NEWS FROM OTHER JOURNALS SECTION

SEPTEMBER 2002 ISSUE

 Editorial note:

This section contains items culled from various Internet news services, discussion lists and other announcements.  Unless specifically noted, I have not visited the sites, used any of the software, reviewed the literature, or written the news items.  I present this digest to you in good faith but cannot vouch for the accuracy of its content.  

Kerry Smith

***************************************************************

Academic Exchange Quarterly 

Call for papers

Mariana Regalado [Regalado@BROOKLYN.CUNY.EDUJESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU 

16 July 2002       Publishing opportunity

ou are invited to submit proposed articles for a special issue of

Academic Exchange Quarterly entitled "The Many Faces of Information

Competence." The issue is co-edited by Michael Adams of the City

University of New York Graduate Center and Mariana Regalado of Brooklyn

College.

Academic librarians are increasingly instructing targeted groups

within the academic environment. Such groups include freshman learning

communities, international students, graduate students, and faculty. Each

of these groups is far from homogenous because of the diversity of their

expectations of libraries and their information-seeking experiences. Even

into the twenty-first century, many faculty members, for example, are

reluctant to use electronic resources.

How can we develop instruction programs that will address the shared

needs of such groups and the diverse needs of individuals? What assessment

tools are available to measure the success of such programs? How can we

identify constituencies being underserved?

Manuscripts are sought that describe successful (and even

unsuccessful) approaches to information literacy for targeted groups

and/or diverse populations in higher education. Manuscripts are also

sought that report on quantitative or qualitative evaluations of the

impact of information literacy programs, courses, and components of

courses. A wide variety of approaches to this topic are sought.

Academic Exchange Quarterly is a scholarly journal fostering

education, career growth, and personal development for college and

university faculty. Its current issue deals with "The Scholarship of

Teaching and Learning," and recent issues have focused on such topics as

assessment of academics, services, and administration and student

perceptions, beliefs, and attitudes. Over 23,000 institutions and

individuals subscribe to the print edition of Academic Exchange Quarterly,

and it is available electronically from Expanded Academic ASAP and

InfoTrac OneFile. Scholars from 263 colleges and universities in 44

states and 22 foreign countries have published in the journal.

Additional information is available at

http://rapidintellect.com/AEQweb/fall03.htm.

Submit proposals to Michael Adams at madams@gc.cuny.edu. The

manuscript deadline will be May 2003.

Please share this message with any librarians or faculty members who

may be interested.

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Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science

Heidi Julien [Heidi.Julien@UALBERTA.CA]   JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU 3 April 2002

New CJILS Editor

New Editor Appointed for Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science

The Canadian Association for Information Science/L'association canadienne des sciences de l'information (CAIS/ACSI) is pleased to announce that Dr. Lynne McKechnie has been appointed as the new editor for the Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science/ La Revue canadienne des sciences de l'information et de bibliothéconomie. This internationally-recognized peer-reviewed journal is published quarterly. Its purpose is to contribute to the advancement of information and library science in Canada.

Dr. McKechnie is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Information and Media Studies at the University of Western Ontario. She teaches and does research in the areas of library services and literature for children and young adults, public libraries, research methods and everyday information behaviour. Dr. McKechnie was co-winner of the 1997 Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE) Award for the best dissertation in library and information science, co-winner of the Liberati Club Award for the most outstanding paper published in 2000 in Collection Building and received a University Student Council Teaching Honour Roll Award of Excellence in 2000. She has received several research grants and awards including the ALISE Research Grant Award (1999) and a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) research grant (1998 - 2002). She recently served on both the ALISE Research Committee and the planning committee for Library Research Seminar II. Before joining the faculty at Western, Dr. McKechnie practised as a children's and public librarian for almost twenty years.

Dr. McKechnie was appointed to the editor's role due to her interest in maintaining high standards for research published in the journal, and for her vision to establish an editorial board, publish thematic issues, and encourage submissions from students in the field. Dr. McKechnie will be taking the reins from the journal's longtime editor, Dr. Lynne Howarth, Dean of the Faculty of Information Studies, University of Toronto. Since 1995, Dr. Howarth has provided effective guidance for the journal, for which the CAIS/ACSI Board is grateful.

Dr. McKechnie encourages interested authors to contact her at: mckechnie@uwo.ca. Please join us in welcoming Dr. McKechnie!


Dr. Heidi Julien, CAIS/ACSI President, 2001-2002
April, 2002
Nouvelle éditrice nommée à La Revue canadienne des sciences de l'information et de bibliothéconomie

L'association canadienne des sciences de l'information / Canadian Association for Information Science (ACSI / CAIS) se fait un plaisir d'annoncer la nomination du docteur Lynne McKechnie au poste d'éditrice à La Revue canadienne des sciences de l'information et de bibliothéconomie / Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science.  Cette revue trimestrielle internationalement acceptée et soumise à la révision par les pairs a pour objectif de contribuer à l'avancement des sciences de l'information et de bibliothéconomie au Canada.

Le docteur McKechnie est maître de conférences à la Faculté des sciences de l'information et de la communication à l'Université Western Ontario.  Elle enseigne et fait de la recherche en services bibliothéconomiques et en littérature pour enfants et jeunes adultes, en bibliothèques publiques, en méthodes de recherche et en comportement informationnel.  Le docteur McKechnie est codétentrice du prix de l'ALISE (Association for Library and Information Science Education) (1997) pour la meilleure thèse en sciences de l'information et en bibliothéconomie, ainsi que du prix Liberati Club pour l'article le plus remarquable publié en l'année 2000 dans la revue Collection Building.  De plus, la même année, le Conseil estudiantin universitaire lui confère le prix d'excellence en enseignement.  Elle détient plusieurs bourses et prix, dont les bourses de recherche de l'ALISE (1999) et du Conseil de recherches en sciences humaines du Canada (CRSH) (1998-2002).  Elle a été membre jusqu'à tout récemment du comité de recherche de l'ALISE et du comité de planification du deuxième séminaire de recherche en bibliothéconomie.  Le docteur McKechnie était bibiothécaire pour enfant dans le secteur publique pendant presque 20 ans avant de se joindre au corps professoral de l'Université Western.

Le docteur McKechnie a été nommée éditrice en raison de son intérêt à maintenir un niveau élevé de recherche publié dans la revue, ainsi que de son projet d'établir un conseil de rédaction, de publier des numéros thématiques et d'encourager la propositions de textes d'étudiants dans le domaine.  Le docteur McKechnie prendra la relève de l'éditrice de longue date, le docteur Lynne Howarth, doyenne de la Faculté des Sciences de l'information à l'Université de Toronto.  Le docteur Howarth a su diriger la revue d'une main sûre, ce dont l'ACSI / CAIS est reconnaissante.

Le docteur McKechnie encourage tout auteur intéressé à la contacter: mckechnie@uwo.ca.  Souhaitons tous la bienvenue au docteur McKechnie!


Dr. Heidi Julien, CAIS/ACSI President, 2001-2002
April, 2002


*****************************************
Heidi Julien, Ph.D.
School of Library and Information Studies
University of Alberta
3-20 Rutherford South, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J4
Ph: 780 492 3934  Fax: 780 492 2430
Email: Heidi.Julien@ualberta.ca
Web: www.slis.ualberta.ca/people_groups.htm

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D-Lib Magazine

    April 2002

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]   asis-l@asis.org; sigdl-l@asis.org   16 April 2002

[Asis-l] [Dlib-subscribers] The April 2002 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

[Forwarded. Dick Hill]

Greetings:

The April 2002 issue of D-Lib Magazine http://www.dlib.org/

is now available. The

table of contents is at

http://www.dlib.org/dlib/april02/04contents.html.

There are four full-length articles, a project upate,

Stephen Paul Davis's review of the book, 'Digital Futures'

by Deegan and Tanner, and several smaller features in D-Lib

Magazine’s 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent

press releases, and news of upcoming conferences and other

items of interest in 'Clips and

Pointers'. The Featured Collection for April is Ronald

Saari's 'Diner City'.

The articles include:

The National Digital Information Infrastructure Preservation

Program: Expectations, Realities, Choices and Progress to

Date

Amy Friedlander, Ph.D., Council on Library and Information

Resources

Metadata Principles and Practicalities

Erik Duval, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven; Wayne Hodgins,

Autodesk; Stuart Sutton, University of Washington; and

Stuart L. Weibel, Dublin Core Metadata Initiative

Challenges for Service Providers When Importing Metadata in

Digital Libraries

Marilyn McClelland, David McArthur, and Sarah Giersch,

CollegisEduprise; and Gary Geisler, University of North

Carolina at Chapel Hill

Integrated and Aggregated Reference Services: The Automation

of Drudgery

Adam Hodgkin, xrefer.com Ltd.

The project update is:

An Update on the Digital Preservation Coalition

Neil Beagrie, Joint Information Systems Committee

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

UKOLN: The UK Office for Library and Information Networking,

Bath, England

http://hosted.ukoln.ac.uk/mirrored/lis-journals/dlib/

The Australian National University Sunsite, Canberra,

Australia

http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of

Göettingen, Göettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina

http://www.dlib.org.ar

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the

April 2002 issue of D-Lib

Magazine at this time, please check back later. There is a

delay between the time of the

magazine is released in the United States and the time when

the mirroring process has

been completed.)

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

 

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May 2002

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]   sigdl-l@asis.org; asis-l@asis.org   16 May 2002

 

[Asis-l] The May 2002 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

 

[Forwarded. Dick Hill]

Greetings:

The May 2002 issue of D-Lib Magazine http://www.dlib.org/ is

now available. The

table of contents is at

http://www.dlib.org/dlib/may02/05contents.html.

There are four full-length articles, Laurence Lannom's

review of the book, 'Scrolling Forward: Making Sense of

Documents in the Digital Age' by David M. Levy, several

smaller features in D-Lib Magazine’s 'In Brief' column,

excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming

conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and

Pointers'. The Featured Collection for May is Thomas A.

Zitter's Cornell University web site 'Vegetable MD Online'.

The articles include:

A Metadata Registry for the Semantic Web

Rachel Heery, UKOLN, and Harry Wagner, OCLC / Dublin Core

Metadata Initiative

Meta-Design of a Community Digital Library

Michael Wright and Mary Marlino, University Corporation for

Atmospheric Research; and Tamara Sumner, University of

Colorado at Boulder

Levels of Service for Digital Repositories

William G. LeFurgy, U.S. National Archives and Records

Administration

Indigenous Cultural and Intellectual Property Rights: A

Digital Library Context

Robert Sullivan, University of Auckland, New Zealand

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

UKOLN: The UK Office for Library and Information Networking,

Bath, England

http://hosted.ukoln.ac.uk/mirrored/lis-journals/dlib/

The Australian National University Sunsite, Canberra,

Australia

http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of

Göettingen, Göettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina

http://www.dlib.org.ar

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the May

2002 issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back

later. There is a delay between the time of the magazine is

released in the United States and the time when the

mirroring process has been completed.)

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

 

June 2002

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]    sigdl-l@asis.org; asis-l@asis.org    19 June 2002

[Asis-l] The June 2002 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

 

Greetings:

The June 2002 issue of D-Lib Magazine http://www.dlib.org/

is now available. The

table of contents is at

http://www.dlib.org/dlib/june02/06contents.html.

There are four full-length features, several smaller

features in D-Lib Magazine’s 'In Brief' column, excerpts

from recent press releases, and news of upcoming conferences

and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'. The

Featured Collection for June is DPDx, from the Division of

Parasitic Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and

Prevention.

The full-length features include:

Building the Biodiversity Commons

Thomas Moritz, American Museum of Natural History

Primary Multimedia Objects and 'Educational Metadata': A

Fundamental Dilemma for Developers of Multimedia Archives

Paul Shabajee, University of Bristol

Evaluation of Digital Library Impact and User Communities by

Analysis of Usage Patterns

Johan Bollen, Old Dominion University and Rick Luce, Los

Alamos National Library

The KYVL Kentuckiana Digital Library Project: Background and

Current Status

Eric Weig, University of Kentucky

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

UKOLN, Bath, England

http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

The Australian National University Sunsite, Canberra,

Australia

http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of

Göettingen, Göettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina

http://www.dlib.org.ar

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the

June 2002 issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check

back later. There is a delay between the time of the

magazine is released in the United States and the time when

the mirroring process has been completed.)

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

 

 

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September 2002

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]  asis-l@asis.org; sigdl-l@asis.org    16 September 2002

[Asis-l] The September 2002 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

 

The September 2002 issue of D-Lib Magazine http://www.dlib.org/ is now

available.

There are four articles, three conference reports, several smaller features

in D-Lib Magazine's 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases,

and news of upcoming conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and

Pointers'. The Featured Collection for September is the Australian Museums

and Galleries Online web site.

The articles are:

Evaluation Methodologies for Information Management Systems

Emile L. Morse, National Institute of Standards and Technology

Building Digital Tobacco Industry Document Libraries at the University of

California, San Francisco Library/Center for Knowledge Management

Heidi Schmidt, Karen Butter and Cynthia Rider, University of California San

Francisco

Experiments with the IFLA Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records

(FRBR)

Thomas B. Hickey, Edward T. O'Neill and Jenny Toves, OCLC Research

Coming to TERM: Designing the Texas Email Repository Model

Marlan Green, Sue Soy, Stan Gunn, and Patricia Galloway, University of

Texas at Austin

The Conference Reports include:

Report on the Second Joint Conference on Digital Libraries: 14 - 18 July

2002, Portland, Oregon

Edie M. Rasmussen, University of Pittsburgh

Emerging Frameworks and Methods: Fourth International Conference on

Conceptions of Library and Information Science (CoLIS4): 21 - 25 July 2002,

Seattle, Washington

Martha Kellogg Smith, University of Washington

Digital Library: IT Opportunities and Challenges in the New Millennium: 8 -

12 July 2002, Beijing, China

Suzie Allard, University of Kentucky

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England

http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

The Australian National University Sunsite, Canberra, Australia

http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib/

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen,

Goettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina

http://www.dlib.org.ar/

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the September 2002

issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later. There is a

delay between the time of the magazine is released in the United States and

the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

 

 

_______________________________________________

DLib-Subscribers mailing list

http://www.dlib.org/mailman/listinfo/dlib-subscribers

Executive Director

American Society for Information Science and Technology

1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510

Silver Spring, MD 20910

FAX: (301) 495-0810

PHONE: (301) 495-0900

http://www.asis.org

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

E is for Everything: The Extra-Ordinary, Evolutionary [e-]Journal

Gerry Mckiernan [gerrymck@iastate.eduASIS-L@ASIS.ORG  29 June 2002

 

"E is for Everything: The Extra-Ordinary, Evolutionary

[e-]Journal"

I am pleased to announce the formal publication of my review article

about the features, functionalities, and content of The Eclectic

Journal titled:

"E is for Everything: The Extra-Ordinary, Evolutionary

[e-]Journal"

The Serials Librarian 43(3/4): 293 - 321 (2002)

ABSTRACT. An ever-increasing number of e-journals are transcending the

limitations of the paper medium by incorporating and integrating a wide

variety of innovative electronic features and content. In this article,

we examine the current evolution of the scholarly journal and review the

emergence of functionalities that expand and extend the conventional

electronic journal. We further explore additional e-journal enhancements

and consider new forms and formats of scholarly communication likely to

arise in the not-so-distant future

This article, as well as many other noteworthy contributions, are

included in a special issue of The Serials Librarian titled _E-Serials

Cataloging:

Access to Continuing and Integrating Resources via the Catalog and the

Web_ and include the following:

E-Serials Cataloging in the 1990's: A Review of the Literature by Ann

Copeland

ISBD(ER) and Its Role in the Management of Electronic Resources by Sten

Hedberg

The Integration of Electronic Resources into Cataloging Instruction in

the LIS Curriculum by Taemin Kim Park

Teaching Seriality: A Major Education Challenge by Arlene G. Taylor

Web Resources for Cataloging Electronic Serials and Continuing

Resources: An Annotated Bibliography by John Blosser, Tim Hagan, and

Yvonne W. Zhang

Internet Resources Cataloging in ARL Libraries: Staffing and Access

Issues by Jeanne M.K. Boydston and Joan M. Leysen

Notes for Remote Access Computer File Serials by Beatrice L. Caraway

On Pins and Needles: Using Structured Metadata for Collocation and

Browsing Capability by Gregory Wool

NESLI MARC Records: An Experiment in Creating MARC Records for

E-Journals by Ross MacIntyre

Improving Access to E-Journals and Databases at the MIT Libraries:

Building a Database-Backed Web Site Called 'Vera' by Nicole Hennig

The Elektronische Zeitschriftenbibliothek: A Successful Library Service

for Electronic Journals in Germany by Evelinde Hutzler and Gerald

Schupfner

The full content of the special issues is available at

[ http://www.ameshomeschool.org/serialslibrarian/sl_41n3-4.htm ]

Don't forget to visit EJI(sm) for The Eclectic Experience

[ http://www.public.iastate.edu/~CYBERSTACKS/EJI.htm]

Seize the E!

/Gerry

Gerry McKiernan

Extra-Ordinary Librarian

Iowa State University Library

Ames IA 50011

gerrymck@iastate.edu

 

 

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First Monday  

   June 2002

Melissa Riesland [riesland65@yahoo.com] ASIS Listserv; New-Lib Listserv; =?UNKNOWN?Q?SLIS=A0Alumni?=

[Asis-l] Fwd: [SERIAL] First Monday June 2002   7 June 2002

Date: Wed, 5 Jun 2002 00:08:16 -0500

From: "Edward J. Valauskas" <ejv@uic.edu

 

 Dear Reader,

 

 The June 2002 issue of First Monday (volume 7,

 number 6) is now

 available at

 http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_6/

 

 -------

 

 Table of Contents

 

 Volume 7, Number 6 - June 3rd 2002

 

 Electric Symbols: Internet Words And Culture

 by John Fraim

 http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_6/fraim/

 

 The Next Stage: Moving from Isolated Digital

 Collections to

 Interoperable Digital Libraries

 by Howard Besser

 http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_6/besser/

 

 The Soundproof Book: Exploration of Rights

 Conflict and Access to

 Commercial EBooks for People with Disabilities

 by George Kerscher and Jim Fruchterman

 

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_6/kerscher/

 

 Cave or Community? An Empirical Examination of

 100 Mature Open Source Projects

 by Sandeep Krishnamurthy

 

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_6/krishnamurthy/

 

 Open Source Intelligence

 by Fleix Stalder and Jesse Hirch

 http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_6/stalder/

 

 Censoring the Internet: The Situation in Turkey

 by Kemal Altintas, Tolga Aydin, and Varol Akman

 http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_6/altinta/

 

 The Place of Law in Cyberspace

 by David Altheide

 

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_6/altheide/

 

 The Medical Journal Meets the Internet

 by Charles Curran

 http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_6/curran/

 

 FM Interviews: Stephanie Mills

 http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_6/mills/

 Book Reviews

 http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_6/reviews/

 

ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

 

July 2002

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]    asis-l@asis.org; sigdl-l@asis.org; sigiii-l@asis.org  11 July 2002

 

The July 2002 issue of First Monday (volume 7, number 7) is now available at

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_7/

-------

Table of Contents

Volume 7, Number 7 - July 1st 2002

Reconceptualizing the Digital Divide

by Mark Warschauer

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_7/warschauer/

Competition and the Development of the Internet in Japan

by Robert F. Delamar

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_7/delamar/

Non-Profits on E: How Non-Profit Organisations are Using the Internet for

Communication, Fundraising, and Community Building

by Pieter Boeder

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_7/boeder/

TOOL: The Open Opinion Layer

by Hassan Masum

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_7/masum/

After the Dot-Bomb: Getting Web Information Retrieval Right This Time

by Marcia J. Bates

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_7/bates/

When Internet Companies Morph: Understanding Organizational Strategy Changes

in the 'New' New Economy

by Robert J. Kauffman, Tim Miller, and Bin Wang

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_7/kauffman/

Management Responsibility in Protecting Information Assets: An Australian

Perspective

by Adrian McCullagh

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_7/mccullagh/

----------------------------

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Table of Contents service. You can unsubscribe to this service by sending a

reply containing the word unsubscribe in the body of the message or use the

form at http://firstmonday.org/join.html

Executive Director

American Society for Information Science and Technology

1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510

Silver Spring, MD 20910

FAX: (301) 495-0810

PHONE: (301) 495-0900

http://www.asis.org

oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

 

September 2002

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]  sigdl-l@asis.org; asis-l@asis.org; sigifp-l@asis.org; sigtis-l@asis.org    11 September 2002

 

Dear Reader,

The September 2002 issue of First Monday (volume 7, number 9) is now

available at http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_9/

-------

Table of Contents

Volume 7, Number 9 - September 2nd 2002

The Social Life of Legal Information: First Impressions

by Paul Duguid

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_9/duguid

Children's Use of New Technology for Picture-Taking

by Ruth Garner, Yong Zhao, and Mark Gillingham

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_9/garner

Keeping Out the Internet? Non-Democratic Legitimacy and Access to the Web

by Geoffry L. Taubman

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_9/taubman

An Empirical Investigation of the Impact of Business-to-business

Electronic Commerce Adoption on the Business Operations of Hong Kong

Manufacturers

by Oliver B. Yau

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_9/yau

The Network Society: A Shift in Cognitive Ecologies?

by Mathew Wall-Smith

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_9/wallsmith

Online Grocery Shopping: Consumer Motives, Concerns, and Business Models

by Mike Kempiak and Mark A. Fox

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_9/kempiak

Digitisation and Its Asian Discontents: The Internet, Politics and

Hacking in China and Indonesia

by Jeroen de Kloet

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_9/kloet

Letters to the Editor

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_9/letters

Book Reviews

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_9/reviews

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Monday's Table of Contents service. You can unsubscribe to this

service by sending a reply containing the word unsubscribe in the

body of the message or use the form at

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The First Monday Editorial Group

Executive Director

American Society for Information Science and Technology

1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510

Silver Spring, MD 20910

FAX: (301) 495-0810

PHONE: (301) 495-0900

http://www.asis.org

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

High Energy Physics Libraries Webzine

Jean-Philippe Schmitt [Jean-Philippe.Schmitt@cern.ch] to: Tom Wilson  HEP Libraries Webzine new issue

2 April 2002

 

The 6th issue of our High Energy Physics Libraries Webzine is now on line.

http://library.cern.ch/HEPLW/

Instead of discribing its content, I'll cite Peter Subers' FOS Newsletter

(04/1/02: http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/index.htm)

"* The March issues of the _High Energy Physics Libraries Webzine_

contains several FOS-related articles:

http://library.cern.ch/HEPLW/6/index.html

Luisella Goldschmidt-Clermont, Communication Patterns in High-Energy

Physics

http://library.cern.ch/HEPLW/6/papers/1/

(Argues in favor of a system for exchanging preprints that takes advantage

of modern advances in rapid communication. If this sounds like old hat,

the reason is that Goldschmidt-Clermont envisioned and inspired the online

preprint exchanges we see to day in so many disciplines. She wrote this

article in February 1965,and for complex reasons it has not been published

until now. For the past 37 years it has circulated as a preprint, guiding

the work of many network engineers and science librarians, including her

own subsequent work. Goldschmidt-Clermont was for many years the Senior

Scientific Information Officer at CERN and a consultant to SLAC and MIT.)

Jens Vigen, New Communication Channels: Electronic Clones, but Probably

the First Steps Toward a New Paradigm

http://library.cern.ch/HEPLW/6/papers/2/

(Explains why Goldschmidt-Clermont's article, above, had to wait 37 years

for publication and describes the role she has played in various FOS

initiatives.)

Heath O'Connell, Physicists Thriving with Paperless Publishing

http://library.cern.ch/HEPLW/6/papers/3/

(Describes the history of online publishing in high energy physics back to

1974.)

Bernd Wegner and Michael Jost, EMIS 2001: A Portal to Mathematics in

Progress

http://library.cern.ch/HEPLW/6/papers/4/

(Describe the recent and ongoing emergence of the European Mathematical

Information Service.)

Renato Spigler, Peer Reviewing and Electronic Publishing

http://library.cern.ch/HEPLW/6/papers/5/

(Compares and evaluates different methods of using the web to facilitate

the peer review of ejournals.)"

Tom, could you please update your "What's in the free e-journals?" page ?

Thank you very much.

Best regards,

Jean-Philippe

==================================================

Jean-Philippe Schmitt

CERN Scientific Information Service (Div. ETT-SI)

1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland

jean-philippe.schmitt@cern.ch

phone: +41 22 767 3508, fax: +41 22 767 2860

==================================================

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Information Research -    Volume 7, No 4

 

Prof. Tom Wilson [t.d.wilson@SHEFFIELD.AC.UKJESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU  29 July 2002

With apologies for the delay, Volume 7 no. 4 now has its Special issue editorial

and the abstracts in Spanish. See: http://InformationR.net/ir/7-4/infres74.html

___________________________________________________

Professor T.D. Wilson, PhD

Publisher/Editor in Chief

Information Research

InformationR.net

University of Sheffield

Sheffield S10 2TN, UK

e-mail: t.d.wilson@shef.ac.uk

Web site: http://InformationR.net/

_________________________________________________

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Information Technology & Libraries (ITAL) journal

Scott Nicholson [scott@SCOTTNICHOLSON.COM]   JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU  24 July 2002

General Call for Submissions

LITA, the technology-focused arm of the ALA, publishes the Information Technology & Libraries (ITAL) journal.  This peer-reviewed journal is seeking paper submissions in the area of the use of information technologies by/in libraries. This journal is an appropriate venue for scholarly library technology research, and ITAL is open to high-quality submissions by library school students.

ITAL is a refereed scholarly journal published by the Library and Information Technology Association, a Division of the American Library Association. It is published quarterly in hard copy with a Web version which includes the table of contents, abstracts, the full text of selected articles, and full book and software reviews.

For more information, visit http://www.lita.org/ital/index.htm to see past issues and details about submitting manuscripts

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Informing Science Journal -    Vol. 5 Issue 2

Eli Cohen [Eli_Cohen@ACM.ORG]   JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU   30 June 2002

Informing Science Journal Vol. 5 Issue 2 now available free at http://inform.nu (4 papers)

Volume 5, Issue 2 of Informing Science: The International Journal of an Emerging Transdiscipline is now available. Of course, online versions of all articles are available for reading free of charge to all.  Printed copies are also available.  Online papers are in Adobe Acrobat (.PDF) format and require a free Acrobat reader to view. Click here for information on obtaining a free reader.

Editors for this issue were Amita Goyal Chin, Bridget O’Connor, Joan Pierson, and Sandeep Purao.

 

-eli

Eli Cohen
Editor-in-Chief

.
.

Pages

Click on Title  below to view the article

Author/Abstract

43-47

Operationalizing Context in Context-Aware Artifacts: Benefits and Pitfalls

Christopher Lueg
University of Technology Sydney, Australia

The idea of context-aware artifacts is that computational artifacts are able to recognize the context in which they are being used so that these artifacts are able to adapt their functionality to the respective context. Most work in developing context-aware artifacts appears to be technology-driven by which we mean that often the relation of the artifacts to the underlying concepts of context remain unclear. In this paper, we look at the concept of context in context-aware artifacts from a cognition-oriented perspective and we argue for an explicit distinction between the concept of context that is operationalized and the original usage situation which we understand as a social setting that has been negotiated among peers in the first place. Acknowledging the difference suggests that developers of context-aware artifacts should pay considerable attention to the fact that the context determined by artifacts may differ from what the persons involved in the situation have negotiated. Furthermore, it suggests to critically review operationalizations of context in context-aware artifacts and their impact on how context is conceptualized.

Keywords: context-aware artifacts, context, situation, situatedness, negotiation

49-65

Web-Based Interactions Support for Information Systems

 

Youcef Baghdadi
United Arab Emirates University, UAE

Work organization, business innovation and IT have enhanced the distributed nature enterprise information systems. Information systems today are made up of subsystems running on heterogeneous IT platforms with varying implementations of business objects and processes increasing the dual risks of (i) inconsistency of business objects views and (ii) inefficiency of processes. This paper frames this problem as lack of representation and implementation of interactions among the subsystems and external sources. It proposes an interaction support system to make interactions an explicit element of the Enterprise Information System like data and operations. It describes a solution where the interaction elements are encapsulated into a separate subsystem and located in a web server to be used by other subsystems to exchange and share data and to perform processes with complete transparency. We argue that such Interaction Support System may provide global, unified and consistent view of business objects and synergy of processes.

Keywords: Information Systems, Interactions, Interactions Support System.

67-78

Educationally Critical Aspects of the Concept of an Information System

 

Chris Cope
La Trobe University, Australia

An empirical study is reported which identified and compared a deep understanding of the concept of an information system (IS) with the various levels of understanding of a group of undergraduate IS students. The aim was to identify the educationally critical aspects of the deep understanding. The study was significant in that the educationally critical aspects are not known, yet have significant implications for IS education and practice. Without addressing the critical aspects in teaching and learning about IS the development of an appropriate deep understanding by students is unlikely. The production of entry-level IS practitioners without a deep understanding of the concept of an IS is logically likely to have adverse implications for IS development projects.

Keywords: Information system concepts, information system teaching, information system learning, phenomenographic research.

79-93

Toward a Model of Growth Stages for Knowledge Management Technology in Law Firms

 

Petter Gottschalk
Norwegian School of Management, Sandvika, Norway

Knowledge management was introduced to law firms to help create, share, and use knowledge more effectively. Information technology can play an important role in successful knowledge management initiatives. In this paper, information technology support for knowledge management is linked to stages of growth. A model of growth stages is proposed consisting of four stages. The first stage is end-user tools that are made available to knowledge workers, the second stage is information about who knows, the third stage is information from knowledge workers, and the final stage is information systems solving knowledge problems. The model can be used to empirically assess the growth stage of law firms as well as indicate future evolution of law firms in the area of knowledge management technology.

Keywords: knowledge management, information technology, stages of growth model, law firms.

 

 

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Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship

    Spring 2002

Andrea Duda [duda@library.ucsb.edu]   istl-updates@library.ucsb.edu    21 May 2002

The Spring 2002 issue of Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship is

now available:

http://www.istl.org

THEME: Partnerships in Sci-Tech Libraries

ARTICLES:

* Bridging the Two Cultures: A Collaborative Approach to Managing

Electronic Resources

by John Dupuis and Patti Ryan, York University

* Riding the Active Learning Wave: Problem-Based Learning as a Catalyst

for Creating Faculty-Librarian Instructional Partnerships

by Michael Fosmire and Alexius Macklin, Purdue University

* AgEcon Search: Partners Build a Web Resource

by Louise Letnes and Julie Kelly, University of Minnesota

* EndNote At Lehigh

by Sharon Siegler and Brian Simboli, Lehigh University

REFEREED ARTICLES

* Making Choices: Factors in the Selection of Information Resources

Among Science Faculty at the University of Michigan Results of a Survey

Conducted July-September, 2000

by Jane Quigley, Dartmouth College, David R. Peck, University of

Michigan, Sara Rutter, University of Michigan, and Elizabeth McKee

Williams, University of Michigan

ACRL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY SECTION

* Continuing Education Needs of Science and Technology Librarians:

Results of the 2001 STS Continuing Education Committee Survey

by Christina M. Desai, Southern Illinois University

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES ON THE INTERNET

* Materials Science Resources on the Web

by Lorraine J. Pellack, Iowa State University

* Astronomical Resources on the Internet

by Joe Kraus, University of Denver and Pete Banholzer, Goddard Space

Flight Center

BOOK REVIEWS

* Using the Biological Literature: A Practical Guide

Reviewed by Lutishoor Salisbury, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

DATABASE REVIEWS & REPORTS

* A Bibliographic Resource for Statistical Theory: Current Index to

Statistics

Reviewed by Laurel L. Kristick, Oregon State University

* PROLA: Database Review

Reviewed by Ian D. Gordon, Brock University

* PubMed: For More than Just Medicine This Is One of the World's

Greatest Databases

Reviewed by Stephanie Bianchi, National Science Foundation

CONFERENCE REPORTS

* Science & Technology Section General Discussion Group, ALA Midwinter

Conference, January 19, 2002

By Norma Kobzina, University of California, Berkeley

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Summer 2002

 

Andrea Duda [duda@library.ucsb.edu]    istl-updates@library.ucsb.edu  27 August 2002

[ISTL-updates] ISTL - Summer 2002 Issue Available

 

The Summer 2002 issue of Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship is

now available at

http://www.istl.org/

CONTENTS:

==========

Articles

==========

* Public Services and Electronic Resources: Perspectives from the Science

and Engineering Libraries at Duke University

by Edward Gray and Anne Langley, Duke University

* NSF-NSDL GREEN Project: A Digital Library Partnership of Academia,

Government, and Industry

by Laura M. Bartolo, Kent State University, Vinod K. Tewary, National

Institute of Standards & Technology, Gregory M. Shreve, Kent State

University, Adam C. Powell IV, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,

and Marcia L. Zeng, Kent State University

* Citation Managers and Citing-Cited Data

by Brian Simboli, Lehigh University, and Min Zhang, Smart IMS, Inc.

===================

Refereed Articles

===================

* The Use of Electronic-Only Journals in Scientific Research

by Richard D. Llewellyn, Lorraine J. Pellack, and Diana D. Shonrock,

Iowa State University

===================================

ACRL Science & Technology Section

===================================

* Perceived Successes and Failures of Science & Tecnology E-Journal

Access: A Comparative Study

by Subject & Bibliographic Access to Science Materials Committee,

Science & Technology Section, Association of College & Research

Libraries

=================================================

Science and Technology Resources on the Internet

=================================================

* Mathematics Resources on the Internet

by Beth A. Roberts, University of Maryland

==============

Book Reviews

==============

* The Scientific Revolution: An Encyclopedia

Reviewed by Ann Jensen, University of California, Berkeley

* The Browsable Classroom: An Introduction to E-Learning for Librarians

Reviewed by Beth Roberts, The University of Maryland

* CRC Dictionary of Agricultural Sciences

Reviewed by Helen Smith, Pennsylvania State University

============================

Database Reviews & Reports

============================

* Columbia Earthscape: An Onlie Resource to the Global Environment

Reviewed by Yelena Pancheshnikov, University of Saskatchewan

====================

Conference Reports

====================

* Science & Technology Section Program, ALA Annual Conference, June 17,

2002

By Victoria Mitchell, University of Oregon

* STS Publisher/Vendor Relations Discussion Group and STS Government

Information Committee, ALA Annual Conference, June 16, 2002

By Victoria Mitchell, University of Oregon

* STS College Librarians Discussion Group, ALA Annual Conference, June

16, 2002

By Victoria Mitchell, University of Oregon

* The Council of Science Editors, 45th Annual Meeting, May 3-7, 2002

By Julia Gelfand, University of California, Irvine

* STS General Discussion Group, ALA Annual Conference, June 16, 2002

By Bryna Coonin, East Carolina University

 

 

===========================================================

Andrea L. Duda

Sciences-Engineering Library

University of California, Santa Barbara

E-mail: duda@library.ucsb.edu

===========================================================______________________________________________

ISTL-updates mailing list

ISTL-updates@library.ucsb.edu

http://listserver.library.ucsb.edu/mailman/listinfo/istl-updates

 

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JASIST 

     Bioinformatics - Call for papers

 

Brad Hemminger [bmh@ILS.UNC.EDU]  bioinformatics@labs.oreilly.com; sigbioinform-l@asis.org; asis-l@asis.org 

ASIS-L: Call for Paper submissions for Special JASIST issue on Bioinformatics  3 April 2002

CALL FOR PAPERS

Special Topics Issue of JASIST: Bioinformatics

 

 

The next special topics issue of the Journal of the American Society for

Information Science and Technology (JASIST), to appear in late 2003,

will be on the topic of bioinformatics. The guest editors will be Dr.

Bradley Hemminger and Dr. David Fenstermacher of the University of North

Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Bioinformatics tools and methodologies for the management of biological

data, information, and knowledge are rapidly being developed and adopted

to address the massive growth of data generated by large scale research

efforts such as the Human Genome Project. Bioinformatics, the

application of information technology to the life sciences, is a fertile

research area for the information science field. While biology is a

specialized domain, the data explosion leaves it facing many of the same

core issues that information scientists and librarians have addressed

for decades: the design and management of information retrieval systems;

integration and querying of multiple heterogeneous databases; novel data

visualization tools; open metadata schemas and ontologies; and methods

for automated database curation and data quality assurance.

This special topic issue will provide an interdisciplinary forum for

researchers and practitioners to present innovative ideas and methods to

address current and future problems in bioinformatics, including the

areas of genomics, proteomics, and computational biology.

Authors are invited to submit original papers in the area of

bioinformatics on topics including, but not limited to, the following:

· Large-scale database design and development

· Database integration

· Database quality assurance

· Information retrieval algorithms

· Metadata and ontological frameworks

· Visualization tools

· Interface design issues

· Legal / intellectual property issues

Inquiries should be made to the guest editors by email, fax or

telephone. Authors should inform the guest editors of their intent to

submit prior to submitting a manuscript. Electronic submissions of

manuscripts in PDF or Word (97 or later) are recommended. If

manuscripts are submitted in printed form, please send four copies of

the manuscript. Inquires and submissions should be addressed to:

 

Dr. Bradley Hemminger

School of Information and Library Science

206A Manning Hall

University of North Carolina

Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3360

Email: bmh@ils.unc.edu

Phone: (919) 966-2998

Fax: (919) 962-8071

Web: http://ils.unc.edu/

Important Dates

May 31, 2002: Notification of intent to submit a manuscript

October 31, 2002: Deadline for manuscript submission

January 31, 2003: Notification of acceptance/rejection of manuscripts

September 2003: Final versions of manuscripts due

Late 2003: Publication

 

All manuscripts will be reviewed by a panel of referees. Original

artwork and a signed copy of the copyright release form will be required

for all accepted papers. A copy of the call for papers will be

available on the World Wide Web, as is further information about JASIST,

at http://www.asist.org/.

ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

 

Research on Information Seeking - Call for Papers

 

Amanda Spink [spink@IST.PSU.EDU]   JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU  JASIST Call for Papers  6 August 2002

 

Call for Papers - Special Topic Issue of JASIST

Research on Information Seeking

 

 

A Special Topics Issue of the Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology (JASIST) is scheduled to come out in 2004 on the topic of Research on Information Seeking. The guest editors for this special issue will be Amanda Spink of The Pennsylvania State University and Charles Cole of McGill University.

 

 

This issue of JASIST seeks papers addressing significant research questions related to the broad research areas of information seeking behavior. Information-seeking is a complex information and communication activity requiring access to diverse sources of information to deal with personal, social, or work-related problems. The proliferation of personal computers, the growth of the Internet, and the accompanying development of information and communication services, provides people with access to many new services and potential new channels of information access. Information seeking studies are a growing body of research that firmly declares the importance of information for everyone in the information age.

 

 

Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

 

Information seeking theories

Information seeking models

Everyday life information seeking

Information seeking in specific environment, e.g., medical, educational, business

Empirical studies

IR/Web systems supporting information seeking, including evaluation

Other information seeking related topics

 

 

Inquiries about the special issue and manuscript submissions (four copies of full articles) should be directed to:

 

 

Dr. Amanda Spink

School of Information Sciences and Technology

The Pennsylvania State University

004C Thomas Building, University Park, PA 16801

(814) 865-4454 Voice (814) 865-5604 Fax

Email: spink@ist.psu.edu

 

 

Dr. Charles Cole

Graduate School of Library and Information Studies

McGill University

3459 McTavish Street

Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 1Y1

Voice: (514) 398-4204 Fax: (514) 398-7193

Email: ccole2@po-box.mcgill.ca

 

 

The deadline for accepting manuscripts for consideration for publication in this special issue is March 30, 2003. A select panel of referees will review all manuscripts, and those accepted will be published in a special issue of JASIST. Original artwork and a signed copy of the copyright release form will be required for all accepted papers. A copy of the call for papers will be available on the World Wide Web as is further information about JASIST, at http://www.asis.org/.

 

 

 

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Soft Power: Informational Ambiguities and Asymmetries in the Network Age - Call for papers

 

Christopher Lueg [lueg@it.uts.edu.auasis-l@asis.org  23 May 2002

[Asis-l] 2nd CfP JASIST: Soft Power - Informational Ambiguities and Asymmetries in the Network Age

 

2nd Call for Papers

Soft Power: Informational Ambiguities and Asymmetries in the Network Age

Special Topic Issue of the Journal of the American Society for

Information Science and Technology (JASIST)

Guest editors:

Christopher Lueg, University of Technology Sydney, Australia

Blaise Cronin, Indiana University, USA.

Deadline: October 31, 2002

 

The next Special Topic Issue of the Journal of the American Society for

Information Science and Technology (JASIST) is scheduled to come out in

2004 on the topic of "Soft Power: Informational Ambiguities and

Asymmetries in the Network Age". The guest editors for this special issue

will be Christopher Lueg of University of Technology Sydney, Australia,

and Blaise Cronin of Indiana University, USA.

Virtually unlimited access to computers and networks in the age of the

Internet and World Wide Web is a double-edged sword, creating both

positive and negative externalities, and generating planned outcomes and

unintended second order effects in near equal measure. On the one hand,

ubiquitous network access provides numerous benefits to business and

society; on the other, it has created a host of unforeseen problems and

technical challenges for organizations of almost every kind.

So-called information-level threats are based on the active or passive

distribution of key information to a large audience. Such information may

result from discussions in Usenet newsgroups or they may be created

purposefully with a certain impact in mind. Examples of such threats are

hoaxes, false rumors, revenge web sites, and joe jobs - spamming under the

name of a competitor which has the effect that the competitor is blamed

(and punished) for spamming.

Information-level threats need to be distinguished from more technical

threats (denial of service, content degrading or destruction).

Information-level threats are not targeted at computers and communications

networks, but at humans receiving the information: the primary lever of an

information-level attack is the content of a message or claim, rather than

its form. An implication of this is that information-level threats are

less about security in a technical or computational sense than notions of

propaganda, opinion formation, and perception management.

Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the

following:

* Identifying information-level activities in networked environments

* Security management, cyber forensics, and counterintelligence

* Strengths and limitations of commercially available Internet

surveillance technology

* Commercial terrorism through the Internet

* Epistemological and neo-cortical warfare

* Information education - understanding information-based threats

* Digital defamation and free speech

* Journalism in the network age

* Branding in the age of the Internet

* Advertising vs. misinformation

The guest editors are seeking papers that address these and related

topics. Inquiries can be made to:

Christopher Lueg <lueg@it.uts.edu.au> or

Blaise Cronin <bcronin@indiana.edu>

Manuscript submissions (Word files) should be addressed to:

Dr. Christopher Lueg

Department of Information Systems

Faculty of Information Technology

University of Technology Sydney

PO Box 123, Broadway NSW 2007

AUSTRALIA

Voice: +61 2 9514 1851

Fax +61 2 9514 1807

Email: lueg@it.uts.edu.au

The deadline for accepting manuscripts for consideration for publication

in this special issue is October 31, 2002. All manuscripts will be

reviewed by a select panel of referees. Original artwork and a signed

copy of the copyright release form will be required for all accepted

papers.

A copy of the call for papers will be available on the World Wide Web at

http://www-staff.it.uts.edu.au/~lueg/CfP_JASIST.html

as is further information about JASIST, at http://www.asis.org/.

 

+______________________________________________________________________+

| |

| Dr. Christopher Lueg lueg@it.uts.edu.au (preferred) |

| Department of Information Systems Fax +61 2 9514 1807 / Vox 1851 |

| University of Technology Sydney www-staff.it.uts.edu.au/~lueg/ |

| PO Box 123 Broadway NSW 2007, AU CRICOS Provider 00099F

 

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  Volume 53, No 9

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.orgasis-l@asis.org  [Asis-l] TOC: JASIST Volume 53, Number 9;     11 June 2002

 

Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology

JASIST

VOLUME 53, NUMBER 9

[Note: URLs for viewing contents of JASIST from past issues are at the

bottom. Immediately below, the contents of Bert Boyce's "In This

Issue" has been cut into the Table of Contents.]

 

EDITORIAL

In This Issue

Bert R. Boyce

693

RESEARCH

Information Seeking and Mediated Searching. Part 1. Theoretical

Framework and Research Design

Amanda Spink, T.D. Wilson, Nigel Ford, Allen Foster, and David Ellis

Published online 19 April 2002

695

In this issue we begin with the first of four parts of a five part

series of papers by Spink, Wilson, Ford,

Foster, and Ellis. Spink, et alia, in the first section of this report set

forth the design of a project to test

whether existing models of the information search process are appropriate

for an environment of

mediated successive searching which they believe characterizes much

information seeking behavior.

Their goal is to develop an integrated model of the process.

Data were collected from 198 individuals, 87 in Texas and 111 in

Sheffield in the U.K., with individuals

with real information needs engaged in interaction with operational

information retrieval systems by use of

transaction logs, recordings of interactions with intermediaries, pre, and

post search interviews,

questionnaire responses, relevance judgments of retrieved text, and

responses to a test of cognitive

styles. Questionnaires were based upon the Kuhlthau model, the Saracevic

model, the Ellis model, and

incorporated a visual analog scale to avoid a consistency bias.

Information Seeking and Mediated Searching. Part 2. Uncertainty and

Its Correlates

T.D. Wilson, Nigel Ford, David Ellis, Allen Foster, and Amanda Spink

Published online 23 April 2002

704

In ``Part 2. Uncertainty and Its Correlates,'' where Wilson is the

primary author, after a review of

uncertainty as a concept in information seeking and decision research, it

is hypothesized that if the

Kuhlthau problem solving stage model is appropriate the searchers will

recognize the stage in which they

currently are operating. Secondly to test Wilson's contention that

operationalized uncertainty would be

useful in characterizing users, it is hypothesized that uncertainty will

decrease as the searcher proceeds

through problem stages and after the completion of the search. A review of

pre and post search interviews

reveals that uncertainty can be operationalized, and that academic

researchers have no difficulty with a

stage model of the information seeking process. Uncertainty is unrelated to

sex, age, or discipline, but is

related to problem stage and domain knowledge. Both concepts appear robust.

Information Seeking and Mediated Searching Study. Part 3. Successive

Searching

Amanda Spink, T.D. Wilson, Nigel Ford, Allen Foster, and David Ellis

Published online 30 April 2002

716

In ``Part 3. Successive Searching.'' where Spink is the primary author,

after a review of the work on

successive searching, a portion of the Texas generated data is reviewed for

insights on how frequently

successive searching occurred, the motivation for its occurrence, and any

distinctive characteristics of the

successive search pattern. Of 18 mediated searches, half requested a second

search and a quarter a

third search. All but one seeker reported a need to refine and enhance the

previous results. Second

searches while characterized as refinements included a significantly higher

number of items retrieved and

more search cycles. Third searches had the most cycles but less retrieved

items than the second.

Number of terms utilized did not change significantly and overlap was

limited to about one in five terms

between first and second searches. No overlap occurred between the second

and third searches.

Problem solving stage shifts did occur with 2 moving to a later stage after

the first search, 5 remaining in

the same stage and one reverting to a previous stage. Precision did not

increase over successive

searches, but partial relevant judgments decreased between the second and

third search.

Information Seeking and Mediated Searching. Part 4. Cognitive Styles

in Information Seeking

Nigel Ford, T.D. Wilson, Allen Foster, David Ellis, and Amanda Spink

Published online 30 April 2002

728

In ``Part 4. Cognitive Styles in Information Seeking,'' where Ford is

the primary author, the results of the

application of the Riding's Cognitive Styles Analysis and the Pask's

holist/serialist portion of the Ford's

Study Process Questionnaire to the 111 U.K. participants. were correlated

using Spearman's coefficient

with reports of focused thinking, degree of change in the intermediary's

perception of the problem and

personal knowledge, problem stage, degree of differentiating activity,

change in problem perception,

engagement in exploring activity, changes in questioning, valuing of

serendipitous information, and other

variables. The results would indicate that field independent individuals

report clearer more focused

thinking, see themselves in an earlier problem stage, and report higher

levels of change in perception of

the problem. Holists value serendipity and report engagement in Kuhlthau's

exploring stage. They are

seen by intermediaries as exhibiting fewer changes in questioning behavior.

A fifth section will appear in a

later issue.

Data Discretization for Novel Relationship Discovery in Information

Retrieval

G. Benoit

Published online 29 April 2002

736

A sample of 600 Dialog and Swiss-Prot full text records in genetics and

molecular biology were parsed

and term frequencies calculated to provide data for a test of Benoit's

visualization model for retrieval. A

retrieved set is displayed graphically allowing for manipulation of

document and concept relationships in

real time, which hopefully will reveal unanticipated relationships.

On Recommending

Jonathan Furner

Published online 3 May 2002

747

By ``recommending'' Furner refers to collaborative filtering where

multiple user rankings of items are

used to create a single new ranking for a user, or to a system itself

generating rankings of items for its

users. This would include document retrieval systems as a subset

recommending systems in the second

instance, but in the first would make document retrieval system and

recommending system synonyms.

Information seeking actions are classified either as evaluative

(determining the worth of an item),

recommending (expressing perceived worth), or informative (examining the

content of an item). The task

of the information retrieval system is to be to predict the particular

ordering that the user would specify in a

given context, given complete knowledge of the collection. Citations may be

considered as the result of

evaluative and recommending decisions by the author, and assigned index

terms may be considered as

the same sort of decisions by the indexer. The selection of relevant

documents by a searcher from a list

also involves evaluative and recommending decisions. This suggests that

searchers should have the

opportunity to bring multiple ranking techniques to bear.

Domain Visualization using VxInsight ) [register mark] for Science

and Technology Management

Kevin W. Boyack, Brian N. Wylie, and George S. Davidson

Published online 3 May 2002

764

Boyack, Wylie, and Davidson developed VxInsight which transforms

information from documents into a

landscape representation which conveys information on the implicit

structure of the data as context for

queries and exploration. From a list of pre-computed similarities it

creates on a plane an x,y location for

each item, or can compute its own similarities based on direct and

co-citation linkages. Three-dimensional

overlays are then generated on the plane to show the extent of clustering

at particular points. Metadata

associated with clustered objects provides a label for each peak from

common words. Clicking on an

object will provide citation information and answer sets for queries run

will be displayed as markers on the

landscape. A time slider allows a view of terrain changes over time.

In a test on the microsystems engineering literature a review article

was used to provide seed terms to

search Science Citation Index and retrieve 20,923 articles of which 13,433

were connected by citation to

at least one other article in the set. The citation list was used to

calculate similarity measures and x.y

coordinates for each article. Four main categories made up the landscape

with 90% of the articles directly

related to one or more of the four. A second test used five databases: SCI,

Cambridge Scientific

Abstracts, Engineering Index, INSPEC, and Medline to extract 17,927 unique

articles by Sandia, Los

Alamos National Laboratory, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory,

with text of abstracts and

RetrievalWare 6.6 utilized to generate the similarity measures. The

subsequent map revealed that despite

some overlap the laboratories generally publish in different areas. A third

test on 3000 physical science

journals utilized 4.7 million articles from SCI where similarity was the

un-normalized sum of cites between

journals in both directions. Physics occupies a central position, with

engineering, mathematics, computing,

and materials science strongly linked. Chemistry is farther removed but

strongly connected.

 

BOOK REVIEWS

A Nation Transformed by Information: How Information has Shaped the

United States from Colonial

Times to the Present, edited by Alfred D. Chandler, Jr. and James W. Cortada

Julian Warner

Published online 30 April 2002

775

Usability for the Web: Designing Web Sites that Work, by Tom Brinck,

Darren Gergle, and Scott D.

Wood

Raven Wallace

Published online 2 May 2002

775

CALL FOR PAPERS

778

ANNOUNCEMENT

779

----------

[Note: The ASIST home page

<http://www.asis.org/Publications/JASIS/tocs.html> contains the Table of

Contents

and abstracts from Bert Boyce's "In This Issue" from January 1993 (Volume

44) to date.

The John Wiley Interscience site <http://www.interscience.wiley.com>

includes issues from 1986 (Volume 37) to

date. Guests have access only to tables of contents and

abstracts. Registered users of the interscience site have

access to the full text of these issues and to preprints.]

Executive Director

American Society for Information Science and Technology

1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510

Silver Spring, MD 20910

FAX: (301) 495-0810

PHONE: (301) 495-0900

http://www.asis.org

oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

 

Volume 53, No 10

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]   asis-l@asis.org  [Asis-l] TOC JASIST, Volume 53, Number 10 -   18 July 2002

 

Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology

JASIST

VOLUME 53, NUMBER 10

[Note: URLs for viewing contents of JASIST from past issues are at the

bottom. Immediately below, the contents of Bert Boyce's "In This Issue"

and part of Andrew Dillon's introduction to the special issue on

Information Architecture has been cut into the Table of Contents.]

EDITORIAL

In This Issue

Bert R. Boyce

781

RESEARCH

Relevance of Web Documents: Ghosts Consensus Method

Andrey L. Gorbunov

Published online 6 June 2002

783

In this issue we begin we will discuss three papers not covered by the

editor of the special topics section. In the first, Gorbunov suggests a

method of refining results achieved from a vector space model search. After

the cosine measure is computed as a relevance function and the documents

ranked, searcher preferences are solicited as to the importance of author

and searcher ideas conforming, the importance of searcher concurrence with

majority users, the importance of little known documents, and the

importance of topical closeness. These are used to form assertions about

seven criteria of relevance: in document frequency, number of links,

presence of terms in metadata, presence in the title, presence in special

zones of the document, distance between searched for words in the document,

and evenness of the distribution of searched for words. These assertions

may be expressed as constraint conditions to produce an objective function

to re-rank the documents, thus providing a ranking more reflective of the

searcher's needs than majority opinion based on links or citations.

Duality Revisited: Construction of Fractional Frequency Distributions

Based on Two Dual Lotka Laws

L. Egghe and I.K. Ravichandra Rao

Published online 11 June 2002

789

Egghe and Rao are able to present evidence that frequency distributions

of author productivity, where productivity is fractionally assigned from

multiple author papers, are a consequence of Lotka's law rather than

exceptions to it. Occurrences of fractional scores will be influenced by

low frequency of papers with a higher number of authors, and the higher

frequency of papers with a low number of authors, while multiple

combinations of papers with different numbers of authors can produce the

same score. Calculation of the fractional frequency distribution is very

difficult since any positive rational number is a possible frequency and

the shapes of simulated and of empirically derived fractional distributions

have been shown to be quite irregular. By grouping data and allowing for

only a limited number of fractional scores, an analytical formula is

produced for the probability of each allowed score, which nicely fits the

grouped empirical data.

The Impact of the Internet on Public Library Use: An Analysis of the

Current Consumer Market for Library and Internet Services

George D'Elia, Corinne Jorgensen, Joseph Woelfel, and Eleanor Jo Rodger

Published online 30 May 2002

802

D'Elia et alia, segment their population of study into six segments:

those who use the library, have access to the Internet and use the

Internet; those who use the library, have access to the Internet and do not

use the Internet, those who use the library, and do not have access to the

Internet; those who do not use the library, have access to the Internet and

use the Internet, those who do not use the library, have access to the

Internet and do not use the Internet; and those who do not use the library,

and have no access to the Internet. A random telephone survey used

screening questions that allowed this segmentation of the sample. A

questionnaire was developed using focus groups of members of the segments,

and previous questionnaires, and was tested in a series of three pilot

surveys. The questions varied depending upon the segment identified for

each sample call of the 3,097 made.

Internet access at home was available to 47%, and at the library 37.5%,

while only 4.3% had access only at home and 0.5% only at the library. The

Internet is used by 53.2% and both library and Internet are used by 40%.

Seventy-five percent of Internet users also use the library and 60% of

library users use the Internet. Use of both media is inversely related to

age, and directly related to educational attainment and household income.

More males than females use the Internet and more females than males use

the library. The ranked order of rating of service characteristics of the

library was significantly and inversely related to the ranked order of the

service characteristics of the Internet, and the Internet was rated

superior to the library in 10 of 16 service characteristics. Library

non-use is attributed to lack of time, and a preference for owning and

retaining materials.

SPECIAL TOPIC ISSUE: INFORMATION ARCHITECTURE

Guest Editor: Andrew Dillon

Information Architecture in JASIST: Just Where Did We Come From?

Andrew Dillon

Published online 17 May 2002

821

In the present issue is a collection of articles representing a spectrum of

perspectives from academics and practitioners, practical and theoretical,

all offering one angle on issues collected under the label information

architecture. In it you will find considerations (not definitive

statements) of important contemporary issues that are being shaped even as

we think, from

curricular (Latham) to method (Large et al.); from conception (Haverty) to

case (Hauck and Weisband); from theory (Toms) to practice (Burke); with

data (Cunliffe) and speculation (Rosenfeld). Even this carving up is

partial, because several articles cross several of these divides.

The articles are not the definitive word on IA; it would be

impossible to expect any collection to be such given the dynamism of the

field. But these articles do offer a valuable snapshot. This is IA as seen

by a variety of thinkers in the early 21st century. No doubt all will think

again about these issues and evolve a more refined perspective, but these

articles do represent, in current parlance, a sense of Big IA and what the

field covers. Drawing in people from outside the normal community of ASIST

conference or IA summit attendees, I believe these articles represent a

landmark effort, and there is no doubt in my mind that IA represents an

exciting and important mix of ideas and perspectives that can serve to

bridge traditional divisions in the information studies disciplines.

Regardless of how the field eventually becomes labeled, the issues IA has

brought into relief must be addressed, and in so doing, such addressing

will help shape the future of information science. Predicting the future is

a thankless task, but the opportunity to stand still and survive as a

practitioner or theoretician has passed - the information domain will be as

much the province of architecture as the physical world, and those that

will shape the new spaces will impact humankind on a level that will prove

beyond the reach of physical architecture. This is only the beginning - get

involved.

Information Architecture: Notes Toward a New Curriculum

Don Latham

Published online 30 May 2002

824

Information Architecture for the Web: The IA Matrix Approach to Designing

Children's Portals

Andrew Large, Jamshid Beheshti, and Charles Cole

Published online 20 May 2002

831

Information Architecture Without Internal Theory: An Inductive Design

Process

Marsha Haverty

Published online 17 May 2002

839

When a Better Interface and Easy Navigation Aren't Enough: Examining the

Information Architecture in a Law Enforcement Agency

Roslin V. Hauck and Suzanne Weisband

Published online 14 May 2002

846

Information Interaction: Providing a Framework for Information Architecture

Elaine G. Toms

Published online 14 May 2002

855

Designing a New Urban Internet

Lauren Burke

Published online 11 June 2002

863

Information Architecture for Bilingual Web Sites

Daniel Cunliffe, Helen Jones, Melanie Jarvis, Kevin Egan, Rhian Huws, and

Sian Munro

Published online 9 May 2002

866

Information Architecture: Looking Ahead

Louis Rosenfeld

Published online 11 June 2002

874

----------

[Note: The ASIST home page

<http://www.asis.org/Publications/JASIS/tocs.html> contains the Table of

Contents and abstracts from Bert Boyce's "In This Issue" from January 1993

(Volume 44) to date.

The John Wiley Interscience site <http://www.interscience.wiley.com>

includes issues from 1986 (Volume 37) to date. Guests have access only to

tables of contents and abstracts. Registered users of the interscience

site have access to the full text of these issues and to preprints.]

oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

 

Volume 53, No 11

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.orgasis-l@asis.org  [Asis-l] JASIST Volume 53, Number 11;    7 August 2002

 

Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology

JASIST

VOLUME 53, NUMBER 11

[Note: URLs for viewing contents of JASIST from past issues are at the

bottom. Immediately below, the contents of Bert Boyce's "In this issue"

has been cut into the Table of Contents.]

EDITORIAL

In This Issue

Bert R. Boyce

877

RESEARCH

30,000 Hits May Be Better Than 300: Precision Anomalies in Internet

Searches

Caroline M. Eastman

Published online 17 June 2002

879

In this issue we begin with a paper where Eastman points out that

conventional narrower queries (the use of conjunctions and phrases) in a

web engine search will reduce returned number of hits but not necessarily

increase precision in the top ranked documents in the return. Thus by

precision anomalies Eastman means that search narrowing activity results in

no precision change or a decrease in precision. Multiple queries with

multiple engines were run by students for a three-year period and the

formulation/engine combination was recorded as was the number of hits.

Relevance was also recorded for the top ten and top twenty ranked

retrievals. While narrower searches reduced total hits they did not usually

improve precision. Initial high precision and poor query reformulation

account for some of the results, as did Alta Vista's failure to use the

ranking algorithm incorporated in its regular search in its advanced search

feature. However, since the top listed returns often reoccurred in all

formulations, it would seem that the ranking algorithms are doing a

consistent job of practical precision ranking that is not improved by

reformulation.

Information Seeking and Mediated Searching. Part 5. User-Intermediary

Interaction

David Ellis, T.D. Wilson, Nigel Ford, Allen Foster, H.M. Lam, R.

Burton, and Amanda Spink

Published online 11 July 2002

883

Ellis, et alia, now provide part five of their study on mediated

searching which is treated separately here because of the presence of

additional authors. The data source remains cases collected from 198

individuals, 87 in Texas and 111 in Sheffield in the U.K. but the focus

here is on seeker/intermediary interaction utilizing the Saracevic triadic

IR model, and the method is the analysis of discourse. While the pre-search

interview stressed problem definition, interaction during the search in

terms of relevance and magnitude continued to develop the problem

statement. The user and intermediary focused on search tactics, review and

relevance, while the intermediary interaction with the system was comprised

of terminology and answers. The interaction clearly affected the search

process. Users and intermediaries considered the process effective and

users felt the intermediary increased their overall satisfaction.

 

Facilitating Community Information Seeking Using the Internet:

Findings from Three Public Library-Community Network Systems

Karen E. Pettigrew, Joan C. Durrance, and Kenton T. Unruh

Published online 21 June 2002

894

Pettigrew, Durrance, and Unruh report on data collected by survey,

interview, field observation and focus groups concerning three communities

recognized for community information networks in which the local public

library played a leading role. The survey was posted for 73 days on the

website of each network and yielded 197 responses providing insights on how

the public uses CI systems, barriers encountered, and resulting benefits to

users and communities. Responding users were diverse demographically, and

sought a wide variety of information types. The information types were

broader than previous CI studies with a strong emphasis on employment,

volunteerism, social services, local history and genealogy, sale, exchange

and donation of goods, news, and technical information. Barriers identified

were technological, economic, geographic, search skill related, cognitive,

and psychological, as well as a large class of information related barriers

concerning the quality of the information provided, its accessibility, and

security. Users are identified who browse the CI system with particular

interest in discovering material of potential value to others. The systems

are valued and used by the adult population and seem to strengthen existing

communities while stimulating the formation of information communities.

A Case Study of Information-Seeking Behavior in 7-Year-Old Children in

a Semistructured Situation

Linda Z. Cooper

Published online 27 June 2002

904

Cooper identifies search strategies in 21 seven year old children

(entering Piaget's concrete operational stage), and compares these to those

characterized by a model of adult search strategies with a particular

interest on the impact of visual information. Videotapes were made of

behavior at a bookshelf of the children in their regularly scheduled media

center class and in visits outside the class time. Children largely ignored

the camera and commented on the videotapes in a debriefing session. Field

notes were also kept. The analysis produced counts of strategy types using

the Belkin model. Thirty-three books on spiders were added to the

collection and filed normally in Dewey 595.4. A CD-ROM encyclopedia was

also made available and both were utilized. Nine search sessions on the

CD-ROM encyclopedia were recorded and a Scan/Learn/Recognize strategy was

favored. At the shelf a Scan/Select/Recognize strategy was common with only

a few looking beyond the cover to make a selection. Metadata use was

discussed and the children agreed it should be used. It was used in the

CD-ROM search but not at the shelves. There is a tendency to rely on visual

information if available, and it appears the Belkin model can be used to

characterize children's search behavior.

The Effects of Menu Design on Information-Seeking Performance and

User's Attitude on the World Wide Web

Byeong-Min Yu and Seak-Zoon Roh

Published online 16 July 2002

923

Yu and Roh investigate the effects of providing a simple menu, a global

and local navigation menu, and a pull-down menu on searching and browsing

speed, as well as the user's perception of the appeal of each menu form and

the degree of disorientation it might cause. The site was a shopping center

with items and prices that could be approached by way of a simple menu with

a hierarchal structure, a menu which retained global links across the top

of the screen, with local links in a frame to the left, or a pull down menu

design. Each of 21 student subjects was given ten searching and five

browsing tasks assigned in three treatments, and responded to a post

exercise questionnaire using a five point Likert scale on attitude toward

the menus. Time was measured from the subjects' indication of starting

until the price was provided, and the procedure repeated three times over a

three-week interval with treatment switching. A repeated measure ANOVA

showed a significant difference among the designs on search speed with the

pull-down menu leading the other two. In browsing speed pull-down and

global/local were not significantly different but both bettered the simple

menu. Attitude and disorientation showed no significant differences.

On Using Genetic Algorithms for Multimodal Relevance Optimization in

Information Retrieval

M. Boughanem, C. Chrisment, and L. Tamine

Published online 20 June 2002

934

Boughanem, Chrisment, and Tamine use 144,186 documents and 25 queries

from the TREC corpus AP88 to evaluate a genetic algorithm for multiple

query evaluation against single query evaluation. They demonstrate niche

construction by the use of a genetic technique to reproduce queries more

often if they retrieve more relevant documents (genotypic sharing), or if

they have close evaluation results (phenotypic sharing).New documents

generated in each iteration are ranked by a merge based on one of these two

principles. Genotypic sharing yields improvements of from 6% to 15% over

single query evaluation, and phenotypic sharing shows from 5% to 15%

improvement. Thus the niching technique appears to offer the possibility of

successful merging of different query expressions.

An Investigation of the Influence of Indexing Exhaustivity and Term

Distributions on a Document Space

Dietmar Wolfram and Jin Zhang

Published online 10 July 2002

943

Wolfram and Zhang are interested in the effect of different indexing

exhaustivity, by which they mean the number of terms chosen, and of

different index term distributions and different term weighting methods on

the resulting document cluster organization. The Distance Angle Retrieval

Environment, DARE, which provides a two dimensional display of retrieved

documents was used to represent the document clusters based upon a

document's distance from the searcher's main interest, and on the angle

formed by the document, a point representing a minor interest, and the

point representing the main interest. If the centroid and the origin of the

document space are assigned as major and minor points the average distance

between documents and the centroid can be measured providing an indication

of cluster organization. in the form of a size normalized similarity

measure. Using 500 records from NTIS and nine models created by

intersecting low, observed, and high exhaustivity levels ( based upon a

negative binomial distribution) with shallow, observed, and steep term

distributions (based upon a Zipf distribution) simulation runs were

preformed using inverse document frequency, inter-document term frequency,

and inverse document frequency based upon both inter and intra-document

frequencies. Low exhaustivity and shallow distributions result in a more

dense document space and less effective retrieval. High exhaustivity and

steeper distributions result in a more diffuse space.

A Comparison of Foreign Authorship Distribution in JASIST and the

Journal of Documentation

Shaoyi He and Amanda Spink

Published online 10 July 2002

953

He and Spink count the first authors in JASIST and JDoc from 1950 to

1999 whose affiliation is outside the country of origin of each publication

and record the time period and the author's geographic location. Foreign

authorship in JASIST increased nearly four fold from 1995 to 1999 and the

number of represented locations 3.6 times while in the same time period

JDoc's foreign authorship doubled and foreign locations increased four

fold. The largest foreign location for JDoc is the USA and the largest

foreign location for JASIST is the UK. Canada is second on both lists.

Brief Communication

Work Tasks and Socio-Cognitive Relevance: A Specific Example

Birger Hjorland and Frank Sejer Christensen

Published online 20 June 2002

960

Finally, in a brief communication, Hjorland and Christensen provide an

analyzed example in order to clarify their views on relevance. A

physician's information seeking focus in dealing with mental illness is

seen as largely determined by his social cognitive state, with complexity

increasing as the individual's understanding of the topic deviates from

mainstream thinking. The physician's viewpoint on the disease will

influence terminology utilized, and an eclectic attitude toward the disease

will result in more broad criteria of relevance. Relevance is seen as a

tool toward meeting an individual goal.

Book Reviews

The Modern Invention of Information: Discourse, History, and Power.

Frank Exner, Little Bear

Published online 23 May 2002

966

Identifying and Analyzing User Needs: A Complete Handbook and

Ready-to-Use Assessment Workbook with Disk.

Ethelene Whitmire

Published online 13 June 2002

966

Designing with JavaScript: Creating Dynamic Web Pages.

Terrence A. Brooks

Published online 6 June 2002

967

Principles of Web Design.

Dale A. Stirling

Published online 6 June 2002

968

The Laws of the Web: Patterns in the Ecology of Information.

Eric G. Ackermann

Published online 20 June 2002

969

CALL FOR PAPERS

A Perspectives Issue on Knowledge Management in Asia

Published online 28 June 2002

971

----------

[Note: The ASIST home page

<http://www.asis.org/Publications/JASIS/tocs.html> contains the Table of

Contents and abstracts from Bert Boyce's "In This Issue" from January 1993

(Volume 44) to date.

The John Wiley Interscience site <http://www.interscience.wiley.com>

includes issues from 1986 (Volume 37) to date. Guests have access only to

tables of contents and abstracts. Registered users of the interscience

site have access to the full text of these issues and to preprints.]

 

oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

 

 Volume 53, No 12

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.orgasis-l@asis.org  [Asis-l] JASIST TOC: Volume 53, Number 12;   16 September 2002

 

Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology

JASIST

VOLUME 53, NUMBER 12

[Note: URLs for viewing contents of JASIST from past issues are at the

bottom. Immediately below, the contents of Bert Boyce's "In This Issue"

and from Claire McInerney and Ronald Day's introduction to the special

issue on Knowledge Management has been cut into the Table of Contents.]

Volume 53, Issue 12, 2002.

EDITORIAL

In This Issue

Bert R. Boyce

973

RESEARCH

An Exploratory Study of Malaysian Publication Productivity in Computer

Science and Information Technology

Yinian Gu

Published online 7 August 2002

974

Gu characterizes the publication activity of computer science and

information technology researchers in Malaysia by data collected through

searches restricted to 1990-1999 in COMPENDX, IEEE Electronic Library, and

INSPEC. These searches supplied 461 records. The first four years

contributed 20% with growth to 80% in the last six years. University

researchers contribute 93%, and 56% are contributed by the three most

productive institutions. Nearly 60% are conference papers.

Dynamic and Evolutionary Updates of Classificatory Schemes in

Scientific Journal Structures

Loet Leydesdorff

Published online 7 August 2002

987

In order to determine ``central tendency journals,'' Leydesdorff

suggests the use of factor analysis on both the cited and citing halves of

a journal-journal citation matrix drawn from citations to and from a

journal of interest with the use of a threshold. A test using JASIST

produces different clusters with changing journals for different time

periods. Such changing classifications of journals are seen as a means of

generating a hypothesis for the next state. The use of fixed sets of

journals to indicate a topical class for analysis of work in a subject will

not reflect reality over time.

Conceptualizing Documentation on the Web: An Evaluation of Different

Heuristic-Based Models for Counting Links between University Web Sites

Mike Thelwall

Published online 8 August 2002

995

Thelwall considers three possible levels of aggregation for counting

links between entities by comparing the incoming links at four levels to

each of 108 United Kingdom university sites. There is no clear generally

accepted definition for a Web page, or a Web document, but a Web site is

normally associated with a domain name, or perhaps the domain name and the

same first few directories. A working definition for a Web document is ``a

body of work with a consistent identifiable theme produced by a single

author or collaborating team. It may consist of any number of partial or

whole unrestricted access electronic files retrievable over the Web.''

Thelwall suggests developing heuristics for aggregating a Web document

either by content and link structure, or by URL analysis, and he evaluates

four URL-based heuristics; individual page, directory, domain name, and

University, where all domain names belonging to a University are treated as

a document. Using the UK's Research Assessment Exercise which assessed

research contributions of individual universities as a standard, and a

crawler created database of the 108 university sites using only those links

found on the home page with duplicates removed, link counts and research

productivity show significant correlation at the 0.1% level using Spearman

for all four definitions. Link counts between pairs of universities and the

product of their productivity suggest that the domain model is the most

robust and the directory model also meaningfully reduces outliers. Link

counts strongly correlate with productivity.

SPECIAL TOPIC SECTION: KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT

Guest Editors: Claire McInerney and Ronald Day

Introduction to the JASIST Special Section on Knowledge Management

Claire McInerney and Ronald Day

Published online 6 August 2002

1008

Our task in editing this issue has been to reinvigorate the Knowledge

Management debate by a collection of articles that theoretically and

practically investigate Knowledge Management from an extended professional

context and from a social context. We have, therefore, included articles

that extend and challenge Knowledge Management as both a theoretical

discourse and as a practical activity. Although the articles included here

might create controversy both by their content and their inclusion in the

Knowledge Management debate, we feel that only by a reevaluation of

Knowledge Management will its central terms be more fully explored and will

its relevance be historically extended and socially engaged.

Thus, this special issue of JASIST on Knowledge Management includes

conceptual and empirical studies covering a broad discursive and social

spectrum over three continents. It is certainly not meant to be

comprehensive of every aspect of KM, nor is it meant to include research

that simply extends the current parameters of KM. Instead, it is an attempt

to assemble a group of interesting, largely interdisciplinary scholarly

readings and research articles that account for KM's past historical

significance and for its future promise as a source of theory and practice

across a variety of fields.

Knowledge Management and the Dynamic Nature of Knowledge

Claire McInerney

Published online 25 July 2002

1009

The issue begins with a general overview of Knowledge Management by

Claire McInerney, touching upon some of the central themes of Knowledge

Management and new directions for its development.

Knowledge Management: Hype, Hope, or Help?

David C. Blair

Published online 26 July 2002

1019

David Blair's article takes a comprehensive view of Knowledge

Management, following its relationship to data or information management

and its still promising possibilities.

Knowledge Integration in Virtual Teams: The Potential Role of KMS

Maryam Alavi and Amrit Tiwana

Published online 19 July 2002

1029

Maryam Alavi and Amrit Tiwana identify four challenges to knowledge

integration in virtual team environments and propose knowledge management

system (KMS) approaches to meet these challenges.

Mundane Knowledge Management and Microlevel Organizational Learning:

An Ethological Approach

Elisabeth Davenport

Published online 25 July 2002

1038

Elisabeth Davenport explores the concepts of mundane knowledge

management and organizational ethology in a case study of a project to

promote virtual enterprise formation.

Knowledge Management in Three Organizations: An Exploratory Study

F. C. Gray Southon, Ross J. Todd, and Megan Seneque

Published online 25 July 2002

1047

F.C. Gray Southon, Ross Todd, and Megan Seneque, report on a study in

Australia that examined knowledge structures in three organizations: a law

firm, an educational institution, and a government council.

Organizational Measures as a Form of Knowledge Management: A

Multitheoretic, Communication-Based Exploration

Jennifer K. Lehr and Ronald E. Rice

Published online 19 July 2002

1060

Jennifer Lehr and Ronald Rice explore Knowledge Management in terms of

four approaches to measurement.

Social Capital, Value, and Measure: Antonio Negri's Challenge to

Capitalism

Ronald E. Day

Published online 6 August 2002

1074

Ronald Day explores the notion of social capital in terms of the

problem of measure and value, particularly through the work of the Italian

philosopher and political economist, Antonio Negri.

----------

[Note: The ASIST home page

<http://www.asis.org/Publications/JASIS/tocs.html> contains the Table of

Contents and abstracts from Bert Boyce's "In This Issue" from January 1993

(Volume 44) to date.

The John Wiley Interscience site <http://www.interscience.wiley.com>

includes issues from 1986 (Volume 37) to date. Guests have access only to

tables of contents and abstracts. Registered users of the interscience

site have access to the full text of these issues and to preprints.]

 

Executive Director

American Society for Information Science and Technology

1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510

Silver Spring, MD 20910

FAX: (301) 495-0810

PHONE: (301) 495-0900

http://www.asis.org

 

 

 

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Information Supply

Gould, Sara [Sara.Gould@bl.uk]    Ifla-L (E-mail)   9 July 2002

 

The Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Information Supply

(With a special emphasis on Electronic Reserve) has posted its complete

Tables of Contents and abstracts, 1990-2002, volumes 1-13, at

www.morrislr.com.

 

Leslie R. Morris

Editor

The Journal of Interlibrary Loan, Document Delivery & Information Supply

(With a special emphasis on Electronic Reserve)

and

The Interlibrary Loan Policies Directory, 7th ed.

54 Northwood Dr.

Lancaster, NY 14043

USA

716-686-0906

morrislr@niagara.edu

www.morrislr.com

Ariel: 207.10.157.18

 

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PRISM, the e-newsletter of the ALA's Office for Accreditation

 

Karen O'Brien [kobrien@ALA.ORG]   JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU  4 April 2002

 

The newest edition of PRISM, the e-newsletter of the ALA's Office for

Accreditation, is available at http://www.ala.org/alaorg/oa/prism.html.

Comments and corrections are welcomed as well as submissions and story

ideas for future editions. Thank you to all who contributed to this

edition.

Please excuse any receipt duplication if you happen to be on multiple

lists.

Karen O'Brien, Assistant Director

Office for Accreditation

American Library Association

50 E. Huron, (4-40 HP)

Chicago, IL 60611-2795

Phone 800-545-2433, ext. 2434

Facsimile 312-280-2433

kobrien@ala.org

http://www.ala.org/accreditation.html

 

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Fall 2002

 

Gretchen Whitney [gwhitney@UTK.EDU]    JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU   Prism 2002 fall edition (fwd)  29 August 2002

 

---------- Forwarded message ----------

Date: Thu, 29 Aug 2002 08:09:17 -0500

From: Karen O'Brien <kobrien@ala.org>

Subject: Prism 2002 fall edition

 

The fall 2002 edition of Prism, the newsletter of the ALA's Office for

Accreditation, is available at http://www.ala.org/alaorg/oa/prism.html.

This edition includes the latest accreditation actions and much more.

 

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Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

    Version 42

Charles W. Bailey, Jr. [cbailey@UH.EDUJESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU 20 April 2002

Version 42 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

is now available. This selective bibliography presents over

1,550 articles, books, and other printed and electronic sources

that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing

efforts on the Internet.

HTML: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html

Acrobat: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf

The HTML document is designed for interactive use. Each

major section is a separate file. There are links to sources

that are freely available on the Internet. It can be can be

searched using Boolean operators. The HTML document includes

three sections not found in the Acrobat file: (1) Archive

(prior versions of the bibliography), (2) Scholarly Electronic

Publishing Resources (over 230 related Web sites), and

(3) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog (list of new

resources that is updated on weekdays).

http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/archive/sepa.htm

http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepr.htm

http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepw.htm

The Acrobat file is designed for printing. The printed

bibliography is over 130 pages long. The Acrobat file is over

340 KB.

The bibliography has the following sections (revised sections are

marked with an asterisk):

Table of Contents

1 Economic Issues*

2 Electronic Books and Texts

2.1 Case Studies and History*

2.2 General Works

2.3 Library Issues*

3 Electronic Serials

3.1 Case Studies and History

3.2 Critiques

3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals*

3.4 General Works*

3.5 Library Issues*

3.6 Research*

4 General Works*

5 Legal Issues

5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*

5.2 License Agreements*

5.3 Other Legal Issues*

6 Library Issues

6.1 Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*

6.2 Digital Libraries*

6.3 General Works*

6.4 Information Integrity and Preservation*

7 New Publishing Models*

8 Publisher Issues*

8.1 Digital Rights Management*

9 Technical Reports and E-Prints*

Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author

Appendix B. About the Author

Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources includes

the following sections:

Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*

Digital Libraries

Electronic Books and Texts*

Electronic Serials

General Electronic Publishing*

Images*

Legal*

Preservation

Publishers

SGML and Related Standards*

Technical Reports and E-Prints*

An article about the bibliography has been published

in The Journal of Electronic Publishing:

 

http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/07-02/bailey.html

 

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Version 43

 

Charles W. Bailey, Jr. [cbailey@uh.edu]   ASIS-L@ASIS.ORG     22 June 2002

[Asis-l] Version 43, Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

 

Version 43 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

is now available. This selective bibliography presents over

1,600 articles, books, and other printed and electronic sources

that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing

efforts on the Internet.

HTML: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html

Acrobat: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf

 

The HTML document is designed for interactive use. Each

major section is a separate file. There are links to sources

that are freely available on the Internet. It can be can be

searched using Boolean operators.

The HTML document includes three sections not found in

the Acrobat file:

(1) Archive (prior versions of the bibliography)

http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/archive/sepa.htm

(2) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources (over 230 related

Web sites)

http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepr.htm

(3) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog (list of new

resources that is updated on weekdays)

http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepw.htm

The Acrobat file is designed for printing. The printed

bibliography is over 130 pages long. The Acrobat file is over

370 KB.

The bibliography has the following sections (revised sections are

marked with an asterisk):

Table of Contents

1 Economic Issues*

2 Electronic Books and Texts

2.1 Case Studies and History*

2.2 General Works*

2.3 Library Issues*

3 Electronic Serials

3.1 Case Studies and History*

3.2 Critiques

3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals

3.4 General Works*

3.5 Library Issues*

3.6 Research*

4 General Works

5 Legal Issues

5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*

5.2 License Agreements*

5.3 Other Legal Issues

6 Library Issues

6.1 Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*

6.2 Digital Libraries*

6.3 General Works*

6.4 Information Integrity and Preservation*

7 New Publishing Models*

8 Publisher Issues

8.1 Digital Rights Management

9 Technical Reports and E-Prints*

Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author

Appendix B. About the Author

Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources includes

the following sections:

Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*

Digital Libraries

Electronic Books and Texts*

Electronic Serials*

General Electronic Publishing*

Images*

Legal*

Preservation

Publishers

SGML and Related Standards

Technical Reports and E-Prints

An article about the bibliography has been published

in The Journal of Electronic Publishing:

http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/07-02/bailey.html

 

ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

 

Version 44

 

Charles W. Bailey, Jr. [cbailey@uh.eduASIS-L@ASIS.ORG  12 August 2002

[Asis-l] Version 44, Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

 

Version 44 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

is now available. This selective bibliography presents over

1,650 articles, books, and other printed and electronic sources

that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing

efforts on the Internet.

HTML: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html

Acrobat: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf

 

The HTML document is designed for interactive use. Each

major section is a separate file. There are links to sources

that are freely available on the Internet. It can be can be

searched using Boolean operators.

The HTML document includes three sections not found in

the Acrobat file:

(1) Archive (prior versions of the bibliography)

http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/archive/sepa.htm

(2) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources (over 230 related

Web sites)

http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepr.htm

(3) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog (list of new

resources that is updated on weekdays)

http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepw.htm

The Acrobat file is designed for printing. The printed

bibliography is 140 pages long. The Acrobat file is over

380 KB.

The bibliography has the following sections (revised sections are

marked with an asterisk):

Table of Contents

1 Economic Issues*

2 Electronic Books and Texts

2.1 Case Studies and History*

2.2 General Works*

2.3 Library Issues

3 Electronic Serials

3.1 Case Studies and History*

3.2 Critiques

3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals*

3.4 General Works*

3.5 Library Issues*

3.6 Research*

4 General Works*

5 Legal Issues

5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*

5.2 License Agreements

5.3 Other Legal Issues

6 Library Issues

6.1 Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*

6.2 Digital Libraries*

6.3 General Works*

6.4 Information Integrity and Preservation*

7 New Publishing Models*

8 Publisher Issues*

8.1 Digital Rights Management*

9 Technical Reports and E-Prints*

Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author

Appendix B. About the Author

Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources includes

the following sections:

Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata

Digital Libraries*

Electronic Books and Texts

Electronic Serials*

General Electronic Publishing*

Images

Legal*

Preservation

Publishers

SGML and Related Standards*

Technical Reports and E-Prints

An article about the bibliography has been published

in The Journal of Electronic Publishing:

http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/07-02/bailey.html

 

Best Regards,

Charles

Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Assistant Dean for Systems,

University of Houston, Library Administration,

114 University Libraries, Houston, TX 77204-2000.

E-mail: cbailey@uh.edu. Voice: (713) 743-9804.

Fax: (713) 743-9811. http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm

 

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SCI-5 Columns from _Science & Technology Libraries

 

Gerry Mckiernan [gerrymck@iastate.eduasis-l@asis.org    11 September 2002

 

SCI-5 Columns from _Science & Technology Libraries_

I am pleased to announce the publication of the first* two* of my SCI-5 columns for _Science and Technology Libraries_ (Haworth):

I. "E-Print Servers," _Science & Technology Libraries_ Vol. 20, No.2/3 (2001): 149-158.

Chemistry Preprint Server

[ http://www.chemweb.com/ ]

Clinical Mediine & Health Research NetPrints(tm)

[ http://clinmed.netprints.org ]

CogPrints: Cognitive Sciences E-Print Server

[http://cogprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/ ]

Mathematics Preprint Server

[ http://www.mathpreprints.com/ ]

PrePRINT Network

[ http://www.osti.gov/preprint/ ]

II. "The Hidden Web," _Science & Technology Libraries_ Vol. 20, No. 4 (2001): 65-74

INFOMINE

[http://infomine.ucr.edu/ ]

CompletePlanet

[ http://www.completeplanet.com/ ]

direct search

NOW [http://www.freepint.com/gary/direct.htm ]

InvisibleWeb.com

[ http://www.invisibleweb.com/ ]

ProFusion

[ http://www.profusion.com ]

Enjoy!

/Gerry

Gerry McKiernan

Hidden Librarian

Iowa State University

Ames IA 50011

gerrymck@iastate.edu

 

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Studies in Media & Information Literacy Education (SIMILE) -     Volume 2 Issue 2 May 2002

Hawkins, Tamara [thawkins@UTPRESS.UTORONTO.CA]   JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU

15 June 2002

 

SIMILE Volume 2 Issue 2 May 2002 is now available at

www.utpjournals.com/simile

-------------------

Announcing the sixth issue (see table of contents and abstracts

below) of

Studies in Media & Information Literacy Education (SIMILE), a new

e-journal

published by the University of Toronto Press.

The journal, which is currently available for free, is intended to

be an electronic meeting place for anyone and everyone interested in the

broad subject of media literacy. The journal will be published four times

per year, in February, May, August, and November. Each issue will contain

three or four full-length refereed articles from scholars approaching media

literacy from a wide variety of perspectives.

SIMILE hopes to bring together scholars and educators at all levels

from the

research university to the grade school to the community college and

everything in between. The submission of theoretically-based work

that has

been tested and applied in the field-the kind of work that demands

collaboration between university-based researchers and, for example,

high

school teachers-is strongly encouraged.

SIMILE Volume 2 Issue 2 May 2002

Scott Robert Olson

Contaminations and hybrids: Indigenous identity and resistance to

global media

ABSTRACT

Postcolonial theory has noted how the dissemination of transnational

media has accelerated the hybridization of culture (Bhabha, 1997;

Paspatergiadis, 1995; Spivak, 1995), a process that is often likened to

infection or contamination (Fisher, 1995). In such a metaphor, the media are

the viral agent. Identity cannot help but be affected, creating numerous

cultural problems for the subaltern and indigenous peoples. In order to

counter the strategies of transnational media, identified by Sholle (1988)

as sedimentation, reification, adaptation, mollification, and

depolitization, the subaltern are resorting to counter tactics identified

here as eruption, deconstruction, mutation, intensification, and

politicization. At the same time, the subaltern use the media available to

them to enact their own alternative communication strategies of dialogue,

mutual interest, rule changing, revolution, secession, and solipsism

Kate Manuel

How first-year college students read Popular Science: An experiment

in teaching media literacy skills

ABSTRACT

Over the course of three consecutive quarters during the 2000-2001

academic year, 63 students enrolled in an information literacy course at a

western American public university were required to conduct a close reading

of an article from Popular Science after preliminary instruction in key

information and media literacy concepts. Students' responses to questions

about (1) the nature of the information and documentation presented by the

text, (2) the purpose and intended audience of the text, and (3) the

authorship and point of view of the text were examined to see to what degree

students were able to think critically about these articles. Findings

suggest that, even after basic instruction in information and media literacy

skills, many students have difficulties identifying problems (biases,

authors' lack of credentials, lack of sources, etc.) with information

resources largely because of the ways in which they typically misread texts

and make mistaken inferences from them. This article provides quantitative

and qualitative descriptions of students' misreadings and mistaken

inferences; discusses possible explanations for students' difficulties in

interpreting texts; and examines the implications of these difficulties for

information literacy and media literacy education.

Shehla Burney

Manufacturing nationalism: Post-September 11 discourse in United

States media

ABSTRACT

Using Chomsky's notion of the manufacture of consent as well as

Said's critiques of Orientalism and culture and imperialism, this article

presents a theory and way of looking at post September 11 discourse in

United States media as a hegemonic, state-oriented manufacturing of

nationalism. Story and memory, images, words and icons, ritual, spectacle,

advertising, and commercialism are deployed subliminally to construct

self-serving nationalist mythologies. These grand narratives of nationalism

evoke meanings and ideologies, which produce an us/them nationalist

discourse that demonizes and dehumanizes the other. The US[A]/ THEM

discourse deflects attention elsewhere from key critical and moral issues

raised by the United States war against terrorism.

Cornel Pewewardy

From subhuman to superhuman: Images of First Nations peoples in

comic books

ABSTRACT

This article chronicles the ways in which First Nations peoples are

portrayed in comic books in the United States. Rendered first as subhuman

and then as superhuman, First Nations peoples were consistently presented as

different in comics. The superhuman characteristics that are occasionally

attributed to First Nations representatives in 20th century media are,

ideologically, not much different from the subhuman characteristics

attributed to First Nations representatives in the 19th century. Both

superhuman and subhuman portrayals serve to exclude, isolate, and deframe

First Nations peoples from a common humanity. A critical analysis of this

phenomenon can provide students with powerful insights into the challenges

that educators face as critical multicultural educators and points the way

to creating oppositional pedagogies.

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Web-based Journal Manuscript Management and Peer-Review Software and Systems

Gerry Mckiernan [gerrymck@iastate.edu]   ASiS-L@asis.org   7 September 2002

[Asis-l] FULLTEXT: "Web-based Journal Manuscript Management and Peer-Review Software and Systems"

FULL TEXT

Web-based Journal Manuscript Management

and

Peer-Review Software and Systems

I am pleased to announce the FREE availability of one of my recent articles "Web-based Journal Manuscript Management and Peer-Review Software and Systems" _Library Hi Tech News_ 19(7) (August 2002): 31-43.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/fm=html/rpsv/cw/mcb/07419058/v19n7/s5002/p2l

In recent years, a variety of experimental and commercial systems have been developed that facilitate the management and review of scholarly manuscripts for electronic and paper publication. Among the established and recent Web-based systems are:

· AllenTrack*

· Bench>Press*

· EdiKitSM

· ESPERE

· Journal Assistant*

· Manuscript Central*

· Rapid Review*

For each, a brief overview is provided, as is a outline of the features and functionalities of the system/service, contact information, Web site, and vendor. In addition, a listing of select journals that are published using a respective software/system are also listed within each profile.

We are most grateful to Eileen Breen of Emerald / MCB University Press [http://www.emeraldinsight.com/] for facilitating access to this article.

 

Enjoy!

/Gerry

Gerry McKiernan

Open Access Librarian

Iowa State University

Ames IA 50011

gerrymck@iastate.edu

 

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END