LIBRES: Library and Information Science Research
Electronic Journal ISSN 1058-6768
2001 Volume 11 Issue 1; March.
Bi-annual LIBRES11N1 JOURNALS


NEWS FROM OTHER JOURNALS


MARCH 2001 ISSUE

 Editorial note:

This section contains items culled from various Internet news services, discussion lists and other announcements.  Unless specifically noted, I have not visited the sites, used any of the software, reviewed the literature, or written the news items.  I present this digest to you in good faith but cannot vouch for the accuracy of its content.  

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Current Cites (Digital Library SunSITE)

Volume 11, no. 9, September 2000

 

[1]Current Cites (Digital Library SunSITE) - [sololib 27 September 2000]

Volume 11, no. 9, September 2000

Edited by [2]Roy Tennant

The Library, University of California, Berkeley, 94720

ISSN: 1060-2356 -

http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/2000/cc00.11.9.html

Contributors: [3]Terry Huwe, [4]Michael Levy, [5]Leslie Myrick , Jim

Ronningen, Lisa Rowlison, [6]Roy Tennant

Abreu, Elinor. [7]"Diving into the Deep Web" [8]The Standard

(September 4, 2000)

(http://www.thestandard.com/article/display/0,1151,18134,00.html). -

In a brief overview of a couple of companies Abreu brings to light an

issue that librarians have worried about for a number of years -- how

to locate information that is contained deep within web-based

databases. Most search engines will not search within databases, or as

Abreu calls it, "the deep Web." A recent survey suggests that there

may be 550 billion documents in the deep web. Now there are a number

of companies developing products that will search multiple databases

on the web, especially because the cost of indexing has been falling.

- [9]ML

Borgman, Christine L. [10]"The Premise and Promise of a Global

Information Infrastructure" [11]First Monday 5(8) (August 7, 2000)

(http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue5_8/borgman/). - Borgman

assesses the rapid growth of worldwide networking capabilities, and

analyzes the interplay between the technology and the political forces

that govern the introduction of technology. She argues that the

premise of universal networking is rational, and the promise is

exciting, because a genuine opportunity does exist to push technology

to the places where it is needed the most. The two most likely

pathways for the emergence of a ubiquitous network are evolutionary,

and revolutionary. However, sustained growth in the information

infrastructure does not necessarily yield new absolutes that will spur

the growth of a utopian society. Borgman argues convincingly that

existing political systems and cultural beliefs will have the greatest

influence on the actual penetration of an information infrastructure

throughout the world. - [12]TH

Crawford, Walt. "Nine Models, One Name: Untangling the E-book Muddle"

[13]American Libraries (September 2000): 56-59. - With all the hype

about device-dependent e-books like the Rocket eBook and the SoftBook

reader (now both owned by the Gemstar International Group), it's easy

to forget that: a) e-books are not new, and b) there are a number of

other e-book publication models. Both of these points are ably

presented by Crawford in an easy to understand overview of e-book

choices. Crawford readily admits to not having an answer to the

question of which model will be important to libraries, but then who

does? Follow this piece with the Donald Hawkins article cited in this

month's issue of Current Cites. - [14]RT

Dodds, Leigh. [15]"Instant RDF?" in [16]<xml.com> (August 30, 2000)

(http://www.xml.com/pub/2000/08/30/instantrdf/) and Dumbill, Edd,

[17]"Putting RDF to Work," in [18]<xml.com> (August 9, 2000)

(http://www.xml.com/pub/2000/08/09/rdfdb/). The [19]Resource

Description Framework (RDF, http://www.w3.org/RDF/), a mechanism for

processing metadata (or data about data), is intended to provide

interoperability for the exchange of machine-understandable metadata

for online resources, whether they be text, data, image, video or

audio files. Intelligent agents will harvest this information, which

can then be used in resource discovery, description, and cataloguing.

The hope is that with a standard system of resource description, a

uniform query language will be able to perform structured queries over

the entirety of the web. Two recent articles on RDF (the Resource

Description Framework) in <xml.com> offer a more technical and

behind-the-scenes slant on the standard as it evolves, covering how

RDF will be generated, stored, culled, and processed: from

controversies brewing on special-interest lists over the proposed data

model and serialization syntax, to an explanation of the

unsavory-sounding process known as "screen-scraping", to an intro to

[20]R.V. Guha's RDFDB (http://web1.guha.com/rdfdb/), a relational

database application for RDF that roll-up-your-sleeves types can try

at home. Dumbill offers a practical application for a kind of

integrative RDF Store that would cross-reference all the data on your

PC: websites, documents, scheduling apps and email. By querying an RDF

database for data connections on your PC you could conceivably search

on and collect all the applicable documents and emails from that

visiting dignitary/important client/job candidate you're meeting at

3:00 today, and before she arrives, check out her homepage! - [21]LM

"The Future of Books" CQ Researcher 10(24) (June 23 2000):545-568. - A

collection of short articles that outline the major parameters

surrounding the issue of electronic books. Included is a historical

discussion of the development of printing, the business of publishing

and recent trends in electronic publishing. Along with the articles

are a number of useful sidebars containing statistics, as well as a

brief bibliography. While the articles would not contain anything new

for someone who has been following the issues it is an

easily-accessible starting point for the neophyte interested in the

debate surrounding e-books and the digital revolution. - ML

Hawkins, Donald T. "Electronic Books: a Major Publishing Revolution.

Part 1: General Considerations and Issues" [22]Online 24(4)

(July/August 2000):14-28. - Few subjects freak out people who love

books like this one does. Read the article and then recommend it to

anybody who needs to calm down and get a grip, because it's a

realistic and comprehensive view of current e-book publishing which

makes it clear that the phenomenon is a new set of alternatives and

not a plague. Hawkins provides a primer on the nature of e-books and

the technology available for displaying them, the factors which stop

most people from reading long works on a screen, problems publishers

are grappling with, and how libraries are dealing with the issue. The

thoroughness here is impressive, references are documented and the

lists of URLs and articles for further reading are extensive. There

will be a second part published in the September Online with the focus

on the players in this market. - JR

Madeiros, Norm. [23]"XML and the Resource Description Framework: The

Great Web Hope" [24]Online (September 2000)

(http://www.onlineinc.com/onlinemag/OL2000/medeiros9.html). - Norm

Madeiros makes explicit one librarian's hope for this massive Library

of Babel we call the web: that through a standardized metadata

framework called the Resource Description Framework (RDF), finding

resources on the web might someday be as easy as accessing resources

in the library using your friendly local OPAC. Libraries have been the

originators and purveyors par excellence of metadata, from the red

ribbon rubrics which announced the contents of scrolls in the Library

of Alexandria to modern MARC records which form the backbone for

various OPAC systems that guide library patrons to the shelf or

electronic file containing the resource they seek. Evoking the W3C

[25]RDF Model and Syntax Specification's call

(http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-rdf-syntax/) for a "Web of Trust" built on

the twin pillars of the RDF standard and Digital Signatures, Madeiros

traces the sad history of the prostitution of <META> tags by

(especially e-commerce) content providers, and looks askance at the

"popularity-contest" model of web-indexing and ranking used by search

engines like Google. The solution may come with the adoption of RDF:

an objective, descriptive, machine-understandable standard. For those

new to RDF (i.e. those who involuntarily raise their eyebrows at the

mention of "screen-scraping") Madeiros appends a couple of handy

cut-&-paste models; the abbreviated syntax, which I excerpt here,

works with HTML, linking to it as you would to a stylesheet, with

<LINK>:

<rdf:RDF xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#"

xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.0/">

<rdf:Description rdf:about="http://doc"

dc:creator="your name here"

dc:title="your document"

dc:description="what it is"

dc:date="2000-09-10" />

</rdf:RDF>

- [26]LM

Melamut, Steven J. [27]"Pursuing Fair Use, Law Libraries and

Electronic Reserves" Law Library Journal 92(2) (Spring 2000):157-192

(http://www.aallnet.org/products/2000-16.pdf). - Melamut takes the

reader through an extensive overview of the leading cases and legal

developments that face libraries which provide a formal electronic

reserve collection. He discusses the copyright issues in traditional

reserves spending much time on the so-called Classroom Guidelines that

are part of the legislative history of the 1976 Copyright Act and the

applicable fair use sections of the Act. While there hasn't been any

litigation regarding electronic reserves there are a number of

significant cases concerning the creation of coursepacks and these

give some indication of the legal landscape that may be applicable to

the area of course reserves. Melamut suggests that libraries will now

have to address the issue of the payment of permission fees given the

fact that the technology makes it much easier to monitor the use of

protected materials and that schools may be liable for copyright

infringement for material from an e-reserve collection. - [28]ML

Sholtz, Paul. [29]"Economics of Personal Information Exchange"

[30]First Monday 5(9) (September 4, 2000)

(http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue5_9/sholtz/). - Sholtz argues

that personal information has become the new currency of online

commerce. However, recent figures indicate that between 75 and 90

million Americans regularly use the Internet, but they rarely pay for

the content they see. These users appear to be comfortable offering

personal information in exchange for free services and information. As

this "economy" develops, large "libraries" of personal data are being

accumulated, bought and sold. This article explores some of the

connotations of e-commerce, which so far has relied upon moving

conventional business practices to the Web. Sholtz see an emerging

opportunity for vendors who can grasp how "communities" of customers

can be approached in ways that protect privacy but offer online

advantages. - [31]TH

Sitts, Maxine K., editor. [32]Handbook for Digital Projects: A

Management Tool for Preservation and Access Andover, MA: Northeast

Document Conservation Center, 2000 (http://www.nedcc.org/dighand.htm).

- [33]The School for Scanning is a long-running and well-respected

workshop on digitization for libraries, archives, and museums. Offered

about once a year, the workshop usually attracts more than 300

attendees who leave the three-day session reeling under the load of

more information than they could possibly absorb, presented by leaders

in the field. Now this book documents some of the most important

information the workshop has to offer, to the benefit of both those

who attended the workshop and those who couldn't. With this hard-bound

volume and the Kenney/Reiger work "Moving Theory Into Practice" (see

the [34]Current Cites review), those tackling digitization projects

will be well-equipped indeed. - [35]RT

Smith, Barbara H. "To Filter or not to Filter: The Role of the Public

Library in Determining Internet Access" Communication Law and Policy

5(3) (Summer 2000):385-421. - As a starting point Smith discusses

society's assumptions about the need to protect children from

undesirable materials. She makes the point that the view of the child

and harm has changed over the centuries resulting in a bourgeois view

that aims to prolong the child's innocence for as long as possible.

Building on this analysis the author outlines various theories of the

first amendment and discusses a number of cases involving schools,

libraries and protection of minors. In particular, she highlights the

only filtering case to date, that of Mainstream Loudon v Board of

Trustees of Loudon County, which held that the public library could

not subject adults to the "electronic equivalent of a children's

reading room." In addition, there have been a number of attempts over

the last few years to introduce statutory law regulating Internet

content. In the discussion of the issues surrounding filtering Smith

suggests a three pronged solution to the problem: the introduction of

privacy walls and screens so that other patrons would not

inadvertently view materials they find offensive; separate children

and adult computers with some filtering on the children's computers;

and finally allowing parents to decide whether their children should

be allowed to use unfiltered computers. Not everyone will agree with

Smith's solutions, and it seems that there could be strong objections

to parents blocking the types of materials their children --

especially teenagers -- can access in the public library. However,

this article clearly articulates the major arguments in the filtering

debate and is useful in this role alone. - [36]ML

Stratford, Jean Slemmons and Juri. "Computerized and Networked

Government Information" [37]Journal of Government Information 27(3)

(May/June 2000): 385-389. - The column, written by this couple from

U.C. Davis, focuses in this issue on government services via the

Internet. It's a little mystifying why the authors state that the

focus is on international topics when most of the examples given are

domestic. Regardless, this is a nice sampling of efforts made by

governmental and intergovernmental groups to provide interactive

services over the net. For me, the richest trove came from their

description of the federal report [38]"Integrated Service Delivery:

Governments Using Technology to Serve Citizens"

(http://policyworks.gov/org/main/mg/intergov/isdtitp.html) because it

led me to poke around at the root [39]policyworks.gov. This is the

home page for the General Services Administration's Office of

Governmentwide Policy, which has lots of links relating to aspects of

federal information policy, the most pertinent being the one for the

Office of Information Technology's [40]"IT Policy On-Ramp"

(http://www.itpolicy.gsa.gov/). Besides the feds, the authors describe

projects by the G8 countries, National Governors' Association and

state and local agencies. - JR

_________________________________________________________________

Current Cites 11(9) (September 2000) ISSN: 1060-2356

Copyright 2000 by the Library, University of California, Berkeley.

All rights reserved.

Copying is permitted for noncommercial use by computerized bulletin

board/conference systems, individual scholars, and libraries.

Libraries are authorized to add the journal to their collections at no

cost. This message must appear on copied material. All commercial use

requires permission from the editor. All product names are trademarks

or registered trade marks of their respective holders. Mention of a

product in this publication does not necessarily imply endorsement of

the product. To subscribe to the Current Cites distribution list, send

the message "sub cites [your name]" to

[41]listserv@library.berkeley.edu, replacing "[your name]" with your

name. To unsubscribe, send the message "unsub cites" to the same

address.

[42]Copyright 2000 UC Regents. All rights reserved.

Document maintained at

http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/2000/cc00.11.9.html by

[43]Roy Tennant.

Last update September 26, 2000. SunSITE Manager:

[44]manager@sunsite.berkeley.edu

References

1. http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/imagemap/cc

2. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

3. http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/autobiography/thuwe/

4. http://www.law.berkeley.edu/library/staff/levy/

5. http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/~scanmgr/LESLIE/citescv.html

6. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

7. http://www.thestandard.com/article/display/0,1151,18134,00.html

8. http://www.thestandard.com/

9. http://www.law.berkeley.edu/library/staff/levy/

10. http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue5_8/borgman/

11. http://www.firstmonday.org/

12. http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/autobiography/thuwe/

13. http://www.ala.org/alonline/

14. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

15. http://www.xml.com/pub/2000/08/30/instantrdf/

16. http://www.xml.com/

17. http://www.xml.com/pub/2000/08/09/rdfdb/

18. http://www.xml.com/

19. http://www.w3.org/RDF/

20. http://web1.guha.com/rdfdb/

21. http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/~scanmgr/LESLIE/citescv.html

22. http://www.onlineinc.com/onlinemag/

23. http://www.onlineinc.com/onlinemag/OL2000/medeiros9.html

24. http://www.onlineinc.com/onlinemag/

25. http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-rdf-syntax/

26. http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/~scanmgr/LESLIE/citescv.html

27. http://www.aallnet.org/products/2000-16.pdf

28. http://www.law.berkeley.edu/library/staff/levy/

29. http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue5_9/sholtz/

30. http://www.firstmonday.org/

31. http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/autobiography/thuwe/

32. http://www.nedcc.org/dighand.htm

33. http://www.nedcc.org/sfsinfo.htm

34.

http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/bibondemand.cgi?title=Moving+Theory+Into+Practice&query=moving+theory+into+practice

35. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

36. http://www.law.berkeley.edu/library/staff/levy/

37. http://www.elsevier.com/inca/publications/store/3/8/2/

38. http://policyworks.gov/org/main/mg/intergov/isdtitp.html

39. http://policyworks.gov/

40. http://www.itpolicy.gsa.gov/

41. mailto:listserv@library.berkeley.edu

42. http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/Admin/copyright.html

43. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

44. mailto:manager@sunsite.berkeley.edu

 

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Volume 11, no. 10, October 2000

[sololib, 25 October 2000]

Edited by [2]Roy Tennant

The Library, University of California, Berkeley, 94720

ISSN: 1060-2356 -

http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/2000/cc00.11.10.html

Contributors: [3]Terry Huwe, [4]Michael Levy, [5]Leslie Myrick ,

Jim Ronningen, Lisa Rowlison, [6]Roy Tennant

Issue Spotlight: Peer-to-Peer Networking

Not since the release of NCSA Mosaic, the networking application

that spawned the phrase "killer app", have we seen the like. Once

again it took a youngster (in this case an 18-year-old college

dropout) to rock our world -- with a networking application that

bears his nickname: "Napster". But as quickly became apparent,

Napster was just the first salvo in a new battle over freedom,

intellectual property rights, and the future of the Internet.

Other clients using the same technology (called "peer-to-peer"

networking since it is individual clients (peers) communicating

directly with one another instead of through a central server),

quickly appeared, with Gnutella and Freenet being among the most

widely known. Developments have been happening so quickly that

it's hard to believe that Napster isn't even two years old yet,

but already the old guard very much has it's guard up. The music

industry has hauled Napster, Inc. into court and the publishing

industry surely isn't far behind, if they could only find some

one or some organization to sue. But there's the rub. With

anonymous applications like Gnutella and Freenet, there is no one

to sue. We're in an entirely different ball game. But don't take

my word for it. This month we've reviewed some of the best

articles we could find on this new phenomenon. They speculate on

the future of creativity, publishing, and access to information

in the wake of an unstoppable technology that will change

everything. Can I possibly be any clearer?

-- The Editor

Adar, Eytan, and Huberman, Bernardo A. [7]

"Free Riding on Gnutella." [8]First Monday 5(10) (October 2,

2000)

(http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue5_10/adar/)

- Two Xerox PARC researchers analyze use traffic on [9]Gnutella,

the underground peer-to-peer file sharing service, and find that

usage patterns aren't really all that egalitarian. Over a single

24 hour period, nearly 70 percent of users shared no files;

instead, they spent their time "free-riding" on the system. Of

the overall traffic, 50 percent of responses were returned by

only one percent of the total sharing host population. The

authors determine that this does not bode well for

community-based file sharing, since communities depend on broad

participation, just as healthy democracies depend on a populace

that actually takes the time to vote. Adar and Huberman suggest

that copyright infringement fears may diminish if this trend

predominates in similar communities. It will be interesting to

follow the peer-to-peer underground movement's growth with this

assertion in mind. - [10]TH

Barlow, John Perry. [11]

"The Next Economy of Ideas." [12]Wired (October 2000): 240-252

(http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/8.10/download.html).

- Building on his famous article [13]The Economy of Ideas, John

Perry Barlow looks at the issue of copyright in the [14]Napster

era. As Barlow comments "no law can be successfully imposed on a

huge population that does not morally support it and possesses

easy means for its invisible evasion." Launching into a scathing

criticism of the entertainment industry and their attempts to

protect intellectual property using such means as the Digital

Millennium Copyright Act, Barlow sees the media behemoths as

fighting a losing battle. In his call to arms the future is one

where "there will be no property in cyberspace." If there is no

property how will those creating content be rewarded and given

incentives? He believes that the interests of creators will be

assured by practical values: "relationship, convenience,

interactivity, service and ethics." Summing his stance up Barlow

envisages artists entering into relationships with consumers who

will be ethically inclined to pay for services. While some will

still dismiss him as a hippy out of touch with the reality of the

modern economy his ideas are thoughtful, provocative and he might

just be right. - [15]ML

Chudnov, Daniel. [16]Docster: The Future of Document Delivery?"

[17]Library Journal 125(13) (August 2000): 60-62.

- In this provocative piece, Chudnov proposes that libraries

modify the Napster model of file sharing for use in interlibrary

lending. The main change that Chudnov suggests is to add

copyright compliance. For details on what he suggests and how it

would work, see the article. But what I find most impressive

about this article isn't so much the details as the idea itself.

Libraries need imaginative ideas, and this is one. Building on a

technology that isn't even two years old yet, Chudnov has

proposed a reasonable solution to a common library problem. We

need more ideas like this, and more librarians with Chudnov's

combination of imagination and technical savvy. - [18]RT

Cohen, Adam. [19]"A Crisis of Content." [20]Time 156(14)

(October 2, 2000): 68-73

(http://www.time.com/time/magazine/articles/0,3266,55700,00.html).

- When Time magazine "gets it," you know the rest of the

population can't be too far behind. And this article shows that

they do. What they "get" is that where intellectual property

rights are concerned, the cat is out of the bag, the cow has

vacated the barn, and the bottle no longer holds the genie.

Napster is just the tip of the file sharing iceberg. As new

peer-to-peer clients like [21]Gnutella

(http://gnutella.wego.com/) and [22]Freenet

(http://freenet.sourceforge.net/) show, any intellectual content

is at risk of being freely shared on the Internet. To demonstrate

this, Cohen uses such examples as sewing patterns (about as

non-Napster like as you can get), which are being freely (and

illegally) swapped online. For a taste of what Cohen has to say

about all this, here are a couple quotes from this piece: "There

is no underestimating the threat that all this free file sharing

poses to existing business models" and "The only thing that is

certain in the content business is that everything is up for

grabs." And if you think this only affects businesses, and not

non-profit libraries, think again. - [23]RT

Heilemann, John. [24]"David Boies: The Wired Interview."

[25]Wired (October 2000): 253-259

(http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/8.10/boies.html).

- At first glance, it appears to many onlookers that it is

clearly illegal for users to record MP3 files from copyrighted

CDs and make them available for dowloading by any Napster user on

the planet. But as this interview with the lead defense attorney

in the Napster case points out, this is far from an open-and-shut

case of copyright infringement. He identifies four major

arguments that the defense is making, any one of which will win

their case if they prevail. Frankly, I couldn't care less if

Napster gets shut down, but the legal defense of Napster involves

issues that go much beyond whether a particular company can

continue to do business or not. - [26]RT

Kuptz, Jerome. [27]"Independence Array." [28]Wired (October

2000): 236-237

(http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/8.10/architecture.html).

- The tagline to this overview of how Gnutella works is

"Gnutella: Unstoppable by Design". And they aren't kidding. Smart

people with nothing better to do have worked hard at making sure

that files can be shared directly between individual network

users in an undetectable and untraceable fashion. Sneaking

through via the HTTP protocol (here's a hint, it's the protocol

upon which the web runs), there are no central servers (like with

Napster), no log files, and no central organization behind it.

This two-page spread on how Gnutella actually works is available

on the web, but the graphic version in the print copy of the

magazine lays out the whole bloody mess in a much more

entertaining fashion. - [29]RT

Crane, Gregory, et. al. [30]"The Symbiosis Between Content and

Technology in the Perseus Digital Library" [31]Cultivate

Interactive (October 2000)

(http://www.cultivate-int.org/issue2/perseus/).

- The [32]Perseus Project is one of the most well-developed

scholar-led digital library projects around. In this conceptual

overview of the project and its many aspects and phases, Crane

et. al. describe the motivations behind this eclectic set of

collections. Maybe it was their enthusiasm or their "can-do"

attitude, but by the end of the article it actually made sense to

me that the project should be dabbling in Shakespeare and Arabic

texts on mechanics at the same time. As they put it, "While all

these projects differ substantially, they are united by our

consistent effort to study the ways in which documents which are

distinct in print libraries begin to merge with one another in a

digital library, dissolving their individual structures and

supporting new patterns of intellectual inquiry." Areas

in which they remain interested include: 1) the development of

new integrated collections, 2) the cognitive effects of digital

libraries, 3) integration of modern computational linguistic

techniques, and 4) information extraction and visualization.

Those wishing for more technical background on the project should

refer to Crane's [33]recent piece in D-Lib Magazine. - [34]RT

Crawford, Walt. [35]"Guest Editorial: Talking about Public Access

-- PACS-L's First Decade." [36]Information Technology and

Libraries 19(3) (September 2000): 112-115

(http://www.lita.org/ital/1903_editorial.html).

- I distinctly remember returning from the 1989 American Library

Association Annual Conference and rushing to sign on to a new

electronic discussion that had just been announced at the

conference: the [37]Public Access Computer Systems Forum, or

PACS-L. Unfortunately, the instructions for signing up assumed

you were on BITNET, and I was trying to sign on via

the Internet. The ensuing days of digging around for

documentation and discovering the way I had to send my message to

sign on was one of my first trials by fire on the Internet. But

PACS-L was well worth the effort, and was so for years. As

Crawford documents so well, PACS-L was *the* library discussion

list of most of the 90's, before becoming a victim of its own

success. Although it has been resurrected, it will never be the

same as it was when a profession was remaking itself in light of

world-wide computer connectivity. If this sounds nostalgic,

it is, as is Crawford's tribute. I guess you just had to be

there. -- [38]RT

Drost, Karen, and Jorna, Miriam. [39]"Empowering Women Through

the Internet: Dutch Women Unite." [40]First Monday 5(10) (October

2, 2000)

(http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue5_10/drost/).

- Drost and Jorna assess the experience of a Dutch collective

known as [41]"Webgrrls-NL", an organization whose goal is to

train Dutch women in the use of the Internet. Webgrrls creates a

forum where Dutch women can learn about computers and the

Internet "without the intervention of men or others who feel the

need to show rather than to teach." That quote points out the

feminist perspective of this organization, but it also opens the

door to think about the ways in which different communities can

best learn in the Internet era. A large body of research confirms

that women and men approach technology differently, and this

article is further grist for the mill. It's also interesting

and very pragmatic in its approach. The conclusions that are

offered could easily apply to other self-identifying groups who

wish to take advantage of the Internet on their own terms.

-- [42]TH

Evans, Fred. [43]"Cyberspace and the Concept of Democracy."

[44] First Monday 5(10) (October 2, 2000)

(http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue5_10/evans/).

- Social theorists and futurists will enjoy this well-researched

inquiry into the nature of democracy in the Net era. Heavily

footnoted and densely populated with ideas and questions, this

article nonetheless raises some blunt questions that are on a lot

of peoples' minds. For example, what are the characteristics of

the body politic, if it's living in the "real" and the "virtual"

worlds at the same time? What are the hazards of this new and

uncharted domain for affecting hearts and minds in the political

process? While the author has many optimistic analyses to share,

he also finds a "dark" side to politics and the Net, which he

categories as oracular in nature. - [45]TH

Griffiths, Jose-Marie. "Deconstructing Earth's Largest Library"

[46]Library Journal 125(13) (August 2000): 44-47.

- Current Cites readers are familiar with [47]Steve Coffman's

provocative thoughts on what librarians can learn from

Amazon.com. This piece aims to "debunk" Coffman's ideas. Since

Griffith does not make her points as clearly and forcefully as

[48]Walt Crawford, they are somewhat difficult to extract, but

they can be roughly summarized as "we can't cooperate enough to

pull it off, our current automated systems are too limited,

and it would be too difficult and costly." From there, Griffiths

explores the issues of digital opportunities (formerly known as

the Digital Divide), the library as place, and the value of the

library 'brand'. A sidebar highlights the [49]Internet Public

Library, [50]Contentville.com, and [51]Fathom.com as "libraries

in cyberspace." - [52]RT

Hawkins, Donald T. "Electronic Books: a Major Publishing

Revolution. Part 2: The Marketplace" [53]Online 24 (5)

(September/October 2000):18-36.

- As the author himself acknowledges, "The marketplace is

moving so rapidly that any list of players quickly becomes

outdated." Some of the specifics relating to the vendors here

have changed since the article's publication, with probably the

biggest news being that Rocket eBooks and SoftBooks now have the

same parent company and are sold through eBook-Gemstar. So, check

the company websites listed for the latest word. As for Hawkins'

more general take on how the market is shaping up, this is an

excellent continuation of part 1, which was published in the

July/August issue. He explores the many ways (including

device-independent ways) in which e-books are being

disseminated, including the system of interest to many libraries

now, netLibrary. - JR

Rutenbeck, Jeff. "The 5 Great Challenges of the Digital Age"

[54]Library Journal NetConnect (Supplement to Library Journal and

School Library Journal, Fall 2000): 30-33.

- We've survived Y2K little the worse for wear, just in time to

face the five "great challenges" Rutenbeck identifies in this

provocative piece. What are they, you ask? 1) Malleability:

"through digital technologies we're inclined to do much more than

preserve or distribute information: we're prone to manipulate it,

alter it, and enhance it in often profound ways", 2) Selectivity:

electing digital over print; selecting the small amount of print

materials we're capable of digitizing, 3) Exclusivity: the

digital divide, the dominance of English as the language of the

Internet, the necessity to have typing skills, 4) Vulnerability:

"we are only now beginning to realize that the benefits of

interconnectedness via the global network also bring with them an

unprecedented shared vulnerability", and 5) Superficiality: the

shallowness of our interactions with information and others in a

networked world. Whether or not you agree with Rutenbeck's

assertions, or his elevation of them to "great challenges", these

issues are important and may be increasingly so. - [55]RT

"Special Issue: Digital Reference Services: Papers Based on the

Virtual Reference Desk Conference" [56]Reference & User Services

Quarterly 39(4) (Summer 2000)

- We've come far from the notion that online reference service is

a nice embellishment, to an expection from users that there will

be a computer interface available for any library need, including

that (potentially) most complex exchange, the reference session.

The articles here address such issues as assessing the quality of

online reference service, the "how-to" points to consider when

creating such a service, what to expect in workload changes and

how to manage them, how to create a successful reference

interview environment when the face to face element is removed,

and how the culture of library use for reference information is

changing. The gatekeeper function of reference librarians is

changing, some would say radically, and these articles are very

helpful for information providers adapting to the new patterns of

information-seeking behavior. - JR

Taylor, Mary K. [57]"Library Webmasters: Satisfactions,

Dissatisfactions, and Expectations." [58]Information Technology

and Libraries 19(3) (September 2000): 116-123

(http://www.lita.org/ital/1903_taylor.html).

- This article reports on the findings of a 1998 survey of

library web managers of institutions that are members of the

Association of Research Libraries. From the survey data one can

glean such interesting nuggets as the fact that of the

respondents, less than a third have attended an HTML workshop or

seminar, and 83% of respondents were self-taught to a greater or

lesser degree. A finding I found surprising was that more than

50% of the respondents shared their position with another person

or committee. The vast majority find satisfaction in their work,

and what the largest number liked the least was not having enough

time to spend on the web site and to learn new skills. Taylor

ends the review of survey results with a list of recommendations

based on her findings. - [59]RT

West, Darrell M. [60]"Assessing E-Government: The Internet,

Democracy, and Service Delivery by State and Federal

Governments." (September 2000)

(http://www.insidepolitics.org/egovtreport00.html).

- Some of the most far reaching and effective delivery of

information services via the Internet has been by Federal and

State governments. In this study of "E-Government" the author

surveyed over 1800 websites during the Summer, 2000.

Unsurprisingly, states with smaller populations and

therefore fewer resources performed poorly compared to larger

states, and federal government provided better services compared

to state governments. Overall the websites were weakest in areas

of security, privacy, disability access, offering specific online

services such as purchasing a license, filing a complaint or

requesting a publication, and democratic outreach such as email,

message boards and the ability for citizens to receive periodic

updates on specific issues. The conclusion of the study is that

the "e-government revolution has fallen short of its true

potential." - [61]ML

_________________________________________________________________

Current Cites 11(10 (October 2000) ISSN: 1060-2356

Copyright 2000 by the Library, University of California, Berkeley.

All rights reserved.

Copying is permitted for noncommercial use by computerized

bulletin board/conference systems, individual scholars, and

libraries. Libraries are authorized to add the journal to their

collections at no cost. This message must appear on copied

material. All commercial use requires permission from the editor.

All product names are trademarks or registered trade marks of

their respective holders. Mention of a product in this

publication does not necessarily imply endorsement of

the product. To subscribe to the Current Cites distribution list,

send the message "sub cites [your name]" to

[62]listserv@library.berkeley.edu, replacing "[your name]" with

your name. To unsubscribe, send the message "unsub cites" to the

same address.

References

1. http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/imagemap/cc

2. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

3. http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/autobiography/thuwe/

4. http://www.law.berkeley.edu/library/staff/levy/

5. http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/~scanmgr/LESLIE/citescv.html

6. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

7. http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue5_10/adar/

8. http://www.firstmonday.dk/

9. http://gnutella.wego.com/

10. http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/autobiography/thuwe/

11. http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/8.10/download.html

12. http://www.wired.com/wired/

13. http://www.wirednews.com/wired/archive/2.03/economy.ideas.html

14. http://www.napster.com/

15. http://www.law.berkeley.edu/library/staff/levy/

16. http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/2000/cc00.11.10.html

17. http://www.libraryjournal.com/

18. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

19. http://www.time.com/time/magazine/articles/0,3266,55700,00.html

20. http://www.time.com/

21. http://gnutella.wego.com/

22. http://freenet.sourceforge.net/

23. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

24. http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/8.10/boies.html

25. http://www.wired.com/wired/

26. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

27. http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/8.10/architecture.html

28. http://www.wired.com/wired/

29. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

30. http://www.cultivate-int.org/issue2/perseus/

31. http://www.cultivate-int.org/

32. http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/

33. http://www.dlib.org/dlib/july00/crane/07crane.html

34. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

35. http://www.lita.org/ital/1903_editorial.html

36. http://www.lita.org/ital/index.htm

37. http://info.lib.uh.edu/pacsl.html

38. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

39. http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue5_10/drost/

40. http://www.firstmonday.dk/

41. http://www.webgrrls.nl/

42. http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/autobiography/thuwe/

43. http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue5_10/evans/

44. http://www.firstmonday.dk/

45. http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/autobiography/thuwe/

46. http://www.libraryjournal.com/

47.

http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/bibondemand.cgi?query=steve+coffman

48. http://home.att.net/~wcc.libmedx/gutting.htm

49. http://www.ipl.org/

50. http://contentville.com/

51. http://fathom.com/

52. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

53. http://www.onlineinc.com/onlinemag/

54. http://www.libraryjournal.com/netconnect.asp

55. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

56. http://www.ala.org/rusa/rusq

57. http://www.lita.org/ital/1903_taylor.html

58. http://www.lita.org/ital/index.htm

59. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

60. http://www.insidepolitics.org/egovtreport00.html

61. http://www.law.berkeley.edu/library/staff/levy/

62. mailto:listserv@library.berkeley.edu

 

****************************************************************

D-Lib Magazine,  

November 2000

[Forwarded. Dick Hill] - asis- 23 November 2000]- 

Greetings:

The November 2000 issue of D-Lib Magazine http://www.dlib.org/ is now

available. The table of contents is at

http://www.dlib.org/dlib/november00/11contents.html.

The November issue contains four articles, ten 'In Brief' items, and a

generous selection of 'Clips and Pointers'. The Featured Collection for

the November issue is the NOVA Online Collection.

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

UKOLN: The UK Office for Library and Information Networking, Bath,

England

http://hosted.ukoln.ac.uk/mirrored/lis-journals/dlib/

The Australian National University Sunsite, Canberra, Australia

http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Göettingen,

Göettingen, Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina

http://www.dlib.org.ar

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the November issue

of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later. There is a

delay between the time of the magazine is released in the United States

and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

The articles in the November 2000 issue of D-Lib Magazine are:

Taking the British Library Forward in the Twenty-first Century

Lynne Brindley, The British Library

Harvard's Library Digital Initiative: Building a First Generation

Digital Library Infrastructure

Dale Flecker, Harvard University Library

Spoken Words, Unspoken Meanings: A DLI2 Project Ethnography

Michael Seadle, Michigan State University

Resource Guide for the Social Sciences: Signposting a Dissemination and

Support Route for Barefoot and Meta-librarians in UK Higher Education

Lesly Huxley and Karen Ford, Institute for Learning and Research

Technology, University of Bristol

The ten “In Brief” items are:

A MAGiC Project

Paul A.S. Needham, Cranfield University

The People's Network

Helen Baigent, Resource: the Council for Museums, Archives and Libraries

 

Building an Audio-visual Digital Library of Historical Documentaries:

The ECHO Project

Pasquale Savino, I.E.I - C.N.R.

High Level Thesaurus Project - HILT

Susannah Wake, University of Strathclyde

The Program for Cooperative Cataloging Task Force on Multiple

Manifestations of Electronic Resources

Wayne Jones, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Reference 24/7: High Tech or High Touch

RUSA President's Program, American Library Association Annual Meeting,

2000

George S. Porter, Caltech

New Developments at the Visual Arts Data Service (News Release)

Philip Pothen, Arts and Humanities Data Service

UC Berkeley Professors Measure Exploding World Production of New

Information (Press Release)

Kathleen Maclay, University of California, Berkeley

OCLC Researchers Measure the World Wide Web (Press Release)

Ed O'Neill, OCLC Online Computer Library Center

IFLA Core Programme for the Advancement of Librarianship (ALP) Announces

DANIDA Travel Grant 2001

Birgitta Sandell, IFLA ALP

Bonnie Wilson

Managing Editor

D-Lib Magazine

 

 

_______________________________________________

DLib-Subscribers mailing list

http://www.dlib.org/mailman/listinfo/dlib-subscribers

 

Executive Director

American Society for Information Science and Technology

(as of Sept 27, 2000)

1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510

Silver Spring, MD 20910

FAX: (301) 495-0810

PHONE: (301) 495-0900

http://www.asis.org

 

 

****************************************

January 2001

Date: Tue, 16 Jan 2001 11:15:33 -0500

From: Bonnie Wilson <bwilson@CNRI.RESTON.VA.US>

Subject: The January 2001 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available.

Reply-to: Public-Access Computer Systems Publications <PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU>

 

Greetings:

 

The January 2001 issue of D-Lib Magazine

http://www.dlib.org/ is now available. The table of

contents is at

http://www.dlib.org/dlib/january01/01contents.html.

 

The January issue contains Caroline Arms’ review of the

book, “The Intellectual Foundation of Information

Organization” by Elaine Svenonius, and an opinion piece

entitled “Commercial Digital Libraries and the Academic

Community: How New Firms Might Develop New Relationships

between "Publisher" and Higher Education” by Gregrory

Crane. This issue also contains four articles, seven 'In

Brief' items, and a generous selection of 'Clips and

Pointers'. The Featured Collection for the January issue is

“Introduction to the Plant Kingdom” a web site created by

Dr. C.M. Sean Carrington, University of the West Indies.

 

The articles in the January 2001 issue of D-Lib Magazine

are:

 

Keeping Dublin Core Simple: Cross-Domain Discovery or

Resource Description?

Carl Lagoze, Cornell University

 

First Steps in an Information Commerce Economy: Digital

Rights Management in the Emerging E-Book Environment

Eamonn Neylon, Manifest Solutions

 

Interoperability: Digital Rights Management and the Emerging

EBook Environment

Stephen Mooney, Stephen P. Mooney & Associates, LLC

 

 

Searching the Deep Web: Directed Query Engine Applications

at the Department of Energy

Walter L. Warnick, R.L. Scott, Karen J. Spence, Lorrie A.

Johnson, and Valerie S. Allen, U.S. Department of Energy,

Office of Scientific and Technical Information, and Abe

Lederman, Innovative Web Applications

 

The seven “In Brief” items are:

 

Realizing the Vision of Networked Access to Library

Resources: An Applied Research and Demonstration Project to

Establish and Operate a Z39.50 Interoperability Testbed

William E. Moen, Ph.D., University of North Texas

 

Open Working Group on Agents in Digital Libraries

Jose Borbinha, National Library of Portugal

 

Museums, Libraries and the 21st Century Learner

Beverly Sheppard, Institute of Museum and Library Services

 

Learning Anytime Anywhere Partnerships (LAAP): A Grant

Program Administered by the Fund for the Improvement of

Postsecondary Education (FIPSE)

Karen B. Levitan, U.S. Department of Education

 

Cross-sectoral Stewardship Strategy for Museums, Archives

and Libraries

Julie Carpenter, Education for Change Ltd

 

New Email List on Digital Preservation

Neil Beagrie, Joint Information Systems Committee

 

JSTOR Completes General Science Collection (News Release)

Carol MacAdam, JSTOR

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

 

UKOLN: The UK Office for Library and Information Networking,

Bath, England

http://hosted.ukoln.ac.uk/mirrored/lis-journals/dlib/

 

The Australian National University Sunsite, Canberra,

Australia

http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib

 

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of

Göettingen, Göettingen, Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

 

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina

http://www.dlib.org.ar

 

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

 

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the

January issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check

back later. There is a delay between the time of the

magazine is released in the United States and the time when

the mirroring process has been completed.)

 

Bonnie Wilson

Managing Editor

D-Lib Magazine

*************************************************************

EJI: A Registry of Innovative E-Journal Features

 

From: Gerry Mckiernan [mailto:GMCKIERN@GWGATE.LIB.IASTATE.EDU]

Sent: Tuesday, 12 December 2000 8:28 AM

To: PACS-L@LISTSERV.UH.EDU

Subject: EJI: A Registry of Innovative E-Journal Features and

Functionalities

 

_EJI: A Registry of Innovative E-Journal Features and Functionalities_

I am pleased to announce the establishment of a new registry entitled

_EJI_

[pronounced E.J.I. _or_ 'edgy"}. _EJI_ is a registry of "Innovative

E-Journal Features and Functionalities" available at

[ http://www.public.iastate.edu/~CYBERSTACKS/EJI.htm ]

Presently the following categories have been established for EJI:

* Accelerated Publication

* Citation Management

* Collective E-Journals

* Indexing

* Issue-In-Progress

* Manuscript Submission and Tracking Systems

* Open Peer Review

* Overlay E-Journals

* Personalized E-Journals

* Reactive E-Journals

* Virtual E-Journals

* Virtual Filing Cabinets

I have chosen not to define each category at this time and hope that

MyWebColleague will understand the nature of each category by visiting the

linked entries.

I am greatly interested in learning about *other* e-journals that have

these features and functionalities.

I am also interested in learning about other 'innovative' or

'cutting-edge' e-journal features and functionalities as well as the

e-journals that exhibit these.

I have identified several additional features and functionalities and hope

that MYWebColleagues are aware of such progressive e-journals. These are:

* Annotative E-Journals

E-Journals that permit a reader to annotate the text of

an e-article with personal comments [This category would also

e-journals that allow a reader to highlight within an e-article

or to

make verbal annotations that would be appended to the

text. It could also include e-journals that include an audio

annotation by the author(s) to supplement an e-article's text]

* Collaborative E-Journals

E-Journal that include a features that allows a reader

to retrieve the articles that were read by other readers

who also read the article currently being read by

a reader [The Amazon feature " Those who bought Book A

also bought Book B, C and D]

* Raw and Supplemental Data / Computer Code

This would include e-journals that allow an author

to include direct / access to raw or supplemental

data that is analyzed in the e-article; or software

code for analyzing the data

* Interactive Formulae, Graphs and/or Models

This would include e-journals that allow readers to

interactive with formulas with the text of an article

to consider other possibilities with other data

or datasets

* Relatedness

This a function found in Science Citation Index CD-ROM

that allows for the identification of 'related' papers based

upon

the degree of shared references. This made be identified as

a 'related' function in the e-journal or a 'find similar'

function.

* Database Access

This would include e-journals that provide either

explicit or implicit access to database records either as

a separate database (e.g., Medline) or as a link to database

records (e.g., Science Direct)

* Advanced Display

This would include e-journals that provide the ability to

display

the results of a search in an alternative format, for example.

using

visualization technologies such as SPIRE and other

visualization

technologies developed at the Pacific Northwest National

Laboratory [ http://multimedia.pnl.gov:2080/infoviz/index.html

],

or those developed out of Xerox PARC [http://www.inxight.com/ ]

or Kohomen Self-Organzing Semantic Maps (SOMs)

[ e.g., http://websom.hut.fi/websom/ ]

* E-Journal Page Customization

E-Journals that allow a reader to customize an e-journal

based upon personal display or organizational preferences

 

[QUITE A LIST, Huh? [:-)]

As Always, Any and All Contributions, Suggestions, Candidates,

Critiques, Questions, Comments, Recounts, Cosmic Insights. etc. Are Most

Welcome!

Regards,

Gerry McKiernan

Edgy Librarian

Iowa State University

Ames IA 50011

gerrymck@iastate.edu

"The Best Way to Predict the Future is to Invent It!"

Alan Kay

*********************************************************************

 

 

GreyNet

[message dated 27 November 2000]

Dear GreyNetters

It is with regret that MCB University Press, parent company of GreyNet - The

Grey Literature Network Service, announces that the services of GreyNet are

discontinued forthwith.

Volume 1 of the "International Journal on Grey Literature" can now be

accessed at <http://www.liblink.co.uk/>

GreyNet publications are now available on interlibrary loan/document

delivery only, via the British Library Document Supply Centre at

<http://www.bl.uk/index.html>. This includes the proceedings of the

conference series.

There will therefore be no GL 2001, or "GL-Compendium - a Net-based

Directory of Grey Literature Collections". Those few members of the

community who subscribed to GL-C for 2000 either directly with MCB, or via

GreyNet membership, will receive a refund over the next few weeks.

Thank you to those of you who have supported GreyNet actively over the

years.

Sincerely

Eileen Breen

GreyNet - The Grey Literature Network Service.

ebreen@mcb.co.uk

 

*********************************************************************

 

iMP

 

September 2000

 

The September issue of iMP: The Magazine on Information Impacts, which is

published on the Web by the Center for Information Strategy and Policy

(CISP) of Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), has been

posted.

You can find the magazine at: http://www.cisp.org/ [follow "visit iMP"] or

http://www.cisp.org/imp/ or

http://www.cisp.org/imp/september_2000/09_00contents.htm

In this issue, we are featuring stories and editorials about IT and

empowerment: Does IT Empower Users in the New Economy?

The Perverse Economics of Information: An Extended Conversation with Paul A.

Strassmann. "The exceptionally favorable results delivered by U.S. IT firms

should not be a source of complacency and certainly not a reason to believe

that the currently favorable U.S. position makes it possible to maintain

sustainable superiority forever."

[http://www.cisp.org/imp/september_2000/09_00strassmann.htm]

Thoughts on Growth in the New Economy. Robert J. Shapiro. "The conclusion

we must draw is that the economy is not a calm landscape of clearing

markets. Rather, it's more a roiling environment with thousands of little

pockets of monopoly constantly being formed and then broken apart by waves

of market forces." [http://www.cisp.org/imp/september_2000/09_00shapiro.htm]

Consumers Are The Real Losers in the Microsoft Antitrust Case. Nicholas

Economides. "Why is it not enough to impose 'conduct' restrictions on

Microsoft, for example, limiting its ability to sell different products as a

bundle? Such restraints may involve harder implementation work for the

government, but they will not be as damaging as dismantlement."

[http://www.cisp.org/imp/september_2000/09_00economides.htm]

Globalization and High Tech Wage Lag. Alan Tonelson. "A large and growing

percentage of trade-induced job flight and downward wage pressure has been

occurring in high tech industries, including many at the cutting edge of the

New Economy." [http://www.cisp.org/imp/september_2000/09_00tonelson.htm]

Will the Internet Promote Democracy? John Daly. "Thirty-five years of

international work have convinced me that nominal 'democracies' vary greatly

in the rights and powers they afford their citizens. In the global arena,

strong democracies are rare; their strength is the result of generations

spent building strong democratic values and institutions."

[http://www.cisp.org/imp/september_2000/daly/09_00daly.htm]

Fostering Competition from the Bottom-Up. Erik Pages goes back-to-basics in

the New Economy.

[http://www.cisp.org/imp/september_2000/09_00pages-insight.htm]

Asking the Right Questions about the Internet. Rob Kling looks at the

"social embeddedness and configurability"; of IT and asks what they mean for

policy analysis.

[http://www.cisp.org/imp/september_2000/09_00kling-insight.htm]

Leslie A. Kelly writes to iMP concerning Kelly v. Arriba Soft, Inc.

[http://www.cisp.org/imp/september_2000/09_00kelly-insight.htm]

 

Of more general interest are our columns, What's Happening and Calendar, in

which we identify new reports, journals, funding opportunities, upcoming

conferences and developments on the Hill and in the courts.

If you no longer wish to continue to receive notices of each new release,

please let us know via the subscribe page at the site

[http://www.cisp.org/imp or

http://www.cisp.org/imp/september_2000/subscribe.html] or by replying to

this message. We apologize for any cross-postings or multiple mailings that

you may have received. We encourage you to forward this notice to others who

may be interested in iMP. Joining our subscription list only provides you

with notices of new iMP releases (10 per year). Information provided to us

will neither be given, shared nor sold for use by any third parties. We

encourage you to review our terms and conditions statement, which includes

our policy on privacy.

We will return in October (October 23, 2000) with an issue devoted to the

e-government: What is Civic Life on the Web? What needs to happen for

government services to migrate to the Web and what happens when it does? Is

it government 24x7 for all? For a few? Does IT mean more government or more

voice in the process?

Welcome back from your summer holidays. It's fall in Washington; there's an

edge to the air, and iMP's on the move.

Amy Friedlander

Editor, iMP Magazine

October 22, 2000

************************************

November 2000  issue

 

[Forwarded. DIck Hill] - asis-l 28 November 2000

 

The November issue of iMP: The Magazine on Information Impacts, which is

published on the Web by the Center for Information Strategy and Policy

(CISP) of Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), has been

posted. You can find the magazine at:

http://www.cisp.org/ [follow "visit imp"] or

http://www.cisp.org/imp/ or

http://www.cisp.org/imp/november_2000/11_00contents.htm

In this issue, we are featuring stories and editorials about how we count,

measure and evaluate: "Counting on the Web?"

So much of modern life presumes quantification: How big? How fast? How

often? How much? How many? Is there really safety in numbers? Editorial

[http://www.cisp.org/imp/november_2000/11_00editorial.htm]

What Counts on the Net? Frameworks and Issues in Measuring the Internet.

Larry Press. "Communication policy is social policy, and effective policy

makers require accurate information as to where we stand and where we are

heading. One aspect of this is an understanding of the global diffusion of

the Internet [http://www.cisp.org/imp/november_2000/press/11_00press.htm]

Internet Growth: Myth and Reality, Use and Abuse. Andrew Odlyzko. Actual

Internet traffic growth rates of 100 percent per year are considerably less

than the much-ballyhooed doubling every 3 or 4 months. But even these

observed rates are still unprecedented and should be provoking new ways of

planning. [http://www.cisp.org/imp/november_2000/odlyzko/11_00odlyzko.htm]

How Big Is the Information Explosion? Peter Lyman and Hal R. Varian. "We

have all had the sensation of drowning in a sea of information -- the

challenge we face is to learn to swim in that sea, rather than drown in it."

[http://www.cisp.org/imp/november_2000/11_00lyman.htm]

Public Opinion on the Web: Confusion, Chaos and Fabulous Pie Charts.

Josephine Ferrigno-Stack."Most political Web site producers have realized

that the best chunk of information these sites can provide is to let us, the

"individual," know what we, the "people" are thinking about any number of

political questions. Problems arise with the exponential growth of shoddy

online poll taking and careless poll reporting

[http://www.cisp.org/imp/november_2000/11_00ferrigno-stack.htm]

How Much did Harry Potter Cost? H. Scott Matthews, Chris T. Hendrickson and

Lester Lave. "While Harry Potter cannot be branded as the primary

contributor to global climate change, the net effect of current e-commerce

systems remains unclear, and consumers seem unaware of the trade-offs."

[http://www.cisp.org/imp/november_2000/11_00matthews.htm]

By the Numbers: Musings about Numerical Challenges in the Information Age.

Shane Greenstein reflects on the meaning of numbers.

[http://www.cisp.org/imp/november_2000/11_00greenstein-insight.htm]

Economics and the Internet -- A Cynic's View. A veteran of government

service, Ron Marks asks a few elementary questions about the economics of

the Net. [http://www.cisp.org/imp/november_2000/11_00marks-insight.htm]

But Can We Count on It? Marjory S. Blumenthal talks about love, trust and

the Internet.

[http://www.cisp.org/imp/november_2000/11_00blumenthal-insight.htm]

Of more general interest are our columns, "What's Happening" and "Calendar",

in which we identify new reports, journals, funding opportunities, upcoming

conferences and developments on the Hill and in the courts.

If you no longer wish to continue to receive notices of each new release,

please let us know via the subscribe page at the site

[http://www.cisp.org/imp/november_2000/subscribe.html] or by replying to

this message. We apologize for any cross-postings or multiple mailings that

you may have received.

We encourage you to forward this notice to others who may be interested in

iMP.

Joining our subscription list only provides you with notices of new iMP

releases (10 per year). Information provided to us will neither be given,

shared, nor sold for use by any third parties. We encourage you to review

our terms and conditions statement, which includes our policy on privacy.

We will leave the November 2000 issue in place through the end of the year

and will return in January 2001 with an issue on science fiction and

visions: "I've Seen the Future and a Writer Saw It First." Perhaps a bit

irreverent but iMP thinks it's okay to greet the new year with a smile. Our

publisher Jeff Cooper and the others on the iMP team join me in wishing all

of you the best of the holiday season. Stay warm, stay dry, stay well and

come back and see us next year.

Amy Friedlander

Editor, iMP Magazine

November 22, 2000

 

 

 

Executive Director

American Society for Information Science and Technology

(as of Sept 27, 2000)

1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510

Silver Spring, MD 20910

FAX: (301) 495-0810

PHONE: (301) 495-0900

http://www.asis.org

*************************************************************

Information Research     (Volume 6 no. 1 October 2000) 

 

Messages to jESSE: [reply, or jESSE@listserv.utk.edu] - 16 October 2000

to Moderator: [gwhitney@utk.edu]

to Sender: [take e-mail address from message below]

Info on jESSE: [http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/jesse.html]

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The latest issue of Information Research (Volume 6 no. 1 October 2000) is

now available at:

http://www.shef.ac.uk/~is/publications/infres/ircont.html

This is a special issue on Web research, edited by Dr. Amanda Spink and Dr.

Dietmar Wolfram containing,

Use of historical documents in a digital world: comparisons with original

materials and microfiche, by Wendy M. Duff and Joan M. Cherry, University of

Toronto, Canada

A bibliometric analysis of select information science print and electronic

journals in the 1990s, by Wallace Koehler and others, University of

Oklahoma, USA

Designing internet research assignments: building a framework for

instructor collaboration, by David Ward and Sarah Reisinger, University of

Illinois, USA.

Selected results from a large study of Web searching: the Excite study, by

Amanda Spink and Jack L. Xu

The effect of query complexity on Web searching results, by Bernard J.

Jansen, University of Maryland (Asian Division), Seoul, Korea.

Making sense of the web: a metaphorical approach, by Lee Ratzan, Rutgers

University, New Jersey, USA

Maintaining Web cache coherency, by Adam Belloum & Bob Hertzberger,

University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

There is also a new review of books on digital libraries.

Enjoy the issue,

Tom Wilson

Publisher and Editor in Chief

Information Research

 

*************************************************************

Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, Winter 2001 issue

From: Andrea Duda [mailto:duda@LIBRARY.UCSB.EDU]

Sent: Thursday, 1 March 2001 5:37 AM

To: PACS-L@LISTSERV.UH.EDU

Subject: ISTL: Winter 2001 issue available

 

The Winter 2001 issue of Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship is

now available at

http://www.istl.org/

This issue focuses on new initiatives for science and technology

librarians.

CONTENTS:

ARTICLES -

* CrossRef: A Collaborative Linking Network

by Ed Pentz, CrossRef

* science.gov - A Physical Sciences Information Infrastructure

by Walter L. Warnick, U.S. Department of Energy

* E-Prints Intersect the Digital Library: Inside the Los Alamos arXiv

by Richard E. Luce, Los Alamos National Laboratory

REFEREED ARTICLES -

* Web Sites of Science-Engineering Libraries: An Analysis of Content

and Design

by Nestor L. Osorio, Northern Illinois University

BOOK REVIEWS -

* Library Handbook for Organic Chemists by Andrew J. Poss

Reviewed by David Flaxbart, University of Texas, Austin

* Web of Knowledge: A Festschrift in Honor of Eugene Garfield edited

by Blaise Cronin and Helen Barsky Atkins

Reviewed by Jane Duffy, The Ohio State University

* The Social Life of Information by John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid

Reviewed by Lea Wade, University of New Orleans

* From Gutenberg to the Global Information Infrastructure by

Christine L. Borgman

Reviewed by Veronica Calderhead, Rutgers University

DATABASE REVIEWS & REPORTS -

* Research Index

Reviewed by Melissa Holmberg, Minnesota State University, Mankato

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES ON THE INTERNET -

* There Is Such a Thing as a Free Lunch: Freely Accessible Databases

for the Public

by Sandy Lewis, University of California, Santa Barbara

CONFERENCE REPORTS -

* STS General Discussion Group, ALA Midwinter Conference

by Bryna Coonin, East Carolina University and Kim Lyons-Mitchell,

University of the Pacific

* Heads of Science & Technology Libraries Discussion Group, ALA

Midwinter Conference

by Laura Lane, Temple University and Don Frank, Portland State

University

===========================================================

Andrea L. Duda

Sciences Collections Coordinator

Davidson Library, University of California, Santa Barbara

E-mail: duda@library.ucsb.edu

===========================================================

**************************************************************

Journal of the American Society for Information Science

(JASIS)

 

Volume 51, Number 13

 

 

Messages to jESSE: [reply, or jESSE@listserv.utk.edu] - 11 October 2000

to Moderator: [gwhitney@utk.edu]

to Sender: [take e-mail address from message below]

Info on jESSE: [http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/jesse.html]

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Journal of the American Society for Information Science

Volume 51, Number 13

[Note: At the bottom are URLs for viewing contents of JASIS from past

issues. The contents of Bert Boyce's "In This Issue" has been cut into the

Table of Contents below. This table of Contents includes a new feature.

You will note that entries include a new item, "Published online 6 July

2000" after the page number. This refers to Wiley's "Early View" feature,

posting articles as soon as they are approved. ASIS members who wish

electronic access but didn't so elect can contact asis@asis.org]

EDITORIAL

In This Issue

Bert R. Boyce

1157

RESEARCH

Web-Based Analyses of E-journal Impact: Approaches, Problems, and Issues

Stephen P. Harter and Charlotte E. Ford

Published online 5 September 2000

1159

We begin with a look by Harter and Ford at the similarity and

differences between citation in scholarly papers and hyper-linking in

scholarly electronic journal articles. Using the 39 e-journals of Harter's

previous study of impact of e-journals, less those that required

subscription or were defunct, impact was measured through back-links.

E-journals exist at more than one location, in multiple formats, and have

multiple URLs. There is no clear way to gather all possibilities. Thus one

link search per e-journal was conducted using only the http// format, and

choosing the URL listed in the most directories. Because of the normal

hierarchical directory structure of the sites, a single truncated URL

brings in all links to the home page, the articles, and perhaps associated

files. In the cases where a hierarchical directory structure did not occur

a second search at the chief articles site was carried out. Three engines

provided the link search capability; AltaVista, which was very inconsistent

in day to day figures, HotBot, which did not provide the needed truncation

capability, and Infoseek, which produced only half the hits of the other

two. However, the three ranked the journals in a very similar fashion, with

high correlation, and so Infoseek was chosen for its consistency. Saved

search results were concatenated into a file for each of the 39 e-journals

with up to 500 URLs in each. Using Grab-a-Site the web pages associated

with these URLs were collected. Pearl programs computed the total number of

back-links, the number to different parts of the e-journal site, and the

numbers generated internally and externally. Self links are quite high at

about 50%; only one in 20 links are to external e-journal articles. Total

external back-links correlate strongly with back-links to external

articles. There appears to be no correlation between citation ranking of

e-journals and back-link ranking. File types linked to e-journals are very

diverse.

 

Predicting the Effectiveness of Naive Data Fusion on the Basis of

System Characteristics

Kwong Bor Ng and Paul B. Kantor

Published online 5 September 2000

1177

In system level data fusion, the retrieval status values assigned by

multiple systems are combined to improve overall performance. Ng and Kantor

test fusion against the standard of an ``oracle'' choice of system made

before search. The measure used, r, is based upon p100, which is the

cumulated number of relevant documents retrieved prior to reaching the

one-hundred-and-first position in a ranked list, divided by 100. The

measure r is the p100 of the poorer scheme over the p100 of the better

scheme. Retrieval scheme similarities are characterized by a measure z

based on the number of pairs of documents placed in different order by each

of two schemes. Measuring the effectiveness of a procedure for predicting

the effectiveness of data fusion requires the use of the ``Receiver

Operating Characteristic, ROC, a plot of the correctly predicted effective

cases as a function of ineffective cases predicted to be effective.

Output lists for TREC4 were used for training and TREC5 for testing.

The ordering of the

fused list is determined by the sum of the normalized relevance scores.

When fusion gives better performance the cases are generally above the z +

r = 1 line and concentrated on the right side indicating that dissimilar

outputs with comparable performance lead to effective fusion. Curves

generated by logistic regression were used to generate classification

scores to create ROC curves. With a detection rate below 75% predictive

power is far better than random. A non-parametric method ranking the data

after splitting it into 100 bins yields a more powerful ROC curve on the

training data, but has less power on the test data.

Bibliometric Information Retrieval System (BIRS): A Web Search

Interface Utilizing Bibliometric Research Results

Ying Ding, Gobinda G. Chowdhury, Schubert Foo, and Weizhong Qian

Published online 8 September 2000

1190

BIRS, (Bibliometric Information Retrieval System) provides Web based

co-author, co-citation, and similar keyword maps which can be used to

generate query terms for ten search engines accessible through a common

interface. The maps, created by Ding et alia, are structured from a ten

year database of library and information science literature and layered as

to level of detail. Thirty-five students chose one of six topics provided

and searched in their choice of search engine. The top 20 hits were then

classed as relevant or not relevant. The subjects then used BIRS to expand

their query information and searched the same engine again. They were then

asked to compare the results and comment on BIRS. Eighty percent reported

an improved understanding of the subject area, seventy seven percent agreed

the BIRS was a help in query construction with 91% using the keyword

facility. Actual variations in relevant and retrieved documents are not

reported.

Shape Recovery: A Visual Method for Evaluation of Information Retrieval

Experiments

Mark Rorvig and Steven Fitzpatrick

Published online 7 September 2000

1205

Rorvig and Fitzpatrick form a document similarity matrix and use

multidimensional scaling to create a set of Cartesian points for visual

evaluation of retrieval performance. The distance from the centroid

document in each cluster to each document, up to one standard deviation of

the mean of all these distances, is then computed, for correlation with

control clusters, and the test and control clusters are displayed. Using

full text from five topic document sets from NIST TREC as control, and 50

and 200 term vectors from a local dictionary with and without stemming as

the four treatments, both visual and correlation comparisons are made. High

apparent shape distortion agrees with low correlation and vice versa.

Stemming has the biggest positive effect when the most distortion is

apparent. The application of categories moves far more non-relevant

documents to the extremities of the visual field than it does relevant

documents. Stemming brings the visual display back closer to the control

but brings back many non-relevant documents.

Empirical Studies of End-User Information Searching

A.G. Sutcliffe, M. Ennis, and S.J. Watkinson

Published online 8 September 2000

1211

Sutcliffe, et alia, using 17 medical students as subjects, searched 4

topics on MEDLINE using WinSPIRS. Subjects notes, search strategies and

search history were recorded and their actions and aloud thoughts subjected

to video and audio recording. Recall made use of a standard relevant set;

chosen by experts from a union of subject outputs; precision was defined as

both subject relevant and independent judge relevant over subject relevant

documents. Average recall was 14%. Novices significantly out-performed more

experienced searchers on one question but other differences were not

significant. More experienced searchers had significantly similar ranking

orders of the queries for recall, novices seemed to find all questions

equally difficult. No differences were apparent for precision. There were

no significant differences in retrieval times or evaluation times overall

but some questions indicated differences. Evaluation time was positively

correlated with query complexity. More experienced searchers used more

query iterations and used broadening and narrowing strategies while novices

favored trial and error. Novice searchers used only the AND operator. These

results are seen as indicating the failure of current user interfaces to

assist the searcher.

Success, a Structured Search Strategy: Rationale, Principles, and

Implications

Chaim Zins

Published online 11 September 2000

1232

Zins evaluates a procedure which he has given the name "Success," and

which involves determining the problem, locating the resources to search,

defining the search terms, and executing the search. Three rounds of

structured questionnaires were sent to 15 information specialists in a

typical Delphi approach in an attempt to analyze the strategy's principles

and rationale, review its guidelines, forms and tables, and discuss its

implications for user instruction. There was disagreement on the need for

subject expertise, agreement that both systematic thinking and creativity

were required. A need for a fifth phase, evaluation came forward, as did

the need for a methodology selection guideline and a post evaluation

reiteration guideline. The five phases were considered indispensable, but

sometimes performed using remembered information and thus not observable.

BOOK REVIEW

Books, Bytes, and Bridges: Libraries and Computer Centers in Academic

Institutions, edited by Larry Hardesty

P. Scott Lapinski

Published online 11 September 2000

1248

CALL FOR PAPERS

1250

------------------------------------------------------

The ASIS home page <http://www.asis.org/Publications/JASIS/tocs.html>

contains the Table of Contents and brief abstracts as above from January

1993 (Volume 44) to date.

The John Wiley Interscience site <http://www.interscience.wiley.com>

includes issues from 1986 (Volume 37) to date.

 

Executive Director

American Society for Information Science and Technology

(as of Sept 27, 2000)

1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510

Silver Spring, MD 20910

FAX: (301) 495-0810

PHONE: (301) 495-0900

http://www.asis.org/

******************************************

 

Call for Papers

Special Topic Issue of JASIS

Web Research

 

[jesse, 28 September 2000]

 

The next Special Topics Issue of the Journal of the American Society for

Information Science (JASIS) is scheduled to come out in late 2001 on the

topic of Web Research. The guest editor for this special issue will be

Amanda Spink of The Pennsylvania State University.

The growth of the World Wide Web and the explosion of Web search engines

and Web sites have broadened the scope of information science research

to include technical and cognitive aspects of human information seeking

and searching on the Web. Web research for information scientists covers

everything from systems design to user behavior. Researchers are

developing and testing new Web tools, as well as beginning to map Web

size and volatility, and model users' interactions with the Web to

improve Web-based retrieval. Many challenges that have faced information

science researchers since the 1950's, such as information overload, and

effective information organization and retrieval, are in sharper focus

on the Web. The Web also provides a growing and large user base for

information science research and experimentation. This issue of JASIS

seeks papers addressing significant research questions on the nature and

problems of Web user behavior and systems design.

Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the

following:

Web user modeling

Web metrics

Web IR

Web systems design

Web tools

Evaluation of Web systems

Web organizing schemas

Other related topics in this area

The guest editor seeks papers that discuss research in the broad

interdisciplinary area of Web Research. Inquiries can be made to the

guest editor at spink@ist.psu.edu.

Manuscript submissions (four copies of full articles) should be

addressed to:

Dr. Amanda Spink

School of Information Sciences and Technology

The Pennsylvania State University

511 Rider I Building, 120 S. Burrowes St.

University Park, PA 16801

(814) 865-4454 Voice

(814) 865-5604 Fax

spink@ist.psu.edu

The deadline for accepting manuscripts for consideration for publication

in this special issue is April 1, 2001. A select panel of referees will

review all manuscripts, and those accepted will be published in a

special issue of JASIS. Original artwork and a signed copy of the

copyright release form will be required or all accepted papers.

A copy of the call for papers will be available on the World Wide Web as

is further information about JASIS, at http://www.asis.org/.

 

*******************************************

Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology

(JASIS&T)

 

Call for Submissions

 

[asis-l, 20 Feb 2001]

 

Perspectives on Music Information Retrieval:

Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology

(JASIS&T)

Guest Editor, J. Stephen Downie <jdownie@uiuc.edu>

 

Introduction:

The Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology

(JASIS&T) is publishing a special Perspectives issue devoted to Music

Information Retrieval (MIR) research. There is a growing number of MIR

research projects currently be undertaken , each with its own motivations,

philosophies, techniques, and results. Up to now, MIR research teams have

published in a wide range of scholarly, professional, and conference

venues. This has made it difficult for those interested in MIR research

to gain an understanding of the "big picture". Thus, the time has come to

gather together an introductory compilation that outlines the central

trends and highlights the major differences in present-day MIR research

and development. Once brought together, this compilation will provide

readers with a deeper and more comprehensive perspective on the

fast-growing field of MIR research.

Nature of Articles:

As guest editor for this Perspectives issue, I would like to see the

volume provide readers with 5 to 7 article-length *overviews* to ongoing

MIR research projects. The keyword here is "overview". I am not looking

for highly focussed papers the report upon the findings of single

experiment. Ideally, should you ever get asked the question, "What is

your project all about?" you should be able to say, "Take a look at our

Perspectives article, it is all outlined there." To this end, each project

overview should cover the following points:

 

** Motivation

** Vision (i.e., in an ideal world, what is your ideal MIR

system?)

** Intermediate and long-term goals (i.e., the pragmatic goals)

** Backgrounds of Researchers (i.e., Musicologists, Computer Scientists,

levels of music background, etc.)

** Research paradigm (s) (e.g., Audio Engineering, Computer Science, IR,

LIS,etc.)

** Source, and justification, of retrieval methods used (i.e., traditional

IR, audio retrieval, string matching, etc.)

** Project history or timeline

** Indicators of success/failure (i.e., evaluation metrics)

** Commonalities with, and distinctions from, other MIR projects

** Test collection(s) (i.e., size, source, genres, media, etc.)

** Nature of music representation (e.g., audio, MIDI, notational code,

etc.)

** Nature of intended user group(s)

** Interface features

** Summary of key findings

** Important stumbling blocks encountered

** Suggestions to others interested in taking on an MIR project

** References to project papers

Tentative Timeline:

1. 30 March 2001--Submission of Intent:

Please submit an intention to participate to jdownie@uiuc.edu . Please

include in your submission:

A. Contact information for principal author

B. Based upon the points covered above, a point-form and/or a

*short* sentence outline of your project overview

2. 15 April 2001--Selection of Project Overviews and Notification to

Proceed

3. 15 June 2001--Submission of Articles

Information about the Journal of the American Society for Information

Science and Technology (JASIS&T) can be found at: http://www.asis.org and

http://www.asis.org/Publications/JASIS/

 

------- End of forwarded message -------

**********************************************************

"Research funding makes the world a better place"

**********************************************************

J. Stephen Downie, PhD

Assistant Professor,

Graduate School of Library and Information Science; and,

Fellow, National Center for Supercomputing Applications (2000-01)

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

(217) 351-5037

 

*******************************************************************

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research_ (JAIR)

 

This weekend in reviewing the functionality of the _Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research_ (JAIR) - an international electronic and print journal [ http://www.jair.org/] - I discovered that it provides a most *remarkable* index to its articles in what is called an "Information Space"

[ http://www.infoarch.ai.mit.edu/jair/jair-space.html ] .

The Information Space is an applet that is automatically loaded upon visiting the address. The address

[ http://www.infoarch.ai.mit.edu/jair/jair-space.html ]

also provides a description and details on navigating the contents of JAIR.

Here's a textual description of the Information Space

QUOTE

An information space is a type of information design in which representations of information objects are situated in a principled space. In a principled space location and direction have meaning, so that mapping and navigation become possible.

Applying this terminology to this information space, we have yellow squares representing JAIR articles (the information objects) arranged according to two hierarchically constructed principles: first, the squares are within circles reflecting their categorization; and second, the circles are arranged so that categories which are more similar are closer together. The metric used to determine pairwise similarity is the number of articles judged to be appropriate for both categories, although only one category is assigned each article for the visualization. The visualization behaves as information map, providing a survey view of the relationships between articles as derived

from the category assignment.

UNQUOTE

A page describing the design rationale for this information space [AN INFORMATION SPACE DESIGN RATIONALE] by Mark A. Foltz, the Information Space developer' is available

[ http://www.infoarch.ai.mit.edu/jair/jair-space.html ] .

In addition, Foltz's *outstanding* Master's thesis _Designing Navigable Information Spaces_ (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, May 1998)

[ http://www.infoarch.ai.mit.edu/publications/mfoltz-thesis/thesis.html]

provides additional details and graphics about the JAIR project and its Information Space

[ http://www.infoarch.ai.mit.edu/publications/mfoltz-thesis/node10.html]

The Information Space was designed by the Information Architecture project [ http://www.infoarch.ai.mit.edu/ ] at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory [ http://www.ai.mit.edu/ ]. "The Information Architecture project seeks to create information spaces, where people will use this awareness to search, browse, and learn. In the same way that they navigate in the physical environment, they will navigate through knowledge."

[For any who have attended any of my recent conference presentation, this

Information Space implementation is a realization of what I have advocated for the past few years! [YES!]

Words can not adequately describe the Information Space for JAIR; only the experience can convey the true value and impact on this novel index.!

[IMHO: If there's one site that you visit after you dig out from your holiday backlog this is it!]

I am greatly interested in learning about Any and All other innovative access methods to E-journal content, similar or different than the Information Space.

As Always, Any and All contributions, questions, critiques, comments, queries, transition teams, cosmic insights, etc. are Most Welcome.

/Gerry McKiernan

Spaced Librarian

Iowa State University

Ames IA 50011

gerrymck@iastate.edu

"The Best Way to Predict the Future is to Invent It!"

Alan Kay

 

*******************************************************************

Journal of Southern Academic and Special Librarianship (JSASL)

 

Announcement and Call for Papers

 

Messages to jESSE: [reply, or jESSE@listserv.utk.edu] - 20 October 2000

to Moderator: [gwhitney@utk.edu]

to Sender: [take e-mail address from message below]

Info on jESSE: [http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/jesse.html]

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The current issue of The Journal of Southern Academic and Special Librarianship (JSASL) is now available on the World Wide Web at:

http://southernlibrarianship.icaap.org

The Journal of Southern Academic and Special Librarianship is an independent, professional, refereed electronic journal dedicated to advancing knowledge and research in the areas of academic and special librarianship. JSASL is distributed by the International Consortium for Alternative Academic Publication (ICAAP) in Athabasca, Alberta, Canada <http://www.icaap.org>.

The October 2000 issue contains:

"The Americans with Disabilities Act Compliance and Academic Libraries in the Southeastern United States " by Linda Lou Wiler and Eleanor Lomax of the Florida Atlantic University Libraries

"NORDINFO: Research and Academic Library Cooperation Across National Borders" by Sigrún Klara Hannesdóttir, Director of NORDINFO, Helsinki, Finland

"Undergraduate Full-Text Databases: Bell and Howell Medical Complete and InfoTrac Health Reference Center - Academic" by Lutishoor Salisbury, Bryan Davidson and Alberta Bailey of the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville

"A Survey of Four Libraries in Kunming: Library Automation and Modernization in a Far Removed Province in China" by Jianli Li of Kunming Institute of Zoology, Yunnan, China and Mary Frances Marx of Southeastern Louisiana University.

 

Call for Papers

The Journal of Southern Academic and Special Librarianship is looking for manuscripts for possible publication in the future. Guidelines for publication in JSASL are located at http://southernlibrarianship.icaap.org/accept.htm

 

 

 

*******************************************************************

 Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography, Version 35

[asis-l, 20 Feb 2001]

Version 35 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

is now available. This selective bibliography presents over

1,290 articles, books, electronic documents, and other sources

that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing

efforts on the Internet and other networks.

HTML: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html

Acrobat: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf

Word 97: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.doc

The HTML document is designed for interactive use. Each

major section is a separate file. There are live links to

sources available on the Internet. It can be can be searched using

Boolean operators.

The Acrobat and Word files are designed for printing. The printed

bibliography is over 100 pages long. The Acrobat file is over

330 KB and the Word file is over 400 KB.

The bibliography has the following sections (revised sections are

marked with an asterisk):

Table of Contents

1 Economic Issues*

2 Electronic Books and Texts

2.1 Case Studies and History*

2.2 General Works*

2.3 Library Issues*

3 Electronic Serials

3.1 Case Studies and History*

3.2 Critiques

3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals*

3.4 General Works*

3.5 Library Issues*

3.6 Research*

4 General Works*

5 Legal Issues

5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*

5.2 License Agreements*

5.3 Other Legal Issues*

6 Library Issues

6.1 Cataloging, Identifiers, and Metadata*

6.2 Digital Libraries*

6.3 General Works*

6.4 Information Conversion, Integrity, and Preservation*

7 New Publishing Models*

8 Publisher Issues*

8.1 Electronic Commerce/Copyright Systems

Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author

Appendix B. About the Author

The HTML document also includes Scholarly Electronic Publishing

Resources, a collection of links to related Web sites:

http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepr.htm

The resources directory includes the following sections:

Cataloging, Classification, and Metadata

Digital Libraries

Electronic Books and Texts

Electronic Serials

General Electronic Publishing

Images

Legal

Preprints

Preservation

Publishers

SGML and Related Standards

 

**********************************************

 

Version 34

 

Messages to jESSE: [reply, or jESSE@listserv.utk.edu]

to Moderator: [gwhitney@utk.edu]

to Sender: [take e-mail address from message below]

Info on jESSE: [http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/jesse.html]

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Version 34 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

is now available. This selective bibliography presents over

1,250 articles, books, electronic documents, and other sources

that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing

efforts on the Internet and other networks.

HTML: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>

Acrobat: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf>

Word 97: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.doc>

The HTML document is designed for interactive use. Each

major section is a separate file. There are live links to

sources available on the Internet. It can be can be searched using

Boolean operators.

The Acrobat and Word files are designed for printing. The printed

bibliography is over 100 pages long. The Acrobat file is over

330 KB and the Word file is over 400 KB.

The bibliography has the following sections (revised sections are

marked with an asterisk):

Table of Contents

1 Economic Issues*

2 Electronic Books and Texts

2.1 Case Studies and History*

2.2 General Works*

2.3 Library Issues*

3 Electronic Serials

3.1 Case Studies and History*

3.2 Critiques*

3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals*

3.4 General Works*

3.5 Library Issues*

3.6 Research*

4 General Works*

5 Legal Issues

5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*

5.2 License Agreements*

5.3 Other Legal Issues*

6 Library Issues

6.1 Cataloging, Identifiers, and Metadata*

6.2 Digital Libraries*

6.3 General Works*

6.4 Information Conversion, Integrity, and Preservation*

7 New Publishing Models*

8 Publisher Issues*

8.1 Electronic Commerce/Copyright Systems*

Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author

Appendix B. About the Author

The HTML document also includes Scholarly Electronic Publishing

Resources, a collection of links to related Web sites:

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepr.htm>

The resources directory includes the following sections:

Cataloging, Classification, and Metadata

Digital Libraries

Electronic Books and Texts

Electronic Serials

General Electronic Publishing

Images

Legal

Preprints

Preservation

Publishers

SGML and Related Standards

 

Version 33

 

Messages to jESSE: [reply, or jESSE@listserv.utk.edu]- 7 October 2000

to Moderator: [gwhitney@utk.edu]

to Sender: [take e-mail address from message below]

Info on jESSE: [http://web.utk.edu/~gwhitney/jesse.html]

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Version 33 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

is now available. This selective bibliography presents over

1,220 articles, books, electronic documents, and other sources

that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing

efforts on the Internet and other networks.

HTML: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>

Acrobat: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf>

Word 97: <URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.doc>

The HTML document is designed for interactive use. Each

major section is a separate file. There are live links to

sources available on the Internet. It can be can be searched using

Boolean operators.

The HTML document also includes Scholarly Electronic Publishing

Resources, a collection of links to related Web sites:

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepr.htm>

The Acrobat and Word files are designed for printing. The Acrobat

file is over 320 KB and the Word file is over 370 KB.

(Revised sections in this version are marked with an asterisk.)

Table of Contents

1 Economic Issues*

2 Electronic Books and Texts

2.1 Case Studies and History*

2.2 General Works*

2.3 Library Issues*

3 Electronic Serials

3.1 Case Studies and History*

3.2 Critiques

3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals*

3.4 General Works*

3.5 Library Issues

3.6 Research*

4 General Works*

5 Legal Issues

5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*

5.2 License Agreements*

5.3 Other Legal Issues

6 Library Issues

6.1 Cataloging, Identifiers, and Metadata*

6.2 Digital Libraries*

6.3 General Works*

6.4 Information Conversion, Integrity, and Preservation*

7 New Publishing Models*

8 Publisher Issues*

8.1 Electronic Commerce/Copyright Systems*

Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author

Appendix B. About the Author

Best Regards,

Charles

Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Assistant Dean for Systems,

University Libraries, University of Houston, Houston, TX

77204-2091. E-mail: cbailey@uh.edu. Voice: (713) 743-9804.

Fax: (713) 743-9811.

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm>

<URL:http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html>

 

 

Best Regards,

Charles

Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Assistant Dean for Systems,

University Libraries, University of Houston, Houston, TX

77204-2091. E-mail: cbailey@uh.edu. Voice: (713) 743-9804.

Fax: (713) 743-9811. http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm

 

*******************************************************************************

 

Virtual E-Journals

[asis-l 27 November 2000]

I am greatly interested in identifying additional 'Virtual' electronic journals.

A 'Virtual Journal' may be described as an electronic journal in a specific subject discipline that is composed of relevant articles selected from other electronic journals.

Two virtual journals of which I am aware are

Virtual Journal of Biological Physics Research

[ http://www.vjbio.org/ ]

and

Virtual Journal of Nanoscale Science & Technology

[ http://www.vjnano.org/ ]

which were launched in January 2000 by the American Institute of Physics (AIP) and the American Physical Society (APS).

Each of the virtual journals presents an online collection of relevant papers from a broad range of "source" journals in the physical sciences.

 

As noted in a press release

[ http://www.aip.org/press_release/vj_release.html ]

These virtual journals are "online journals that ... collect relevant papers from a broad range of physical science journals, including all journals published by APS and AIP and selected journals from participating publishers on AIP's Online Journal Publishing Service (OJPS). From the user's perspective, the virtual journals ... look and feel like "real"

journals, providing browsable Tables of Contents and freely available abstracts, with links to full-text articles in the source

journals. Subscribers to the source journal will be able to seamlessly access the full-text articles, while non-subscribers will

have the option to purchase articles for immediate online delivery."

"Virtual journals ... provide users with quick, convenient access to information in cutting-edge fields," according to Martin

Blume, Editor-in-Chief at the American Physical Society. "Gathering into one spot all the papers on a given topic that appear

in a wide range of premier physics-related journals ... help specialists keep abreast of the latest developments, not only with

title 'alerts' but with abstracts and full-text articles."

Participating source journals include all journals published by APS and AIP, journals from participating publishers on AIP's Online Journal Publishing

Service (OJPS), and as of August 2000 _Science_ magazine

[ http://ojps.aip.org/jhtml/vjs/partpub.html].

As Always, Any and All additional candidate ''Virtual Journals' would be most welcome, including any that are currently under consideration or development.

[I'd also be interested in the titles of current or former

'Anthologized' print journals that consist/consisted of articles reprinted/republished from other print journals] [Any citations about this publishing phenomenon - either in print or electronic - would be of great interest!]

/Gerry McKiernan

Anthologized Librarian

Iowa State University

Ames IA 50011

gerrymck@iastate.edu

***************************************************************************************

 

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