NEWS FROM OTHER JOURNALS SECTION

MARCH 2003  ISSUE

 Editorial note:

This section contains items culled from various Internet news services, discussion lists and other announcements.  Unless specifically noted, I have not visited the sites, used any of the software, reviewed the literature, or written the news items.  I present this digest to you in good faith but cannot vouch for the accuracy of its content.  

Kerry Smith

 

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D-Lib

October 2002

The October 2002 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

From:  Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]                            Mon 14/10/2002 9:32 PM

To:  sigdl-l@asis.org; asis-l@asis.org

[Sending for Bonnie Wilson. Dick Hill]

 

Greetings:

 

The October 2002 issue of D-Lib Magazine http://www.dlib.org/ is now available.

 

There are four articles, a report on a major digital library conference,

several smaller features in D-Lib Magazine's 'In Brief' column, excerpts

from recent press releases, and news of upcoming conferences and other

items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  The Featured Collection for

October is Making the Macintosh: Technology and Culture in Silicon Valley.

 

The articles are:

 

Comparing Library and User Related Costs of Print and Electronic Journal

Collections: A First Step Towards a Comprehensive Analysis Carol Hansen Montgomery, Drexel University and Donald W. King, University

of Pittsburgh

 

Open Citation Linking: The Way Forward

Steve Hitchcock, Tim Brody, Christopher Gutteridge, Les Carr, Wendy Hall

and Stevan Harnad, University of Southampton, and Donna Bergmark and Carl

Lagoze, Cornell University

 

Toward a Global Digital Library: Generalizing US-Korea Collaboration on

Digital Libraries

US-Korea Collaboration on Digital Libraries Edward A. Fox, Virginia Tech;

Reagan W. Moore, San Diego Supercomputer Center; Ronald L. Larsen,

University of Pittsburgh; Sung Hyon Myaeng, Chungnam National University;

and Sung-Hyuk Kim, Sookmyung Women's University

 

Information Retrieval by Semantic Analysis and Visualization of the Concept

Space of D-Lib Magazine

Junliang Zhang, University of North Carolina and Javed Mostafa and Himansu

Tripathy, Indiana University

 

The Conference Report is:

 

Report on the Sixth European Conference on Digital Libraries: 15 - 18

September 2002, Rome, Italy

George Buchanan, Middlesex University

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

 

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

 

The Australian National University Sunsite, Canberra, Australia http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib

 

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen,

Goettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

 

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

 

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

 

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the October 2002 issue

of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is a delay

between the time of the magazine is released in the United States and the

time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

 

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December 2002

 

From:  Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]                Tue 17/12/2002 11:30 PM

To:  sigdl-l@asis.org; asis-l@asis.org

 

[Forwarded.  Dick Hill]

 

Greetings:

 

The December 2002 issue of D-Lib Magazine

http://www.dlib.org/ is now available.

 

There are five articles, an opinion piece, a conference

report, several smaller features in D-Lib Magazine's 'In

Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news

of upcoming conferences and other items of interest in

'Clips and Pointers'.  The Featured Collection for December

is the Univerisity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's Weather World 2010 (WW2010) project web site.

 

The opinion piece is:

 

A Framework for Digital Library Research: Broadening the

Vision

Dagobert Soergel, University of Maryland

 

The articles are:

 

Uncovering Information Hidden in Web Archives: A Glimpse at

Web Analysis Building on Data Warehouses

Andreas Rauber, and Robert M. Bruckner, Vienna University of Technology; Andreas Aschenbrenner, Vienna University of Technology and ERPANET; Oliver Witvoet, University of Vienna; and Max Kaiser, Austrian National Library

 

Towards Continuous Web Archiving: First Results and an

Agenda for the Future

Julien Masanes, Bibliotheque Nationale de France

 

The Open Video Digital Library

Gary Marchionini and Gary Geisler, University of North

Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

After Migration to an Electronic Journal Collection: Impact

on Faculty and Doctoral Students

Donald W. King, University of Pittsburgh and Carol Hansen Montgomery, Ph.D., Drexel University

 

Who Is Reading On-line Education Journals? Why? And What Are They Reading? Lawrence M. Rudner and Jennifer S. Gellmann, ERIC/University of Maryland, and Marie Miller-Whitehead, TVEE.ORG

 

The Conference Report is:

 

Report on eLibrary@UBC 4: Research, Collaboration and the Digital Library - Visions for 2010 Lee Iverson, University of British Columbia

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

 

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

 

The Australian National University Sunsite, Canberra,

Australia

http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib

 

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen, Goettingen, Germany http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

 

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

 

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

 

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the December 2002 issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is a delay between the time of the magazine is released in the United States and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

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January 2003

 

From:  Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]                        Thu 16/01/2003 11:56 PM

To:  sigdl-l@asis.org; asis-l@asis.org

 

[Asis-l] Forwarded:  [Dlib-subscribers] The January 2003 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

 

[Forwarded.  Dick Hill]

 

(This message is being cross-posted.)

 

Greetings:

 

The January 2003 issue of D-Lib Magazine

http://www.dlib.org/ is now available.

 

There are six articles, three conference reports, several smaller features in D-Lib Magazine’s 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  The Featured Collection for January is the Univerisity of Virginia's "Mark Twain in His Times" web site, created by Stephen Railton.

 

 

The articles include:

 

On Making and Identifying a "Copy"

Norman Paskin, International DOI Foundation

 

Building Safety Systems with Dynamic Disseminations of Multimedia Digital Objects José H. Canós, Javier Jaén, Juan C. Lorente, and Jennifer Pérez, Polytechnic University of Valencia

 

MOAC - A Report on Integrating Museum and Archive Access in

the Online Archive of California

Richard Rinehart, University of California, Berkeley

 

DSpace: An Open Source Dynamic Digital Repository

MacKenzie Smith, Mary Barton, Margret Branschofsky, Greg McClellan, and Julie Harford Walker, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and Mick Bass, Dave Stuve, and Robert Tansley, Hewlett-Packard Labs

 

iVia Open Source Virtual Library System

Steve Mitchell, Margaret Mooney, Julie Mason, Gordon

Paynter, Johannes Ruscheinski, Artur Kedzierski, and Keith Humphreys, University of California, Riverside

 

Open Archives Activities and Experiences in Europe: An

Overview by the Open Archives Forum

Susanne Dobratz and Birgit Matthaei, Humbolt University,

Berlin

 

The Conference Reports are:

 

Digital Libraries: Advanced Methods and Technologies,

Digital Collections: Report on RCDL'2002 - the 4th

All-Russian Scientific Conference, Dubna, 15 - 17 October

2002

Leonid A. Kalinichenko, Russian Academy of Science; Vladimir

V. Korenkov, Vladislav P. Shirikov, and Alexey N. Sissakian, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research; and Oleg V. Sunturenko, Russian Foundation for Basic Research

 

ASIST 2002: Report on the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Information Science and Technology: 18 - 21 November 2002, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania David Robins, University of Pittsburgh

 

Report on the Fifth International Conference on Asian

Digital Libraries (ICADL 2002): 11 - 14 December 2002, Singapore Sally Jo Cunningham, University of Waikato

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

 

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

 

The Australian National University Sunsite, Canberra,

Australia

http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib

 

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen, Goettingen, Germany http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

 

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

 

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

 

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the January 2003 issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is a delay between the time of the magazine is released in the United States and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

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February 2003

 

From:  Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]               Tue 18/02/2003 9:50 PM

To:  asis-l@asis.org; sigdl-l@asis.org

 

[Forwarded.  Dick Hill]

 

Greetings:

 

The February 2003 issue of D-Lib Magazine

(http://www.dlib.org/) is now available.

 

This issue of D-Lib Magazine is a special issue on digital reference, a collaboration between D-Lib Magazine and Guest Editor, Joanne Silverstein, Information Institute of Syracuse, Syracuse University.

 

There are five articles, a book review, several smaller features in D-Lib Magazine's 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  The Featured Collection for February is the Univerisity of Michigan's web site "Flora and Fauna in the Great Lakes Region", with a description of the site contributed by Terri Geitgey.

 

The articles include:

 

Current State of Digital Reference in Primary and Secondary Education R. David Lankes, Syracuse University

 

The Technological Challenges of Digital Reference: An

Overview

Jeffrey Penka, OCLC Online Computer Library Center, Inc.

 

Question Negotiation and the Technological Environment

Joseph Janes, University of Washington and Joanne

Silverstein, Syracuse University

 

Evaluation of Chat Reference Service Quality: Pilot Study Marilyn Domas White, Eileen G. Abels, and Neal Kaske, University of Maryland

 

Visual Resource Reference: Collaboration Between Digital Museums and Digital Libraries Abby A. Goodrum, Syracuse University

 

The book reviewed is:

 

The Virtual Reference Librarian's Handbook

by Anne Grodzins Lipow, Neal-Schuman Publishers, Inc.,

January 2003

Reviewed by: Jennifer Barth and Kate Bejune, AskERIC

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

 

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

 

The Australian National University Sunsite, Canberra,

Australia

http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib

 

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen, Goettingen, Germany http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

 

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

 

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

 

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the February 2003 issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

 

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March 2003

 

 

From:  Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]               Wed 19/03/2003 12:12 AM

To:  asis-l@asis.org; sigdl-l@asis.org

[Forwarded.  Dick Hill]

 

Greetings:

 

The March 2003 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now available.

 

In this issue there are six articles, several smaller features in D-Lib

Magazine's 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news

of upcoming conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and

Pointers'. The Featured Collection for March is Strange Science" created by

Michon Scott.

 

The articles include:

 

The SCIELO Brazilian Scientific Journal Gateway and Open Archives: A Report

on the Development of the SciELO - Open Archives Data Provider Server Carlos Henrique Marcondes, Federal Fluminense University, Brazil, and Luis

Fernando Sayao, Nuclear Energy National Commission, Brazil

 

Usability of Hypermedia Educational e-Books

Paloma Diaz, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Spain.

 

Building upon the MyLibrary Concept to Better Meet the Information Needs of

College Students

Susan Gibbons, University of Rochester

 

Open Archives and UK Institutions: An Overview

Stephen Pinfield, University of Nottingham, United Kingdom

 

The Utah Digital Newspapers Project

Kenning Arlitsch and Karen Edge, University of Utah and L. Yapp, DiMeMa, Inc.

 

Examples of Practical Digital Libraries: Collections Built Internationally

Using Greenstone

Ian H. Witten, University of Waikato, New Zealand

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

 

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

 

The Australian National University Sunsite, Canberra, Australia http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib

 

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen,

Goettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

 

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

 

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

 

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the March 2003 issue

of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later. There is a delay

between the time the magazine is released in the United States and the time

when the mirroring process has been completed.)

 

 

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

 

 

_______________________________________________

DLib-Subscribers mailing list http://www.dlib.org/mailman/listinfo/dlib-subscribers

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FIRST MONDAY

 

volume 7, number 11

From:  Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]                                 Mon 25/11/2002 8:46 PM

To:  asis-l@asis.org

 

Dear Reader,

 

The November 2002 issue of First Monday (volume 7, number 11) is now available at http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_11/

 

-------

 

Table of Contents

 

Volume 7, Number 11 - November 4th 2002

 

The Lives and Death of Moore's Law

by Ilkka Tuomi

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_11/tuomi/

 

Reality Bytes: Cyberterrorism and Terrorist 'Use' of the Internet by Maura Conway http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_11/conway/

 

Corporate Cyberstalking: An Invitation to Build Theory

by Paul Bocij

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_11/bocij/

 

The 'Digital Divide' Among Financially Disadvantaged Families in Australia by Jennifer McLaren and Gianni Zappala http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_11/mclaren/

 

Exploring the Future of the Digital Divide through Ethnographic Futures Research by Matthew M. Mitchell http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_11/mitchell/

 

Examining the Determinants of Who is Hyperlinked to Whom: A Survey of Webmasters in Korea by Han Woo Park http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_11/park/

 

Copyright Contradictions in Scholarly Publishing

by John Willinsky http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_11/willinsky/

 

By Choice or by Chance: How the Internet Is Used to Prepare for, Manage, and Share Information about Emergencies by Laurie Putnam http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_11/putnam/

 

Control of B2B E-Commerce and the Impact on Industry Structure by Stephen S. Standifird and J. Christopher Sandvig http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_11/standifird/

 

Book Reviews

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_11/reviews/

 

----------------------------

 

You've received this message because you're registered to First Monday's Table of Contents service. You can unsubscribe to this service by sending a reply containing the word unsubscribe in the body of the message or use the form at http://firstmonday.org/join.html

 

First Monday Editorial Group

 

Executive Director

American Society for Information Science and Technology

1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510

Silver Spring, MD  20910

FAX: (301) 495-0810

PHONE: (301) 495-0900

 

http://www.asis.org

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

Vol 8, No 1,

January 2003

 

From:  Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]                           Tue 7/01/2003 9:28 PM

To:  asis-l@asis.org

 

[Forwarded.  Dick Hill]

 

Reply-To: "Edward J. Valauskas" <ejv@uic.edu>

Sender: Readership of First Monday <FIRSTMONDAY@LISTSERV.UIC.EDU>

From: "Edward J. Valauskas" <ejv@uic.edu>

Subject: First Monday January 2003

 

Dear Reader,

 

The January 2003 issue of First Monday (volume 8, number 1) is now

available at http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_1/

 

-------

 

Table of Contents

 

Volume 8, Number 1 - January 6th 2003

 

The Usability of Open Source Software

by David M. Nichols and Michael B. Twidale

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_1/nichols/

 

The Institutional Design of Open Source Programming: Implications for

Addressing Complex Public Policy and Management Problems by Charles M.

Schweik and Andrei Semenovn

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_1/schweik/

 

Digitizing Old Photographs for the Web

by Ruth Garner, Mark Gillingham, and Yong Zhao

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_1/garner/

 

A Critical Analysis of the Adoption and Utilization of the Internet in

Thailand for Educational Purposes by Noppadol Prammanee

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_1/prammanee/

 

Combat Power and Enterprise Competitiveness

by John S. Quarterman, Ken Harker, and Peter H. Salus

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_1/quarterman/

 

A Gendered World: Students and Instructional Technologies

by Indhu Rajagopal with Nis Bojin

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_1/rajagopal/

 

Open Networks, Closed Regimes: The Impact of the Internet on

Authoritarian Rule by Shanthi Kalathil and Taylor C. Boas

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_1/kalathil/

 

----------------------------

 

You've received this message because you're registered to First

Monday's Table of Contents service. You can unsubscribe to this service

by sending a reply containing the word unsubscribe in the body of the

message or use the form at http://firstmonday.org/join.html

 

First Monday Editorial Group

Executive Director

American Society for Information Science and Technology

1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510

Silver Spring, MD  20910

FAX: (301) 495-0810

PHONE: (301) 495-0900

 

http://www.asis.org

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Volume 8, number 2

 

February 2003

 

From:  Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]                          Tue 11/02/2003 9:22 PM

To:  asis-l@asis.org; sigdl0l@asis.org; sigiii-l@asis.org

 

[Forwarded.  Dick Hill]

 

Date: Mon, 10 Feb 2003 20:42:19 -0600

 

From: "Edward J. Valauskas" <ejv@uic.edu>

Subject: First Monday February 2003

 

To: FIRSTMONDAY@LISTSERV.UIC.EDU

 

Dear Reader,

 

The February 2003 issue of First Monday (volume 8, number 2) is now

available at http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_2/

 

-------

 

Table of Contents

 

Volume 8, Number 2 - February 3rd 2003

 

Reconciling interiors: The screen as installation

by James Charlton

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_2/charlton/

 

Cyborg logs and collective stream of (de)consciousness capture for

producing attribution-free informatic content such as cyborglogs

by Steve Mann

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_2/mann/

 

Collaborative development of open content: A process model to unlock

the potential for African universities

by Derek Keats

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_2/keats/

 

Electronic citizenship and global social movements

by Liza Tsaliki

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_2/tsaliki/

 

A study of Internet usage in Nigerian universities: A case study of

Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria

by K.O. Jagboro

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_2/jagboro/

 

E-media in development: Combining multiple e-media types

by Robin van Koert

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_2/koert/

 

Cybermethods: An assessment

by Hellen Megens and Brian Martin

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_2/megens/

 

Book reviews

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_2/reviews/

 

----------------------------

 

You've received this message because you're registered to First Monday's

Table of Contents service. You can unsubscribe to this service by sending a

reply containing the word unsubscribe in the body of the message or use the

form at http://firstmonday.org/join.html

 

First Monday Editorial Group

Executive Director

American Society for Information Science and Technology

1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510

Silver Spring, MD  20910

FAX: (301) 495-0810

PHONE: (301) 495-0900

 

http://www.asis.org

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Volume 8, No 3

 

March 2003

 

From:  Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]                       Tue 18/03/2003 8:55 PM

 

To:  asis-l@asis.org; sigifp-l@asis.org; sigdl-l@asis.org

 

[Forwarded.  Dick Hill]

 

Sender: Readership of First Monday <FIRSTMONDAY@LISTSERV.UIC.EDU>

From: "Edward J. Valauskas" <ejv@uic.edu>

Subject: First Monday March 2003

Comments: To: firstmonday@uic.edu

To: FIRSTMONDAY@LISTSERV.UIC.EDU

 

Dear Reader,

 

The March 2003 issue of First Monday (volume 8, number 3) is now

available at http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_3/

 

-------

 

Table of Contents

 

Volume 8, Number 3 - March 3rd 2003

 

Information process patents in the U.S. and Europe: Policy avoidance

and policy divergence by Brian Kahin

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_3/kahin/

 

Just how open must an open network be for an open network to be labeled

"open"?

by Jonathan Sallet

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_3/sallet/

 

The processed book

by Joseph J. Esposito http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_3/esposito/

 

Connection discrepancies: Unmasking further layers of the digital

divide by Elizabeth Davison and Shelia R. Cotten

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_3/davison/

 

Leaderless resistance today

by Simson L. Garfinkel

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_3/garfinkel/

 

----------------------------

 

You've received this message because you're registered to First

Monday's Table of Contents service. You can unsubscribe to this service

by sending a reply containing the word unsubscribe in the body of the

message or use the form at http://firstmonday.org/join.html

 

First Monday Editorial Group

Executive Director

American Society for Information Science and Technology

1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510

Silver Spring, MD  20910

FAX: (301) 495-0810

PHONE: (301) 495-0900

 

http://www.asis.org

 

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

GOVERNMENT INFORMATION QUARTERLY:  AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT, POLICIES, AND PRACTICES

 

Volume 19, No 4

 

From:  John Bertot [jcbertot@lis.fsu.edu]                          Fri 3/01/2003 2:09 AM

To:  ASIS-L@asis.org

[Asis-l] New Issue of Government Information Quarterly

 

The editors (see below) of _Government Information Quarterly:  An International Journal of Information Technology Management, Policies, and Practices_ are pleased to announce the release of Volume 19, number 4 (2002). The issue, edited by Duncan Aldrich, Charles R. McClure, and John Carlo Bertot, is a symposium issue that reviews e-government activities at various levels of government.

 

Issue 4 articles include:

 

E-Government: initiatives, developments, and issues, Pages 349-355 by Duncan Aldrich, John Carlo Bertot and Charles R. McClure

 

Constitutional principles and E-government: an opinion about possible effects of Federalism and the separation of powers on E-government policies, Pages 357-368  by Paul T. Jaeger

 

Information micro-practices in Texas rural courts: methods and issues for e-government, Pages 369-387 by Philip Doty and Sanda Erdelez

 

Online rulemaking: a step toward E-governance, Pages 389-405 by Robert D. Carlitz and Rosemary W. Gunn

 

The national biological information infrastructure as an E-government tool, Pages 407-424 by Ron Sepic and Kate Kase

 

Book/Feature reviews include:

 

Encyclopedia of the U.S. Census Margo J. Anderson (Editor). Washington

D.C.: CQ Press, 2000. xxiv, 324 pp. $125.00 (cloth). ISBN 1-56802-428-2, Pages 427-428 by Ben Amata

 

Environmental Information Systems in Industry and Public Administration Claus Rautenstrauch and Susanne Patig, Hershey, PA: Idea Group Publishing, 2001, 436 p., $119.95 (cloth). ISBN 1-930708-02-5, Pages 428-430 by Suzanne L. Holcombe

 

Telecommuting and Virtual Offices: Issues & Opportunities Nancy J. Johnson; Hershey, [PA]: Idea Group Publishing, 2001. 255 pp. [includes index] $34.98 (paperback), ISBN 1-87829879-9. LC 00-047192, Pages 430-431 by Faye Couture

 

The Interstate 40 bridge collapse at Webbers Falls web site Oklahoma Department of Libraries. Visited August 2002. http://www.odl.state.ok.us/usinfo/topiclists/us-i40.htM, Pages 431-432 by Charles D. Bernholz

 

The National Security Archive web site http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/, Pages 432-434 by Denise Arial Dorris

 

 

The full text of these and other articles is available through Elsevier ScienceDirect at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/issue/6542-2002-999809995-372664 as well as in print publication. ======================================================================

 

Government Information Quarterly is a quarterly publication of Elsevier Science.  The journal explores such topics as information and telecommunications policy; access to and use of government information; information technology management, implementation, planning, and evaluation; information services development, management, and provision in a distributed networked environment; e-commerce in governments; service quality assessment, benchmarking, and performance measurement; and, governing and governance in a networked environment.

 

Additional information regarding the journal and journal submissions is available at:  http://www.elsevier.com/locate/govinf

 

John Carlo Bertot <jcbertot@lis.fsu.edu>, School of Information Studies, Florida State University serves as the journal editor.

 

Charles R. McClure <cmcclure@lis.fsu.edu>, School of Information Studies, Florida State University serves as the journal associate editor.

 

John A. Shuler <alfred@uic.edu>, Documents, Maps, Microforms, & Curriculum Department. Univeristy of Illinois Chicago serves as the journal assistant editor.

 

 

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Volume 20, number 1 (2003)

 

From:  John Bertot [jcbertot@lis.fsu.edu]                     Tue 18/03/2003 8:08 PM

To:  asis-l@asis.org

 

 

The editors (see below) of _Government Information Quarterly:  An International Journal of Information Technology Management, Policies, and Practices_ are pleased to announce the release of Volume 20, number 1 (2003). The issue contains a number of articles related to aspects of e-government from an international perspective, policy issues emanating from the Patriot Act, government manager decision making, and a number of reviews.

 

Issue 1 articles include:

 

Civil liberties vs. intelligence collection: the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act court speaks in public, Pages 1-12 Lee S. Strickland

 

Public and private sector interests in e-government: a look at the DOE's PubSCIENCE, Pages 13-27 Joseph A. Salem, Jr.

 

The effectiveness of parliamentary information services in the United Kingdom, Pages 29-46 Rita Marcella, Graeme Baxter and Nick Moore

 

Access to government information in Japan: a long way toward electronic government?, Pages 47-62 Takashi Koga

 

U.S. government decision makers' expectations and patterns of use of emerging and existing information technologies, Pages 63-76 James T. Ault and John M. Gleason

 

 

The full text of these and other articles is available through Elsevier ScienceDirect at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/issue/6542-2002-999809995-372664 as well as in print publication. ======================================================================

 

Government Information Quarterly is a quarterly publication of Elsevier Science.  The journal explores such topics as information and telecommunications policy; access to and use of government information; information technology management, implementation, planning, and evaluation; information services development, management, and provision in a distributed networked environment; e-commerce in governments; service quality assessment, benchmarking, and performance measurement; and, governing and governance in a networked environment.

 

Additional information regarding the journal and journal submissions is available at:  http://www.elsevier.com/locate/govinf

 

John Carlo Bertot <jcbertot@lis.fsu.edu>, School of Information Studies, Florida State University serves as the journal editor.

 

Charles R. McClure <cmcclure@lis.fsu.edu>, School of Information Studies, Florida State University serves as the journal associate editor.

 

John A. Shuler <alfred@uic.edu>, Documents, Maps, Microforms, & Curriculum Department. Univeristy of Illinois Chicago serves as the journal assistant editor.

 

*************************************************************************

* John Carlo Bertot, Ph.D.                        Phone: (850) 644-8118 *

* Associate Professor                               Fax: (850) 644-4522 *

* School of Information Studies             Email: jcbertot@lis.fsu.edu *

* Florida State University        http://slis-two.lis.fsu.edu/~jcbertot *

* 101 Shores Building                                                   *

* Tallahassee, FL 32306-2100   

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INDIAN JOURNAL OF LIBRARY & INFORMATION SCIENCE ( IJLIS )

From:  Editor [editor@ijlis.com]                      Sat 19/10/2002 1:37 PM

To:  alaoif@ala.org; srrtac-l@ala.org; member-forum@ala.org; ifla-l@infoserv.inist.fr; sophie.felfoldi@ifla.nl; RKent20551@cs.com; eli_cohen@acm.org; Karin Passchier; Claire McConchie; amfasick@earthlink.net; aames-l@ala.org; acrl-frm@ala1.ala.org; alanews@ala1.ala.org; alf-l@yorku.ca; alsc-l@ala.org; arlis-l@LSV.UKY.EDU; asis-l@asis.org; axslib-l@maelstrom.stjohns.edu; bib-med@listserv.rediris.es; calibpub@listproc.sjsu.edu; ConferenceAlert-owner@yahoogroups.com; corp-l@lakenet.org; DIG_REF@listserv.syr.edu; diglib@infoserv.inist.fr; fedlib@sun8.loc.gov; fedref-l@sun8.loc.gov; fl-lib@florida3.dos.state.fl.us; hosplib-l@lakenet.org; lalinc-l@listserv.lsu.edu; kat@libraryhq.com; libref-l@listserv.kent.edu; livereference@yahoogroups.com; MEDLIB-L@listserv.buffalo.edu; museum-l@home.ease.lsoft.com; nettrain@listserv.buffalo.edu; oclcfed@sun8.loc.gov; osdls@listserv.arizona.edu; pcst-l@cornell.edu; pnla-l@krl.org; publib-net@sunsite.berkeley.edu; stumpers-l@cuis.edu; web4lib@sunsite.berkeley.edu; wlma@yahoogroups.com

 

Dear Colleague,

 

Indian Journal of Library & Information Science ( IJLIS ) is a freely circulated journal among Indian Librarians. Also, it has its presence in the international scenario. The total number of copies circulated exceed 13 ,000 . The main intention of IJLIS is to introduce new trends and technologies emerge in the field of LIS to national and international readership.

 

 Are you interested to contribute an article to Indian Journal of Library & Information Science ( IJLIS ) on any relevant topic - we will consider even a modified version of any of your published works.

 

If so, kindly visit www.ijlis.com  for more guidelines to contributors.

 

 

Regards

 

Biju K Abraham

Editor

IJLIS

 

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INFORMATION RESEARCH

Volume 8 No 1

From:  Prof. Tom Wilson [T.D.Wilson@sheffield.ac.uk]                       Tue 15/10/2002 12:30 AM

To:  asis-l@asis.org

Volume 8 No 1 is now available. Check out http://InformationR.net/ir/ - remember to hit "Reload" if you have been using the journal recently.

 

Here is the Editorial - even if you don't normally read the Editorial - please read the first para. :-)

 

Introduction

 

First, some Editorial news. I have established a discussion list for Information Research, which I hope authors, readers and members of the Editorial Board will make use of. If it fails to attract much discussion over the course of Volume 8, I shall discontinue it. However, I'll be using it for announcements about the journal, so if you are interested, do join. The list is "IR- DISCUSS@jiscmail.ac.uk" and you can join by following the instructions at the Web page:

 

http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/IR-DISCUSS.html

 

The second Editorial matter is to announce some changes to the Editorial structure of the journal. Originally, I anticipated that mirror sites might be needed to speed access, but this does not seem to have been necessary. Consequently, those who had previously been designated as 'Regional Editors', will simply become members of the Editorial Board, with the exception of Prof. Jose Vicente Rodriquez, who remains responsible for the Luso-Hispanic area, as we gradually build up a corpus of papers from that region, and of Dr. Elena Maceviciute whose role in supporting the Book Review section is recognized. As a result of swelling the Board's numbers by recruiting former members of the Board of the Journal of Documentation, we are also thanking some members who have served their three years (probably temporarily!)

 

This issue

 

This issue is intentionally provocative. We called for papers that took a critical view of 'knowledge management', in the personal belief that it is a conceptually empty buzz word. Naturally, not all of the authors agree completely with this proposition. One or two believe that, although 'knowledge' cannot be managed, the concept is of practical value in organizations when applied to the management of people or work processes, so as to encourage information sharing. Others, like myself, believe that for academics to embrace the concept and seek to give it some kind of credibility in scientific discourse, is to deny the scholarly aim of critical analysis.

 

We begin the issue with an invited paper: I came across Frank Miller's Web site for his company, Fernstar, when I was exploring the concept of 'knowledge management' some two or three years ago, and when I invited him to update one of the documents on his site, I'm glad to say that he accepted. Frank takes the view that if we talked about 'meaning' and 'message' the notion that 'knowledge' could be managed would disappear - I'm not sure that would be true, but 'I=3D0 (information has no intrinsic meaning) presents an interesting argument.

 

France Bouthillier and Kathleen Shearer ask whether 'knowledge management' is an emerging discipline or a new label for 'information management' noting the lack of clear distinction between the two. They conclude that, '...although the concepts of tacit and explicit knowledge, knowledge sharing and knowledge technologies are often used, they are not clearly defined', but, 'Dismissing KM as simply a management fad could be a missed opportunity to understand how knowledge is developed, gained and used in organizations, and ultimately in society.'

 

Next, Paul Hildreth and Chris Kimble suggest that '...the term knowledge suffers from a high degree of what might be called "terminological ambiguity" and often requires a host of adjectives to make clear exactly in what sense it is being used.' They suggest that knowledge cannot be captured, codified or stored and that the only way forward is to acknowledge that knowledge resides in people. They offer the idea of 'communities of practice' as one that could genuinely help in the more effective utilization of personal knowledge in organizations.

 

Suliman Al-Hawamdeh, one of the two editors of this issue, identifies the concept of 'tacit knowledge' as the main challenge for any idea of 'knowledge management', which should focus on people, as the repositories of knowledge, and the bearers of 'intellectual capital'.

 

The title of my own paper, 'The nonsense of "knowledge management", presents my views in a rather obvious fashion. However, after analysing a cross-section of the literature, consultancy Web sites, and the sites of MBA programmes, I can find little to support the notion that anyone is doing anything that amounts to managing 'knowledge'. Managing information, yes; managing work practices, yes; but managing knowledge - no. And using the term simply as a label does not make the mish-mash of subjects covered by the label anything like a discipline.

 

Finally, we have a Working Paper from Len Ponzi and Michael Koenig, which reports on the first author's work towards the Ph.D. The work is partly quantitative, exploring the literature of 'knowledge management' and describing it in terms of prior work on management fads and fashions. The authors conclude that, '...a more detailed analysis, which the authors look forward to conducting, needs to be undertaken to determine whether knowledge management is more than an unusually broad- shouldered fad.' We shall look forward to reading about that more detailed analysis in Information Research.

 

In reviewing many papers for my own article, I came to the conclusion that the root of the difficulty over 'knowledge management' is semantic. This is why I sought to define 'information' and 'knowledge' in such a way that they can be seen to be related, but separate. Many writers fail completely to define what they mean by 'knowledge' and how it differs from 'information', and, indeed, many define 'knowledge' in terms of 'information' =96 a number of examples of this are given in my paper. The result is semantic and conceptual confusion: not least for the practising manager seeking to make sense of the research that is filtered into the business magazines.

 

What, then, to do about it? At the very least those in the academic community and those in consultancy companies, who are concerned about the vacuous nature of much of the so-called research output, could band together in common agreement on terminology. Frank Miller has suggested that we should talk about 'message' and 'meaning' instead of about 'information' and 'knowledge', but that may be a little too radical for some. Equally radical is my suggestion that we ought to drop the word 'knowledge' from all work in this area and talk about 'information management' or 'information resource management' or 'information technology management' when that is what we mean, and use 'intellectual capital', 'intangible assets', 'organizational change', 'human resources management', etc., when we are using 'knowledge management' as a synonym for any of those things. The truly useless thing is that different writers are using the same term, 'knowledge management', to talk about all of these matters.

 

Finally

 

It's curious (or perhaps not) and certainly frustrating for the Editor, that so many people appear appear not to read the simple instructions on preparing bibliographical references. If you are contemplating submitting a paper to Information Research, please read the instructions to authors, especially section 3.2

 

I shall be augmenting these instructions to include how to give references for Web pages and other electronic documents, when time allows. The absolutely essential point here is to check that the page exists at the time you submit the paper - they have a tendency to disappear at a quite amazing rate.

 

Another reminder for those contemplating a submision: the evaluation form is available on the site.

 

'Best sellers': an update on the most 'hit' papers on the site (as of the morning of 12th October 2002), expanded backwards in time to Volume 3 no. 4 (as far back as the counters go) - there have been one or two changes since the last issue. And no-one has answered my question - does the use of an issue of an electronic journal decline less rapidly than a print journal?

 

Vol. 3 No. 4 - Business use of the World Wide Web: a report on further investigations, by Hooi-Im Ng, Ying Jie Pan, and T.D. Wilson, Department of Information Studies, University of Sheffield, U.K. - 6,833 hits. Vol. 4 No. 1 - The Internet as a learning tool: a preliminary study, by Kate Garland, S.J. Anderson, and J.M. Noyes, University of Bristol - 5,896 hits Vol. 4 No. 2 - Student attitudes towards electronic information resources, by Kathryn Ray & Joan Day, Department of Information and Library Management, University of Northumbria at Newcastle, UK - 8,631 hits Vol. 4 No. 3 - Information in organisations: directions for information management, by Joyce Kirk, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia - 10,853 hits Vol. 5 No. 1 - Experiencing information seeking and learning: a study of the interaction between two phenomena, by Louise Limberg, H=F6gskolan i Bor=E5s Bor=E5s, Sweden - 4,747 hits Vol. 5 No. 2 - Textual and chemical information processing: different domains but similar algorithms, by Peter Willett, Department of Information Studies, University of Sheffield, UK. - 3,202 hits Vol. 5 No. 3 - Recent trends in user studies: action research and qualitative methods, T.D. Wilson, Department of Information Studies, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK - 7,696 hits Vol. 5 No. 4 - Information exchange in virtual communities: a typology, by Gary Burnett, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, USA - 3,912 hits Vol. 6 No. 1 - Designing internet research assignments: building a framework for instructor collaboration., by David Ward and Sarah Reisinger, University of Illinois, USA - 7,446 hits Vol. 6 No. 2 - National Information Infrastructure and the realization of Singapore IT2000 initiative,, by Cheryl Marie Cordeiro and Suliman Al- Hawamdeh, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore - 2,714 hits Vol. 6 No. 3 - Determining organizational information needs: the Critical Success Factors approach, by Maija-Leena Huotari, University of Tampere, Finland and T.D. Wilson, University of Sheffield, U.K. - 5,261 hits Vol. 6 No. 4 - Scholarly communication, scholarly publication and the status of emerging formats, by Leah Halliday, Department of Information Science, Loughborough University, UK - 1,128 hits Vol. 7 No. 1 - Environmental scanning as information seeking and organizational learning., by Chun Wei Choo, Faculty of Information Studies, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada - 4,524 hits Vol 7 No. 2 - Critical realism and information systems research: why bother with philosophy?, by Philip J. Dobson, School of Management Information Systems, Edith Cowan University, Churchlands, Western Australia - 1,241 hits Vol 7 No. 3 - The role of motivation and risk behaviour in software development success, by Kenneth R. Walsh and Helmut Schneider, Information Systems and Decision Sciences Department, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA - 969 hits Vol 7 No. 4 - The Semantic Web: opportunities and challenges for

next- generation Web applications, by Shiyong Lu, Ming Dong and Farshad Fotouhi, Department of Computer Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA - 692 hits

 

Professor Tom Wilson Publisher/Editor-in-Chief

 

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Volume 8, No 2

January 2003

From:  Prof. Tom Wilson [t.d.wilson@SHEF.AC.UK]                      Tue 21/01/2003 11:51 PM

To:  JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU

A new issue of Information Research is now available - go to http://InformationR.net/ir/ and click on the part number.

 

I normally reproduce the Editorial in these messages, but it is rather long - people might find the bit about weblogs of interest :-)

 

...and, of course, the list of the 'Best hits' :-)

 

Tom Wilson

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New column for Information Research

From:  Tom Wilson [t.d.wilson@sheffield.ac.uk]                           Tue 19/11/2002 11:06 PM

To: JESSE; LIS-LINK@JISCMAIL.AC.UK; asis-l@asis.org

I'm happy to announce that Dr. Terrence A. Brooks of the University of Washington's Information School has agreed to write an occasional column for Information Research. His first is on 'Web services' - see it at: http://InformationR.net/ir/8-1/TB0211.html

 

Tom Wilson

 

________________________________________________________________

Professor T.D. Wilson, PhD

Publisher/Editor in Chief

Information Research

InformationR.net

University of Sheffield

Sheffield S10 2TNUK

e-mail: t.d.wilson@shef.ac.uk

Web site: http://InformationR.net/

 

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THE INFORMED LIBRARIAN ONLINE

 

From:  Arlene Eis [aeis@carroll.com]                             Tue 25/02/2003 7:09 AM

To:  aeis@carroll.com

 

Dear Editor:

 

         We would like to inform you that the library-related journal that

you edit is covered in our monthly FREE email newsletter, THE INFORMED

LIBRARIAN ONLINE, which helps librarians keep abreast of their professional

reading. Every time you produce an issue of your title, we link to it from

our newsletter. See our entire list of titles at

http://www.infosourcespub.com/ilojnltitles.cfm

         We would appreciate your letting YOUR readers know of our free

email newsletter. Any mention you can make of THE INFORMED LIBRARIAN

ONLINE, would be wonderful. Those who wish to sign up for this newsletter,

which also offers special discounts on books for librarians, may do so at

http://www.infosourcespub.com/ilofreesubscribe.cfm

         Thanks for your help!

__________________________

Arlene L. Eis

 

Infosources Publishing

140 Norma Road

Teaneck, NJ 07666

Phone: 201-836-7072 Fax: 201-836-9591

URL: http://www.infosourcespub.com

Serving the Information Professional since 1981

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ISTL (Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship)

 Fall 2002

From:  Andrea Duda [duda@library.ucsb.edu]                                        Tue 3/12/2002 8:12 AM

To:  istl-updates@library.ucsb.edu

The Fall 2002 issue of Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship is now available at http://www.istl.org/

 

CONTENTS:

 

Articles

Theme: Digital Archiving

 

      Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe As A Cooperative Archiving Solution

      for E-Journals by Victoria A. Reich, Stanford University

 

      Building Digital Archives for Scientific Information by Leah

      Solla, Cornell University

 

      Scholarly Communication: The Use and Non-Use of E-Print Archives

      for the Dissemination of Scientific Information by Ibironke Lawal,

      Virginia Commonwealth University

 

Refereed Articles

 

      ARL Physics Web Pages: An Evaluation by Established, Transitional

      and Emerging Benchmarks by Jane C. Duffy, Ohio State University

 

Science and Technology Resources on the Internet

 

      Computer Security by Jane F. Kinkus, Purdue University

 

Book Reviews

 

      Envisioning Science: The Design and Craft of the Science Image

      Reviewed by Julia Gelfand, University of California, Irvine

 

      Designing Instruction for Technology-Enhanced Learning Reviewed by

      Elizabeth A. Dupuis, University of California, Berkeley

 

      Attracting, Educating and Serving Remote Users through the Web: A

      How-To-Do It Manual for Librarians Reviewed by Beth A. Roberts,

      University of Maryland

 

      Information Retrieval: SciFinder and SciFinder Scholar Reviewed by

      Mary Ann Mahoney, University of California, Berkeley

 

      Distributed Work Reviewed by Allison V. Level, Colorado State

      University

 

Database Reviews & Reports

 

      Analysis of Serials Indexed in Meteorological and Geoastrophysical

      Abstracts (MGA) by Laurel L. Kristick, Oregon State University

 

Conference Reports

 

      Physics-Astronomy-Mathematics Sessions at SLA 2002, June 8 - 13,

      2002 By Kizer Walker, Cornell University

 

          ===========================================================

                                Andrea L. Duda

                         Sciences-Engineering Library

                    University of California, Santa Barbara

                         E-mail: duda@library.ucsb.edu

 

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JASIST

Volume 53, # 13

From:  Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]     Fri 11/10/2002 9:14 PM

To:  asis-l@asis.org; and others

Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology JASIST VOLUME 53, NUMBER 13

 

[Note: URLs for viewing contents of JASIST from past issues are at the

bottom.  Immediately below, the contents of Bert Boyce's "In This Issue"

has been cut into the Table of Contents.]

 

  EDITORIAL

 

  In This Issue

  Bert R. Boyce

  1083

 

  RESEARCH

  State Digital Library Usability: Contributing Organizational Factors

  Hong (Iris) Xie and Dietmar Wolfram

  Published online 18 September 2002

  1085

   In this issue Xie and Wolfram study the Wisconsin state digital library

BadgerLink to determine the organizational factors that lead to different

use requirements and the degree to which these are met, as well as impact

on physical libraries. To this end, usage data from EBSCOhost and ProQuest

logs for BadgerLink were analyzed, 313 Wisconsin libraries of all types

were surveyed (76% response rate), and analyzed along with 81 responses to

a voluntary web survey of end users. Heaviest users were K-12 schools and

institutions of higher education. Heaviest use sites were the two largest

state universities and the state's largest public library. Small libraries

were infrequent users. Web survey respondents were mature working

professionals. Sixty percent searched for specific information, but 46%

reported browsing in subject areas. Libraries with dedicated Internet

access reported more frequent usage than those with dial-up connection.

Those who accessed from libraries reported more frequent use than those at

work or at home. Libraries that trained end users reported more use, but

the majority of the web survey respondents reported themselves as

self-taught. Logs confirm reported subject interests. Three surrogates were

requested for every full text document but full text availability is

reported as the reason for

use by 30% of users. Availability has led to the cancellation of

subscriptions in many libraries that are important promoters of the

service. A model will need to include interactions based upon the influence

of each involved participant on the others. It will also need to include

the extension of the activities of one participant to other participant

organizations and the communication among these organizations.

 

  Unfounded Attribution of the ``Half-Life'' Index-Number of Literature

Obsolescence to Burton and Kebler: A Literature Science Study

  Endre Szava-Kovats

  Published online 21 August 2002

  1098

   Szava-Kovats demonstrates that the common attribution of the origin of

the concept of half-life in subject-oriented journal literatures to the

1960 Burton and Kebler article in American Documentation is not

correct.  The first use appears to be in C. R. Gosnell's 1944 paper in

College and Research Libraries. It was later discussed by J. D. Bernal at

the 1958 International Conference on Scientific Information in Washington,

DC. While Burton and Kebler do solve some of the theoretical problems by

redefining half-life, they do not express confidence in the use of

half-life in this milieu, and Burton later advocates in 1961 the term

``median age'' which was introduced by Broadus in this context in 1953.

 

  Is the Relationship Between Numbers of References and Paper Lengths the

Same for All Sciences?

  Helmut A. Abt and Eugene Garfield

  Published online 19 September 2002

  1106

   It has been shown in the physical sciences that a paper's length is

related to its number of references in a linear manner. Abt and Garfield

here look at the life and social sciences with the thought that if the

relation holds the citation counts will provide a measure of relative

importance across these disciplines. In the life sciences 200 research

papers from 1999-2000 were scanned in each of 10 journals to produce counts

of 1000 word normalized pages. In the social sciences an average of 70

research papers in nine journals were scanned for the two-year period.

Papers of average length in the various sciences have the same average

number of references within plus or minus 17%. A look at the 30 to 60

papers over the two years in 18 review journals indicates twice the

references of research papers of the same length.

 

  Algorithmic Procedure for Finding Semantically Related Journals

  Alexander I. Pudovkin and Eugene Garfield

  Published online 3 September 2002

  1113

   Journal Citation Reports provides a classification of journals most

heavily cited by a given journal and which most heavily cite that journal,

but size variation is not taken into account. Pudovkin and Garfield suggest

a procedure for meeting this difficulty. The relatedness of journal i to

journal j is determined by the number of citations from journal i to

journal j in a given year normalized by the product of the papers published

in the j journal in that year times the number of references cited in the i

journal in that year. A multiplier of ten to the sixth is suggested to

bring the values into an easily perceptible range. While citations received

depend upon the overall cumulative number of papers published by a journal,

the current year is utilized since that data is available in JCR. Citations

to current year papers would be quite low in most fields and thus not

included. To produce the final index, the maximum of the A citing B value,

and the B citing A value is chosen and used to indicate the closeness of

the journals. The procedure is illustrated for the journal Genetics.

 

  Using Graded Relevance Assessments in IR Evaluation

  Jaana Kekalainen and Kalervo Jarvelin

  Published online 3 September 2002

  1120

   Kekalainen and Jarvelin use what they term generalized, nonbinary recall

and precision measures where recall is the sum of the relevance scores of

the retrieved documents divided by the sum of relevance scores of all

documents in the data base, and precision is the sum of the relevance

scores of the retrieved documents divided by the number of documents where

the relevance scores are real numbers between zero and one. Using the

In-Query system and a text data base of 53,893 newspaper articles with 30

queries selected from those for which four relevance categories to provide

recall measures were available, search results were evaluated by four

judges. Searches were done by average key term weight, Boolean expression,

and by average term weight where the terms are grouped by a synonym

operator, and for each case with and without expansion of the original

terms. Use of higher standards of relevance appears to increase the

superiority of the best method. Some methods do a better job of getting the

highly

relevant documents but do not increase retrieval of marginal ones. There is

evidence that generalized precision provides more equitable results, while

binary precision provides undeserved merit to some methods. Generally

graded relevance measures seem to provide additional insight into IR

evaluation.

 

  Automatic Thesaurus Generation for Chinese Documents

  Yuen-Hsien Tseng

  Published online 19 September 2002

  1130

   Tseng constructs a word co-occurrence based thesaurus by means of the

automatic analysis of Chinese text. Words are identified by a longest

dictionary match supplemented by a key word extraction algorithm that

merges back nearby tokens and accepts shorter strings of characters if they

occur more often than the longest string. Single character auxiliary words

are a major source of error but this can be greatly reduced with the use of

a 70-character 2680 word stop list.

   Extracted terms with their associate document weights are sorted by

decreasing frequency and the top of this list is associated using a Dice

coefficient modified to account for longer documents on the weights of term

pairs. Co-occurrence is not in the document as a whole but in paragraph or

sentence size sections in order to reduce computation time. A window of 29

characters or 11 words was found to be sufficient. A thesaurus was produced

from 25,230 Chinese news articles and judges asked to review the top 50

terms associated with each of 30 single word query terms. They determined

69% to be relevant.

 

  On Bidirectional English-Arabic Search

  M. Aljlayl, O. Frieder, and D. Grossman

  Published online 19 September 2002

  1139

   Aljlayl, Frieder, and Grossman review machine translation of query

methodologies and apply them to English-Arabic/Arabic-English

Cross-Language Information Retrieval. In the dictionary method, replacement

of each term with all possible equivalents in the target language results

in considerable ambiguity, while taking the first term in the dictionary

list reduces the ambiguity but may fail to capture the meaning. A Two-Phase

method takes all possible equivalents and translates them back, retaining

only those that generate the original term. It results in an average query

length of six terms in TREC7 and 12 in TREC9. Arabic to English

translations consistently preformed below the original English queries, and

the Two-Phase method consistently preformed at the highest level and

significantly better than the Every-Match method.

   Machine translation using other techniques is economical for queries but

not likely so for documents. Using ALKAFI, a commercial translation system

from Arabic to English and the Al-Mutarjim Al-Arabey system for English to

Arabic, nearly 60% of monolingual retrievals were generated going from

Arabic to English. Smaller numbers of terms in the source query improve

performance, and these systems require syntactically well-formed queries

for good performance.

 

  The Influence of Mental Models and Goals on Search Patterns During Web

Interaction

  Debra J. Slone

  Published online 19 September 2002

  1152

   Thirty-one patrons, who were selected by Slone to provide a range of age

and experience, agreed when approached while using the catalog of the Wake

County library system to try searching via the Internet.  Fifteen searched

the Wake County online catalog in this manner and 16 searched the World

Wide Web, including that catalog. They were subjected to brief

pre-structured taped interviews before and after their searches and

observed during the searching process resulting in a log of behaviors,

comments, pages accessed, and time spent. Data were analyzed across

participants and categories. Web searches were characterized as linking,

URL, search engine, within a site domain, and searching a web catalog; and

participants by the number of these techniques used. Four used only one, 13

used two, 11 used three, two used four, and one all five.

  Participant experience was characterized as never used, used search

engines, browsing experience, email experience, URL experience, catalog

experience, and finally chat room/newsgroup experience.  Sixteen percent of

the participants had never used the Internet, 71% had used search engines,

65% had browsed, 58% had used email, 39% had used URLs, 39% had used online

catalogs, and 32% had used chat rooms. The catalog was normally consulted

before the web, where both were used, and experience with an online catalog

assists in web use. Scrolling was found to be unpopular and practiced

halfheartedly.

  Children's Use of the Yahooligans! Web Search Engine. III. Cognitive and

Physical Behaviors on Fully

Self-Generated Search Tasks

  Dania Bilal

  Published online 19 September 2002

  1170

   Bilal, in this third part of her Yahooligans! study looks at children's

performance with self-generated search tasks, as compared to previously

assigned search tasks looking for differences in success, cognitive

behavior, physical behavior, and task preference. Lotus ScreenCam was used

to record interactions and post search interviews to record impressions.

The subjects, the same 22 seventh grade children in the previous studies,

generated topics of interest that were mediated with the researcher into

more specific topics where necessary. Fifteen usable sessions form the

basis of the study. Eleven children were successful in finding information,

a rate of 73% compared to 69% in assigned research questions, and 50% in

assigned fact-finding questions.

   Eighty-seven percent began using one or two keyword searches. Spelling

was a problem. Successful children made fewer keyword searches and the

number of search moves averaged 5.5 as compared to 2.4 on the research

oriented task and 3.49 on the factual. Backtracking and looping were

common. The self-generated task was preferred by 47% of the subjects.

 

  Book Reviews

  Usability Testing for Library Web Sites: A Hands-On Guide, by Elaina

Norlin and CM Winters

  Matt Jones

  Published online 7 August 2002

  1184

 

  Accessing and Browsing Information and Communication, by Ronald E. Rice,

Maureen McCreadie, and Shan-Ju L. Chang

  Robert J. Sandusky

  Published online 29 August 2002

  1185

 

  Strategies for Electronic Commerce and the Internet, by Henry C. Lucas, Jr.

  Roisin Faherty

  Published online 22 August 2002

  1187

 

  CALL FOR PAPERS

  1189

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

 

VOLUME 53, NUMBER 14

 

From:  Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]                       Wed 1/01/2003 2:50 AM

To:  asis-l@asis.org; and others

 

Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology JASIST VOLUME 53, NUMBER 14

 

[Note: below are URLs for viewing contents of JASIST from past

issues.  Below the contents of Bert Boyce's "In This Issue" for Research

Articles and Brief Communications, and Barbara Wildemuth’s introduction to

“Perspectives On...Effective Methods for Studying Information Seeking and

Use have been cut into the Table of Contents.]

 

Editorial

 

1191

IN THIS ISSUE

Bert R. Boyce

Published Online: 26 Nov 2002

 

Research Article

1192-1209

  Co-Evolution of User and Organizational Interfaces: a Longitudinal Case

Study of Www Dissemination of National Statistics

Gary Marchionini

Published Online: 15 Nov 2002

         Marchionini posits that an organization's culture and its public

face interact with the interfaces that the organization creates for

communicating with its users; an interaction that results in the

modification and evolution of the organization itself. This conclusion is

the result of the analysis of 5 years of interviews with the U.S. Bureau of

Labor Statistics staff and of transaction logs collected for the purpose of

improving user interfaces for the Web sites of that Bureau. Internet

services have become a part of the BLS infrastructure rather than an add-on

dissemination service. Significant resources have been applied to Internet

dissemination and a long-term development plan based on collected data

exists, which has led to the regular addition of new added services. More

and more diverse users are appearing, including nonspecialists, and the

Bureau has developed a goal of universal access.

 

1210-1215

Analysis of SciFinder Scholar and Web of Science Citation Searches Katherine M. Whitley Published Online: 15 Nov 2002 Whitley finds differences in Chemical Abstracts SciFinder Scholar and ISI's

Web of Science coverage of chemist's citing references. Using what is

termed a haphazard sample of 15 chemistry researchers at U.S. universities

and a random sample of 15 from the author index of the American Chemical

Society National Meeting & Exposition Program (April 7-11, 2002, Orlando,

FL) she searched their works cited in each database in 1999, 2000, and

2001. The average duplication rate is 60%. The average unique percentage

for SFS is 23% and for WOS, 17%. Source journal titles appear in both of

the coverage lists for the two indexes, so a sizable number of articles in

both indexes are likely not being processed properly. Neither index alone

will provide a comprehensive search.

 

1218-1222

Effective Methods for Studying Information Seeking and Use Barbara M. Wildemuth Published Online: 15 Nov 2002

         In conjunction with the American Society for Information Science

and Technology's (ASIST) annual meeting in fall 2001, the Special Interest

Group on Information Needs, Seeking, and Use (SIG USE) sponsored a research

symposium on Effective Methods for Studying Information Seeking and Use.

The symposium was intended to address the SIG's goal of promoting studies

of human information behavior by focusing on the research methods that can

most effectively be used to study information needs, information seeking,

information use, and other human information behaviors. The symposium

included the presentation of six refereed articles, which were revised

based on the discussion at the symposium and are included here. The six

articles describe the application of a variety of research methods, singly

or in combination. Some of the methods are most appropriate for studying

individuals and their interactions with information, while others can be

applied to studying group behaviors. The studies were conducted in a

variety of settings, from a Web-searching laboratory to an archive, from

hospitals to the great outdoors (i.e., forest and river sites). Each method

or set of methods was applied to a particular user group, including young

children, teenagers, and adults. Each article makes a unique contribution

to our repertoire of research methods, as briefly reviewed here.

          The articles presented in this issue are a smorgasbord of some of

the research methods currently being used for studying information needs,

seeking, and use. They generated some interesting discussions during the

SIG USE symposium, and provided those present with many ideas for

furthering their own research programs. It is hoped that their long-term

effect will be the strengthening of research efforts focused on

understanding people's information needs, seeking, and use.

 

1223-1231

Methodology for a Project Examining Cognitive Categories for Library

Information in Young Children

Linda Z. Cooper

Published Online: 15 Nov 2002

          Cooper's article ([2002]) is based on a study of children's

understanding of libraries and the information they hold. The study

involved three sessions with children in kindergarten through fourth grade.

In the first session, the children were asked to visualize an empty library

and to suggest the types of books that they felt would be important to

include in the library. In the second session, the children were asked to

imagine that the books they had suggested had been delivered and were piled

on the floor. They were then asked to suggest ways in which the books might

be sorted so that it would be easier to find a particular book. The group

then practiced sorting a few of the terms generated in the first session

onto shelves  in the imaginary library. In the third session, the children

worked in small groups to complete a card(book)-sorting exercise, as

practiced in the second session. After completing the sorting task, each

group also named each shelf.  Multidimensional scaling and hierarchical

clustering techniques were used to analyze the results of the card-sorting

exercise. Although prior studies of information seeking (e.g., Bilal,

[2000], [2001]; Borgman, Hirsch, Walter, & Gallagher, [1995]; Large,

Beheshti, & Breuleux, [1998]; Pejtersen, [1992]; Solomon, [1993]) have

included young children as study participants, they typically have focused

on individual children interacting with existing information resources.

Using visualization techniques and drawing on children's imaginative

capabilities, Cooper has provided an example of how researchers can work

with groups of young children to understand their perspectives on libraries

and how library resources might be organized. In addition, the card-sorting

exercise that Cooper designed for the children took into account their

cognitive development (and how it changes between kindergarten and fourth

grade) and, by having them work in groups, the individual idiosyncracies

that might weaken the reliability of the findings. Although these methods

would benefit from further development, they provide a basis for future

work with young children.

 

1232-1238

“I Spent 1 ½ Hours Sifting Through One Large Box....”: Diaries as

Information Behavior of the Archives User: Lessons Learned Elaine G. Toms, Wendy Duff Published Online: 15 Nov 2002

         Toms and Duff ([2002]) describe their use of diaries to

investigate historians' use of archives. They cite the use of diaries as a

data collection method in information and library science, and diaries have

also been used in studies of human-computer interaction (e.g., Brown,

Sellen, & O'Hara, [2000]). In the diary, an individual is asked to record

his or her public and private thoughts in a particular situation, for

example, while accessing and using archival materials. In this study,

graduate students in history were asked to make diary entries recording

which tools were used and why, how those tools were used, and whether they

were helpful. Diaries hold great promise for some studies of information

seeking and use because study participants record their thoughts

concurrently with the information interactions. Thus, the diary entries can

act as a surrogate for direct observation of these interactions. Archives

use would seem to be an appropriate setting for this research method,

because it is unlikely that the researcher could travel with the study

participant to directly observe his or her information- seeking behaviors.

However, Toms and Duff found that there are many barriers to using this

research method. The chief problem is the burden imposed on the research

participants and, because of the burden, their lack of compliance with the

request to complete diary entries. Although diary entries may be a rich

source of data, collecting them continues to be a challenge for the researcher.

 

1239-1244

Beyond Logs and Surveys: In-depth Measures of People's Web Use Skills Eszter Hargittai Published Online: 15 Nov 2002

         Web searching and the strategies that people use in their Web

searches is a topic of great interest in information science. A number of

studies have used Web transaction logs to gain insight into searchers'

behaviors (e.g., Jansen, [2000]; Rieh & Xie, [2001]; Spink, Jansen, &

Ozmultu, [2000]). Alternatively, researchers have surveyed Web users about

their searching behaviors (e.g., Lenhart, [2000]; Spink, Bateman, & Jansen,

[1999]). Hargittai ([2002]) provides an example of a large-scale laboratory

study of searching behaviors. In the summer of 2001, a random sample of

citizens of one New Jersey county were invited to participate in the study

(additional counties will be added to the study in the future). The

participants were interviewed about their Web use and knowledge about the

Web, then observed as they completed 17 assigned search tasks. During the

session, participants were asked to comment on their search behaviors. Each

session was captured via audiotape and screen capture. During the summer of

2001, 63 participants completed the study. In many ways, Hargittai's

([2002]) work resembles earlier studies of Web searching. Having people

complete assigned search tasks while being observed is standard practice in

laboratory studies of searching behaviors (e.g., see Dempsey, Vreeland,

Sumner, Yang, [2000]; Palmquist & Kim, [2000]). Capturing the searchers'

comments as they search is less common, but has been done in previous

studies (e.g., Fidel et al., [1999]; Wang, Hawk, & Tenopir, [2000]). The

unique contribution of Hargittai's work is its scale: she is asking a large

number of participants to complete and comment on a large number of search

tasks. Incorporating the research and methodological perspectives of

sociology into her design of this study, Hargittai is demonstrating that it

is feasible to conduct such large-scale studies of searching behavior.

 

1245-1250

  Following Experts at Work in Their Own Information Spaces: Using

Observational Methods to Develop Tools for the Digital Library Paul Gorman, Mary Lavelle, Lois Delcambre, David Maier Published Online: 15 Nov 2002

         The work of Gorman, Lavelle, Delcambre, and Maier ([2002]) was

conducted in several phases, with each phase focused on a different

conceptualization of the way in which physicians use medical records. Their

initial focus was on the ways in which physicians familiarized  themselves

with the content of a patient's medical record. The researchers observed

physicians and asked them to think aloud as the physicians used a medical

record to solve a clinical problem. Based on the outcomes of this phase,

the next phase focused on capturing traces  left by experts as they

examined the medical records. Pilot observations were conducted in multiple

health care settings, followed by more in- depth ethnographic observation

in an intensive care unit. Based on these observations, the team of

researchers began to focus on the bundles  of information selected,

organized, and annotated as the physicians worked with the medical records.

Focus groups were used to verify that this conceptualization of information

use by physicians was valid. This study helps us to understand how

different research methods might serve different roles during the course of

a study or series of studies. In each phase, the research team began with a

particular conceptualization of the information behavior they were

studying. However, the results in each phase caused the research team to

adjust their view, each time bringing it closer to the view of the target

audience - physicians. The most effort was put into the second phase. Thus,

the first phase can be seen as preliminary, providing a first view of the

situation of interest. The second phase was the primary study, with some

pilot observations conducted in preparation for the intensive ethnographic

observations that yielded the richest data. The final phase provided a

mechanism for confirming the validity of the phase two findings, for a

broader range of physicians. This serial combination of methods provides a

strong basis for design of tools for working with medical records.

 

1251-1258

  Complementary User-centered Methodologies for Information Seeking and

Use: System's Design in the Biological Information Browsing Environment (BIBE) P. Bryan Heidorn, Bharat Mehra, Mary F. Lokhaiser Published Online: 15 Nov 2002

          The work of Heidorn, Mehra, and Lokhaiser ([2002]) goes even

further in incorporating multiple methods, by integrating findings from

interviews, participant observation, field observation, and focus groups to

study the information needs and information seeking of groups of high

school students conducting biodiversity surveys. Interviews were conducted

with botanists and with the students' teachers. The researchers

participated in training for conducting biodiversity surveys and so were

participants as well as being observers of the experiences of the other

study participants. Students and their teachers were observed while

actually conducting biodiversity surveys in the field (and I do mean, the

field!). Finally, focus group interviews were conducted with small groups

of students, asking about their experiences with the biodiversity survey

and gathering their input about a new software tool for identifying

particular plants. In contrast to the work of Gorman and his colleagues

([2002]), Heidorn et al. ([2002]) use these methods in a single phase,

allowing them to both triangulate data points for validation purposes and

enrich their understanding of information seeking and use in this context.

Clearly, none of these methods is unique to this study. Thus, the

contribution of this study is its weaving together of methods selected to

complement each other in terms of the perspectives they provide. The

interviews with botanists provided outside experts' views of the process of

plant identification - essentially a knowledge elicitation process that was

useful in developing tools for nonexperts. The interviews with students and

teachers (both individual and group) allowed them to speak about their

experiences in trying to identify particular plants and the tools that

supported that process. Participating in the training sessions provided the

researchers with a first-person perspective on the knowledge that study

participants might have as they entered the field to conduct a biodiversity

survey. Direct observation in the field helped the researchers to

understand the actual (as opposed to reported) use of the students'

knowledge and the available tools. These methods are well-integrated, yet

each provides some new insights for the researchers - in the authors'

words, they are complementary to each other.

 

1259-1266

  Scenarios in the Afya Project as a Participatory Action Research (PAR)

Tool for Studying Information Seeking and Use Across the “Digital Divide” Bharat Mehra, Ann Peterson Bishop, Imani Bazzell, Cynthia Smith Published Online: 15 Nov 2002

         Although all of the studies included here might be described as

user-centered, the Afya project, described by Mehra, Bishop, Bazzell, and

Smith ([2002]), is the only study that explicitly includes the target

audience in the design of the research (thus making it participatory

research). In addition, it is action research, in which findings are

quickly incorporated into day-to-day project operations. The project's goal

is to gain a better understanding of the provision of community health and

information services for Black women, and to intervene effectively in this

process. This article is focused on the use of scenarios  as one method for

accomplishing this goal. The use of scenarios is common in the field of

human-computer interaction and interface design (Carroll, [2000]).

Scenarios are stories; they can be either factual or fictional, but they

are always realistic. Within the context of this study, scenarios were

generated by analyzing the discussions that occurred in three focus groups.

Each scenario is a narrative that includes key social realities of the

project participants, specific instances of local Black women's health

experiences, and questions that mirror their information needs. Although

participatory design is an approach sometimes used in information science

(Schuler & Namioka, [1993]), participatory action research is relatively

rare. It requires that the researchers and their study participants

establish a relationship of trust, so that they can together formulate the

goals of the research project. In this regard, the Afya project has been

successful. On this basis, they are able to give a voice to the project

participants - a group that is typically disempowered. With this voice, the

project participants can tell their stories, generating scenarios that can

then be used in making decisions in the design of information sources and

services needed by the participants. The proactive nature of action

research combined with an iterative approach to design supports this

approach, helping the participants to maintain the trusting relationships

required for the research to succeed.

 

Brief Communication

1267-1270

Banking (On) Different Forms of Symbolic Capital

Blaise Cronin, Debora Shaw

Published Online: 7 Nov 2002

         Using the 25 most cited Library and Information Science professors

in Budd's study of faculty productivity, Cronin and Shaw gathered their

total Web hits on Google, and total

mentions in open media using LexisNexis, in an attempt to determine if this

group constituted

public intellectuals in Posner's sense. All have Web presence (123 to

18,520) but nine do not appear in the public media (0 to 310). Web hits and

media mentions are highly correlated, while the correlations of these two

measures with citation counts are .69 and .66, respectively. While it

appears Hal Varian might qualify, it seems there are no outstanding public

intellectuals in the group.

 

Book Review

1271-1272

Digital Preservation and Metadata: History, Theory, Practice, by Susan S.

Lazinger

Derek G. Law

Published Online: 6 Nov 2002

 

Letter to the Editor

1273-1275

Engineering a Search Engine (WebLib) and Browser (Knowledge Navigator) for

Digital Libraries: Global Knowledge Discovery Tools Exclusively for

Librarians and Libraries on the Web

V. Sreenivasulu

Published Online: 7 Nov 2002

 

1275-1276

The Special Competency of Information Specialists

Birger Hjorland

Published Online: 7 Nov 2002

 

1276

Integer Partitions Result in Skewed Rank-Frequency Distributions Donald A. Windsor Published Online: 7 Nov 2002

 

1277

Erratum

Published Online: 5 Nov 2002

 

------------------------------------------------------

 [Note: The ASIST home page

http://www.asis.org/Publications/JASIS/tocs.html> contains the Table of

Contents and abstracts from Bert Boyce's "In This Issue" from January 1993

(Volume 44) to date.

 

The John Wiley Interscience site <http://www.interscience.wiley.com>

includes issues from 1986 (Volume 37) to date.  Guests have access only to

tables of contents and abstracts.  Registered users of the interscience

site have access to the full text of these issues and to preprints.]

 

 

Executive Director

American Society for Information Science and Technology

1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510

Silver Spring, MD  20910

FAX: (301) 495-0810

PHONE: (301) 495-0900

Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

Volume 54, No 6

 

From:  Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]                    Tue 4/03/2003 3:52 AM

To:  asis-l@asis.org; and others

 

Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology JASIST VOLUME 54, NUMBER 6

 

[Note: and the end of this message are URLs for viewing contents of JASIST

from past issues.  The contents of Bert Boyce's "In this Issue" has been

cut into the Table of Contents.]

 

CONTENTS

 

IN THIS ISSUE

Bert L. Boyce

471

 

RESEARCH

 

Web Search Strategies and Approaches to Studying

Nigel Ford, David Miller, and Nicola Moss

473

Published online 25 February 2003

         In this issue Ford, Miller and Moss utilize 68 volunteers from a

population of  250 Master's students to complete on the web three search

tasks with clear fact based goals and three or less facets. One task

required broadening the search concepts from those given, a second provided

a specific terminology for one facet but required a second facet that would

require translation, and the third required general to specific

transformation. The students were measured as to their performance on

Entewistle's Revised Inventory of Approaches to Studying providing values

for ten study variables and asked to assess their experience on the

Internet, with Alta Vista, and with Boolean search. Searches were conducted

on Alta Vista using Netscape Navigator 4 with participants free to choose

and switch Boolean, best match or combined search modes at will while a

front end script recorded all submitted searches and help access. Search

related variables extracted were from  Boolean only queries, best match

only queries, and combined queries. Factor analyses were conducted on all

variables for each search mode for each search. In task one Boolean is

differentiated from best match search by sharing high loads on active

interest, intention to reproduce, fear of failure, and relating ideas. The

combined searcher is linked with the best match searcher with low active

interest, low intention to reproduce and low fear of failure. In task

2  Boolean is differentiated from best match search by sharing high loads

on intention to reproduce and low on intention to understand. Best match

loads positively with intention to understand and negatively with intention

to reproduce. Combined searching linked with both good and with poor time

management.  In task 3 the loads mimic task 1.  It seems Boolean is

consistently linked to a reproductive rather than a meaning seeking

approach, but also with high levels of interest and fear of failure. Best

match associates with the converse of these measures.

 

Three Target Document Range Metrics for University Web Sites Mike Thewall and David Wilkinson 489 Published online 25 February 2003

          Thelwall and Wilkinson use crawls of university web sites in the

UK, Australia, and New Zealand to generate all links targeted at same

country university web sites which they then use to create a graph

structure for study. Using Broder's study as a model they identify a

strongly connected component, SCC, where one could start anywhere in the

set and reach every other page, and an Out component whose pages  can be

reached from all strongly connected pages but provide no link back to that

set. The other components in the Broder model are not accessible except

with access to a major search engine database. In link and out link counts

for all three university systems in both the Out and SCC components when

graphed logarithmically display the linear nature which would indicate that

power laws, and a success breeds success phenomena, are generally in

effect. However, automatically generated pages, non-HTML web pages, and

large resource-driven sites all were associated with anomalies in this

observation.

 

Searching for Images: The Analysis of Users' Queries for Image Retrieval in

American History

Youngok Choi and Edie M. Rasmussen

497

Published online 25 February 2003

         Choi and Rasmussen collect queries to the Library of Congress's

American Memory photo archive from 48 scholars in American History by way

of interviews and pre and post search questionnaires. Their interest is in

the types of information need common in the visual domain, and the

categories of terms most often used or indicated as appropriate for the

description of image contents. Each search resulted in the provision of 20

items for evaluation by the searcher. Terms in queries and acceptable

retrievals were categorized by a who, what, when, where faceted

classification and queries into four needs categories; specific, general,

abstract, and subjective. Two out of three analysts assigned all 38

requests into the same one of the four categories and in 19 cases all three

agreed. General/nameable needs accounted for 60.5%, specific needs 26.3%,

7.9% for general/abstract, and 5.3% for subjective needs. The facet

analysis indicated most content was of the form person/thing or

event/condition limited by geography or time.

 

Information as Commodity and Economic Sector: Its Emergence in the

Discourse of Industrial Classification

Cheryl Knott Malone and Fernando Elichirigoity

511

Published online 25 February 2003

         Malone and Elichirigoity review the concept of "information" as it

exists in the 1997 implemented North American Industry Classification

System (NAICS), the current scheme for the organization of governmental

data about the economies of the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. The term

represents one of 20 major economic sectors based upon processes of

production and upon which data may be reported. It also represents a

measurable commodity based upon the concept of copyright. A review of the

background studies and reports which document the development of NAICS

shows the desire for a single underlying principle, similarity of

production processes rather than a marketing approach, and the construction

of the information sector within the context of globalization and the

internet. The three nations agreed in 1996 that the information sector

should consist of industries engaged in the "transformation of information

into a commodity that is produced, manipulated and distributed...," or as

the NAICS manual states, industries that "primarily create and disseminate

a product subject to copyright." However, industries that transfer or

transport such products are also included which seems inconsistent with the

production principle. In 2002 the category was modified to separate

internet publishing and broadcasting from these subcategories and to create

an internet services category.

 

A Method for the Comparative Analysis of Concentration of Author

Productivity, Giving Consideration to the Effect of Sample Size Dependency

of Statistical Measures

Fuyuki Yoshikane, Kyo Kageura, and Keita Tsuji

511

 

Published online 25 February 2003

         Studies of the concentration of author productivity based upon

counts of papers by individual authors will produce measures that change

systematically with sample size.  Yoshikane,  Kageura, and Tsuji seek a

statistical framework which will avoid this scale effect problem. Using the

number of authors in a field as an absolute concentration measure, and

Gini's index as a relative concentration measure, they describe

four  literatures form both viewpoints with measures insensitive to one

another. Both measures will increase with sample size. They then plot

profiles of the two measures on the basis of a Monte-Carlo simulation of

1000 trials for 20 equally spaced intervals and compare the characteristics

of the literatures. Using data from conferences hosted by four academic

societies between 1992 and 1997, they find a coefficient of loss exceeding

0.15 indicating measures will depend highly on sample size. The simulation

shows that a larger sample size leads to lower absolute concentration and

higher relative concentration. Comparisons made at the same sample size

present quite different results than the original data and allow direct

comparison of population characteristics.

 

Incorporating User Search Behavior into Relevance Feedback

Ian Ruthven, Mounia Lalmas, and Keith van Rijsbergen

528

Published online 25 February 2003

         Ruthvewn,  Mounia, and van Rijsbergen rank and select terms for

query expansion using information gathered on searcher evaluation behavior.

Using the TREC Financial Times and Los Angeles Times collections and search

topics from TREC-6 placed in simulated work situations, six student

subjects each preformed three searches on an experimental system and three

on a control system with instructions to search by natural language

expression in any way they found comfortable. Searching was analyzed for

behavior differences between experimental and control situations, and for

effectiveness and perceptions. In three experiments paired t-tests were the

analysis tool with controls being a no relevance feedback system, a

standard ranking for automatic expansion system, and a standard ranking for

interactive expansion while the  experimental systems based ranking upon

user information on temporal relevance and partial relevance.  Two further

experiments compare using user behavior (number assessed relevant and

similarity of relevant documents) to choose a query expansion technique

against a non-selective technique and finally the effect of providing the

user with knowledge of the process. When partial relevance data and time of

assessment data are incorporated in term ranking more relevant documents

were recovered in fewer iterations, however retrieval effectiveness overall

was not improved. The subjects, none-the-less, rated the suggested terms as

more useful and used them more heavily. Explanations of what the feedback

techniques were doing led to higher use of the techniques.

 

Requirements for a Cocitation Similarity Measure, with Special Reference to

Pearson's Correlation Coefficient

Per Ahlgren, Bo Jarneving, and Ronald Rousseau

549

Published online 25 February 2003

         Ahlgren,  Jarneving, and. Rousseau review accepted procedures for

author co-citation analysis first pointing out that since in the raw data

matrix the row and column values are identical i,e, the co-citation count

of two authors, there is no clear choice for diagonal values. They suggest

the number of times an author has been co-cited with himself excluding self

citation rather than the common treatment as zeros or as missing values.

When the matrix is converted to a similarity matrix the normal procedure is

to create a matrix of Pearson's r coefficients between data vectors.

Ranking by r and by co-citation frequency and by intuition can easily yield

three different orders. It would seem  necessary that the adding of zeros

to the matrix will not affect the value or the relative order of similarity

measures but it is shown that this is not the case with Pearson's r. Using

913 bibliographic descriptions form the Web of Science of articles form

JASIS and Scientometrics, authors names were extracted, edited and 12

information retrieval authors and 12 bibliometric authors each from the top

100 most cited were selected. Co-citation and r value (diagonal elements

treated as missing) matrices were constructed, and then reconstructed in

expanded form. Adding zeros can both change the r value and the ordering of

the authors based upon that value. A chi-squared distance measure would not

violate these requirements, nor would the cosine coefficient. It is also

argued that co-citation data is ordinal data since there is no assurance of

an absolute zero number of co-citations, and thus Pearson is not

appropriate. The number of ties in co-citation data make the use of the

Spearman rank order coefficient problematic.

 

Modeling the Information-Seeking Behavior of Social Scientists: Ellis's

Study Revisited

Lokman I. Meho and Helen R. Tibbo

569

Published online 25 February 2003

         Meho and  Tibbo show that the Ellis model of information seeking

applies to a web environment by way of a replication of his study in this

case using behavior of social science faculty studying stateless nations, a

group diverse in skills, origins, and research specialities. Data were

collected by way of e-mail interviews.  Material on stateless nations was

limited to papers in English on social science topics published between

1998 and 2000. Of these 251 had 212  unique authors identified as academic

scholars and had sufficient information to provide e-mail addresses. Of the

139 whose addresses were located, 9 who were physically close were reserved

for face to face interviews, and of the remainder 60 agreed to participate

and responded to the 25 open ended question interview. Follow up questions

generated a 75% response. Of the possible face to face interviews five

agreed to participate and provided 26 thousand words as opposed to 69

thousand by the 45 e-mail participants. The activities of the Ellis model

are confirmed but four additional activities are also identified. These

are: accessing, i.e. finding the material identified in indirect sources of

information;  networking, or the maintaining of close contacts with a wide

range of colleagues and other human sources;  verifying, i.e. checking the

accuracy of new information; and information managing, the filing and

organizing of collected information.  All activities are grouped into four

stages: searching, accessing, processing, and ending.

 

BOOK REVIEWS

 

Electronic Collection Department: A Practical Guide, by Stuart D. Lee 487 Reviewed by Marianne Afifi Published online 25 February 2003

 

Beyond Our Control? Confronting the Limits of Our Legal System in the Age

of CyberSpace, by Stuart Biegel

588

Reviewed by Kenneth Einar Himma

Published online 25 February 2003

 

Economic Growth in the Information Age, by Dale W. Jorgensen 591 Reviewed by John Cullen Published online 25 February 2003

 

------------------------------------------------------

The ASIS web site <http://www.asis.org/Publications/JASIS/tocs.html>

contains the Table of Contents and brief abstracts as above from January

1993 (Volume 44) to date.

 

The John Wiley Interscience site <http://www.interscience.wiley.com>

includes issues from 1986 (Volume 37) to date.  Guests have access only to

tables of contents and abstracts.  Registered users of the interscience

site have access to the full text of these issues and to preprints.

 

Executive Director

American Society for Information Science and Technology

1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510

Silver Spring, MD  20910

FAX: (301) 495-0810

PHONE: (301) 495-0900

 

http://www.asis.org

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

Call for Papers - Knowledge Management in Asia

 

From:  Suliman Hawamdeh (Assoc Prof) [ASSuliman@ntu.edu.sg]                       Tue 4/03/2003 9:15 AM

To:  --------------

 

A Perspective issue in the Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology (JASIST) is scheduled to come out in 2004 on the topic of Knowledge Management in Asia. Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

·         Knowledge management initiatives

·         Knowledge management education

·         Knowledge sharing culture

·         Knowledge strategies and implementations

·         Knowledge measurements

·         Knowledge management in the public sector

·         Case studies

 

The guest editor(s) seek papers that  discuss  research in  the area of Knowledge Management in Asia.  Inquiries can be made to the guest editor at assuliman@ntu.edu.sg or suliman@hawamdeh.net  Manuscript submissions (four copies of full  articles) should be addressed to:

 

     Suliman Hawamdeh

     School of Communication and Information

     Nanyang Technological University

     31 Nanyang Link

     SINGAPORE  637718

 

The deadline for accepting manuscripts for consideration for Publication in this  special  issue  is  June   30, 2003.   All manuscripts will be reviewed by the guest editor and the JASIST  Associate  Editor  for  Perspectives,  and those  accepted  will  be  published  in  a special issue of JASIST. Original artwork and a signed copy  of  the  copyright release form will be required for all accepted papers.

 

Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

Call for Papers JASIST Special Issue on Webometrics

 

From:  Liwen Vaughan [lvaughan@UWO.CA]                            Tue 25/03/2003 1:39 AM

To:  JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU

 

 

This is the second call for papers for JASIST special issue on Webometrics. Sorry for cross posting.

 

Liwen Vaughan, PhD
Associate Professor
Faculty of Information and Media Studies
University of Western Ontario
London, Ontario
N6A 5B7
Canada
Phone: (519) 661-2111 ext. 88499
Fax: (519) 661-3506

 

 

                        CALL FOR PAPERS

 

               ***********************************
               JASIST Special Issue on Webometrics
               ***********************************

 

                Submission deadline June 30, 2003

 

The next Special Topics Issue of Journal of the American Society for
Information Science and Technology (JASIST) is scheduled to come out in
late 2004 on the topic of webometrics. The guest editors for this special
issue will be Mike Thelwall of The University of Wolverhampton, UK, and
Liwen Vaughan of The University of Western Ontario, Canada.

 

Webometrics, the quantitative study of web phenomena, encompasses a
variety of types of research, some of which date back to the early years
of the Web although the widespread adoption of the term itself is
relatively new. The dynamic, diversified and far-reaching nature of the
Web provides a fertile ground for knowledge discovery. Frequencies and
patterns of word and phrase usage on web pages can provide valuable
information for search algorithms. The selective coverage of web sites
by search engines reflects favor toward certain communities and bias
against others. Use of query terms reflects issues of interest and
concern to people. The size and structure of web sites around the world
can provide extensive social, cultural, economic and political
information. Web links, although individually less reliable sources of
information than bibliographic citations, may reveal significant trends
when aggregated over large areas of the Web.

 

This issue will provide a forum for a broad spectrum of scholars to
compile a body of research that begins to cement these emerging areas
into a coherent field. It will also serve as a tribute to Tomas Almind
who originated the term webometrics with Peter Ingwersen and who died
in an accident before he could see the influence of his ideas. It is
envisaged that future progress of webometrics will prove the Web to be
one of the most valuable mainstream data sources for information science.

 

Specific topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the
following:

 

* Structures, patterns and topologies of hyperlinks on the Web
* Methodological issues pertaining to the use of search engines,
  crawlers, and other online tools for data collection
* Motives for the creation of hyperlinks
* Categorization of web page types and content.
* Social, cultural, and linguistic factors in Web use
* Frequency distributions of web query terms
* The application of webometrics to information retrieval research
* Web impact measurements
* Mapping web communities and relationships
* Applying and extending bibliometric and scientometric techniques onto
  the study of the Web

 

The guest editors seek papers that address these and related topics. The
quantitative orientation of Webometrics does not preclude the use of
qualitative methods when appropriate. Inquires can be made to Mike Thelwall
(m.thelwall@wlv.ac.uk) or Liwen Vaughan (lvaughan@uwo.ca). Manuscripts can
be submitted in electronic form (Word or PDF) to either guest editor or in
print form (four copies of full articles) to:

 

Dr. Liwen Vaughan
Faculty of Information and
Media Studies
University of Western Ontario
London, Ontario, N6A 5B7
Canada
Phone: (519) 661-2111 ext. 88499
Fax: (519) 661-3506
E-mail: lvaughan@uwo.ca

 

The deadline for accepting manuscripts for consideration for publication in
this special issue is
June 30, 2003. Authors are requested to notify the guest
editors of their intent to submit prior to submitting a paper. The guest
editors will be happy to provide advice on the suitability of topics if needed.

 

All manuscripts will be reviewed by a select panel of referees, and those
accepted will be published in a special issue of JASIST. Original artwork and
a signed copy of the copyright release form will be required for all accepted
papers. A copy of the call for papers will be available on the World Wide Web as
is further information about JASIST, at http://www.asis.org/.

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

JELIS (JOURNAL OF EDUCATION FOR LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE)

 

Spring 2002


From:  Gretchen Whitney [gwhitney@UTK.EDU]                               Wed 6/11/2002 2:05 AM

To:  JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU

 

Date: Tue, 05 Nov 2002 11:23:23 -0500

From: Joseph J. Mika <aa2500@wayne.edu>

 

 

The Table of Contents and abstracts of articles of the latest issue (and earlier issues) of the Journal of Education for Library and Information

Science is available at:   http://www.lisp.wayne.edu/jelis/index.html

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

JOURNAL OF DIGITAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT(ISSN 0972-7272)

VOLUME 1 NUMBER 1 MARCH 2003

 

From:  ppich@vsnl.net                           Tue 18/03/2003 12:18 PM

 

To:  aflib-l@mailman.nlsa.ac.za; acrl-frm@ala1.ala.org; bib-med@listserv.rediris.es; diglib@infoserv.inist.fr; ifla-l@infoserv.inist.fr; publib-net@sunsite.berkeley.edu; lis-link@jiscmail.ac.uk; sla-ccle@lists.sla.org; BUSLIB-L@LISTSERV.IDBSU.EDU; STS-L@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU; SLA-DITE@LISTSERV.SLA.ORG; TSLIBRARIANS@LISTSERV.KENT.EDU; buckchi-announcements@acm.org; Cocacm@acm.org; oplinlist@epicurus.oplin.lib.oh.us; ohioarv@lists.acs.ohio-state.edu; Jbyrnes@sloma.state.oh.us; Asis-L@asis.org; Jhatzakos@asis.org

 

Journal of Digital Information Management(ISSN 0972-7272) Volume 1 Number 1 March 2003

 

Contents

 

Digital Information Science and Technology-P.Pichappan

Links to the Future- Harald Krottmaier

Indexing an intelligent video database using evolutionary control- Ronnie Cheung Design A Method for Detecting the Inconsistent Loops in the Specification of Multimedia Hyper-Presentation Using Petri-Net - Jong-Keun Cho, Si-Yeon Woo, Younghwan Lim, Hak-Young Kim Fine-tuning of Graphic Thesaurus Displays- Timothy C. Craven The dawn of a new era for mobile and Ambient Learning: MOBIlearn- Giorgio Da Bormida, Paul Lefrere, Roberto Vaccaro Vision Online- Emmanuelle Clement Plus call for papers for IV Conference and Book Chapter

--------------------------

URL: www.dirf.org/jdim

email: info@dirf.org

 

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LIBRARY LINK NEWSLETTER

November 2002

From:   Claire Jones [cjones@emeraldinsight.com]                           Wed 13/11/2002 7:56 PM

To:  k.smith@cc.curtin.edu.au

Dear Kerry

 

Thanks for your e-mail. You have received the Library Link newsletter due to you being signed up as a Library Link member via the form at

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/cgi-bin/librarylink.pl

Please let me know if you would like to be unsubscribed at any time.

Yes, I would be happy for you to recirculate the Library Link newsletter. Please can you ensure that if you redistribute the newsletter, whether via e-mail or include it in your journal, that the main homepage URL is quoted as www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink and that the URL http://www.emeraldinsight.com/cgi-bin/librarylink.pl is mentioned as where someone can sign up to receive the monthly Library Link newsletter directly

 

Many thanks for your support.

 

Warm regards

 

--

Claire Jones

Internet Brand Executive

Emerald

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

                    Library Link Newsletter

                    November 2002

                    http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

                    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Contents

----------

 

1. Library Collection & Development Management - Viewpoint and Article 2. Library Management & Information Services - Viewpoint and Article 3. Library Technology - Viewpoint and Article 4. Library Link News 5. Emerald Supports the IFLA Section on LIS Journals 6. Feedback

 

*****

 

1. Library Collection & Development Management

 

Viewpoint - November 2002

 

Weeding - Is It Still Worth the Effort?

Philip Calvert

 

Ranked on a scale of one to ten for its ability to excite librarians, weeding the collection would probably rate about 1.5 at the most. Yet we have always known that weeding is an essential part of good collection management, albeit a rather neglected aspect of it. Recent research by Julie Banks of Southeast Missouri State University should make us question some of our traditional assumptions about the benefits of weeding, and whether we should be focussing on different ways to make our library collections more actively appealing to the customers.

 

Click here to read the full viewpoint http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection

 

Article

 

"Weeding Book Collections in the Age of the Internet" by Julie Banks (2002) Collection Building, 21, 3: 113-119. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection/index.htm#article

 

*****

 

2. Library Management & Information Services

 

Viewpoint - November 2002

 

Being Politically Incorrect: Consensus is for the Insecure Professor G E Gorman

 

There is a tendency among management gurus and seasoned practitioners to assume a mono-cultural view of successful management practice. That is, if it works for Bill Gates or Dick Smith or Lynn Brindley, then it must work for us. For example, in the modern information environment we are encouraged to believe that management by consensus through teamwork is the ideal, largely because it has succeeded in some organisations in some places. This, we are told, creates a more caring environment in which staff feel empowered and therefore willing to do their best for the organisation, and to serve the clients with new levels of commitment.

 

Click here to read the full viewpoint http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management

 

Article

 

"Team Management & University Libraries in Ghana: The Influence of Culture" by Badu, E.E. (2002) Library Management, 23, 6/7: 287-293 http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management/index.htm#article

 

*****

 

3. Library Technology

 

Viewpoint - November 2002

 

Koha - An Open Source Success Story

Brenda Chawner

 

In 1999, Rosalie Blake, Head of Libraries, Horowhenua Library Trust (HLT), in rural New Zealand, faced a dilemma. The software used by the HLT to handle the day-to-day transactions (everything from lending books to reserving items to buying new material to paying fines) was 12 years old, and no longer being developed by the company that developed it. In addition, the network it used was not expected to be Y2K compliant, meaning that it would need to be replaced.

 

Click here to read the full viewpoint http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/technology

 

Article

 

"Open Source Software in Libraries" by Bretthauer, David (2001) Library Hi Tech News, 18 (5): 8-9 http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/technology/index.htm#article

 

*****

 

4. Library Link News

 

This section of the site aims to help you keep abreast of the latest news and information in your field and includes Press Releases, Forthcoming Events, Books and Journals, and Publishing Opportunities. All areas of the news section have been updated this week.

 

Go to http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news for the latest news additions.

 

*****

 

5.    Emerald Supports the IFLA Section on LIS Journals

 

A gold corporate partner since January 1998, Emerald supports the work of the Section on LIS Journals (http://www.ifla.org/VII/s45/slisj.htm).

 

The Group is hosting a programme at the 69th General Conference and Council in Berlin called "Blurring the boundaries: changing the way in which we create, distribute and utilise knowledge in LIS journals". Proposals for presentations are welcome. The Group also welcomes new members for active participation in its debates and projects.

 

For more information and links to calls for papers please go to http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

 

*****

 

4.    Feedback

 

We would like your feedback both on the structure and content of the site, what you would like to see on Library Link, as well as your thoughts on the viewpoints and topics covered. If you have any comments or suggestions you may send them to mailto:librarylink@emeraldinsight.com or complete our feedback form at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/librarylinkfeedback.htm

 

Thank you.

 

Claire Jones

Library Link

E-mail: cjones@emeraldinsight.com

URL: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

January 2003

From:  Library Link [librarylink@emeraldinsight.com]                                 Wed 15/01/2003 7:15 PM

To:  k.smith@cc.curtin.edu.au

Library Link Newsletter

                    January 2003

                    http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

                    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Contents

----------

 

1. Library Collection & Development Management - Viewpoint and Article 2. Library Management & Information Services - Viewpoint and Article 3. Library Technology - Viewpoint and Article 4. Library Link News updates 5. Feedback

 

*****

 

1. Library Collection & Development Management

 

Viewpoint - January 2003

 

Sleeping with the Enemy?

Philip Calvert

 

If a private survey were done on what librarians think of journal publishers, I predict that the most common response would be something along the lines of 'they are all money-grabbing exploiters of public intellectual property'.  A public survey might garner slightly more polite responses, but you get the point. Many librarians, especially in the academic sector, seem to regard commercial journal publishers as an enemy who should be done away with as quickly as possible.  Well, it is quite all right to let off steam when frustrated, and everyone would expect the serials librarian to gripe about journal price increases, but this becomes dangerous when senior managers talk nonsense about commercial publishers in public meetings, and that's what I've been hearing lately.

 

Click here to read the full viewpoint http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection

 

Free Article

 

"Issues in developing, managing and marketing electronic journal collections", Ashcroft, L. (2002) Collection Building, Vol. 21 No. 4, pp. 147-154. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection/index.htm#article

 

*****

 

2. Library Management & Information Services

 

Viewpoint - January 2003

 

Distance education and library/information services: some management issues James H. Sweetland

 

For good or ill, distance education is growing rapidly, especially that connected with use of computer-based information systems, such as interactive video and the World Wide Web.  While there is a growing body of literature on the subject, the amount of material concerned with management issues is still rather small, and that concerned with library management issues smaller still.

 

Click here to read the full viewpoint http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management

 

Free Article

 

"An Evaluation of the Information Needs and Practices of Part-Time and Distance-Learning Students in the Context of Educational and Social Change through Lifelong Learning." Rowland, F., and Rubbert, I. (2001) Journal of Documentation 57, 6: 741-762. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management/index.htm#article

 

*****

 

3. Library Technology

 

Viewpoint - January 2003

 

Considerations for Using Wireless Computers in Libraries

Amy S. Van Epps

 

Wireless networks are popping up in many locations in our world today: local coffee shops, various eateries, college campuses and some public libraries. Not surprisingly, installing wireless in libraries is becoming an ever larger topic of discussion. While many of the issues discussed here are applicable in most types of libraries, this column will specifically look at wireless services in a university library setting. Many questions arise around wireless networking, including: Is the library waiting for the university to answer the wireless need, or has the library gone ahead on its own? How are various libraries providing this service to their clients? And what additional services are the library staff offering as a result of having a wireless network available in their space?

 

Click here to read the full viewpoint http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/technology

 

Free Article

 

"Wireless in Libraries." Graham, R. (2002)

Library Hi-Tech 20, 2: 237-240. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/technology/index.htm#article

 

*****

 

4. Library Link News

 

This section of the site aims to help you keep abreast of the latest news and information in your field and includes:

 

Press Releases http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/press.htm

 

Forthcoming Events http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/bandj.htm

 

Books and Journals http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/bandj.htm

 

Publishing Opportunities http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/publishing.htm

 

All areas of the news section have been updated this week.

 

 

Go to http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news for the latest news additions.

 

*****

 

5.    Feedback

 

We would like your feedback both on the structure and content of the site, what you would like to see on Library Link, as well as your thoughts on the viewpoints and topics covered. If you have any comments or suggestions you may send them to mailto:librarylink@emeraldinsight.com or complete our feedback form at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/librarylinkfeedback.htm

 

Thank you.

 

Claire Jones

Library Link

mailto:cjones@emeraldinsight.com

URL: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

February 2003

From:  Claire Jones [librarylink@emeraldinsight.com]                                Fri 14/02/2003 6:33 PM

To:  k.smith@cc.curtin.edu.au

Library Link Newsletter

                    February 2003

                    http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

                    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Contents

----------

 

1. Free access to New Library World

2. Call for Papers - Imminent Deadline

3. Literati Club Research Funds Awards 2003 - Imminent Deadline 4. Library Link News 5. Meet the Editor of The Electronic Library 6. Feedback

 

 

*****

 

1. Free access to New Library World

 

Please note, that Emerald's New Library World journal is available for limited free access this week until Sunday 16th February 2003 as part of the Journals of the Week offer at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/jotw

 

*****

 

2. Call for Papers - Imminent Deadline

8th IFLA Interlending and Document Supply International Conference

 

The deadline to submit a proposal for a paper at the 8th IFLA Interlending and Document Supply Conference is fast approaching. All proposals must be received by 21 February 2003. For information on topics of interest and how to submit a proposal please visit http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/onemonth.htm

 

*****

 

3. Literati Club Research Funds Awards 2003

 

As part of Emerald's commitment to recognise and reward the scholarly research community's contribution to Emerald journals, we have pledged to use a proportion of the fees received from copyright organisations to fund research which increases the effectiveness of the knowledge creation and transmission process. We are delighted to invite all contributors to Emerald journals/publications to submit applications for the Research Fund Awards 2003.

 

The deadline for submission is 28th February 2003; presentations will be made at the Literati Club Awards for Excellence in April. We will consider proposals requiring funding that does not exceed £5,000.

 

For more information visit http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals/fundawards.htm

 

 

*****

 

4. Library Link News

 

Keep up to date with the latest news and information in your field. Visit:

 

Press Releases http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/press.htm

 

Forthcoming Events http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/events.htm

 

*****

 

5. Meet the Editor of The Electronic Library

 

The Electronic Library is sponsor of the morning coffee break on Wednesday 26th March at Internet Librarian International, NEC, Birmingham UK (see http://www.internet-librarian.com/conference03/wednesday.html)

 

Join the Editor and Managing Editor 10-10.30am and pick up a copy of this prestigious journal.

 

 

*****

 

5.    Feedback

 

We would like your feedback both on the structure and content of the site, what you would like to see on Library Link, as well as your thoughts on the viewpoints and topics covered. If you have any comments or suggestions you may send them to mailto:librarylink@emeraldinsight.com or complete our feedback form at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/librarylinkfeedback.htm

 

 

Thank you

 

Claire Jones

Library Link

E-mail: cjones@emeraldinsight.com

URL: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

 

Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

March 2003

 

From:  Library Link [librarylink@emeraldinsight.com]                          Tue 18/03/2003 11:16 PM

To:  Kerry Smith

   Library Link Newsletter

                    March 2003

                    http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

                    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Contents

----------

 

1. Library Collection & Development Management - Viewpoint and Article 2. Library Management & Information Services - Viewpoint and Article 3. Library Link News 4. Library Management - New editor appointed 5. Meet the Editor of The Electronic Library 6. Feedback

 

 

*****

 

1. Library Collection & Development Management

 

Viewpoint - March 2003

 

The problem is access, the solution is infrastructure

Gary Gorman

 

It used to be said that library users want books on shelves above all else, and that they will settle for second or third best if what they most want is unavailable. This probably remains true, despite our best efforts to educate users to be critical consumers of information resources. With the advent of the Web some of us believed, perhaps naively, that readers might gain better access to their sought resources, and therefore stop settling for second best. But this assumed that open and free access to quality resources would be one of the great benefits of the Web.

 

Click here to read the full viewpoint http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection

 

Free Article

 

"Improving Access: Is There Any Hope?"

Friend, F.J. (2002)

Interlending and Document Supply 30, 4: 178-182 http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection/index.htm#article

 

*****

 

2. Library Management & Information Services - Viewpoint and Article

 

Of partnerships and pre-nups

Philip Calvert

 

Partnerships are hot news. Not only in the information management world, but also in politics and economics we see the value of countries and corporations joining forces for mutual benefit. As a first example, the grouping of countries joined together as the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation has lasted more than 50 years as an agency for defending peace, and even as you read these words there are negotiations taking place that will enlarge NATO by bringing even more countries into the fold. In the business world there are numerous instances of companies joining together to add value to each partner, though as a warning one can observe that the massive combination of Time Warner and America Online doesn't seem to have benefitted either side as yet. On a personal level, it seems to have reached the point that one no longer introduces a husband or wife but a 'partner', perhaps based on a realisation that the arrangement might be dissolved one day and the pre-nuptial agreement will take effect.

 

Click here to read the full viewpoint http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management

 

Free Article

 

"External Partnerships and Academic Libraries"

Wilding, T. (2002)

Library Management 23, 4/5: 199-202. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management/index.htm#article

 

*****

 

3. Library Link News

 

Keep up to date with the latest news and information in your field. Visit:

 

Press Releases http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/press.htm

 

Forthcoming Events http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/events.htm

 

Books & Journals - Announcements & Reviews http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/bandj.htm

 

 

*****

 

4. Library Management - New editor appointed

 

Emerald is delighted to announce the appointment of Stephen O'Connor, Chief Executive Officer of CAVAL Collaborative Solutions, Melbourne, Australia as Editor of Library Management. Stephen succeeds Patricia Layzell Ward, who after more than six years of outstanding editorship has decided to step down. CAVAL works with educational institutions and libraries to enable them inexpensively and effectively to operate in the digital environment. Caval also works in over 60 languages for cataloguing and metadata while also managing a consortium for electronic plagiarism detection.

 

For more information go to http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals/lm/neweditor.htm

*****

 

5. Meet the Editor of The Electronic Library

 

The Electronic Library is sponsor of the morning coffee break on Wednesday 26th March at Internet Librarian International, NEC, Birmingham UK (see http://www.internet-librarian.com/conference03/wednesday.html)

 

Join the Editor and Managing Editor 10-10.30am and pick up a copy of this prestigious journal.

 

 

*****

 

6.    Feedback

 

We would like your feedback both on the structure and content of the site, what you would like to see on Library Link, as well as your thoughts on the viewpoints and topics covered. If you have any comments or suggestions you may send them to mailto:librarylink@emeraldinsight.com or complete our feedback form at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/librarylinkfeedback.htm

 

 

Thank you

 

Claire Jones

Library Link

E-mail: cjones@emeraldinsight.com http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

LIBRI

September 2002

From:  Ian Johnson (imsij) [i.m.johnson@RGU.AC.UK]                       Fri 11/10/2002 11:03 PM

To:  LIS-FID@JISCMAIL.AC.UK

LIBRI: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SERVICES

 

Volume 52, number 3, September 2002

 

CONTENTS

*       The Death of the Scholarly Monograph in the Humanities? Citation Patterns in Literary Scholarship

*       A Qualitative Study of Web-Mounted Pathfinders Created by Academic Business Libraries

*       Assessing Digital Reference

*       NTU (Nanyang Technological University) Library as a Learning Organisation

*       The Provision of Library and Information Services to Distance Learners: The Open University of Tanzania (OUT)

 

The Death of the Scholarly Monograph in the Humanities? Citation Patterns in Literary Scholarship

 

Jennifer Wolfe Thompson

School of Library and information science, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, USA

 

Winner of LIBRI Best Student Paper Award 2002

 

A significant effect of the crisis in academic publishing is the decline in publication and purchase of the scholarly monograph in the humanities. As library collections of monographs in the humanities continue to shrink, humanities scholars are clearly confronting difficult challenges in performing and publishing their research. Analysis of viable solutions to the publishing crisis in general, and in the humanities in particular, requires concrete information about the current state of academic publishing. The purpose of this study is to provide some insight, through citation analysis, into current patterns of scholarly publishing in the field of nineteenth-century British and American literary studies. Emerging and shifting publication formats, currency in secondary materials, and existing core groups of authors, works, journals, and publishers were evaluated.

 

By extending a sample selection method developed by Yeva Lindholm-Romantschuk and Julian Warner, this study examined 6,708 citations from both monographs and periodicals. The citations were first classified as references to primary or secondary materials. Citations to primary materials were tabulated according to publication format. For citations to secondary materials, the following aspects were identified and recorded: author, date, journal title (if applicable), publisher (if applicable), and publication format. The analysis showed that scholars in this field still generally fit the traditional profile of humanities scholars, using a large number of primary sources, drawing upon secondary sources from a broad age spectrum, and relying heavily on the monograph format for both primary and secondary materials. Electronic publishing is not generally considered a viable alternative to print publishing. Articles form an important aspect of literary research, but are not substitutes for monographs. Groups of core works and authors were not identifiable in this sample. However, significant core groups of journals and publishers do exist in this discourse community, and publishing is dominated by university presses. Because the sample was not randomized, the results of the study are not generalizable. However, the results map part of the territory of current scholarly communication in the humanities, provide information to illuminate further discussion of solutions to the publishing crisis in this field, and indicate areas for further research.

 

 

A Qualitative Study of Web-Mounted Pathfinders Created by Academic Business Libraries

 

Carla Dunsmore

School of Library and Information Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada

 

The nature of academic business pathfinders or subject guides mounted on the Internet was examined by qualitative content analysis. Specifically, the research sought to understand the concept, purposes and principles of pathfinders; the terminology representing pathfinders; the navigational pathway through the library Website to the pathfinders; and their common contents. Ten Canadian and ten American academic library Websites were sampled for pathfinders on three business topics: company, industry and marketing. Findings showed that the traditional term 'pathfinder' was not used on these academic Websites; instead 'subject guides' or 'research guides' were the most popular synonyms. The content analysis identified that subject guides have two basic functions, which are to facilitate access and to provide a search strategy. Four principles were found for creating Web-mounted, subject guides: accessibility, consistency, selectivity, and transparency. The research also found that subject guides are important library finding tools as evidenced by the time and effort devoted to their creation, and their placement on valuable library homepage screen space.

 

 

Assessing Digital Reference

 

Ruth A. Hodges

School of Information Studies, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA

 

The World Wide Web has emerged as a powerful tool to enhance navigation and communication over the Internet. Within the past few years, numerous Web-based digital reference services have been established by libraries. The goal of this study is to identify user behaviors as reflected in the queries they submit to these services. The study is user-centered and seeks to evaluate digital reference services from the users' perspectives. To address these issues, the paper examines digital reference questions received at a large university library in the Southeastern United States (SeU) from January to March 2001. Content analysis and descriptive statistics are used to the analyze data. Findings suggest that questions received by the digital reference service simulate questions received by traditional reference services; that digital reference service reaches only a small segment of the target population; and that the question submission form needs to be redesigned to better identify and prevent the loss of valuable user information. If the library is to succeed in delivering digital reference service and in defining the roles of reference librarians, it must enhance the quality of service to users in order to have a sustainable, competitive advantage in the provision of information in the digital realm.

 

 

NTU (Nanyang Technological University) Library as a Learning Organisation

 

Tan Siew Chye Michael and Susan Ellen Higgins

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore and Charles Sturt University, New South Wales, Australia

 

With the advent of the Internet and info-communication technologies, academic libraries all over the world have been undergoing rapid changes to take advantage of new technology to meet the information needs of their users. However, the provision of technologies such as digital resources is only part of the management puzzle. The fostering of a learning culture for staff and students is equally important. The Nanyang Technological University (NTU) Library in Singapore had been in the process of developing resources and services in order to better serve the university community since its inception in 1981. The researchers were curious to find out if the NTU library met the criteria of a learning organisation. This study concludes that the library had a majority of the characteristics characterising learning organisations. New mindsets had to be cultivated and greater trust fostered amongst the employees to leverage the library's knowledge assets. Individuals had to be rewarded based on their ability to collaborate, champion learning and share knowledge. The managers had to take on new roles to empower their staff to do their best work. Such changes were necessary in order to actualise the goal of becoming a world-class academic library.

 

 

The Provision of Library and Information Services to Distance Learners: The Open University of Tanzania (OUT)

 

Jangawe Msuya and Farijala Maro

University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

 

This paper presents the findings of research conducted on the provision of information services to distance learners by the Open University of Tanzania (OUT). The objective of the research was to discover how the Open University of Tanzania provides library and information services to its distance learners and the extent to which these services meet the needs of the learners. The study was done with a view to suggesting ways in which information provision at OUT could be improved. Data collection was done in the Dar es Salaam and Mwanza regions where a total number of 190 respondents were involved in the survey. Findings of the study reveal that the Open University of Tanzania has problems in meeting the information needs of its staff and students. The Main library does not have adequate resources while OUT Information Units at Regional Centres and Tanzania Library Services are poorly stocked. In addition, the few materials that are available do not reflect the curriculum. As a way of alleviating the problem, OUT students use the library services of other nearby institutions. Recommendations to improve the situation are given at the conclusion.

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

SCHOLARLY ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING BIBLIOGRAPHY

Version 45

From:  Charles W. Bailey, Jr. [cbailey@uh.edu]                       Mon 14/10/2002 10:47 PM

To:  ASIS-L@ASIS.ORG

Version 45 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography is now available.  This selective bibliography presents over 1,700 articles, books, and other printed and electronic sources that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing efforts on the Internet.

 

     HTML: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html

     Acrobat: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf

    

The HTML document is designed for interactive use.  Each

major section is a separate file.  There are links to sources that are freely available on the Internet.  It can be can be searched using Boolean operators.

 

The HTML document includes three sections not found in

the Acrobat file:

 

(1) Archive (prior versions of the bibliography)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/archive/sepa.htm

 

(2) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources (over 230 related Web sites)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepr.htm

 

(3) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog (list of new resources that is updated on weekdays)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepw.htm

 

The Acrobat file is designed for printing.  The printed bibliography is over 140 pages long.  The Acrobat file is over 380 KB.

 

The bibliography has the following sections (revised sections are marked with an asterisk):

 

Table of Contents

 

1 Economic Issues*

2 Electronic Books and Texts

     2.1 Case Studies and History

     2.2 General Works*

     2.3 Library Issues

3  Electronic Serials

     3.1 Case Studies and History

     3.2 Critiques*

     3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals

     3.4 General Works*

     3.5 Library Issues*

     3.6 Research*

4 General Works*

5 Legal Issues

     5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*

     5.2 License Agreements

     5.3 Other Legal Issues

6  Library Issues

     6.1 Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*

     6.2 Digital Libraries*

     6.3 General Works*

     6.4 Information Integrity and Preservation*

7 New Publishing Models*

8 Publisher Issues*

     8.1 Digital Rights Management

9 Technical Reports and E-Prints*

Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author

Appendix B. About the Author

 

Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources includes

the following sections:

 

Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*

Digital Libraries*

Electronic Books and Texts*

Electronic Serials*

General Electronic Publishing*

Images

Legal*

Preservation

Publishers*

SGML and Related Standards

Technical Reports and E-Prints

 

An article about the bibliography has been published

in The Journal of Electronic Publishing:

 

http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/07-02/bailey.html

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

Version 46

 

From:  Charles W. Bailey, Jr. [cbailey@UH.EDU]             Fri 13/12/2002 6:50 AM

To:  JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU

 

Version 46 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography is now available.  This selective bibliography presents over 1,750 articles, books, and other printed and electronic sources that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing efforts on the Internet.

 

     HTML: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html

     Acrobat: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf

 

The HTML document is designed for interactive use.  Each

major section is a separate file.  There are links to sources that are freely available on the Internet.  It can be can be searched using Boolean operators.

 

The HTML document includes three sections not found in

the Acrobat file:

 

(1) Archive (prior versions of the bibliography)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/archive/sepa.htm

 

(2) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources (over 230 related Web sites)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepr.htm

 

(3) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog (list of new resources that is updated on weekdays)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepw.htm

 

The Acrobat file is designed for printing.  The printed bibliography is over 145 pages long.  The Acrobat file is over 390 KB.

 

The bibliography has the following sections (revised sections are marked with an asterisk):

 

Table of Contents

 

1 Economic Issues*

2 Electronic Books and Texts

     2.1 Case Studies and History*

     2.2 General Works*

     2.3 Library Issues

3  Electronic Serials

     3.1 Case Studies and History

     3.2 Critiques*

     3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals

     3.4 General Works*

     3.5 Library Issues*

     3.6 Research*

4 General Works*

5 Legal Issues

     5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*

     5.2 License Agreements*

     5.3 Other Legal Issues

6  Library Issues

     6.1 Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*

     6.2 Digital Libraries*

     6.3 General Works*

     6.4 Information Integrity and Preservation*

7 New Publishing Models*

8 Publisher Issues*

     8.1 Digital Rights Management

9 Technical Reports and E-Prints*

Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author

Appendix B. About the Author

 

Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources includes

the following sections:

 

Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*

Digital Libraries*

Electronic Books and Texts*

Electronic Serials*

General Electronic Publishing*

Images*

Legal*

Preservation*

Publishers

SGML and Related Standards

Technical Reports and E-Prints*

 

An article about the bibliography has been published

in The Journal of Electronic Publishing:

 

http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/07-02/bailey.html

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

Version 47

 

From:  Charles W. Bailey, Jr. [cbailey@UH.EDU]                       Fri 21/02/2003 7:11 AM

To:  JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU

 

Version 47 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography is now available.  This selective bibliography presents over 1,800 articles, books, and other printed and electronic sources that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing efforts on the Internet.

 

     HTML: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html

     Acrobat: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf

 

The HTML document is designed for interactive use.  Each

major section is a separate file.  There are links to sources that are freely available on the Internet.  It can be can be searched using Boolean operators.

 

The HTML document includes three sections not found in

the Acrobat file:

 

(1) Archive (prior versions of the bibliography)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/archive/sepa.htm

 

(2) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources (over 230 related Web sites)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepr.htm

 

(3) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog (list of new resources that is updated on weekdays)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepw.htm

 

The Acrobat file is designed for printing.  The printed bibliography is over 145 pages long.  The Acrobat file is over 400 KB.

 

The bibliography has the following sections (revised sections are marked with an asterisk):

 

Table of Contents

 

1 Economic Issues*

2 Electronic Books and Texts

     2.1 Case Studies and History

     2.2 General Works*

     2.3 Library Issues

3  Electronic Serials

     3.1 Case Studies and History*

     3.2 Critiques

     3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals*

     3.4 General Works*

     3.5 Library Issues*

     3.6 Research*

4 General Works*

5 Legal Issues

     5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*

     5.2 License Agreements*

     5.3 Other Legal Issues

6  Library Issues

     6.1 Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*

     6.2 Digital Libraries*

     6.3 General Works*

     6.4 Information Integrity and Preservation*

7 New Publishing Models*

8 Publisher Issues*

     8.1 Digital Rights Management*

9 Repositories and E-Prints*

Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author

Appendix B. About the Author

 

Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources includes

the following sections:

 

Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*

Digital Libraries*

Electronic Books and Texts*

Electronic Serials*

General Electronic Publishing*

Images

Legal*

Preservation

Publishers

Repositories and E-Prints*

SGML and Related Standards

 

An article about the bibliography has been published

in The Journal of Electronic Publishing:

 

http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/07-02/bailey.html

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

 

Best Regards,

Charles

 

Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Assistant Dean for Systems,

University of Houston, Library Administration,

114 University Libraries, Houston, TX 77204-2000.

E-mail: cbailey@uh.edu.  Voice: (713) 743-9804.

Fax: (713) 743-9811.  http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

THE SCOUT REPORT

November 27, 2002

From:  Kennedy, Toni [Toni.Kennedy@maynegroup.com]                          Thu 28/11/2002 6:01 AM  

To:  OPALs Listserv (E-mail)

-----Original Message-----

From: Internet Scout Project [mailto:scout@SCOUT.WISC.EDU]

Sent: Thursday, 28 November 2002 02:10

To: SCOUT-REPORT@hypatia.cs.wisc.edu

Subject: The Scout Report -- November 27, 2002

 

 

========  The Scout Report                                            ==

========  November 27, 2002                                         ====

========  Volume 8, Number 47                                     ======

======                                   Internet Scout Project ========

====                                    University of Wisconsin ========

==                              Department of Computer Sciences ========

 

 

==   I N   T H E   S C O U T   R E P O R T   T H I S   W E E K  ========

 

 

 

====== NSDL Scout Reports ====

1.  NSDL Scout Reports for the Life Sciences and Physical Sciences

 

====== Research and Education ====

2.  US Banking in the Last Fifty Years: Growth and Adaptation 3.  The Dynamics of Protest Diffusion: The 1960 Sit-In Movement in the American South 4.  The British Library: Turning the Pages 5.  Charles H. Templeton Sheet Music Collection 6.  The Pilgrims in American Culture: Thanksgiving 7.  Ethnic Identity, Bounded Solidarity, and the Formation of Immigrant Networks of Care 8.  Biological Soil Crusts 9.  Antarctic Meteorology Online

 

====== General Interest ====

10. Through the Lens of Time: Images of African Americans from the Cook Collection of Photographs 11. Two about Carnegie Libraries 12. Nazi Persecution of Homosexuals: 1933-1945 13. The Charles Ives Society 14. City Stories 15. The South Asian Literary Recordings Project 16. Gateway to Government Food Safety Information

 

====== Network Tools ====

17. AbiWord 1.0.3

18. NetChimes

 

====== In The News ====

19. New Report from the United Nations Reveals Dramatic Shift in the Worldwide AIDS Epidemic

 

 

Copyright and subscription information appear at the end of the Scout Report. For more information on all services of the Internet Scout Project, please visit our Website: http://scout.wisc.edu/

 

If you'd like to know how the Internet Scout team selects resources for inclusion in the Scout Report, visit our Selection Criteria page at: http://scout.wisc.edu/about/criteria.html

 

The Scout Report on the Web:

  Current issue: http://scout.wisc.edu/report/sr/current/

  This issue: http://scout.wisc.edu/report/sr/2002/scout-021127.html

 

 

Visit the Internet Scout Weblog at: http://scout.wisc.edu/weblog/

 

 

Feedback is always welcome: scout@scout.wisc.edu

 

 

 

====== NSDL Scout Reports ====

 

1.  NSDL Scout Reports for the Life Sciences and Physical Sciences The twenty-third issues of the first volumes of the Life Sciences Report and Physical Sciences Report are available. The Topic in Depth section of Life Sciences Report annotates sites on the biology of Thanksgiving. The Physical Sciences Report's Topic in Depth section offers Web sites and comments about chlorine.

 

====== Research and Education ====

 

2.  US Banking in the Last Fifty Years: Growth and Adaptation [.pdf] http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/econ/archive/wp2002-19.pdf

 

Released in August 2002, this working paper from the Social Systems Research Institute at the University of Wisconsin provides a broad overview of the dramatic changes within the commercial banking sector of the United States during the past fifty years. Authored by Professor Emeritus Donald D. Hester of the University's economics department, the paper proceeds chronologically from the conclusion of World War II and provides some comparative insights between the banking situation of the 1920s in the United States with those of the past ten years. Throughout the work, Professor Hester focuses his attention on banking practices, portfolio composition, and the changing role of banks as financial intermediaries. In the course of his work, Professor Hester concludes that banks have been increasingly discarding their traditional mode of financing loans and investments with deposits they collect, instead becoming brokers who originate loans and then use securitization to lodge them with other investors who are likely to be less informed and correspondingly more vulnerable to losses. [KMG]

 

 

3.  The Dynamics of Protest Diffusion: The 1960 Sit-In Movement in the American South [.pdf] http://www.sociology.ox.ac.uk/swps/2002-07.pdf

 

Part of the Working Papers in Sociology series from Oxford University, this work addresses the dynamics of protest diffusion by taking an in-depth and rigorous look at the 1960 sit-in movement that took place in different locations around the South. Within the papers 31 pages, Professor Kenneth Andrews of Harvard and Professor Michael Biggs of the University of Oxford offer a brief exposition of previous research into the spontaneity and organization in the dynamics of social movements, along with presenting their own approach to this oft-contested area of scholarship. Using cross- sectional regressional models and event history analysis, the authors are able to show support for the significance of formal movement organization in the initial period of protest, and the diffusion effect, where the existence of previous protests would increase the likelihood of further protest. While the authors note that their results are not that surprising, their efforts here are some of the first to systematically utilize a quantitative approach to examining this powerful social movement. [KMG]

 

 

4.  The British Library: Turning the Pages [Shockwave] http://www.bl.uk/collections/treasures/digitisation.html#

 

The online exhibits and digitization projects of the British Library are some of the finest in the world, and the Turning the Pages exhibit may be one of their best thus far. Utilizing the most contemporary advances in interactive display, visitors to the site can virtually turn the pages of the nine currently available original manuscripts located here. The nine manuscripts represent some of the most important printed pieces of material in the Library's collection, and in a few cases, some of the most important documents in world history. Currently, their number includes the _Sherborne Missal_, the greatest English illuminated manuscript of the late Middle Ages; the _Diamond Sutra_, the world's earliest dated printed book; and Sultan Baybar's _Quran_, one of the most exquisite copies of the _Quran_ in the British Library. Equally exciting are the project notes available here, which mention that the next manuscript to be added will be the anatomical drawings of Vesalius. [KMG]

 

 

5.  Charles H. Templeton Sheet Music Collection http://library.msstate.edu/ragtime/main.html

 

Charles H. Templeton, an alumnus of Mississippi State University and music lover, gave his entire collection of sheet music (some 22,000 titles) to the school's library several years ago, and they have recently begun putting some of the scanned sheet music online. So far, the online searchable archive is only partially available, but a good selection of the sheet music is scanned and can be viewed and downloaded for closer examination. The available sheet music is divided into several main categories, including blues, rags, movie tunes, show tunes, Irving Berlin, war songs, and minstrel songs. Additionally, the site provides information on the digitization process and technology utilized by the project and the collection in general. In Mr. Templeton's own words, "There are many things to be learned from this collection, whether you are a music major or a business major or studying marketing." [KMG]

 

 

6.  The Pilgrims in American Culture: Thanksgiving http://www.plimoth.org/Library/Thanksgiving/thanksgi.htm

 

Located at the Plimoth Plantation Web site, this collection of material related to the First Thanksgiving will be of great interest to those seeking to learn more about the facts and myths surrounding this famous event in American history. While most of the factual information about this meal comes from first-hand accounts written by William Bradford and Edward Winslow, these accounts are best understood by also studying household traditions, cooking techniques, and religious practices. The site consists primarily of brief essays that elucidate these various nuances of this legendary meal, including pieces on who exactly was in attendance at the 1621 First Thanksgiving, first-hand accounts about the meal, the bill of fare at the meal, and a piece that dispels the popular myth that popcorn was served at this meal. Perhaps the best part of the site are the modern recipe equivalents for the dishes served at the First Thanksgiving, including roast fowl, seethed cod, and hominy pudding. [KMG]

 

 

7.  Ethnic Identity, Bounded Solidarity, and the Formation of Immigrant Networks of Care [.pdf] http://workingfamilies.berkeley.edu/papers/55.pdf

 

Released as part of the Berkeley Center for Working Families Working Paper series, this 20-page paper by Johanna Shih addresses the ethnic solidarity and networks of care among the Asian immigrant community within Silicon Valley. In the work, Dr. Shih draws on a number of different research practices, including long-form interviews and participant observation in order to investigate network construction, identities, and normative informal care behaviors among Asian immigrants in the area. Additionally, Dr. Shih analyzes US Census data from 1990 and 2000 to document differences among white and Asian families, demonstrating that Asian families are more likely to have both parents working full-time in the labor force, thereby increasing the difficulty they may have finding adequate child care. In her concluding remarks, Dr. Shih comments that the experiences of immigration and the geographic concentrations of ethnic communities create a sense of we-ness and bounded solidarity that interprets ethnicity as a form of kinship and shared values. [KMG]

 

 

8.  Biological Soil Crusts [.pdf]

http://www.soilcrust.org/

 

Biological soil crust probably isn't the first thing that springs to mind when snapping that photo of the Delicate Arch at Arches National Park. However, without the algae, mosses, cyanobacteria, and other tiny organisms that inhabit the surface of desert soils, places like Arches and other arid environments would be quite different. The US Geological Survey provides an online guide to biological soil crusts in this easy-to-navigate Web site. Crust 101 contains a detailed introduction to soil crust ecology, and the Advanced feature offers an extensive technical reference. The Web site also includes a photo gallery, list of related references, and a short list of links. This site is also reviewed in the November 27, 2002 _NSDL Life Science Report_.[RS]

 

 

9.  Antarctic Meteorology Online http://www.antarctica.ac.uk/met/metlog/

 

The Antarctic Meteorology Online Web site is provided by the British Antarctic Survey and the Natural Environment Research Council. Visitors will find weather reports provided by the dozens of stations located in the Antarctic. The Web master has made these data accessible by each specific station; by a clickable map; by a list of all land, ship, or buoy stations; or by an oracle database interface. The reports are at least 10 minutes old and are normally not more than six hours old. The information provided includes a graph of pressure and temperature, as well as links to previous reports, which make the site a good and easily accessible resource. This site is also reviewed in the November 27, 2002 _NSDL Physical Science Report_. [JAB]

 

====== General Interest ====

 

10. Through the Lens of Time: Images of African Americans from the Cook Collection of Photographs http://www.library.vcu.edu/jbc/speccoll/cook/

 

Father and son George and Huestis Cook were photographers active in the US South, particularly Virginia, from the 1860s to the 1930s. These work resulted in the George and Huestis Cook Photograph Collection at the Valentine Richmond History Center, which contains over 10,000 negatives. In 1954, 156 of these photographs were published in a book entitled _Shadows in Silver_. Through the Lens of Time offers digital versions of almost 300 of the Cooks' photographs, selected from the Valentine Museum's collection, and digitized by Virginia Commonwealth University. Although these pictures have been on the Web since 2000, with significant additions in 2001, it is well worth a return or first time visit to see them. George Cook, one of the first commercial photographers in the US, trained other photographers in the business, and acquired the collections of photographers who were retiring, amassing an extensive collection of photographs documenting the city of Richmond, VA. Huestis Cook's photographs are unique in showing African- Americans realistically, instead of in popular stereotypical settings. Huestis also documented the tobacco business and Virginia plantations. The Web interface provides both keyword searching and browsing by 19 different subject headings, such as children, portraits, or tobacco. Once images have been retrieved in a search, the subject headings are presented as links, so that users can easily broaden a search to related topics. Explanations of the terminology used to describe the pictures and instructions for ordering copies are also available at the site. [DS]

 

 

11. Two about Carnegie Libraries

Carnegie Libraries of California http://www.carnegie-libraries.org/

Deconstructing the Philanthropic Library: The Sociological Reasons Behind Andrew Carnegies Millions to Libraries http://www.lib.msu.edu/lorenze1/carnegie.htm

 

Late in his life, the philanthropist Andrew Carnegie began to donate millions of dollars to fund literally thousands of libraries around the United States and other parts of the English speaking world. Many of the libraries are still in use across the country, some still as libraries and others serving as cultural and neighborhood centers. This first site is the product of Lucy Kortum and Pat and Bernie Skehan, all of whom share a great fondness and interest in the Carnegie library buildings contained within California. On the site, visitors will find information about all of the extant and demolished Carnegie libraries, including historical photographs and a brief discussion about each building's history. This archive of libraries is also searchable by city, area, region, style of architecture, and by current use. An extended essay by Abigal A. Van Slyck located here discusses the innovative nature of the Carnegie library layout and general design. The second site is an essay by Michael Lorenzen, a librarian at Michigan State University, about the reasons behind Andrew Carnegie's sponsorship of libraries around the United States, which is a nice complement to the site on the Carnegie Libraries of California. [KMG]

 

 

12. Nazi Persecution of Homosexuals: 1933-1945 http://www.ushmm.org/museum/exhibit/online/hsx/

 

This new online exhibit from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum offers some valuable insights into the persecution of homosexuals by the National Socialist government under Adolf Hitler. The exhibit begins by recounting the story of Richard Grune, an artist who had trained at the Bauhaus school, who was identified by the Nazis in 1934 and later spent the entirety of World War II in the Flossenburg concentration camp. The primary sections of the site consist of 12 short essays that recount the Nazi ideology behind the persecution of homosexuals, their initial raids and surveillance of known homosexual gathering places, and other dominant themes during this somber period. The short essays also include important visual documentation of the period, including images of internal Nazi documents. Perhaps the most evocative and moving elements of the site are the haunting drawings created by Richard Grune, drawn after his release from the concentration camp. All in all, an effective and sensitive site designed to elucidate one of the less well-known aspects of social history under the Nazi regime. [KMG]

 

 

13. The Charles Ives Society

http://www.charlesives.org/

 

Regrettably ignored during most of his long life by the musical establishment, Charles Ives is perhaps the United States' most important and ground-breaking composer. Begun in 1973, the Charles Ives Society is supported by the American Academy of Arts and Letters, largely from a grant by Mr. Ives' widow, Harmony Twichell Ives. Given their mission, it is not surprising that their site contains a wealth of helpful material for musicologists, performers, and those with a general interest in the life and work of Charles Ives. The site contains a complete descriptive catalogue of his music, listing all of his compositions, both published and unpublished. Visitors looking for an introduction to Mr. Ives will do well to read the short essay written by Jan Swafford. Finally, a small photo gallery provides images of Mr. Ives throughout his life, and a calendar of upcoming performances of his compositions rounds out the site. [KMG]

 

 

14. City Stories

http://citystories.com/

 

The City Stories project is a network of city-based storytelling sites, tying real people in real cities all over the world together with a thread of personal stories. The first City Stories site was begun by Derek Powazek, and with offers from volunteers to maintain sites across the world, the City Stories network has expanded to several dozen cities, including Tumon (in Guam), Denver, San Diego, Chicago, and Seattle. The site also notes that City Stories will be expanding to over twenty new cities in the near future. Essentially, each City Stories site is a collection of short stories and thought pieces by local residents, sharing experiences and ideas through the site. Visitors to each site can also post their comments about each individual piece of writing and add their own stories. Finally, each site also contains links about their city for persons seeking to learn a bit more about the place. [KMG]

 

 

15. The South Asian Literary Recordings Project [Real Audio] http://www.loc.gov/acq/ovop/delhi/salrp/

 

Undertaken by the Library of Congress' New Delhi Office, this impressive project was designed to create an audio archive of South Asian authors reading their own work in the original language of its publication. The project began in earnest during April 2000, and by September 2002 (when this site was launched), eighty authors had been recorded. The site features readings in 22 different languages, including Hindi, Bengali, Sindhi, Gujarati, Nepali, and English. The authors reading in English include some of the most prolific and accomplished South Asian authors of the last century. Those featured readings on the site include Keki N. Daruwalla, Anne Ranasinghe, and Mulk Raj Anand, whose career has spanned over seventy-five years. Additionally, a brief profile of each author is included with their representative audio recordings. Persons interested in learning more about South Asia's vast and prodigious literary tradition in the 20th century will find this site a valuable resource. [KMG]

 

 

16. Gateway to Government Food Safety Information http://www.foodsafety.gov/

 

Given all the recent concern about different foodborne pathogens in the news and on television, this site (sponsored by the US federal government) will help answer a variety of questions that consumers and persons in the food industry may have about any number of related topics. For consumers with questions about preparing food and purchasing food from the supermarket, the site has a very helpful section titled Consumer Advice that deals with topics such as food handling, where to report complaints about food products, and seasonal advice tips. A specific section for young persons and educators provides additional materials, such as lesson plans and educational quizzes on food safety. Rounding out the site is a section featuring video broadcasts, which include food safety conference meetings, and an area devoted to current and timely news items related to food safety from different governmental agencies. [KMG]

 

 

 

====== Network Tools ====

 

17. AbiWord 1.0.3

http://www.abisource.com/

 

A bit different than other word processors, AbiWord is a free word processor that is able to run on virtually any platform and supports a wide array of languages. Also of note is the fact that AbiWord is being developed as an Open Source project, which means that the lines of code comprising the application are freely available and redistributable. Perhaps the most important feature of AbiWord is that documents written in the program are readable by any text editor. The available support features for AbiWord are quite impressive, including a complete user's manual, tutorial, weekly news updates, and a FAQ section for user reference. Additionally, users of AbiWord are invited to make suggestions about how the application may be improved in future editions. AbiWord is fully compatible with all Windows operating systems and Mac OS X. [KMG]

 

 

18. NetChimes http://download.birnamlabs.com/index.php#netChimes

 

This little tool will be quite helpful for persons with Web sites who are looking for instant information about who is accessing any part of their site. NetChimes can connect to an unlimited number of servers (for persons with multiple sites) and comes with 20 sounds that can be associated for quick notification of Web activity. Additionally, an unlimited number of visitors can be notified of Web site changes and updates. NetChimes is compatible with the operating system Windows 95 and higher. [KMG]

 

 

 

====== In The News ====

 

19. New Report from the United Nations Reveals Dramatic Shift in the Worldwide AIDS Epidemic Women Make up Half of HIV Cases http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A43638-2002Nov26.html

Aids Epidemic Bringing Social Collapse http://www.guardian.co.uk/aids/story/0,7369,848436,00.html

AIDS Epidemic Update [.pdf] http://www.unaids.org/worldaidsday/2002/press/update/epiupdate_en.pdf

Fact Sheet 2002: Meeting the Need [.doc] http://www.unaids.org/worldaidsday/2002/press/factsheets/FSneed_en.doc

HIV Prevention in Humanitarian Settings [.pdf] http://www.unfpa.org/aids/docs/progbrief07.pdf

National Center for HIV, STD, and TB Prevention http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/dhap.htm

 

In a report released by the United Nations and the World Health Organization this week, it was discovered that, for the first time in 20 years, about as many women as men are infected with HIV. The report also stated that 42 million people worldwide are now living with HIV, including 5 million new infections in 2002 alone. While prevention programs are working quite effectively in certain countries, such as South Africa, the infection rate for HIV has risen dramatically throughout the entire region of Eastern Europe. Certain practices continue to contribute to the spread of HIV, such as intergenerational sex; drug use; and in some areas, rape. In a rather ominous commentary on the situation, Alan Whiteside, the director of the HIV/ AIDS research division at the University of Natal in South Africa commented that, "In a situation where life expectancy has plummeted, it's very hard to keep them engaged in a future when they don't believe they have one."

 

The first two sites lead to recent news articles on the HIV situation around the world, with the first one originating from the Washington Post and the second from the Guardian in the United Kingdom. The third link leads to the most recent 40-page report from the United Nations and the World Health Organization, which addresses the gravity of the situation in the different regions of the world. The fourth site provides a brief synopsis of the progress that is needed to address the problem of funding for HIV/ AIDS prevention and mitigation, particularly in impoverished developing nations. The fifth link leads to a document produced by the United Nations Population Fund that details how agencies and governments may best address HIV prevention in humanitarian settings, and in particular, within countries and regions beset by natural disasters and warfare. Part of the United States Center for Disease Control, the final site contains a multitude of fact sheets, statistics, and trends about the HIV epidemic in the United States. [KMG]

 

 

======                        ======

==   Index for November 27, 2002  ==

======                        ======

 

1.  NSDL Scout Reports for the Life Sciences and Physical Sciences The twenty-third issues of the first volumes of the Life Sciences Report and Physical Sciences Report are available. The Topic in Depth section of Life Sciences Report annotates sites on the biology of Thanksgiving. The Physical Sciences Report's Topic in Depth section offers Web sites and comments about chlorine.

 

2.  US Banking in the Last Fifty Years: Growth and Adaptation [.pdf] http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/econ/archive/wp2002-19.pdf

 

3.  The Dynamics of Protest Diffusion: The 1960 Sit-In Movement in the American South [.pdf] http://www.sociology.ox.ac.uk/swps/2002-07.pdf

 

4.  The British Library: Turning the Pages [Shockwave] http://www.bl.uk/collections/treasures/digitisation.html#

 

5.  Charles H. Templeton Sheet Music Collection http://library.msstate.edu/ragtime/main.html

 

6.  The Pilgrims in American Culture: Thanksgiving http://www.plimoth.org/Library/Thanksgiving/thanksgi.htm

 

7.  Ethnic Identity, Bounded Solidarity, and the Formation of Immigrant Networks of Care [.pdf] http://workingfamilies.berkeley.edu/papers/55.pdf

 

8.  Biological Soil Crusts [.pdf]

http://www.soilcrust.org/

 

9.  Antarctic Meteorology Online http://www.antarctica.ac.uk/met/metlog/

 

10. Through the Lens of Time: Images of African Americans from the Cook Collection of Photographs http://www.library.vcu.edu/jbc/speccoll/cook/

 

11. Two about Carnegie Libraries

Carnegie Libraries of California http://www.carnegie-libraries.org/

Deconstructing the Philanthropic Library: The Sociological Reasons Behind Andrew Carnegies Millions to Libraries http://www.lib.msu.edu/lorenze1/carnegie.htm

 

12. Nazi Persecution of Homosexuals: 1933-1945 http://www.ushmm.org/museum/exhibit/online/hsx/

 

13. The Charles Ives Society

http://www.charlesives.org/

 

14. City Stories

http://citystories.com/

 

15. The South Asian Literary Recordings Project [Real Audio] http://www.loc.gov/acq/ovop/delhi/salrp/

 

16. Gateway to Government Food Safety Information http://www.foodsafety.gov/

 

17. AbiWord 1.0.3

http://www.abisource.com/

 

18. NetChimes http://download.birnamlabs.com/index.php#netChimes

 

19. New Report from the United Nations Reveals Dramatic Shift in the Worldwide AIDS Epidemic Women Make up Half of HIV Cases http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A43638-2002Nov26.html

Aids Epidemic Bringing Social Collapse http://www.guardian.co.uk/aids/story/0,7369,848436,00.html

AIDS Epidemic Update [.pdf] http://www.unaids.org/worldaidsday/2002/press/update/epiupdate_en.pdf

Fact Sheet 2002: Meeting the Need [.doc] http://www.unaids.org/worldaidsday/2002/press/factsheets/FSneed_en.doc

HIV Prevention in Humanitarian Settings [.pdf] http://www.unfpa.org/aids/docs/progbrief07.pdf

National Center for HIV, STD, and TB Prevention http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/dhap.htm

 

 

 

======                                ====

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====== The Scout Report

====== Brought to You by the Internet Scout Project

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The Scout Report (ISSN 1092-3861) is published every Friday of the year except the last Friday of December by the Internet Scout Project, located in the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Department of Computer Sciences.

 

               Editor   Max Grinnell        [KMG]

      Managing Editor   Ted Schroeder       [TS]

             Director   Rachael Bower       [REB]

   Technical Director   Edward Almasy       [EA]

         Contributors   Rachel Sohmer      [RS]

                        Joel Brieske        [JB]

                        Cavin Leske         [CL]

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                        Laura Boyle         [LB]

                        Yasuhiro Sasahira   [YS]

                        Debra Shapiro       [DS]

  Internet Catalogers   David Sleasman      [DJS]

                        Colin Holden        [CH]

    Software Engineer   Barry Wiegan        [BW]

Technical Specialists   Pat Coulthard       [PC]

                                                Noah Diewald            [ND]

    Website Designer    Andy Yaco-Mink      [AY]

 

For information on additional contributors, see the Internet Scout Project staff page. http://scout.wisc.edu/about/team.html

 

Below are the copyright statements to be included when reproducing annotations from The Scout Report.

 

The single phrase below is the copyright notice to be used when reproducing any portion of this report, in any format.

 

From The Scout Report, Copyright Internet Scout Project 1994-2002. http://scout.wisc.edu/

 

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Copyright Susan Calcari and the University of Wisconsin Board of Regents, 1994-2002. The Internet Scout Project (http://scout.wisc.edu/), located in the Computer Sciences Department of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, provides information about the Internet to the U.S. research and education community under a grant from the National Science Foundation, number NCR- 9712163. The Government has certain rights in this material. Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of the entire Scout Report provided this paragraph, including the copyright notice, are preserved on all copies.

 

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SOASIS&T ... THE NEWSLETTER OF THE SOUTHERN OHIO CHAPTER OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

 

December 2002

 

From:   Neff, Patricia S. (LNG-DAY) [Patricia.Neff@lexisnexis.com]                 Sat 14/12/2002 7:49 AM

To:  'asis-l@asis.org'

 

The December 2002 issue of soasis&t ... on the move, the newsletter of the Southern Ohio Chapter of the American Society for Information Science & Technology, is available online at the Newsletters section of our SOASIST

site:

 

http://www.soasist.org/enews <http://www.soasist.org/enews

 

Volume 23, Issue 3, December 2002.

 

See this issue of our award-winning newsletter for :

 

Message from Chair & New Member Welcome..p. 1

McClanahan Wins Scholarship Competition..p. 2

Chapter Awards..p. 3

Catching Up with ASIST.. p. 4

Allard Wins ASIST James M. Crestos Leadership Award..p. 5 UK-ASIST Student Chapter Update..p. 5 ASIST SIG-CR Classification Research Workshop..p. 6 ASIST Business & Leadership Reports..p. 7 Event Report: Disruptive Technology..p. 8 Minutes of Board Meeting  1/31/ 2002..p. 9 Past & Upcoming Events..p. 11 Budget for 9/30/2002..p. 12 New from ASIST Online Bookstore..p. 13 Current Officers & List Information..p. 14

 

Deadline for submissions for the next issue is Feb. 15, 2003.  As always, please forward any comments or suggestions regarding the newsletter to the editor:

 

Patricia Neff

SOASIST Newsletter Editor & Assembly Rep

Product Manager, Legal Taxonomy & Search Products paticia.neff@lexisnexis.com <mailto:patricia.neff@lexisnexis.com>

http://www.lexisnexis.com <http://www.lexisnexis.com>

LexisNexis

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

March 2003

 

From:  Neff, Patricia S. (LNG-DAY) [Patricia.Neff@lexisnexis.com]                  Wed 2/04/2003 9:14 AM

To:  'asis-l@asis.org'

 

The March 2003 issue of

soasis&t ... on the move, the newsletter of the Southern Ohio Chapter of the American Society for Information Science & Technology,

is available online at the Newsletters section of our SOASIST site: http://www.soasist.org/enews <http://www.soasist.org/enews>

Volume 24, Issue 1, March 2003.

See this issue of our award-winning newsletter for :

Message from Chair & New Member Welcome 1

Upcoming & Past Events 2

Annual Meeting Report from SOASIST Scholarship Winner 3

SOASIST Mentors 4

December Event Report: Media Literacy     5

Minutes of Board Meetings, April-December 2002 6

Budget for 12/31/2002 10

New from ASIST Online Bookstore 11

Current Officers & List Information 12

 

As always, please forward any comments or suggestions regarding the newsletter to the editor: Patricia Neff SOASIST Newsletter Editor & Assembly Rep patricia.neff@lexisnexis.com <mailto:patricia.neff@lexisnexis.com

937-865-6800 x55560

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