introduction to the special section.]

    Editorial

    In This Issue
   Bert R. Boyce
   481

    JASIS Standards
   Donald H. Kraft
   483

    Research
    Condorcet Query Engine: A Query Engine for Coordinated Index Terms
   Paul E. van der Vet and Nicolaas J. I. Mars
   485
    Van der Vet and Mars revive the attempts to incorporate predicate relationship between assigned index terms during the searching process, to control for the difference between, for example, ``aspirin as a cause of, and aspirin as a cure for, headache.'' Such relationships, and syntaxes for their use, are defined for each indexing language and are applied to terms from specified hierarchies of indexing concepts to create coordinated concepts. This is used with the possibility of specifying all narrower terms than the chosen concept with an ANY operator. Thus for a query one may choose a single or ANY predicate relationship, a single or ANY term as the first element of syntax, and a single or ANY term as the second. Such indexing concepts can then be combined with Boolean operators. The system will take considerable time or space resources for concept expansion. The problem of syntax assignment at the time of indexing is not addressed.  

    Derivative Bibliographic Relationships: The Work Relationship in a Global Bibliographic Database
   Richard P. Smiraglia and Gregory H. Leazer
   493
   Using OCLC Online Computer Library Center's WorldCat, the proportions of works in families whose members consist of multiple editions, translations, amplifications, extractions, adaptions, accompanying material, and performances, were investigated by Smiraglia and Leazer. From a random sample of 1,000 records a final sample of 477 progenitor records was culled, and then WorldCat was searched for derivative records. Derivative works, and thus families greater than one, existed for one-third of the sample. Family size ranged from 2 to 45 with a mean of 3.54, or 1.77 if single-member families are included. Two-thirds of the observed derivations are controlled with collocating headings. Discipline, form, and genre do not affect derivation. Families seem to reach full size soon after publication of the progenitor, although older ancestors have large families.

    Cyberbrowsing: Information Customization on the Web
   Hal Berghel, Daniel Berleant, Thomas Foy, and Marcus McGuire 505
   Customization for Berghel et al. is the personalization of information bearing items by extraction, interaction, and nonprescriptive nonlinear traversal on a client's machine. Cyberbrowser is a browser add-on which allows the analysis of retrieved items by preforming frequency count-based keyword selection, displaying the keywords with frequencies, and selecting sentences with chosen keywords present.


    Hierarchical Concept Indexing of Full-Text Documents in the Unified Medical Language System[register mark] Information Sources Map

Lawrence W. Wright, Holly K. Grossetta Nardini, Alar R. Aronson, and Thomas C. Rindflesch
   512
   Using Health Services/Technology Assessment Text (HSTAT) as a database, Wright et al. extracted four HSTAT files with material on breast cancer and containing 66 distinct documents. By using the available SGML tags, chapter and section headings were located and used to divide the documents into parts while retaining its hierarchical structure. Using MetaMap, which translates medical text to UMLS Metathesaurus terms and ranks these by occurrence, specificity, and position, terms which are less accurate than human indexing but superior to purely extracted terms are chosen using the document fragments. Since both the whole document and its sections are represented, the resulting index is hierarchical in nature. Of the MetaMap-generated MeSH terms, 60% were not in the current indexing of HSTAT, and MMI produced results similar to that of the HSTAT search facility--except that MMI could bring in larger sections or whole documents, rather than fine sections alone.


    Stemming Methodologies Over Individual Query Words for an Arabic Information Retrieval System
   Hani Abu-Salem, Mahmoud Al-Omari, and Martha W. Evens
   524
   A stem in Arabic is a root verb form combined with derivational morphemes but with affixes removed. Abu-Salem et al. choose to use a word, a stem, or a root for a query term based upon which form has the highest average inverse document frequency value, a method necessitating the creation of a three-field term record. Using 120 documents and 32 queries provided by users who also provided relevance judgements, this mixed stemming method was compared to the individual forms alone using binary weighting, and inverse document frequency weighting. The root with weighting method was the superior. The mixed stemming improved binary weighting search results in all cases but did not increase performance over weighted stems or roots.


    An Experiment on Node Size in a Hypermedia System
   Su Hee Kim and Caroline M. Eastman
   530
   For Kim and Eastman nodes are that material that can be viewed by scrolling in a hypermedia system without using a link. Node size can be viewed as required storage, window size for viewing, or logical size, i.e., the number of characters, words, lines, or other items presented to the viewer. To determine if window size and text length affect retrieval time, groups of 10 students searched 20 queries on each of the four possible versions of a file prepared in two card sizes and two text lengths. ANOVA does not support interaction between card size and text length, or between the two card sizes. A significant difference occurs between text lengths, where longer text provides quicker results.

    Faculty Perceptions of Electronic Journals as Scholarly Communication:
A Question of Prestige and Legitimacy
   Cheri Speier, Jonathan Palmer, Daniel Wren, and Susan Hahn
   537
   Speier et al. surveyed a random sample of the business school faculty at 47 ARL universities for demographics, perceptions of promotion and tenure, and familiarity with electronic publishing. A 22% return rate yielded 300 usable surveys. Only 16% had read electronic journals and only 7% had submitted a paper to one. Youth and a high level of publishing are associated with awareness of electronic journals. Finance and MIS faculty are significantly more aware of electronic journals than management, marketing, or operations management. The view toward the value of e-journals appears to be negative, or at best neutral, when compared to paper journals.

    Activity of Understanding a Problem during Interaction with an ``Enabling'' Information Retrieval System: Modeling Information Flow
   Charles Cole
   544
   Cole derives a new model of communication by combining Shannon's model with the three world model of Popper. He stresses the two-way feedback operations that reoccur as conjectures and refutations continue toward a conclusion governed by the cognitive state of the user who serves repeatedly as both destination and source in Shannon's sense.

    Erratum
   553



**************************

Volume 50, No 7

Date:         Wed, 14 Apr 1999 13:44:29 -0400
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@utkux.utcc.utk.edu>
From: Richard Hill <rhill@ASIS.ORG>
Subject:      JASIS TOC, Volume 50, N. 7

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Journal of the American Society for Information Science
JASIS
VOLUME 50, NUMBER 7

[Note: below are URLs for viewing contents of JASIS from past issues. Below the contents of Bert Boyce's "In This Issue" has been cut into the Table of Contents as well as material from the introduction to the special
section.]

CONTENTS

    EDITORIAL

    In This Issue
   Bert R. Boyce
   555

    RESEARCH

    H.G. Wells's Idea of a World Brain: A Critical Reassessment
   W. Boyd Rayward
   557
    To begin this issue, Rayward examines Wells's concept of the ``World Brain,'' provoking questions on the nature of today's global information systems. Wells advocated a New Republic, a world government growing from a world organization of scientific work and communication, an encyclopedia providing a systematic ordering of human thought and acting as a sort of superuniversity. As a physical organization it would involve collecting, summarizing, updating, and publishing the flow of new knowledge using microfilm and the information technologies of the day.

   Wells also believed in man's evolution toward a ``conscious unification of the human species,'' by way of the superhuman apparatus of public knowledge toward social rather than individualistic goals. This involves eugenics, the breeding out of the less intelligent, the movement of scientists into the political process, and the deportation of criminal elements. The encyclopedia organization would speed this process by dominating worldwide education to create a common interpretation of reality. The Wellsian World Brain would function not only as a repository of scientific knowledge but as a database of the populace recording their characteristics and movements.


    Literature-Based Discovery by Lexical Statistics
   Robert K. Lindsay and Michael D. Gordon
   574
   Lindsay and Gordon explore a word count approach to Swanson's literature-based knowledge discovery strategy using complete MEDLINE records, two- and three-word phrases, and the identification of intermediary topics by high-occurrence frequency. Swanson's study linking migraine and dietary magnesium was duplicated. Ten of the 12 intermediate literatures previously found were identified.


    Jumpstarting the Information Design for a Community Network
    Misha W. Vaughan and Nancy Schwartz
   588
   Vaughan and Schwartz provide an example of a community service web site design based to a large degree on iterative user study information. Focus group sessions with paper prototypes and card sorts were used to solicit user opinion on how the site could differentiate itself from newspapers, libraries, and city government as a source, whether organization and labeling maximize meaningfulness to the user, and whether multiple categories might be reduced to a simplified hierarchy. Groups reduced the main categories to 10 to fit screen requirements and shared and discussed their results. All were asked to suggest services that might be provided different than those already available in the community. Discussion led to consensus on a structure, which was used to build a web site which was tested by eight participants each given 21 tasks to perform. A path followed by at least six was assumed to be appropriate. This resulted in the shifting, renaming, and cross-linking of several headings, and the removal of strongly community-oriented heading from an alphabetical display to the lead position.

    Searching Scientific Information on the Internet: A Dutch Academic User
Survey
     Henk J. Voorbij
   598
   A random 1,000-person sample of the academic community of the Netherlands was surveyed by Voorbij's questionnaire. Of the 50% responding, 71% were Internet users. Students and faculty do not differ appreciably in levels of use. E-mail use is high, e-journal use is low. More traditional subject information sources rate above the Internet but it is heavily used to access factual and ephemeral material. Meta search and advanced search options are considered important but seldom used. Low precision, lack of quality sources, and response speed are seen as problems, but 68% believe results justify time invested. Lack of skill and of access are major reasons for non-use, but a significant number of non-users cited sufficient information elsewhere, and lack of knowledge as to what might be available in their disciplines. A focus group of 11 experienced faculty indicated a very positive attitude toward the World Wide Web, e-mail, and discussion groups. None were disposed to publishing on the Web.

    SENTINEL: A Multiple Engine Information Retrieval and Visualization System
     Kevin L. Fox, Ophir Frieder, Margaret M. Knepper, and Eric J. Snowberg
    616
   Fox et al. describe SENTINEL, a retrieval system using both an n-gram filter and a modification of the vector space model with vectors of documents judged relevant resubmitted in a feedback process, and documents ranked by combining their scores in both systems. Words with similar use are clustered together using a neural network training algorithm forming axes used for underlying positioning. The ranked list output with feedback capabilities is supplemented with a three-dimensional map of document and query positions based on the training set axes.

    BRIEF COMMUNICATION

    Systematic Weighting and Ranking: Cutting the Gordian Knot
    Charles H. Davis and Geoffrey W. McKim
   626
   Davis and McKim describe the weighting and ranking algorithm of SWEAR[trade mark], which uses powers of two to assign weights to query terms entered. If N terms are entered, the first entered term is given a 2N weight, the second a 2N-1 weight, and so forth until the last receives a 21 weight. Terms to be negated are given a negative weight equal to the sum of the positive weights, and possible terms a weight of 1 (20). A threshold is set at 2, and an accumulator for each document sums the weights of occurrences of query terms to generate a retrieval status value that provides a weak order of documents containing query terms. The searcher can change the weighting scheme, and thus the output ranking, by changing the order of entry.

    BOOK REVIEWS

    Ink into Bits: A Web of Converging Media, by Charles T. Meadow
     Jeff White
   629

    Technology and Privacy: The New Landscape, edited by Philip E. Agre and Marc Rotenberg
     Marc Lampson
   631

    LETTER TO THE EDITOR
   634

    Erratum
   635

------------------------------------------------------
The ASIS home page <http://www.asis.org> contains the Table of Contents and brief abstracts as above from January 1993 (Volume 44) to date.

The John Wiley Interscience site <http://www.interscience.wiley.com> includes issues from 1986 (Volume 37) to date.  Guests have access only to tables of contents and abstracts.  Registered users of the interscience site have access to the full text of these issues and to preprints.  We are still working on restoring access for ASIS members as "registered users."

****************************

Volume 50, No. 8


Date:         Wed, 21 Apr 1999 09:01:28 -0400
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@utkux.utcc.utk.edu>
From: Richard Hill <rhill@ASIS.ORG>
Subject:      JASIS TOC, Volume 50, Number 8

Messages to jESSE: [reply, or jESSE@listserv.utk.edu]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Journal of the American Society for Information Science
JASIS
VOLUME 50, NUMBER 8

[Note: below are URLs for viewing contents of JASIS from past issues.
Below the contents of Bert Boyce's "In This Issue" has been cut into the
Table of Contents.]


    EDITORIAL

    In This Issue
   Bert R. Boyce
   637

    RESEARCH

    Images of Similarity: A Visual Exploration of Optimal Similarity Metrics and Scaling Properties of TREC Topic-Document Sets
   Mark Rorvig
   639
    In our first two papers, Rorvig takes a visual look at the TREC data. In ``Images of Similarity,'' five different similarity measures used on five TREC document sets are scaled and plotted using multidimensional scaling with ordinal, interval, and maximum likelihood assumptions. Cosine, and surprisingly overlap, provide the desired bull's-eye pattern under maximum likelihood assumptions and tighten as assumptions move from ordinal to maximum likelihood. Ordinal assumptions with MDS are not adequate for a visual information retrieval interface. A regularity in the pattern of relevant documents would seem to indicate a consistency in human relevance assignments not indicated in previous work.

    A Visual Exploration of the Orderliness of TREC Relevance Judgments
   Mark Rorvig
   652
   In the second paper, multidimensional scaling of topical sets from the TREC database indicates that Shaw's criticism of clustering techniques does not extend to similarity data transformed to spatial proximities since the isomorphic relations between topic distances do appear. Only two of 200 randomly introduced documents are found in the center of the dense area of relevant documents, suggesting that while the TREC evaluation methods do exclude relevant documents, the problem may not be as severe as Harter has proposed. The semantic relevance of others from the 200 found close to the dense area is unclear and will require investigation.

    Automatic Indexing of Documents from Journal Descriptors:  A Preliminary Investigation
   Susanne M. Humphrey
   661
   Humphery outlines a technique for associating the journal descriptors (JDs) in NLM's serials authority file SERLINE with words commonly occurring in the titles and abstracts of papers found in journals that have been assigned these descriptors. A Medline training set will produce a table of text words associated with particular journals, and the descriptors assigned. The test process involved text indexing of titles and abstracts of 3,995 training set documents covering 1,466 journals to extract terms occurring 13 or more times in the set. A measure can be based upon the number of occurrences of a term in association with particular journal descriptor divided by its total occurrences, or on the number of papers containing the term for each descriptor divided by the total number of papers containing the word in the training set. This produces a ranked list of descriptors for each word extracted from a paper. The average rankings over all a document's terms are then used for the document's JD ranking. Tests of papers outside the training set return the JDs of these papers' journals and other JDs as well. The inverse of the citation count for a JD is shown to be a likely normalization factor for JDs with high citation counts.

    Bibliometric Overview of Library and Information Science Research in Spain
   V. Cano
   675
   The 345 papers that constitute the 17-year output of two leading Spanish library and information science journals were analyzed by Cano to collect author affiliation, number of authors per paper, country of the first author, number of authors publishing in both journals, and number of authors publishing in other journals indexed by LISA. Sixty-eight percent of the papers have single authors, and only seven authors published in both journals. Empirical and descriptive methods dominate.

    User Reactions as Access Mechanism: An Exploration Based on Captions for Images
   Brian C. O'Connor, Mary K. O'Connor, and June M. Abbas
   681
   O'Connor et al. believe verbal user reactions to images may be collected and used to represent the knowledge state of the reactor to the image, with the assumption that future users may wish an image that evokes a similar state. A world wide web site of 300 images was exposed to 120 respondents asked to provide responses of words to describe the image, words to describe the feelings evoked by the image, and to write a caption. The 82 images receiving 10 or more responses were then characterized by counts of total responses, adjectives describing the image as a whole, narrative responses, captions with narrative responses as well as the percentage of responses with adjectival descriptors, the percentage of narrative responses, and the percentage of captions with narrative responses. There is a tendency for different respondents to assign diametrically opposed adjectives.

    Medical Students' Confidence Judgments Using a Factual Database and Personal Memory: A Comparison
   Karen M. O'Keefe, Barbara M. Wildemuth, and Charles P. Friedman
   698
   Measuring need fulfillment by their subject's confidence in the accuracy of their answers, O'Keefe et al. examine medical students' ability to recognize the meeting of an information need from memory and from using a factual database. Twelve of 43 students, randomly selected and tested three times, completed a sufficient amount of questions with confidence rankings to be analyzed. Two passes were recorded each time: first, short answers from memory; then with the aid of a database search. An ANOVA shows no significant effect on Brier scores, the sum of the square of the differences between the confidence rating and the score for each question divided by the number of questions, on the basis of memory versus database support. Confidence, the difference between the average of the confidence probabilities for a set of questions and the proportion answered correctly, increased with experience over the three repetitions.

    Employing Multiple Representations for Chinese Information Retrieval
   K. L. Kwok
   709
   Kwok finds that difficult Chinese word segmentation can be avoided if bigrams (instances of two consecutive characters) are extracted and used, despite the fact that this method leads to an index space three times as large as word extraction. Bigrams extract the two-thirds of Chinese words which are two characters in length, but while meaningless combinations of very high and low occurrence may be removed, many meaningless bigrams will remain. Single character words, which make up about 9% of the language, would also not be represented.
   Using a dictionary of 2,175 common one-, two-, and three-character words, strings are processed left to right, with useful terms retained when found. The remaining strings are segmented using rules. A probabilistic feedback model is then used to generate RSVs indicating matches between queries and documents, or document segments. Using the TREC 5 and 6 collections, Kwok finds that mixing single character with bigram or with short-word indexing improves average precision in four of five cases. Short-word and character is most efficient and gives the best results. Combining the results of short-word and character with bigram and character yields an additional 5% improvement at substantial overhead cost.

    BOOK REVIEWS

    Deep Information: The Role of Information Policy in Environmental 
Sustainability, by John Felleman
   Mike Steckel
   724

    Electronic Databases and Publishing, edited by Albert Henderson
   Marianne Afifi
   725

    Localist Connectionist Approaches to Human Cognition, edited by
Jonathan Grainger and Arthur M. Jacobs
   Chaomei Chen
   726

    Ethics, Information and Technology: Readings, edited by Richard N.
Stichler and Robert Hauptman
   Thomas A. Peters
   727

    Indexing and Abstracting in Theory and Practice, by F. W. Lancaster
   Jens-Erik Mai
   729

    Remediation: Understanding New Media, by Jay David Bolter and Richard
Grusin
   Ronald Day
   731

    CALL FOR PAPERS
   733

------------------------------------------------------
The ASIS home page <http://www.asis.org> contains the Table of Contents and brief abstracts as above from January 1993 (Volume 44) to date.

The John Wiley Interscience site <http://www.interscience.wiley.com> includes issues from 1986 (Volume 37) to date.  Guests have access only to tables of contents and abstracts.  Registered users of the interscience site have access to the full text of these issues and to preprints.  We are still working on restoring access for ASIS members as "registered users."



******************************
Volume 50, no. 9


Date:         Thu, 3 Jun 1999 15:14:54 -0400
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@listserv.utk.edu>
From: Richard Hill <rhill@ASIS.ORG>
Subject:      JASIS TOC, Volume 50, Number 9

Journal of the American Society for Information Science
JASIS
VOLUME 50, NUMBER 9

[Note: URLs for viewing the contents of past JASIS issues are listed. Below, Bert Boyce's "In This Issue" has been cut into the Table of Contents  for research articles and Mark Rorvig and Lois Lunin's introductory material for the Perspectives section has been edited and cut into that portion of the table of contents.]

VOLUME 50, NUMBER 9.  JULY 1999

    EDITORIAL

    In This Issue
   Bert R. Boyce
   735

    RESEARCH

    What Is Information Discovery About?
   H. A. Proper and P. D. Bruza
   737
        Proper and Bruza's believe that information discovery is an attempt to  broadly model information retrieval outside the context of any operational retrieval model. They define user need in terms of supply and demand for something undefined called infions, or information particles. Relevance is meeting a set of requirements stated in the same terms. Aboutness is apparently a relation on a set of key words, but satisfaction is a relationship on information carriers and their logical descriptions. A distinction is made between system and user satisfaction, which will be close in factual descriptions but not necessarily so in cases of aboutness.

    Text Segmentation for Chinese Spell Checking
   Kin Hong Lee, Qin Lu, and Mau Kit Michael Ng
   751
        Since Chinese text has no natural delimiters text must be segmented into valid words before error correction can take place. Many words are represented by single characters but others require multiple character strings. Lee, Lu, and Ng. test the Block of Combinations (BOC) segmentation method which uses a 60,000-word dictionary with the 2,000 most frequently used words grammatically tagged. A user dictionary for adding words not predefined is available, and otherwise unidentified words are stored in a temporary file. The 200 most frequent single character words are accepted but others are suspected to be errors and presented to the user for clarification with similar words as suggestions. Since the number of possible segmentations increases rapidly as the number of characters grows, a sliding five-word window is used rather than a complete sentence. The procedure is more accurate than another method which takes about the same computational time.

    A Fuzzy Genetic Algorithm Approach to an Adaptive Information Retrieval Agent
   Maria J. Martin-Bautista, Maria-Amparo Vila, and Henrik Legind Larsen
   760
        The Genetic Information Retrieval Agent Filter (GIRAF) is a software agent, tested here by Martin-Bautista, Vila, and Larsen, that can work offline to filter and rank retrieved documents from an Internet search engine. Query terms are extracted from evaluated initial search documents or from ideal documents provided by a user, and each of these terms is given a weight that is the average of its occurrence frequency in all documents analyzed. One of four gene types is assigned randomly to each term to form a triple with its weight, and chromosomes (strings of these gene triples) are randomly formed. Type one genes use as their weight a number of occurrences of the term in a document that will give complete satisfaction (a higher number reducing satisfaction). Type two genes are satisfied completely by documents that have no occurrences of the term. Type three genes use the weight as a traditional threshold with complete satisfaction achieved if the number is reached or exceeded. Type four divides each document into three parts and will be satisfied by any of the parts. Chromosomes are ranked by their similarity to relevant documents and modified by choosing parents where the first is random and the second higher than the first and preforming a gene crossover. Mutation also randomly occurs. New chromosomes cause those at the bottom of the list to be removed. Tests with virtual users indicate that type three genes work best, except that when user profiles are permitted to change during the process, type one gains some advantage.

    A Distance and Angle Similarity Measure Method
   Jin Zhang and Robert R. Korfhage
   772
        The typical angularity measure (cosine) identifies documents whose index term distributions are similar. Despite this similarity, they may be far apart in the document space if the level of detail in the discussion of the topics is different. Document similarity with a distance measure depends upon the length of the hypersphere radius from the reference point to the document. Zhang and Korfhage present a similarity measure which combines distance and angularity based measures. This measure ``s'' is the product of two parameters, a and c, where ``a'' has the negative radius as an exponent (a typical distance measure) and ``c'' (between 0 and 1) has the value of the angle divided by the maximum value of the angle as an exponent. The maximum value of ``s'' is equal to the distance-based measure and the minimum is smaller but in the same position as the cosine measure. Varying ``a'' and ``c'' will reflect a user's emphasis on distance or angularity.

    DARE: Distance and Angle Retrieval Environment: A Tale of the Two Measures
   Jin Zhang and Robert R. Korfhage
   779
   In a second paper, Zhang and Korfhage present a visualization model which can display both distance and angle measures simultaneously and handle both conjunction and intersection. Changing the slope and position of a straight line in the visualization space results in a modification of the threshold-defined contour in the document vector space and thus expands or contracts the scope and emphasis of the retrieved set.

    PERSPECTIVES ISSUE ON . . . VISUAL INFORMATION RETRIEVAL INTERFACES

    Introduction and Overview: Visualization, Retrieval, and Knowledge
   Mark Rorvig and Lois F. Lunin
   790
        This Perspectives issue is assembled to provide an historical background to visualization in information retrieval. It is a review of the assumptions and technology configurations by which the current literature may be interpreted. The techniques of the authors of this issue differ, but all treat their techniques as manuals of description flowing from a history of common mathematical and technical influences.  All technologies have histories of development. The historical forces of visualization frame the current efforts and comprise the field in which new problem dimensions are addressed. No field of scientific inquiry emerges without a background. This issue adds to the depth necessary for the study of visualization by new students and new scholars.

    The NASA Image Collection Visual Thesaurus
   M. E. Rorvig, C. H. Turner, and J. Moncada
   794
         The first visual interface to a collection was designed and implemented at the Johnson Space Center of NASA in the years 1988-1992.  In this interface, described in the article entitled, "The NASA Visual Thesaurus," the Rorvig et al assumed that the task of inferring images from terms and terms from images would introduce invariance in image indexing.  The system remained in use for two years, but eventually failed because no automatic method to assign terms to images could be discovered, and the manual cost of such term assignment was too great to be supported.         Rorvig et al attempted to use image descriptions clustered by cosine vector methods to identify a unique image for every thesaurus term. The candidate images suggested by this method were often heartbreakingly close to the mark. But close was not good enough. These developments were described in detail by Seloff (1990). Although the Seloff article has been widely cited, the initial article which specified the design parameters for the system of his report has remained unpublished.  It appears in this article in the form originally presented at the ASIS mid-year conference of 1988.  The article is significant because it represents the first identification of the components of a visual interface.

    Visualizing Science by Citation Mapping
   Henry Small
   799
        The article by Henry Small of the Institute for Scientific Information addresses the two decade long historical use of visualization techniques in calculating the relationships among scientific fields by their patterns of co-citation. Small begins with the simplest of algorithms as conceived within the computational limitations of the 1970's and ends with the most ambitious ones presently available through Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). In this article, students and scholars will find algorithms applicable to many different aspects of the co-citation problem, as Small frankly describes the research paths that were successful and led to further enhancements as well as the ones which were eventually discarded either because of their inefficiency in computation, or their failure to yield truthful insights validated by earlier techniques.  Many of these algorithms may be transplanted to address similar problems with data that may be encountered by researchers who require some intermediate processing alternatives.


    The Ecological Approach to Text Visualization
   James A. Wise
   814
        The article by Jim Wise of Integral Visuals Corporation details the technical advances of researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) over an intense five year history of development. Wise's "The Ecological Approach to Text Visualization" offers a rich archive of techniques. This descriptive tour de force  begins with the most brutal techniques (e.g., vectors of length 200K analyzed through Multidimensional Scaling (MDS)) and, in completely clear and intelligible detail describes the short cut methods developed for computational efficiency. These efforts have resulted in the presently available commercial product "ThemeMedia" offered through a subsidiary of the Smaby Group of investors (which purchased rights to further develop the technology). Among the highlights of this article is a description of the discovery that single and multiple link cluster centroids can be used to approximate the full text collections originally required for visual display.  Additionally, the transformations of the 2d dot displays to the present terrain models simultaneously developed at PNNL and SNL are described in sufficient detail for engineers to reproduce the same progression of results.

    Interactive Graphical Queries for Bibliographic Search
   Martin Brooks and Jennifer Campbell
   824
        Brooks and Campbell describe the translation of interactive boolean interfaces with data to a visual display. The "islands" interface which they illustrate harnesses the power of visualization to the process of commercial text retrieval. It is a fact that students are still mystified by these processes. One need only while away a few minutes on any college campus to realize that most persons still have not got a clue about the meaning of term conjunction and its impact on search results.  Anyone who has ever performed a boolean search will be able to examine the effect of visualization on this process, and this article is offered to permit a broad view of practice changes which can be expected in future systems. "islands" may not be the ideal interface, but something like it, to paraphrase an advertising slogan, will be "...coming soon to a library near you."

    A Collection of Visual Thesauri for Browsing Large Collections of
Geographic Images
   Marshall C. Ramsey, Hsinchun Chen, Bin Zhu, and Bruce R. Schatz
   836
        In Ramsay et al, earth observing images are  parsed as texts are parsed. These authors use Gabor filters to combine like terrains. No clearer description of this process is available in the present literature. A Gabor filter yields textures. By segmenting images into component texture boundaries, search classes may be derived without resorting to textual description.  This technology thus succeeds where the NASA effort by Rorvig et al failed. The results reported in this article are concrete and verifiable; indeed, anyone who has ever traveled over Arizona highways can authenticate these data. The authors acknowledge the contributions of the Alexandria Digital Libraries Project, particularly the work of Manjunath and Ma  (1996), but claim their own extensions to this work as well.


    Conference Notes--1996: Foundations of Advanced Information 
Visualization for Visual Information (Retrieval) Systems
   Mark Rorvig and Matthias Hemmje
   845
        One of the landmark developments in visual retrieval occurred at a workshop held in Zurich in the summer of 1996 in conjunction with the Association for Computing Machinery's Special Interest Group on Information Retrieval Annual Meeting. For the first time, both European and North American interests were represented in the development of criteria for evaluation of visual information retrieval. Among the Europeans, the newly formed FADIVA (Foundations of Advanced Information Visualization) group played the dominant role. The workshop report reproduced in this issue has been widely circulated, but never before published. This conference led to the first visualization of native TREC/Tipster data as a prelude to formal visual information retrieval evaluation strategies (Rorvig and Fitzpatrick, 1998; Rorvig, 1998).

[Robert Korfhage, one of the intellectual fathers of the visual information retrieval effort in both Europe and North America, has contributed his bibliography on this issue.  The bibliography is comprehensive for all work in this field c. 1997.  Such documents are of interest in determining the scope of future advances. In 1997, this was the known world view of this area of scholarly effort. For practical use in permitting users to copy this bibliography, it is available through the ASIS SIGVIZ website <http://www.asis.org/SIG/SIGVIS/references.html>where future editions may be conveniently updated.]

    BOOK REVIEWS

    Foundations of Library and Information Science, by Richard E. Rubin
   Boyd P. Holmes
   848

    Into the Future: The Foundation of Library and Information Services in the Post-Industrial Era, by Michael Harris, Stan A. Hannah, and Pamela C. Harris
   Ebrahim Afshar
   849

    Newspapers of Record in a Digital Age: From Hot Type to Hot Link, by
Shannon E. Martin and Kathleen A. Hansen    Amy E. Sanidas
   850

    ERRATUM
   852
------------------------------------------------------
The ASIS home page <http://www.asis.org> contains the Table of Contents and  brief abstracts as above from January 1993 (Volume 44) to date.

The John Wiley Interscience site <http://www.interscience.wiley.com> includes issues from 1986 (Volume 37) to date.  Guests have access only to tables of contents and abstracts.  Registered users of the Interscience site have access to the full text of these issues and to preprints.  We are still working on restoring access for ASIS members as "registered users."

*******************************
Volume 50, Number 12

Date:         Mon, 23 Aug 1999 10:49:04 -0400
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
              <ASIS-L@asis.org>
From: Richard Hill <rhill@asis.org>
Subject:      JASIS Table of Contents.  Vol 50, # 12
To: ASIS-L@asis.lib.indiana.edu

Journal of the American Society for Information Science
JASIS
VOLUME 50, NUMBER 12

[Note: below are URLs for viewing contents of JASIS from past issues.]

Special Topic Issue: the 50th Anniversary of the Journal of the American Society for Information Science

Part 2: Paradigms, Models, and Methods of Information Science

Guest Editor: M. J. Bates

CONTENTS
The Invisible Substrate of Information Science
Marcia J. Bates
1043

Information Science
Tefko Saracevic
1051

Industrial Roots of Information Science
Donald A. Windsor
1064

Historial Note: The Start of a Stop List at Biological Abstracts
Barbara J. Flood
1066

Interaction in Information Retrieval: Trends Over Time
Pamela A. Savage-Knepshield and Nicholas J. Belkin
1067

Museum Informatics and Collaborative Technologies: The Emerging Socio-Technological Dimension of Information Science in Museum Environments
Paul F. Marty
1083

Mapping the Dimensions of a Dynamic Field
Caroline Haythornthwaite, Geoffrey Bowker, Christine Jenkins, and W. Boyd
Rayward
1092

Information Science and Information Systems: Conjunct Subjects Disjunct Disciplines
David Ellis, David Allen, and Tom Wilson
1095

Comparing Information Access Approaches
Matthew Chalmers
1108

The Rise of Ontologies or the Reinvention of Classification
Dagobert Soergel
1119

From Retrieval to Communication: The Development, Use, and Consequences of Digital Documentary Systems
Rob Kling and Holly Crawford
1121

More Research Needed: Informal Information-Seeking Behavior of Youth on the Internet
Eliza T. Dresang
1123

An Information View of History
Julian Warner
1125

The Control and Direction of Professional Education
Bill Crowley
1127

Informing Information Science: The Case for Activity Theory
Mark A. Spasser
1136

Aligning Studies of Information Seeking and Use with Domain Analysis
Carole L. Palmer
1139

The Growth of Understanding in Information Science: Towards a Developmental Model
Nigel Ford
1141

Information Science in 2010: A Loughborough University View
Ron Summers, Charles Oppenheim, Jack Meadows, Cliff McKnight, and Margaret Kinnell
1153
------------------------------------------------------
The ASIS home page <http://www.asis.org> contains the Table of Contents and brief abstracts as above from January 1993 (Volume 44) to date.

The John Wiley Interscience site <http://www.interscience.wiley.com> includes issues from 1986 (Volume 37) to date.  Guests have access only to tables of contents and abstracts.  Registered users of the interscience site have access to the full text of these issues.  We are still working on restoring access for ASIS members as "registered users."


---------------
Richard Hill
American Society for Information Science
8720 Georgia Avenue, Suite 501
Silver Spring, MD  20910
(301) 495-0900
FAX: (301) 495-0810
http://www.asis.org

*****************************

Volume 50, Number 13


Date:         Wed, 22 Sep 1999 08:56:31 -0400
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@listserv.utk.edu>
From: Richard Hill <rhill@ASIS.ORG>
Subject:      JASIS Volume 50, Number 13 TOC

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Journal of the American Society for Information Science
JASIS. VOLUME 50, NUMBER 13
November 1999

[Note: at the bottom of this message are URLs for viewing contents of JASIS from past issues. Below the contents of Bert Boyce's "In This Issue" as well as material from Zorana Ercegovac's introduction to the special section has been added to the Table of Contents.]

EDITORIAL

In This Issue
Bert R. Boyce
1163

Special Topic Issue: Integrating Multiple Overlapping Metadata Standards
Guest Editor: Zorana Ercegovac
Introduction
Zorana Ercegovac
1165
    Metadata has remained one of the critical components in the context of knowledge representation and data mining in digital libraries as it had traditionally been in the context of the pre-Web libraries. Today in the digital libraries environment in which individual collections of massive heterogenous objects need to be unified and linked in a single resource, we have witnessed both the growth of different metadata and the attempts to reconcile the common attributes in the existing overlapping standards. The ultimate goal is to make it possible to access relevant information seamlessly regardless of its type (e.g., visual and museum objects, historical data, cultural heritage, scientific data), location, and scholarly tradition (e.g., librarians, archivists, scientists).
    This Special Issue of JASIS addresses different applications of metadata standards in geospatial collections, education, historical costume collection, data management, and information retrieval, and explores the future thinking of metadata standards for digital libraries.

Collection Metadata Solutions for Digital Library Applications
Linda L. Hill, Greg Janee, Ron Dolin, James Frew, and Mary Larsgaard
1169
    We begin with an article by Hall and her colleagues at the Alexandria Digital Library. They first look at the meaning of the concept of a collection in the context of digital libraries in general, and especially within the Alexandria Digital Library. In order to make sense of high heterogeneity that exists among digital library collections, Hall et al. discuss the design and implementation approach of collection metadata that "represents the inherent and contextual characteristics of a collection." Since ADL's collection contains maps, remote- sensing images, aerial photographs, and related texts, the architecture of the ADL collection metadata differs from either the archival/EAD approach or the START's text- oriented approach. The article defines its structure and explicates ADL's capability to support collection registration, network discovery, user documentation, and collection management for its georeferenced collections. Conceptual Design and Deployment of a Metadata Framework for Educational Resources on the Internet
Stuart A. Sutton
1182
  In order to link teachers and educational material that is distributed across the Internet and created by federal, state, academic, nonprofit and commercial sites, Sutton's paper discusses a conceptual design and employment of a metadata framework for educational resources on the Internet. The paper first describes the Gateway to Educational Materials, GEM, framework (http://geminfo.org/) and its underpinnings in the Dublin Core Set; the paper goes on to suggest the extension of the original GEM to account for the information seeking behavior of teachers who search for educational resources on the Internet. The result was the proposal to add unique metadata elements: five description elements, two evaluative elements, and one meta- metadata element. Sutton also discusses syntax, design and implementation of harvesting tools for retrieving GEM metadata.

Metadata Elements for Object Description and Representation: A Case Report from a Digitized Historical Fashion Collection Project
Marcia Lei Zeng
1193
  Zeng examines the fitness of three existing metadata formats (USMARC, The Dublin Core Element Set, and the Visual Resources Association) to support a collection of historical fashion objects held at the Kent State University Fashion Museum. Zeng adopted and modified the VRA metadata format to catalog the entire digitized historical fashion collection.

A Comparison of the Two Traditions of Metadata Development
Kathleen Burnett, Kwong Bor Ng, and Soyeon Park
1209
  Burnett, Ng and Park discuss two different approaches: the bibliographic approach that has origins in cataloging (the library community), and the data management approach that has roots in computer processing (the computer science profession). The article compares element sets between and among six different metadata (i.e., USMARC, The Dublin Core, TEI, Semantic Header, IAFA Templates and URC) and supports a proposal for an integrated approach to metadata.

Use of Metadata Vocabularies in Data Retrieval
Edwin M. Cortez
1218
  Finally, in the context of Information Retrieval and the Internet, Cortez considers a metadata vocabulary as a negotiator between a set of 39 different databases (disparate by structure, vocabulary, use and purpose) and equally diverse user populations. The proposed metadata vocabulary relates to the domain of food, agriculture, natural resources and rural development; it attempts to normalize semantic and hierarchical distinctions between and among different databases and to act as a front-end unified language to the prototype Database Catalog.

Research

The Ecological Approach to Text Visualization
James A. Wise
1224
    The Spatial Paradigm for Information Retrieval and Exploration, SPIRE, converts digitized text documents into vector space document representations using 280 element vectors whose elements were produced by a neural net trained on the domain of the documents. These are clustered with a similarity measure and projected onto a two-dimensional plane using a modification of multidimensional scaling that uses document-to-centroid distances rather than pairwise document distances. The visualization shows the reoccurrence of a concept as a height on a projection that resembles a terrain map.

A Hybrid Method for Abstracting Newspaper Articles
James Liu, Yan Wu, and Lina Zhou
1234
    Liu, Zhou, and Wu begin their abstract extraction from Chinese text by comparing character pairs with user chosen keywords for exact, partial, or variable character matches. Word frequency of all words is compared to a standard word frequency table, where nouns and verbs of frequency at variance with the standard are extracted . High variance words are used to select sentences until the required length of text is extracted. In a combined method, matching is supplemented by weighted extraction. An additional level uses parts of speech, pronoun referents, and syntactic rules as well as syntactic markers explicit in Chinese text.     Thirty five users were surveyed and 60% found keyword and percentage extraction to be useful. The extraction of summaries was not well received.

Formal Features of Cyberspace: Relationships between Web Page Complexity and Site Traffic
Erik P. Bucy, Annie Lang, Robert F. Potter, and Maria Elizabeth Grabe
1246
    Using a sample of 5,000 Web sites top ranked by hits using 100hot's InSite Pro service, Bucy, Lang, Potter, and Grabe randomly selected 500 sites, and 496 home pages were coded to reflect domain name, rank, average number of page views over six weeks, and the banner, body, and advertisements were analyzed for features and links. Banners occur on 75% of sites and are most commonly white. One-fifth featured movement. Home pages averaged 2.4 screens in length and 79% used one or more frames. The dominant background color was white. A graphical element occurred on 95% of the pages, with a logo being the most common. Movement was present in about one-third of the pages. Asynchronous elements--links, surveys, contact information--occurred in 98.9% of pages with an average of 27.1 such elements per page. Just 15.9% used real-time interactive elements, like audio or video links, or chat rooms (which were the most common of these). Over half the pages exhibited advertisements of some kind but less than one-third of these had dynamic features.     For commercial sites, high visitation correlates with high graphics use and less strongly with asynchronous interactive elements. In noncommercial sites, there is a strong correlation between visits and asynchronous interactive elements. Real time interactive elements are rare. Advertising is prominent, but pages are not generally over-designed.

Book Reviews
Understanding Information Retrieval Interactions: Theoretical and Practical Implications, by Carol A. Hert
Sue Myburgh
1257

Information Literacy: Essential Skills for the Information Age, by Kathleen L. Spitzer with Michael B. Eisenberg and Carrie A. Lowe
Cheryl Knott Malone
1257

Scholarly Book Reviewing in the Social Sciences and Humanities. The Flow of Ideas Within and Among Disciplines, by Ylva Lindholm-Romantschuk
Jack Andersen
1259

------------------------------------------------------
The ASIS home page <http://www.asis.org> contains the Table of Contents and brief abstracts as above from January 1993 (Volume 44) to date.

The John Wiley Interscience site <http://www.interscience.wiley.com> includes issues from 1986 (Volume 37) to date. Guests have access only to tables of contents and abstracts. Registered users of the interscience site have access to the full text of these issues and to preprints. We are still working on restoring access for ASIS members as "registered users."



---------------
Richard Hill
American Society for Information Science
8720 Georgia Avenue, Suite 501
Silver Spring, MD  20910
(301) 495-0900
FAX: (301) 495-0810
http://www.asis.org

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx



13.                JOURNAL OF INTERNET CATALOGUING

SPECIAL ISSUE


Date:         Sun, 1 Aug 1999 13:57:01 -0500
              <IFLA-L@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA>
From:         Gerry Mckiernan <GMCKIERN@GWGATE.LIB.IASTATE.EDU>
Subject:      _Journal of Internet Cataloging_ Special Issue
To:           IFLA-L@INFOSERV.NLC-BNC.CA

  A year ago, I had the great honor and privilege of participating in a Colloquium on Library Science Research entitled "Internet, Metadata and Information Access to Libraries and Networks in the Electronic Age" at the University Center for Library Science Research (CUIB) of the National Autonomous University ofMexico (UNAM)

[http://cuib.laborales.unam.mx/cursos/coloquio.html ] 

During the conference I had the pleasure of meeting  Michael Gorman, Dean of the California State University Library, Fresno,  who gave the colloquium's keynote address; Robin Wendler, Office of Information Systems, Harvard University; Judith Hopkins, University of Buffalo and owner of the Autocat e-list; Sandy Roe of Dakota State University; Traugott Koch of the NetLab of Lund University; and several Mexican librarians and information specialists as well as faculty associated with CUIB, including its director Lic. Elsa Ramirez Leyva, and Dr. Filberto Felipe Martinez-Arellano and Lic. Lina Escalona-Rios, joint coordinators of the Colloquium.

   Earlier this summer selected papers from the Colloquium were re-published in an issue of the _Journal of Internet Cataloging_ 2(1) . Abstracts of these  papers can be read at

http://www.haworthpressinc.com/jic/jic2nr1.html


   I invite my colleagues to review this contents page and when opportunity presents itself to read these excellent contributions [I wish to personally thank Dr. Ruth Carter, editor of JIC, for considering these papers for re-publication in a special issue, and CUIB for its permission]. Although not include in JIC, the presentation by Traugott Koch is available online at:

    http://www.ub2.lu.se/tk/demos/mex9808a.html

  All  conference papers, including a number by
our Mexican and Latin colleagues, are scheduled to be published / have been published in a separate conference proceedings.

  I wish to formally thank my hosts at CUIB for their gracious hospitality and kindness, for their support, and for the opportunity to participate in this most informative, stimulating, and provocative program.

   Regards,

/Gerry McKiernan
Curator, CyberStacks(sm)
and
Science and Technology Librarian and Bibliographer
Iowa State University Library
Ames IA 50011

gerrymck@iastate.edu



xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx


14.                JOURNAL T.A.L.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Date: Sat, 3 Jul 1999 11:21:49 -0400 (EDT)
To: lis-fid@mailbase.ac.uk

Forwarded message:
>From daemon Fri Jul  2 22:57:23 1999
Date:         Fri, 2 Jul 1999 22:56:18 -0400
Sender: Records Management Program <RECMGMT@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU>
From: Karim Boughida <boughidk@sprint.ca>
Subject:      [CFP] : Information Retrieval-oriented Natural Language Processing
To: RECMGMT@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU

From: Nathalie Aussenac-Gilles <aussenac@irit.fr>
To: boughidk@sprint.ca <boughidk@sprint.ca>
Date: 2 juillet, 1999 11:28
Subject: [Fwd: CFP: Journal t.a.l., IR-oriented NLP]


Christian Jacquemin wrote:

 Journal T.A.L.: Call for Submissions

          Information Retrieval-oriented Natural Language Processing

                    Submission deadline: November 1st, 1999

            Issue coordinated by Christian Jacquemin (LIMSI, Orsay)

            http://www.biomath.jussieu.fr/ATALA/tal/appel-ri.en.html

 Theme
 -----------------------------------------------------------------------=

 Because  of  the recent  growth  of  electronic data  available through the  Internet  or  digital  libraries,  information  access has  become  a major  scientific  issue.  Evaluation  conferences  in information  retrieval have  promoted the development of search engines and indexing techniques over very  large text databases.

 In such  a favorable context, several  factors have promoted the convergence  of Natural Language Processing (NLP) and Information Retrieval (IR):

    * New NLP techniques have been designed. They allow for efficient processing of large-scale textual data from various sources.    

* Fine NLP techniques for automatic indexing and document handling have lead to precision and recall rates higher than traditional text simplification techniques.
    * Evaluation conferences such as TREC (IR) or MUC (Information  Extraction) have promoted interdisciplinary projects with researchers from NLP and IR, leading to fruitful interdisciplinary cooperations.
    * The emergence of new paradigms in NLP has raised new scientific issues and offered new experimental fields in Computational Linguistics.

 Topics of interest (this list is not restrictive)
 -----------------------------------------------------------------------=
---
--

 The topics of interest include:

    * morphological analysis, rule- or dictionary-based stemming,
    * robust and partial parsing for IR,
    * large-scale semantic disambiguation for IR,
    * automatic acquisition of semantic knowledge, automatic thesaurus construction for IR,
    * computer-aided construction of large-scale linguistic resources for IR,
    * recycling of IR data, such as thesauri, for IR-oriented NLP,
    * automatic indexing or abstracting,
    * automatic classification and routing, document categorization,
    * integration of linguistic components in IR-oriented NLP applications,
    * specification and evaluation of IR-oriented NLP systems,
    * computational terminology as a means for building resources for IR-oriented NLP.

 Papers may focus on other topics in NLP provided that they address issues on  their  application to  IR (wrt  to automatic indexing,  text simplification,  query/document   pairing, query expansion, text   segmentation and  classification, etc).

 Format
 -----------------------------------------------------------------------=
---
--

 Papers  (30 pages  max,  Helvetica 12)  are accepted  in RTF  or Latex =
 +
ps
 formats. Latex style is can be downloaded from
 http://www.biomath.jussieu.fr/ATALA/tal/tal.html.

 Submissions formats  are available in  the issues of the  T.A.L. journal and will be sent to the contributors upon request to Christian Jacquemin.

 Language
 -----------------------------------------------------------------------=

 Submissions can be written in French or in English.

  Submission of articles
  -----------------------------------------------------------------------=
  Papers are preferably submitted electronically:
 
       jacquemin@limsi.fr
 
  or through hard copies at:
 
       Christian Jacquemin,
       LIMSI-CNRS,
       BP 133,
       91403 ORSAY,
       FRANCE
 
  Submission deadlines
  -----------------------------------------------------------------------=
---
--
 
  The  submission  deadline is  November 1st, 1999 . If  you plan to  submit a paper, please contact Christian Jacquemin before September 1st, 1999.     The  articles will be  reviewed by a  member of  the editorial board  a= nd an   external reviewer specialized in IR-oriented NLP. Decisions of the editorial   board and  referees' reports will be  transmitted to the authors  before the end of 1999  The  final versions  of the accepted  papers will  be required for February 15th, 2000 for a publication in summer 2000.
 
  The Journal T.A.L.
  -----------------------------------------------------------------------=
---
--
 
  T.A.L. is the journal of the French association for Computational Linguistic   ATALA :  (http://www.biomath.jussieu.fr/ATALA/ ).  Two issues  are published   every  year on various  topics in  Natural Language Processing.  The Journal   T.A.L. is distributed by the French publisher Klincksieck.  
  Editorial Board
  -----------------------------------------------------------------------=
---
--
 
   Editors:                       A. Abeill=E9 (Universit=E9 Paris 7)
                                  Ph. Blache (LPL, CNRS)
                                  B. Habert (ENS Fontenay-Saint Cloud)
   Members of the Editorial       J. Anis (Universit=E9 Paris 10)
   Board:                         Ph. Blache (LPL, CNRS)
                                  D. Cl=E9ment (Bergische Universit=E4t
                                  Wuppertal)
                                  A. Condamines (CNRS, Toulouse le Mirail=
)
                                  Ch. Dalessandro (LIMSI, Paris)
                                  M. El-Beze (Universit=E9 d'Avignon)
                                  C. Gardent (Universit=E4t des Saarlande=
s)
                                  Ch. Jacquemin (IRIN, Nantes)
                                  J-L. Lebrave (CNRS, ITEM)
                                  B. Victorri (ELSAP, Caen)
                                  E. Tzoukermann (Bell Labs)
                                  P. Zweigenbaum (AP-HP, Paris 6)
   Scientific Committee:          M. Borillo (CNRS, P. Sabatier, Toulouse=
)
                                  R. Carr=E9 (ENST, Paris)
                                  J-P. Descl=E9s (Universit=E9 Paris IV)
                                  C. Fuchs (CNRS, ENS Paris)
                                  M. Gross (LADL, Paris 7)
                                  F. Rastier (Paris 4)
                                  W. von Hahn (Univ Hambourg)
                                  Y. Wilks (Sheffield Univ)
                                  A. Zaenen (Xerox Grenoble)
   Secretary:                     Jeanine Mary (UFRL Paris 7)

  --
  Christian Jacquemin, LIMSI-CNRS, BP 133, 91403 ORSAY, FRANCE
  tel +33 (0)1 69 85 80 22 / fax -- 80 88    mailto:jacquemin@limsi.fr
  http://www.limsi.fr/Individu/jacquemi/  ftp://ftp.limsi.fr/pub/jacquemi=
/

This message brought to you by the RECMGMT List


xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx




15.                LIBRARY CONSORTIUM  MANAGEMENT

CALL FOR PAPERS


Date:         Thu, 2 Sep 1999 09:56:23 +0100
Sender:       Solo Librarians Listserv <SOLOLIB-L@LISTSERV.SILVERPLATTER.COM 
From:         Chris Keenan <ckeenan@MCB.CO.UK 
Subject:      Call for Papers: Library Consortium Management
To:           SOLOLIB-L@LISTSERV.SILVERPLATTER.COM

Apologies for Cross Posting

Library Consortium Management: An International Journal
http://www.mcb.co.uk/lcm.htm

(For information on how to access the first two online issues for free, either go the http://www.mcb.co.uk/lcm.htm or see the foot of this message.)

--------Call for Papers--------

"Share your experiences of library/corporate co-operative purchasing with the community of interest"

Whatever your area of expertise, Librarian Consortium Management is interested in publishing articles on your experiences and suggestions an topics such as:

*Consortium directors*
What has your experience been of negotiating contracts with publishers?
How is your consortium governed and financed?
How do you manage the relationship with suppliers, agents and your membership?

*Library managers*
How has your library's membership of a consortium affected library management?

*Library directors*
Have you ever had to make a decision on whether or not to join a consortium?

*University IT directors*
How has membership of library consortia affected your management of campus computing?

*Publishers*
What has your experience been of negotiating with consortia?

*Vendors*
How has the emergence of library consortia affected you?

Send your article proposals or outlines to the Editor, Arnold Hirshon, Executive Director: NELINET.  E-mail: ahirshon@nelinet.net Full details of the journal aims and scope; editorial team and guidelines for authors can be found at http://www.mcb.co.uk/portfolio/lcm/call.htm


About Library Consortium Management

"Library Consortium Management: An International Journal", is the new, dedicated forum for advancing the body of knowledge in these areas.

Volume 1 Issue 1/2 features papers on the situation in Australian and South African consortia, with an opinion piece from Karen Hunter of Elsevier and a review of national site licensing and consortia purchasing by Rollo Turner of the Association of Subscription Agents.

To find out more about this journal, access to Library Consortium Management free by going to http://www.mcb.co.uk/lcm.htm and follow the links.


Please feel free to circulate this call for papers amongst your colleagues.


xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

16.                LIBRARY TRENDS

47(4), Spring 1999


Date:         Thu, 1 Jul 1999 12:59:37 -0500
From: GSLIS Publications Office <puboff@ALEXIA.LIS.UIUC.EDU>
To: ASIS-L@asis.lib.indiana.edu

Now available!
Library Trends,47(4), Spring 1999

Human Response to Library Technology
Edited by Janice J. Kirkland and Michael Gorman

Single copies are $18.50, including postage. Subscription rates for the quarterly are: Institutional, $85 per volume ($92 for international subscribers); Individual, $60 per volume ($67 for international subscribers); and Student, $25 per volume ($32 for international subscribers). Order single copies or subscriptions from the University of Illinois Press, Journals Department, 1325 S. Oak Street, Champaign, IL 61820. ISSN 0024-2594

From the "Introduction" by Janice J. Kirkland and Michael Gorman: Today the resources in libraries are being endangered by technology. When we tamper with access to the records of the past in such a way as to change them or make them less accessible, and when we digitize and discard the originals, whatever we may tell ourselves we are doing and whatever our reasons for doing it, we betray the trust which we assumed when we accepted responsibility for them. When we do not answer questions about sources with the full range of possibilities, but instead suggest only a search of the Internet, we abdicate our central role as intermediaries between the records and the users. When those of us who are school or college librarians forget the essential links between the library and the education of students, between the curriculum and their minds and futures, when we substitute training in the use of electronic sources for help with analytical skills to find and evaluate ideas, we are betraying our students and betraying society.
                People who purchase and implement library technology often make changes without asking if they provide better service or improve access for library users. They tend to lose sight of the basic fact that people and their real needs are at all times more important than are the artificial methods, including technological methods, that we devise for organizing information.
                There is a continuing need to examine frequently how technology in libraries is affecting human beings, how it affects the surviving work of persons now gone who contributed to the record of civilization, and how it affects persons now living who are the record's caretakers. With that end in mind, we have here assembled a collection of eleven articles expressing a variety of views of the human response to library technology.

Articles and authors include:

"Introduction," Janice J. Kirkland and Michael Gorman

"Revolution in the Library," Gertrude Himmelfarb

"The Rush to Technology: A View from the Humanists," Virginia Massey-Burzio

"Faculty Response to Library Technology: Insights on Attitudes," Wendy M. Starkweather and Camille Clark Wallin

"The Information Age versus Gender Equity? Technology and Values in Education for Library and Information Science," Suzanne Hildenbrand

"The Rewards of Managing an Electronic Mailing List," Karin Begg Borei

"Four Retreats and a Forum: A Meditation on Retreats as a Response to Change," Linda S. Dobb

"Ten Years Later: Support Staff Perceptions and Opinions on Technology in the Workplace," Dorothy E. Jones

"Scholarly Use of Internet-Based Electronic Resources: A Survey Report," Yin Zhang

"The Human Element in the Virtual Library," Laverna M. Saunders

"The Human Implications of Technology's Impact on the Content of Library Science Journals," Donald E. Riggs and Sha Li Zhang

"The Archival View of Technology: Resources for the Scholar of the Future," David S. Zeidberg

"Afterword," F. W. Lancaster


      The Publications Office of the Graduate School of Library and Information Science
    University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

(217) 333-1359 phone, (217) 244-7329 FAX
puboff@alexia.lis.uiuc.edu
http://edfu.lis.uiuc.edu/puboff

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
17. M-BED(SM): A REGISTRY OF EMBEDDED MULTIMEDIA ELECTRONIC JOURNALS


Date:         Fri, 2 Jul 1999 09:42:37 -0500
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
              <ASIS-L@asis.org>
From: Gerry Mckiernan <GMCKIERN@GWGATE.LIB.IASTATE.EDU>
Subject:      M-Bed(sm): A Registry of Embedded Multimedia Electronic Journals

_M-Bed(sm): A Registry of Embedded Multimedia Electronic Journals_

   I am pleased to announcement the formal establishment of a new registry of electronic journals that incorporate or integrate embedded multimedia within their e-articles. The registry is  entitled:

_M-Bed(sm): A Registry of Embedded Multimedia Electronic Journals_

and is accessible from

 http://www.public.iastate.edu/~CYBERSTACKS/M-Bed.htm

   Currently the registry is only an alphabetical listing of identified  e-journal titles. As time permits, I will be preparing specialized indexes by type of multimedia and plug-in as well. The registry also contains a General Bibliography of key works on the topic of multimedia in e-journals.

   I have prepared a 2,000 word newsletter article on "Embedded Multimedia in Electronic Journals" that is scheduled to be published within the newsletter of the Special Interest Group on Visualization, Images, and Sound (VIS) of the American Society for Information Science (ASIS) in the near future. The address for the ASIS SIG VIS is

    http://www.asis.org/SIG/SIGVIS/news.html

   I would greatly appreciate learning of additional multimedia e-journals as well as receiving citations/sitations to any high-relevant literature not currently listed for expanded article I will be preparing this summer for a Fall deadline.

   I wish to express my gratitude to all who contributed nominations for this listing as well as relevant citations from my previous queries.

   Thanks again to all!

/Gerry McKiernan
Theoretical Librarian
Iowa State University
Ames IA 50011

gerrymck@iastate.edu

 "Words still have ... primacy, but they can be illuminated by images and moving pictures and by numbers and by sounds."
 Tom Wilson / "In the Beginning Was the Word ..." /                                         ELVIRA2: 4

P.S. Please explore the EmBEDed multimedia in the
registry's logo [Forgive for the link from the graphic -
my wife's from Michigan and I couldn't resist (Go (Big) Blue {;-)]


xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

18.                NEWSIDIC - The Journal of the European Association of
Information Services

Date: Mon, 5 Jul 1999 17:52:44 +0100
Subject: NEWSIDIC : Issue 139
From: "Gary OWEN" <gfowen@lineone.net>
Sender: lis-fid-request@mailbase.ac.uk
Errors-To: lis-fid-request@mailbase.ac.uk

The latest issue of NEWSIDIC - The Journal of the European Association of Information Services has just been produced.


Articles include:

The subscription agent in the age of electronic journals
 by Robert Blay, Electronic Products Manager, SWETS UK LTD

The Dutch electronic commerce platform
by Wout L van Wijngaarden, Koeniglich Niederlaendische Botschaft Buero fuer
Wissenschaft und Technologie

CBIR technology : can it meet real user needs?
by John P Eakins, Institute of Image Data Research, University of
Northumbria at Newcastle

Expanding the web community presence
Karen Hunter, Senior Vice President, Elsevier Science
(reproduced by kind permission of the NFAIS)

The User's view : managing information in a dynamic world
by Dr Geoff Kerrison, Head of Information Management, Defence Evaluation
and Reserch Agency

"Just meme, me myself and I?
by Dominique Vanpee, VITO

The EUSIDIC Secretariat has a few spare copies, so if you would like one
please email:

Mia Hakl
EUSIDIC Secretariat
secretariat@eusidic.org

If demand outweighs supply, please tell us which article interests you and we may be able to send it electronically.

For further information on EUSIDIC and it's activities please go to our website at:

http://www.eusidic.org


xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

19.                SCHOLARLY ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING BIBLIOGRAPHY

VERSION 24

Date:         Thu, 1 Apr 1999 11:41:17 CST
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@utkux.utcc.utk.edu>
From: "Charles W. Bailey, Jr." <LIB3@UHUPVM1.UH.EDU>
Subject:      Version 24, Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

Version 24 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography is now available.  This selective bibliography presents over 950 articles, books, electronic documents, and other sources that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing efforts on the Internet and other networks.

     HTML: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>
     Acrobat: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf>
     Word: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.doc>

The HTML document is designed for interactive use.  Each major section is a separate file.  There are live links to sources available on the Internet.  It can be can be searched, and it includes Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources, a collection of links to related Web sites: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepr.htm>.

The Acrobat and Word files are designed for printing.
Each file is over 200 KB.

(Revised sections in this version are marked with an asterisk.)

Table of Contents

1 Economic Issues*
2 Electronic Books and Texts
     2.1 Case Studies and History
     2.2 General Works
     2.3 Library Issues
3  Electronic Serials
     3.1 Case Studies and History*
     3.2 Critiques
     3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals*
     3.4 General Works*
     3.5 Library Issues*
     3.6 Research*
4 General Works*
5 Legal Issues
     5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*
     5.2 License Agreements*
     5.3 Other Legal Issues*
6  Library Issues
     6.1 Cataloging, Classification, and Metadata*
     6.2 Digital Libraries*
     6.3 General Works*
     6.4 Information Conversion, Integrity, and Preservation*
7 New Publishing Models*
8 Publisher Issues*
     8.1 Electronic Commerce/Copyright Systems*
Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author
Appendix B. About the Author


Best Regards,
Charles

Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Assistant Dean for Systems,
University Libraries, University of Houston, Houston, TX
77204-2091.  E-mail: cbailey@uh.edu.  Voice: (713) 743-9804.
Fax: (713) 743-9811.

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm>
<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>

****************************

VERSION 25

Date:         Tue, 1 Jun 1999 14:35:39 CST
Sender: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum <JESSE@listserv.utk.edu>
From: "Charles W. Bailey, Jr." <LIB3@UHUPVM1.UH.EDU>
Subject:      Version 25, Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

Messages to jESSE: [reply, or jESSE@listserv.utk.edu]
         to Moderator: [gwhitney@utk.edu]
         to Sender: [take e-mail address from message below]
Info on jESSE: [http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/jesse.html]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Version 25 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography is now available.  This selective bibliography presents over 990 articles, books, electronic documents, and other sources that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing efforts on the Internet and other networks.

     HTML: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>
     Acrobat: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf>
     Word: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.doc>

The HTML document is designed for interactive use.  Each major section is a separate file.  There are live links to sources available on the Internet.  It can be can be searched using
Boolean operators.

The HTML document also includes Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources, a collection of links to related Web sites:

     <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepr.htm>

The Acrobat and Word files are designed for printing.
Each file is over 200 KB.

(Revised sections in this version are marked with an asterisk.)

Table of Contents

1 Economic Issues*
2 Electronic Books and Texts
     2.1 Case Studies and History*
     2.2 General Works*
     2.3 Library Issues*
3  Electronic Serials
     3.1 Case Studies and History*
     3.2 Critiques
     3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals*
     3.4 General Works*
     3.5 Library Issues*
     3.6 Research*
4 General Works*
5 Legal Issues
     5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*
     5.2 License Agreements*
     5.3 Other Legal Issues
6  Library Issues
     6.1 Cataloging, Classification, and Metadata*
     6.2 Digital Libraries*
     6.3 General Works*
     6.4 Information Conversion, Integrity, and Preservation*
7 New Publishing Models*
8 Publisher Issues*
     8.1 Electronic Commerce/Copyright Systems
Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author
Appendix B. About the Author


Best Regards,
Charles

Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Assistant Dean for Systems,
University Libraries, University of Houston, Houston, TX
77204-2091.  E-mail: cbailey@uh.edu.  Voice: (713) 743-9804.
Fax: (713) 743-9811.

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm>
<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>



******************************

VERSION 26

Date:         Mon, 2 Aug 1999 19:23:55 -0400
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
              <ASIS-L@asis.org>
From: Cassandra Armstrong <brush@lis.pitt.edu>
To: ASIS-L@asis.lib.indiana.edu

X-Sender: cbailey2@bayou.uh.edu
To: ASIS-L@asis.lib.indiana.edu

Version 26 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography is now available.  This selective bibliography presents over 1,000 articles, books, electronic documents, and other sources that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing efforts on the Internet and other networks.

     HTML: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>
     Acrobat: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf>
     Word: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.doc>

The HTML document is designed for interactive use.  Each major section is a separate file.  There are live links to sources available on the Internet.  It can be can be searched using Boolean operators.

The HTML document also includes Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources, a collection of links to related Web sites:

     <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepr.htm>

The Acrobat and Word files are designed for printing.
Each file is over 200 KB.

(Revised sections in this version are marked with an asterisk.)

Table of Contents

1 Economic Issues*
2 Electronic Books and Texts
     2.1 Case Studies and History*
     2.2 General Works*
     2.3 Library Issues
3  Electronic Serials
     3.1 Case Studies and History
     3.2 Critiques
     3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals*
     3.4 General Works*
     3.5 Library Issues*
     3.6 Research*
4 General Works*
5 Legal Issues
     5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*
     5.2 License Agreements*
     5.3 Other Legal Issues*
6  Library Issues
     6.1 Cataloging, Classification, and Metadata*
     6.2 Digital Libraries*
     6.3 General Works*
     6.4 Information Conversion, Integrity, and Preservation*
7 New Publishing Models*
8 Publisher Issues*
     8.1 Electronic Commerce/Copyright Systems*
Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author
Appendix B. About the Author

Best Regards,
Charles

Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Assistant Dean for Systems,
University Libraries, University of Houston, Houston, TX
77204-2091.  E-mail: cbailey@uh.edu.  Voice: (713) 743-9804.
Fax: (713) 743-9811.

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm>
<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>

********************************
VERSION  27


Date:         Fri, 1 Oct 1999 16:19:32 -0500
Sender: "ASIS-L: American Society for Information Science"
              <ASIS-L@asis.org>
From: "Charles W. Bailey, Jr." <cbailey@UH.EDU>
Subject:      Version 27, Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

Version 27 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography is now available.  This selective bibliography presents over 1,000 articles, books, electronic documents, and other sources that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing efforts on the Internet and other networks.

     HTML: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>
     Acrobat: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf>
     Word 97: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.doc>

The HTML document is designed for interactive use.  Each major section is a separate file.  There are live links to sources available on the Internet.  It can be can be searched using Boolean operators.

The HTML document also includes Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources, a collection of links to related Web sites:

     <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepr.htm>

The Acrobat and Word files are designed for printing.
Each file is over 250 KB.

(Revised sections in this version are marked with an asterisk.)

Table of Contents

1 Economic Issues*
2 Electronic Books and Texts
     2.1 Case Studies and History*
     2.2 General Works
     2.3 Library Issues
3  Electronic Serials
     3.1 Case Studies and History
     3.2 Critiques
     3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals
     3.4 General Works*
     3.5 Library Issues*
     3.6 Research*
4 General Works*
5 Legal Issues
     5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*
     5.2 License Agreements*
     5.3 Other Legal Issues
6  Library Issues
     6.1 Cataloging, Classification, and Metadata*
     6.2 Digital Libraries*
     6.3 General Works*
     6.4 Information Conversion, Integrity, and Preservation*
7 New Publishing Models*
8 Publisher Issues*
     8.1 Electronic Commerce/Copyright Systems
Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author
Appendix B. About the Author

Best Regards,
Charles

Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Assistant Dean for Systems,
University Libraries, University of Houston, Houston, TX
77204-2091.  E-mail: cbailey@uh.edu.  Voice: (713) 743-9804.
Fax: (713) 743-9811.

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm>
URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html


xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx


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