NEWS FROM OTHER JOURNALS SECTION

 

SEPTEMBER 2003  ISSUE

 Editorial note:

This section contains items culled from various Internet news services, discussion lists and other announcements.  Unless specifically noted, I have not visited the sites, used any of the software, reviewed the literature, or written the news items.  I present this digest to you in good faith but cannot vouch for the accuracy of its content.  

Kerry Smith

 

Ariadne

 

Issue 36

From: Richard Waller [mailto:lisrw@UKOLN.AC.UK]

Sent: Friday, 1 August 2003 7:56 PM

To: JISC-E-COLLECTIONS@JISCMAIL.AC.UK

Subject: 'Ariadne' issue 36 is available

With apologies for cross-posting:

The July 2003 issue of Ariadne is now available.

http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/

Ariadne magazine is intended principally for information science professionals in academia, and also to interested lay people both in and beyond the Higher Education community. Its main geographic focus is the UK, but it is widely read in the US and worldwide.

 

Articles in the July issue include 'Developing the JISC Information Environment Service Registry', 'Mapping the JISC IE service landscape', 'Domesday Redux: The rescue of the BBC Domesday Project videodiscs', 'eBank UK: Building the links between research data, scholarly communication and learning' and 'The RoMEO Project: Protecting metadata in an open access environment' as well as articles on IPR, external content in institutional portals and more.

 

Best regards,

Richard Waller

Editor Ariadne

ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk

 

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Association for Information Systems Special Interest Group on Human-Computer Interaction

            2nd  newsletter

Ping Zhang [Pzhang@syr.edu]                                                                    Fri 11/07/2003 10:05 PM

[Asis-l] AIS SIGHCI Newsletter

 

Dear colleagues,

 

I hope you will enjoy the 2nd  newsletter of the Association for Information Systems Special Interest Group on Human-Computer Interaction. It can be found in PDF format at http://melody.syr.edu/hci/newsletter. If you prefer a hard copy, please send such a request to Lina, our newsletter editor at nli@mailbox.syr.edu.

 

Sincerely,

 

 

Ping

 

_________________________________

 

Dr. Ping Zhang

Associate Professor

School of Information Studies

Syracuse University

Syracuse, NY 13244

Phone: (315) 443-5617

Fax: (315) 443-5806

pzhang@syr.edu

IST at SU: http://istweb.syr.edu

AIS SIGHCI: http://melody.syr.edu/hci

Dr. Zhang: http://melody.syr.edu/pzhang

 

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Current Cites

Volume 14, no. 8, August 2003

From: CITES Moderator [mailto:citeschk@LIBRARY.BERKELEY.EDU]

Sent: Friday, 29 August 2003 6:14 AM

To: PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU

Subject: Current Cites, August 2003

 

 

                                Current Cites

 

                       Volume 14, no. 8, August 2003

 

                          Edited by [2]Roy Tennant

 

           The Library, University of California, Berkeley, 94720

                             ISSN: 1060-2356 -

        http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/2003/cc03.14.8.html

 

      Contributors: [3]Charles W. Bailey, Jr., [4]Terry Huwe, [5]Shirl

                Kennedy, [6]Leo Robert Klein, [7]Roy Tennant

 

     Bates, Marcia J.. [8]Task Force Recommendation 2.3 Research and

     Design Review: Improving User Access to Library Catalog and Portal

     Information   Wash., DC: Library of Congress, June 2003.

     (http://www.loc.gov/catdir/bibcontrol/2.3BatesReport6-03.doc.pdf).

     - Don't let the daunting title get you down. This report, an

     outgrowth of the [9]Library of Congress Conference on Bibliographic

     Control for the New Millennium, responds to the charge to "explore

     ways to enrich metadata records by focusing on providing additional

     subject and other access mechanisms...and increasing granularity of

     access and display (e.g., by enabling progression through hierarch

     and versions and by additional description information including

     summaries)". Bates and those with whom she discussed this work item

     came to understand that this charge could be recast as three

     distinct areas of inquiry: 1) user access vocabulary, 2) links

     among bibliographic families, and 3) staging of access to resources

     in the interface. Bates begins with the obligatory review of

     pertinent literature, but in an informative and interesting manner,

     which properly sets the stage for the next section of "Implications

     and Recommendations." Well worth reading for anyone interested in

     where we're heading with bibliographic search systems -- or at

     least with where we should be heading. - [10]RT

 

     Bausch, Paul.  "[11]Amazon Hacks: Power-Search for Books"

     [12]O'Reilly and Associates: Amazon Hacks   (August 2003)

     (http://hacks.oreilly.com/pub/h/393). - OK. Technically, this is

     not an article. Rather, this is "Sample Hack #9" from a new

     [13]O'Reilly and Associates title, [14]Amazon Hacks. In our

     library, we use [15]Amazon.com all the time to verify titles

     because its search engine is so much better than the lame one at

     [16]Baker & Taylor Online. But I gotta tell you...I did not have a

     clue that Amazon's search engine supported the kind of advanced

     syntax that is described in this particular hack. You will learn

     how to go above and beyond what the advanced search form offers by

     employing judicious grouping of phrases, Boolean operators and

     creative alterations to URLs. Says the author -- an experienced Web

     application developer and the co-creator of [17]Blogger --"Over its

     lifetime, Amazon.com has invested $900 million in technology." The

     [18]collection of hacks is on O'Reilly's website, but only a few

     are available in full-text. - [19]SK

 

     Darlington, Jeffrey, Andy  Finney, and Adrian  Pearce.

     "[20]Domesday Redux: The Rescue of the BBC Domesday Project

     Videodiscs"  [21]Ariadne   (36) (July 2003)

     (http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue36/tna/). - This fascinating article

     describes how a team of UK preservationists rescued the BBC

     Domesday videodiscs from certain obsolescence. The modern-day

     [22]Domesday Project aimed to capture a snapshot of life in Britain

     in 1986, on a pair of videodiscs, as a celebration of the 900th

     anniversay of the original [23]Domesday Book of William the

     Conqueror. Videodiscs are now an anachronism, but these discs were

     rescued just in time, and recreated using modern technologies. The

     story is interesting, and is one of the first of many we will

     experience over the years, as we rescue important data from the

     death grip of obsolete technologies. - [24]RT

 

     Festa, Paul.  "[25]Battle of the Blog: Dispute Exposes Bitter Power

     Struggle Behind Web Logs"  [26]CNET News.com   (4 August 2003)

     (http://news.com.com/2009-1032-5059006.html?part=dht&tag=ntop). -

     All is not well in blogland. As many of our readers know, blogs,

     newsletters, web sites, and virtually any Internet technology that

     can use or produce a syndication service use a technology called

     RSS. RSS variously stands for "Really Simple Syndication," "RDF

     Site Summary," or "Rich Site Summary," depending on which version

     you're talking about. And therein is the rub. The war is being

     fought over who should control the RSS format, which is expressed

     in XML. Dave Winer, of [27]UserLand Software fame and now of

     [28]Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet & Society, believes it

     should be him, while others prefer to launch out on their own.

     Therefore, there are now two warring versions of RSS, one dubbed

     RSS 2.x and the other still in search of a name. If you want to

     wade into this battle, you should first start with the recently

     released [29]RSS Primer cited elsewhere in this issue, then choose

     your weapons. But my suggestion is to just fire up your favorite

     [30]RSS reader, and leave the fighting to others. - [31]RT

 

     Kauppila, Paul, and Sharon  Russell.  "Economies of Scale in the

     Library World: the Dr Martin Luther King Jr Library in San Jose,

     California."  [32]New Library World   104(7) (2003):  255-266. -

     What do you do when money's tight and both the state university and

     the local public library need new library buildings? Why, combine

     the two in one building, of course. At least that's what they're

     doing in San Jose in the "first large-scale joint-use venture of

     its kind in the nation". The facility itself just opened this month

     so there's not much of a record as to whether this marriage is

     going to work or not. The collections will remain separate with the

     academic portion sticking with LC classification and the public

     part continuing with Dewey. Both technical services and reference

     will be combined though staff may hale from either the city or

     university. Certain databases licensed to the university will only

     be available to students and faculty and not to the general public.

     Boy, is this a leap in faith! The authors call it a "win-win"

     situation but only time will tell. Note, available through Emerald

     at [33]http://www.emeraldinsight.com/0307-4803.htm. - [34]LRK

 

     Keller, Michael A., Victoria A.  Reich, and Andrew C.  Herkovic.

     "[35]What Is A Library Anymore, Anyway?"  [36]First Monday   8(5)

     (May 5, 2003) (http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_5/keller/).

     - This paper was presented at the Fourth Annual Conference on

     Libraries and Museums in the Digital World, which was held in

     February 2003, in Washington, DC. The authors tackle a familiar

     topic -- rumors of our imminent demise -- with imagination and

     energy. They avoid defensive tones, but bluntly assert that

     forecasts of obsolescence are often the result of projection upon

     libraries from other perspectives. Moreover, it is interesting to

     observe what suppositions are embedded in those forecasts, because

     they all too often miss the deeper functions libraries perform. The

     authors argue that "local custodianship" of collections is a key

     value point for libraries, and by focusing on collections as an

     expression of local community will help assure their future. The

     extent to which libraries forget their roles as custodians of

     collections may determine how bright their future turns out to be.

     - [37]TH

 

     Kunze, John A.. [38]Towards Electronic Persistence Using ARK

     Identifiers   Oakland, CA: California Digital Library, July 2003.

     (http://ark.cdlib.org/arkcdl.pdf). - The topic of persistent

     identifiers is as old as the first broken URL. With [39]PURLs,

     [40]Handles, URNs, and lord only knows what else, why another

     scheme in the form of Archival Resource Keys (ARKs)? Because, as

     Kunze points out, existing schemes are constructed on the wrong

     foundation. PURLs and Handles are simply indirect naming schemes

     that allow an authority to change the physical location of an item

     without causing the published identifier to break. But persistence

     is much more than that, Kunze asserts. "A founding principle of the

     ARK is that persistence is purely a matter of service, and is

     neither inherent in an object nor conferred on it by a particular

     naming syntax. The best an identifier can do is lead users to those

     services." By definition, Kunze explains, an ARK is bound to three

     things: "(a) object access, (b) object metadata, and (c) a faceted

     commitment statement." In other words, an ARK for a given object

     can be queried to retrieve a statement that describes the level of

     persistence that the owning organization declares regarding that

     object (the specific statement is entirely up to the individual

     institution, and can be anything from "we'll drop this like a hot

     potato at the first sign of trouble" to "we'll go down fighting to

     keep this available" and numerous points in between, worded in

     whatever way is appropriate). Although some details on the scheme

     are included in this succinct document, the whole nine yards are

     also available in the [41]full ARK specification. Kunze ends by

     describing how the [42]California Digital Library is [43]using ARKs

     for digital objects it controls. Whether or not ARK as a persistent

     identifier scheme wins the day, Kunze has a handle on exactly what

     makes or breaks persistence -- commitment, not redirection. -

     [44]RT

 

     "[45]Married to the Mob(log)?"  [46]ABCNEWS.com   (29 July 2003)

     (http://abcnews.go.com/sections/scitech/FutureTech/moblogging030729

     .html). - My sons roll their eyes so far back into their skulls

     that only the whites are showing. Mom just got a [47]camera phone.

     Right now, I am amusing myself mainly by taking pictures of myself

     at work and e-mailing them to friends. But just wait till I start

     my own [48]moblog (pronouced MO-blog, as in "mobile blog")! This,

     folks, is the bleeding edge. If you have a camera phone with

     wireless Web access, there are a bunch of sites that make it

     relatively easy for you to create your own online digital journal.

     And people are doing this in droves. Think of the possibilities!

     This article describes how a student in Singapore took cell phone

     photos of an out-of-control teacher ripping up a classmate's paper

     and then posted these on the Web. This single act touched off a

     nationwide debate "over the state of student-teacher relations in

     the country's education system." While a lot of moblogs are merely

     content to explore the bizarre and indulge the voyeur, some are

     said to be changing the very nature of journalism. For example,

     some folks stuck in the recent northeastern U.S. blackout (who were

     able to get a scarce wireless signal) provided illustrated

     on-the-scene reports throughout the event. - [49]SK

 

     Moffat, M.. [50]RSS - A Primer for Publishers & Content

     Providers   (August 2003) (http://www.eevl.ac.uk/rss_primer/

). -

     RSS is an interesting technology that underlies blogs (web logs),

     as well as some newsletters, journals, and web sites. Basically, it

     is a method to provide current awareness kinds of services using a

     simple XML-encoded metadata format. This primer, aimed at those

     providing content on the Internet, is a very useful primer for

     virtually anyone wanting to know more about this technology. -

     [51]RT

 

     Rimmer, Matthew.  "[52]The Dead Poets Society: The Copyright Term

     and the Public Domain "  [53]First Monday   8(6) (2 June 2003)

     (http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_6/rimmer/). - The author

     evaluates U.S. copyright litigation from a variety of perspectives,

     including history, intellectual property law, constitutional law

     and freedom of speech, cultural heritage, and international trade.

     He essentially argues that the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension

     Act 1998, which was recently upheld by the U. S. Supreme Court,

     will inhibit the advancement of cultural and artistic expression

     using new technologies. He cites the Eldritch Press and Project

     Gutenberg as examples of innovative uses of digital technology that

     may become less possible in the future, if the law becomes adopted

     as an international standard by other nations. - [54]TH

 

     Susman, Thomas M., David J.  Carter, and  Ropes & Gray LLP, et.

     al.[55]Publisher Mergers: A Consumer-Based Approach to Antitrust

     Analysis   Washington, DC: Information Access Alliance, 2003.

     (http://www.informationaccess.org/WhitePaperV2Final.pdf). - This

     report discusses the critical importance of the wide dissemination

     of legal and research information, analyzes the skyrocketing cost

     of scholarly journals and its effect on libraries' ability to

     purchase these journals, examines the roles of publisher mergers in

     such price increases, and proposes new criteria for antitrust

     regulators to use in evaluating publisher mergers that are based on

     how libraries make collection development decisions. The focus is

     on two sectors of the scholarly publishing marketplace that have

     been most heavily impacted by cost increases: legal and STM

     (scientific, technical, and medical) information. A key argument of

     the report is that the scholarly publishing marketplace has

     exceptional characteristics: journals on the same topic provide

     unique content and they do not substitute for each other.

     Consequently, demand is often "inelastic": driven by researchers'

     needs for a journal's specific content, libraries are often

     reluctant to cancel its subscription, even in the face of

     significant cost increases. However, given budget constraints and

     constantly rising costs, libraries are forced to make decisions

     about what journals to cut, and, when they do so, they frequently

     group journals into broad academic fields, analyzing relative price

     and usage factors. This analysis results in journals in different

     sub-disciplines being in competition with each other for library

     funding despite the fact that their content may have little

     overlap. Antitrust regulators may not be aware of this collection

     development strategy and believe that journals in different

     sub-disciplines do not compete with each other. This new view of

     the dynamics of the library marketplace has profound implications

     for how antitrust analysis should be conducted: "Market definition

     would be based on broad portfolios of journals consistent with the

     portfolios that libraries construct when selecting journals, rather

     than on narrow content-based comparisons that fail to take account

     of the competition for library dollars between journals with little

     content overlap." - [56]CB

 

     Tufte, Edward.  "[57]PowerPoint Is Evil"  [58]Wired Magazine

     11(9) (September 2003)

     (http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/11.09/ppt2.html). - When the

     author of "The Visual Display of Quantitative Information" comes

     out against your product, in this case PowerPoint, likening it to a

     bad drug, you might wish you hadn't got out of bed that day. Tufte

     blasts the popular Microsoft product for its "pushy style", a style

     which "routinely disrupts, dominates, and trivializes content". In

     the right hands, it can be "a competent slide manager" but it can

     also lend itself (perhaps inherently?) to what he condemns as

     nothing but "chartjunk". Great article to get slideware newbies

     thinking about the impact of visual information. - [59]LRK

     _________________________________________________________________

 

                      Current Cites - ISSN: 1060-2356

   Copyright (c) 2003 by the Regents of the University of California All

                              rights reserved.

 

   Copying is permitted for noncommercial use by computerized bulletin

   board/conference systems, individual scholars, and libraries.

   Libraries are authorized to add the journal to their collections at no

   cost. This message must appear on copied material. All commercial use

   requires permission from the editor. All product names are trademarks

   or registered trade marks of their respective holders. Mention of a

   product in this publication does not necessarily imply endorsement of

   the product. To subscribe to the Current Cites distribution list, send

   the message "sub cites [your name]" to

   [60]listserv@library.berkeley.edu, replacing "[your name]" with your

   name. To unsubscribe, send the message "unsub cites" to the same

   address.

 

References

 

   Visible links

   1. LYNXIMGMAP:http://sunsite/CurrentCites/2003/cc03.14.8.html#head

   2. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

   3. http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm

   4. http://iir.berkeley.edu/faculty/huwe/

   5. http://www.hooboy.com/

   6. http://leoklein.com/

   7. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

   8. http://www.loc.gov/catdir/bibcontrol/2.3BatesReport6-03.doc.pdf

   9. http://www.loc.gov/catdir/bibcontrol/

  10. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

  11. http://hacks.oreilly.com/pub/h/393

  12. http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/amazonhks/

  13. http://www.oreilly.com/

  14. http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/amazonhks/

  15. http://www.amazon.com/

  16. http://www.btol.com/

  17. http://www.blogger.com/

  18. http://hacks.oreilly.com/pub/ht/24

  19. http://www.hooboy.com/

  20. http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue36/tna/

  21. http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/

  22. http://www.domesday.org.uk/

  23. http://www.pro.gov.uk/virtualmuseum/millennium/domesday/book/default.htm

  24. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

  25. http://news.com.com/2009-1032-5059006.html?part=dht&tag=ntop

  26. http://news.com.com/

  27. http://www.userland.com/

  28. http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/home/

  29. http://www.eevl.ac.uk/rss_primer/

  30. http://www.lights.com/weblogs/rss.html

  31. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

  32. http://fidelio.emeraldinsight.com/vl=6613161/cl=18/nw=1/rpsv/nlw.htm

  33. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/0307-4803.htm

  34. http://leoklein.com/

  35. http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_5/keller/

  36. http://www.firstmonday.org/

  37. http://iir.berkeley.edu/faculty/huwe/

  38. http://ark.cdlib.org/arkcdl.pdf

  39. http://purl.org/

  40. http://www.handle.net/

  41. http://ark.cdlib.org/arkspec.pdf

  42. http://www.cdlib.org/

  43. http://ark.cdlib.org/

  44. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

  45. http://abcnews.go.com/sections/scitech/FutureTech/moblogging030729.html

  46. http://abcnews.go.com/

  47. http://www.verizonwireless.com/b2c/splash/nationalPromo/cameraPhone.jsp

  48. http://www.moblogging.org/

  49. http://www.hooboy.com/

  50. http://www.eevl.ac.uk/rss_primer/

  51. http://escholarship.cdlib.org/rtennant/

  52. http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_6/rimmer/

  53. http://www.firstmonday.org/

  54. http://iir.berkeley.edu/faculty/huwe/

  55. http://www.informationaccess.org/WhitePaperV2Final.pdf

  56. http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm

  57. http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/11.09/ppt2.html

  58. http://www.wired.com/

  59. http://leoklein.com/

  60. mailto:listserv@library.berkeley.edu

 

   Hidden links:

  63. http://sunsite/CurrentCites/2003/cc03.14.8.html

  64. http://sunsite/CurrentCites/2003/cc03.14.8.html

  65. http://sunsite/CurrentCites/2003/cc03.14.8.html

  66. http://sunsite/CurrentCites/2003/cc03.14.8.html

 

 

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DigiCULT.Info Newsletter

 

Issue 4 – August 2003

DigiCULT Forum [digicultforum@digicult.info]                                          Mon 11/08/2003 7:17 PM

[DIGICULT-NEWSLETTER] DigiCULT.Info Newsletter Issue 4 / A Newsletter on Digital Culture / August 2003 / ISSN 1609-3941

 

 

Issue 4 - A Newsletter on Digital Culture

August 2003, ISSN 1609-3941 

 

 

Welcome to the fourth DigiCULT.Info. This issue focuses on the following topics:

 

 

The rescue of the BBC Domesday project, which provides an important look into the dangers of technological obsolescence, and consequent struggle to unlock the data. The results of the ORION survey, which point to a stronger than expected take-up of 3D in archaeology museums.

 

YLE, Finland's national public service broadcasting company, has adopted a full digital radio archive solution, in this article they share their experience in designing and creating this digital sound archive. Lisa Spiro introduces the Learning Science and Technology Repository (LESTER), a gateway to events, discussion and information in the development of learning technologies.

 

The article "Digital Object Identifier System" examines how DOIs can help to manage intellectual property in the digital environment.

 

Finally, the "News in the Spotlight" section includes amongst others: business models of news website; the US National Plan for preserving digital information; and, a report on preserving e-mail.

 

We invite you to visit DigiCULT online for a complete list of DigiCULT publications along with the opportunity to comment on drafted reports.

 

Download the Newsletter!

Hi-Res (3,5 MB)  http://data.digicult.info/download/digicult_newsletter_issue4_highres.pdf

Lo-Res (500k)     http://data.digicult.info/download/digicult_newsletter_issue4_lowres.pdf

 

(c) DigiCULT Forum 2003

http://www.digicult.info

 

 

 

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Disinfojournal

Adrian Smith [a.smith@leeds.ac.uk]                                  Wed 9/04/2003 10:22 PM

'springer@disinfojournal.net'; ifla-l@infoserv.inist.fr

 

For instance author/editor Alan Springer contributes:

 

"The main interest of this study is to illustrate and demonstrate a new method (derived by the information theory) which allows us a numerical assessment to the today relatively unknown phenomenon of malicious

(mal-information) or wrong information (disinformation) on your intranet. One focus is the approximation of the percentage for wrong information. The author came to the result that about 10 percent of the commercial information portals are malicious or wrong.

 

"The study evaluates 50 document-oriented intranets in 40 successful major companies in Germany, UK and US"

 

adrian smith

leeds UK

 

-----Original Message-----

From: springer@disinfojournal.net [mailto:springer@disinfojournal.net]

Sent: 08 April 2003 18:08

To: ifla-l@infoserv.inist.fr

Subject: new issue - disinfojournal

 

 

Dear Readers,

 

the e-journal "disinfojournal" launched a new issue!

article topics are:

 

- information literacy & scholarly communication

- disinformation & warbloggs

- institutional disinfomation processing

- information warfare & internet

- consumer behavior on the net

 

You find the e-journal under

 

http://www.disinfojournal.net/

 

 

Sincerely

 

Alan Springer (Editor)

 

PS: please excuse cross-postings

 

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D-Lib Magazine

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]                          Wed 16/04/2003 9:06 PM

asis-l@asis.org; sigdl-l@asis.org

 

April 2003

[Forwarded.  Dick Hill]

 

Greetings:

 

The April 2003 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now available.

 

In this issue there are five articles, a book review, a review of two

journals, several smaller features in D-Lib Magazines 'In Brief' column,

excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming conferences and

other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'. The Featured Collection

for April is Learning Curve, from The National Archives, London.

 

The articles include:

 

Trends in the Evolution of the Public Web: 1998 - 2002

Edward T. O'Neill, Brian F. Lavoie, and Rick Bennett, OCLC Office of Research

 

 

The Fedora Project: An Open-source Digital Object Repository Management System Thornton Staples and Ross Wayland, University of Virginia and Sandra

Payette, Cornell University

 

State of the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative, April 2003

Makx Dekkers, DCMI, and Stuart Weibel, OCLC Office of Research

 

Preservation Metadata: Pragmatic First Steps at the National Library of New

Zealand

Sam Searle and Dave Thompson, National Library of New Zealand

 

How Many People Search the ERIC Database Each Day?

Lawrence M. Rudner, University of Maryland, College Park

 

The book reviewed is:

 

Encoded Archival Description on the Internet

Daniel V. Pitti and Wendy M. Duff, eds., Haworth Press, (December 2002) Reviewed by: Helen R. Tibbo, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

The journal review is:

 

Enhancing the Marketplace of Archival Ideas

A review of two journals - Archival Science: International Journal on

Recorded Information and the Journal of Archival Organization Reviewed by: Elizabeth Yakel, University of Michigan

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

 

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

 

The Australian National University Sunsite, Canberra, Australia http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib

 

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen,

Goettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

 

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

 

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

 

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the April 2003 issue

of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later. There is a delay

between the time the magazine is released in the United States and the time

when the mirroring process has been completed.)

 

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

 

May 2003

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]                          Fri 16/05/2003 8:56 PM

[Asis-l] The May 2003 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

 

[Forwarded.  Dick Hill]

 

Greetings:

 

The May 2003 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now available.

 

In this issue there are six articles, a book review, several smaller

features in D-Lib Magazine's 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent press

releases, and news of upcoming conferences and other items of interest in

'Clips and Pointers'. The Featured Collection for May is Albumen

Photographs: History, Science and Preservation, courtesy of Timothy Vitale,

Preservation Associates; Paul Messier, Boston Art Conservation; Walter

Henry, Stanford University Libraries; and John Burke, Oakland Museum of

California.

 

The articles include:

 

Usage Analysis for the Identification of Research Trends in Digital Libraries Johan Bollen, Soma Sekhara Vemulapalli and Weining Xu, Old Dominion

University; and Rick Luce, Los Alamos National Laboratory

 

 

Keepers of the Crumbling Culture: What Digital Preservation Can Learn from

Library History

Deanna Marcum and Amy Friedlander, Council on Library and Information Resources

 

Patterns of Journal Use by Scientists through Three Evolutionary Phases Carol Tenopir, Matt Grayson, Yan Zhang and Mercy Ebuen, University of

Tennessee; Donald W. King, University of Pittsburgh; and Peter Boyce, Maria

Mitchell Association

 

Developing a Content Management System-based Web Site

Clare Rogers, National Trust, and John Kirriemuir, Ceangal

 

Exploring Charging Models for Digital Cultural Heritage in Europe Simon Tanner, University of Hertfordshire, and Marilyn Deegan, Oxford

University

 

Visions: The Academic Library in 2012

James W. Marcum, Fairleigh Dickinson University

 

The book reviewed is:

 

XML for Libraries

Roy Tennant, Editor, Neal-Schuman Publishers, Inc., 2002 Reviewed by: Priscilla Caplan, Florida Center for Library Automation

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

 

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

 

The Australian National University Sunsite, Canberra, Australia http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib

 

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen,

Goettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

 

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

 

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

 

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the May 2003 issue of

D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later. There is a delay

between the time the magazine is released in the United States and the time

when the mirroring process has been completed.)

 

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

 

Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

June 2003

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]                          Wed 18/06/2003 12:59 AM

[Asis-l] [Dlib-subscribers] The June 2003 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

 

[Forwarded.  Dick Hill]

 

Greetings:

 

The June 2003 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now available.

 

In this issue there are five articles, several smaller features in D-Lib

Magazine's 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news

of upcoming conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and

Pointers'.  The Featured Collection for June is PapaInk: The Children's Art

Archive, courtesy of Marc Feldman and Audrey Manring, PapaInk.

 

The articles include:

 

Visualizing Keyword Distribution Across Multidisciplinary C-Space Donald Beagle, Belmont Abbey College

 

Google Meets eBay: What Academic Librarians Can Learn from Alternative

Information Providers

Anne R. Kenney, Nancy Y. McGovern, Ida T. Martinez, and Lance J. Heidig,

Cornell University

 

Trends in Use of Electronic Journals in Higher Education in the UK - Views

of Academic Staff and Students

Karen Bonthron, University of Edinburgh; Christine Urquhart, Rhian Thomas,

David Ellis, Jean Everitt, Ray Lonsdale, Elizabeth McDermott, Helen Morris,

Rebecca Phillips, Siân Spink, and Alison Yeoman, University of Wales

Aberystwyth; and Chris Armstrong and Roger Fenton, Information Automation

Ltd.

 

DOI: A 2003 Progress Report

Norman Paskin, International DOI Foundation

 

Understanding the International Audiences for Digital Cultural Content Paul Miller, UKOLN; David Dawson, Resource: the Council for Museums,

Archives & Libraries; and John Perkins, CIMI Consortium

 

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

 

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

 

The Australian National University Sunsite, Canberra, Australia http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib

 

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen,

Goettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

 

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

 

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

 

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the June 2003 issue of

D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is a delay

between the time the magazine is released in the United States and the time

when the mirroring process has been completed.)

 

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

 

 

_______________________________________________

DLib-Subscribers mailing list http://www.dlib.org/mailman/listinfo/dlib-subscribers

 

Executive Director

American Society for Information Science and Technology

1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510

Silver Spring, MD  20910

FAX: (301) 495-0810

PHONE: (301) 495-0900

 

http://www.asis.org

 

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

EUCLID newsletter

 

---------- Forwarded message ----------

Date: Wed, 7 May 2003 12:58:31 +0200

From: Ragnar Andreas Audunson <Ragnar.Audunson@JBI.HIO.NO>

To: LIS-BAILER@JISCMAIL.AC.UK

Subject: EUCLID newsletter

 

Dear colleagues,

 

On http://www.jbi.hio.no/bibin/euclid/eucnew.htm

 

you will find the last newsletter of EUCLID - The European Association for Education and Research in Library and Information Science.

 

We would in particular like to draw your attention to:

 

- The registration form for the common ALISE/EUCLID conference in Potsdam, Germany, on LIS-education in a period of continuous change. The conference takes place on the 3st of July and 1st of August, i.e. immidiately before the IFLA conference in Berlin.

 

- The information in the payment of membership fee 2003.

 

We hope you can spread information about the ALISE/EUCLID-conference and on the plans and activities of EUCLID among your staff members.

 

Yours sincerely

on behalf of the EUCLID-board

 

Ragnar Audunson

chairman

 

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

First Monday

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]                                      Tue 8/04/2003 7:38 PM

asis-l@asis.org; sigdl-l@asis.org

 

April 2003

 

[Forwarded.  Dick Hill]

 

Dear Reader,

 

The April 2003 issue of First Monday (volume 8, number 4) is now available at http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_4/

 

-------

 

Table of Contents

 

Volume 8, Number 4 - April 7th 2003

 

Clustering and dependencies in free/open source software development: Methodology and tools by Rishab Aiyer Ghosh http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_4/ghosh/

 

Consumers on the Web: Identification of usage patterns

by Nina Koiso-Kanttila http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_4/koiso/

 

The impact of cybercafes on information services in Uganda

by Samuel Gitta and J.R. Ikoja-Odongo http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_4/gitta/

 

Managing Internet gambling in the workplace

by  Mark Fox, Larry Phillips, and Ganesh Vaidyanathan http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_4/fox/

 

Belonging and diaspora: The Chinese and the Internet

by Loong Wong

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_4/wong/

 

Research note: Across the United States, 85,000 to 144,000 public computing sites by Kate Williams http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_4/williams/

 

Book reviews

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_4/reviews/

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

May 2003

 

volume 8, number 5

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]              Fri 9/05/2003 11:28 PM

[Asis-l] First Monday May 2003

 

[Forwarded, Dick Hill]

 

Dear Reader,

 

The May 2003 issue of First Monday (volume 8, number 5) is now available at http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_5/

 

-------

 

Table of Contents

 

Volume 8, Number 5 - May 5th 2003

 

Sustaining Digital Resources: Web-Wise 2003 Selected papers from the Fourth Annual Conference on Libraries and Museums in the Digital World sponsored by the U.S. Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and Johns Hopkins University, 26-28 February 2003, Washington, D.C.

 

Creating the Digital Future

by Robert Coonrod http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_5/coonrod/

 

The International Children's Digital Library: Description and analysis of first use by Allison Druin, Benjamin B. Bederson, Ann Weeks, Allison Farber, Jesse Grosjean, Mona Leigh Guha, Juan Pablo Hourcade, Juhyun Lee, Sabrina Liao, Kara Reuter, Anne Rose, Yoshifumi Takayama, and Lingling Zhang http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_5/druin/

 

The Lowell Observatory Public Astronomical Research Center

by Jeffrey C. Hall

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_5/hall/

 

OpenKey: Illinois-North Carolina Collaborative Environment for Botanical Resources by P. Bryan Heidorn and Lesley Deem http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_5/heidorn/

 

What is a library anymore, anyway?

by Michael A. Keller, Victoria A. Reich, and Andrew C. Herkovic http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_5/keller/

 

The Syracuse University Library Radius Project: Development of a non-destructive playback system for cylinder recordings by William A. Penn and Martha J. Hanson http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_5/penn/

 

Issues in sustainability: Creating value for online users

by Abby Smith

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_5/smith/

 

Business model issues in the development of digital cultural content by Gerry Wall http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_5/wall/

 

Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

June  2003

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]                                      Mon 16/06/2003 8:22 PM

[Asis-l] [Forwarded]  First Monday June 2003      

 

[orwarded.  Dick Hill]

 

Dear Reader,

 

The June 2003 issue of First Monday (volume 8, number 6) is now available at http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_6/

 

-------

 

Table of Contents

 

Volume 8, Number 6 - June 2nd 2003

 

A social network caught in the Web

by Lada A. Adamic, Orkut Buyukkokten, and Eytan Adar http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_6/adamic/

 

Analyzing the taxonomy of Internet business models using graphs by Chiou-Pirng Wang and KwaiChow Chan http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_6/wang/

 

The dead poets society: The copyright term and the public domain by Matthew Rimmer http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_6/rimmer/

 

Toward a model of information policy analysis: Speech as an illustrative example by Terrence A. Maxwell http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_6/maxwell/

 

Business models of news Web sites: A survey of empirical trends and expert opinion by Frederick Schiff http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_6/schiff/

 

Book reviews

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_6/reviews/

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

July 2003

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]                                                              Thu 10/07/2003 4:55 AM

[Asis-l] First Monday July 2003

 

 

[Forwarded.  Dick Hill

 

Dear Reader,

 

The July 2003 issue of First Monday (volume 8, number 7) is now available at http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_7/

 

-------

 

Table of Contents

 

Volume 8, Number 7 - June 7th 2003

 

Search engine personalization: An exploratory study

by Yashmeet Khopkar, Amanda Spink, C. Lee Giles, Prital Shah, and Sandip Debnath http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_7/khopkar/

 

A copyright cold war? The polarized rhetoric of the peer-to-peer debates by John Logie http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_7/logie/

 

Information politics: The story of an emerging metadata standard by Joan Starr http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_7/starr/

 

The 'grey digital divide': Perception, exclusion and barriers of access to the Internet for older people by  Peter Millward http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_7/millward/

 

Expressiveness and conformity in Internet-based polls

by Sebnem Cilesiz and Richard Ferdig http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_7/cilesiz/

 

The impact of digital games in education

by Begona Gros

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_7/gros/

 

----------------------------

 

You've received this message because you're registered to First Monday's Table of Contents service. You can unsubscribe to this service by sending a reply containing the word unsubscribe in the body of the message or use the form at http://firstmonday.org/join.html

 

First Monday Editorial Group

 

Executive Director

American Society for Information Science and Technology

1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510

Silver Spring, MD  20910

FAX: (301) 495-0810

PHONE: (301) 495-0900

 

http://www.asis.org

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Government Information Quarterly

John Bertot [jcbertot@lis.fsu.edu]                           Thu 12/06/2003 9:52 PM

asis-l@asis.org

 

Volume 20, number 2 (2003)

 

The editors (see below) of _Government Information Quarterly:  An International Journal of Information Technology Management, Policies, and Practices_ are pleased to announce the release of Volume 20, number 2 (2003). The issue is a symposium issue entitled "Setting the Agenda for Rural Broadband," and is guest edited by Stephen D. McDowell and Sharon Strover.  The issue contains a number of articles that explore telecommunications issues in rural America from policy, technology, and societal perspectives.

 

Issue 2 articles include:

 

Rural technology deployment and access: successes upon which to build, Pages 85-93, Bob Rowe.

 

The prospects for broadband deployment in rural America, Pages 95-106, Sharon Strover.

 

Testing the validity of NECA's Middle Mile cost simulation model using survey data, Pages 107-119 Victor Glass, Joe Chang and Maria Petukhova.

 

Technological breakthroughs lower the cost of broadband service to isolated customers, Pages 121-133 Victor Glass, Salvatore Talluto and Chris Babb.

 

Creating demand: influencing information technology diffusion in rural communities, Pages 135-150, C. Ann Hollifield and Joseph F. Donnermeyer.

 

What is broadband? Where is "rural"?, Pages 151-166, Shree Venkatachalam and Stephen D. McDowell.

 

Local governments and universities cooperate to expand broadband telecom

services: the broadband regional affiliation for managed planning (B-RAMP) and the Michigan State University site for information and telecommunication experimentation (M-SITE), Pages 167-176, Ronald G. Choura, Ronald K. Siegel, Jr. , Thomas A. Muth and Mark R. Levy.

 

Cable TV is the next market for rural Telcos, Pages 177-183, Victor Glass and Sal Talluto.

 

The multiple dimensions of the digital divide: more than the technology 'haves' and 'have nots', Pages 185-191, John Carlo Bertot.

 

Issue 2 Reviews include:

 

Teaching Legal Research and Providing Access to Electronic Resources

Editors: Gary L. Hill, Dennis S. Sears, and Lovisa Lyman. New York, NY: The Haworth Information Press, 2001. 224 pp. [index unpaged] $59.95 (hard cover)/$34.95 (soft cover), ISBN 0-7890-1369-X, Page 193, Faye Couture.

 

Government of the future OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development). Paris: Governance, OECD, 2000. 256 pp. $20. ISBN 92-64-18448-1, Pages 194-196, Linda J. Chia.

 

The Design & Management of Effective Distance Learning Programs Richard Discenza, Caroline Howard, and Karen Schenk, editors; Hershey, PA: Idea Group Publishing, 2002. 300 pp. $74.95 (hardcover). ISBN: 1-930708-20-3, Pages 196-197, Nancy Marshall.

 

A Bridge to One America: The Civil Rights Performance Of The Clinton Administration United States Commission on Civil Rights. Washington, D.C.:, 2001. 94 pp. (PDF) Bill Clinton and Black America. DeWayne Wickham. New

York: Ballantine Books, 2002. 304 pp. $24.00 (Hardback). ISBN: 0345450329, Pages 197-199, Bill Sleeman.

 

Degrees of Latitude: Mapping Colonial America Margaret Beck Pritchard and Henry G. Taliaferro. The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation in association with Harry N. Abrams, Inc. 434 pp. $95.00. 0-87935-214-0 (CWF) 0-8109-3529-2 (H. N. Abrams), Pages 200-201, Marsha L. Selmer.

 

FEDBIZOPPS (Federal Business Opportunities) Washington, DC: U.S. General Services Administration. Visited December 2002., Pages 201-203, Martha Jo Sani.

 

Global Information Infrastructure: The Birth, Vision and Architecture Andrew S. Targowski, Harrisburg, PA: Idea Group Publishing, 1996. 456 pp. $64.95.

ISBN: 1-878289-32-2, Pages 203-205, Sarah Holmes.

 

Measuring the Value of Information Technology Han van der Zee, Hershey, PA: Information Science Publishing, 2002, $74.95, 213 pp., ISBN: 1-930708-08-4, Pages 205-206, Mardi Mahaffy.

 

Korean Government Publications: An Introductory Guide Myoung Chung Wilson. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press, Inc., 2000. $45.00, 216 pp. ISBN: 08108317110, Pages 207-208, Susan L. Kendall.

 

The full text of these and other articles is available through Elsevier ScienceDirect at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/issue/6542-2003-999799997-434422 as well as in print publication. ======================================================================

 

Government Information Quarterly is a quarterly publication of Elsevier Science.  The journal explores such topics as information and telecommunications policy; access to and use of government information; information technology management, implementation, planning, and evaluation; information services development, management, and provision in a distributed networked environment; e-commerce in governments; service quality assessment, benchmarking, and performance measurement; and, governing and governance in a networked environment.

 

Additional information regarding the journal and journal submissions is available at:  http://www.elsevier.com/locate/govinf

 

John Carlo Bertot <jcbertot@lis.fsu.edu>, School of Information Studies, Florida State University serves as the journal editor.

 

Charles R. McClure <cmcclure@lis.fsu.edu>, School of Information Studies, Florida State University serves as the journal associate editor.

 

John A. Shuler <alfred@uic.edu>, Documents, Maps, Microforms, & Curriculum Department, Univeristy of Illinois Chicago serves as the journal assistant editor.

 

Aimee C. Quinn <aquinn@uic.edu>, Government Documents Department, Univeristy of Illinois Chicago serves as the journal reviews editor.

 

*************************************************************************

* John Carlo Bertot, Ph.D.                        Phone: (850) 644-8118 *

* Associate Professor                               Fax: (850) 644-4522 *

* School of Information Studies             Email: jcbertot@lis.fsu.edu *

* Florida State University        http://slis-two.lis.fsu.edu/~jcbertot *

* 101 Shores Building                                                   *

* Tallahassee, FL 32306-2100                                            *

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

Volume 20, number 3 (2003)

John Bertot [jcbertot@lis.fsu.edu]                                       Wed 6/08/2003 7:28 PM

 

New Issue of Government Information Quarterly

 

The editors (see below) of _Government Information Quarterly:  An International Journal of Information Technology Management, Policies, and Practices_ are pleased to announce the release of Volume 20, number 3 (2003). The issue  contains a number of articles that explore information access, dissemination, and systems policy issues.

 

Issue 3 articles include:

 

Access to classified information: seeking security clearances for state and local officials and personnel, Pages 213-232 Frederick M. Kaiser

 

The public need to know: emergencies, government organizations, and public information policies, Pages 233-258 Terrence A. Maxwell

 

Every citizen a missile: the need for an emergent systems approach by law enforcement, Pages 259-280 Kevin C. Desouza and Tobin Hensgen

 

Keeping the citizenry informed: early congressional printing and 21st century information policy, Pages 281-293 Aimee C. Quinn

 

The impact of the USA Patriot Act on collection and analysis of personal information under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, Pages 295-314 Paul T. Jaeger, John Carlo Bertot and Charles R. McClure

 

 

Reviews include:

 

Management and disposition of excess weapons plutonium National Academy of Sciences, Committee on International Security and Arms Control. Washington,

DC: National Academy Press, 1994. 275 pp. $56.50 (cloth). ISBN:0-30905-042-1, Pages 315-316 Tiffeni J. Fontno

 

Public services issues with rare and archival law materials Michael Widener (Editor). New York: Haworth Press, 2001. 198 pp. [includes index], $34.95 (paperback), ISBN 0-7890-1408-4, Page 317 Faye Couture

 

The Louisiana Purchase: emergence of an American Nation Peter J. Kastor (Editor). Landmark Events in U.S. History Series. Washington: CQ Press, 2002. 299 pp. $125.00 (cloth). ISBN 1-56802-706-0, Pages 318-320 Charles D. Bernholz

 

 

======================================================================

 

Government Information Quarterly is a quarterly publication of Elsevier Science.  The journal explores such topics as information and telecommunications policy; access to and use of government information; information technology management, implementation, planning, and evaluation; information services development, management, and provision in a distributed networked environment; e-commerce in governments; service quality assessment, benchmarking, and performance measurement; and, governing and governance in a networked environment.

 

Additional information regarding the journal and journal submissions is available at:  http://www.elsevier.com/locate/govinf

 

John Carlo Bertot <jcbertot@lis.fsu.edu>, School of Information Studies, Florida State University serves as the journal editor.

 

Charles R. McClure <cmcclure@lis.fsu.edu>, School of Information Studies, Florida State University serves as the journal associate editor.

 

John A. Shuler <alfred@uic.edu>, Documents, Maps, Microforms, & Curriculum Department, Univeristy of Illinois Chicago serves as the journal assistant editor.

 

Aimee C. Quinn <aquinn@uic.edu>, Government Documents Department, Univeristy of Illinois Chicago serves as the journal reviews editor.

 

 

*************************************************************************

* John Carlo Bertot, Ph.D.                        Phone: (850) 644-8118 *

* Associate Professor                               Fax: (850) 644-4522 *

* School of Information Studies             Email: jcbertot@lis.fsu.edu *

* Florida State University        http://slis-two.lis.fsu.edu/~jcbertot *

* 101 Shores Building                                                   *

* Tallahassee, FL 32306-2100                                            *

*************************************************************************

 

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

Information for Social Change

 

No. 17

Rory Litwin [rlitwin@earthlink.net]                                        Sun 29/06/2003 11:25 AM

Information for Social Change No. 17

 

Information for Social Change is now an electronic-only publication.

 

Issue 17, Summer 2003, is now published and on the web at

http://libr.org/ISC/TOC.html

 

The issue is available as a single Word document or as individual html

articles.

 

Table of Contents, No. 17, Summer 2003

 

Editorial.

Developing a Needs Based Library Service. John Pateman

Activist and Archivist. Martin Lowe

Globalisation, Libraries and Information. Ruth Rikowski

Library privatization: fact or fiction?. Ruth Rikowski

Still at your service? GATS, privatization and public services in the UK.

Ruth Rikowski

Free trade with library services: no 'all clear' regarding GATS. Anders

Ericon interviews Frode Bakken

Framework for the future. John Pateman

The People's Network. John Pateman

Building Better Library Services. John Pateman

Overdue: how to create a modern public library service. John Pateman

 

 

 

Here's the editorial from this issue:

 

 

Welcome to issue 17 of Information for Social Change. In common with many

other LIS journals we have now become an electronic publication. This means

that we will no longer be producing hard copies of ISC. If you want a hard

copy go to our website at www.libr.org/ISC/ and download a copy to print

out.

 

This issue is in three parts. Part one features articles by John Pateman

(Developing a Needs Based Library Service) and Martyn Lowe (Activism and

Archivist). These are intended to stir up interest and debate so please

send us your views.

 

Part two continues our theme of discussing the impact of globalization and

privatization on library services. Ruth Rikowski has become our resident

expert on this subject and she has made three further valuable

contributions to this debate in this issue : Globalisation, libraries and

information; Library Privatisation: fact or fiction?; and Still at your

service - GATS, privatization and public services in the UK. We also

feature an interview by Anders Ericson with Frode Bakken, on the subject of

Free trade with library services ? no "All clear" regarding GATS.

 

Part three is a round up of recent publications which affect public

libraries in the UK - Framework for the future; The People's Network;

Building Better Library Services; Overdue ? how to create a modern public

library service. This last title, by Charles Leadbetter of Demos, is

particularly thought provoking. Its final sentence - "Libraries are sleep

walking to disaster; it is time they woke up" - should give us all food for

thought.

 

Our next issue, due out in January 2004, will include a report on the

Libraries in the Third World Forum which is being held during the Culture

and Development 3rd Congress in Havana, Cuba, between 9-12 June 2003.

Participants at the Forum include ISC editor John Pateman, who will be

taking part in a Round Table discussion on the theme of "libraries

contribution to solidarity and social justice in a world of neo-liberal

globalization".

 

We are also exploring the possibility, with our sister organization in the

US, the Progressive Librarians Guild, of producing a joint issue of ISC and

PLG, possibly on the theme of how the so-called "war on terror" is

affecting library and information services.

 

Corrections and amendments

 

The article by Jane Mackenzie (The Quiet Storm) which appeared in ISC 16,

was originally published in the Big Issue no 501, Aug 12-18th 2002,

pp.10-11. Jane Mackenzie is the Deputy Editor (News) of the Big Issue.

 

The ISC website states that the "Green Anarchist" ceased publication in

2000. This is not the case! The "Green Anarchist" is still being published

and can be obtained from BCM 1715, London, WC1N 3XX, UK. The cover price of

issue No. 67 Autumn 02 is "£1 / $2, free to prisoners, £5,000 to cops"

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Information Research

Tom Wilson [t.d.wilson@sheffield.ac.uk]                                                    Wed 16/04/2003 10:00 PM

JESSE; LIS-LINK@JISCMAIL.AC.UK; lis-bailer@JISCMAIL.AC.UK; KNOW-ORG@JISCMAIL.AC.UK; asis-l@asis.org

[Asis-l] New Issue of Information Research

The latest issue of Information Research is now available:

 

http://InformationR.net/ir/

 

Papers:

 

What is this link doing here? Beginning a fine-grained process of identifying reasons for academic hyperlink creation, by Mike Thelwall, School of Computing and Information Technology, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton WV1 1EQ, UK

 

Web search: how the Web has changed information retrieval, by Terrence A. Brooks, Information School, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA

 

The IIR evaluation model: a framework for evaluation of interactive information retrieval systems, by Pia Borlund, Department of Information Studies, Royal School of Library and Information Science, Aalborg branch, Aalborg, Denmark

 

Competency in network use as a resource for citizenship: implications for the digital divide, by Pirkko J&auml;&auml;skel&auml;inen, The Central Pension Security Institute, Finland and Reijo Savolainen, Department of Information Studies, University of Tampere, Finland

 

and an occasional column:

 

Watch this: corralling wild bits, by Terrence A. Brooks

 

along with a crop of book reviews.

 

Tom Wilson

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Prof. Tom Wilson [t.d.wilson@SHEFFIELD.AC.UK]                                            Sun 27/07/2003 12:33 AM

New issue of Information Research                                                JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU

 

A new issue of Information Research is now available at http://InformationR.net/ir/

 

This issue contains six papers from the Department of Information and Communication at Manchester Metropolitan University in the UK, representing the wide range of research being conducted. This is the second issue devoted to work in a single institution - the first covered IR research at the University of Tampere, Finland. Two further issues are planned - covering the University of Northumbria, UK, and Victoria University, Wellington, New Zealand.

 

Proposals from other institutions covering research in information science, information management, information systems and related areas are welcome.

 

Tom Wilson

 

 

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Information Research weblog

Prof. Tom Wilson [T.D.Wilson@sheffield.ac.uk]                Wed 4/06/2003 9:04 PM

 

The Information Research weblog, at http://www.free-conversant.com/irweblog/

now has 'channels' - i.e., classification categories for the messages. These are human-assigned (i.e., by me :-) ) since as Seth Dillingham of Macrobyte said in a support message, "If we could automate this for you, we'd be rich and famous..." Indeed - the Holy Grail of automatic classification seems to be as far removed from implementation as it was when I used to teach classification, indexing and IR forty years ago :-) i.e., it seems to have attained just about the same possibility of categorization at the level of, say, somewhat less than the first 100 Dewey classes.

 

Not all of the messages have been assigned to a chennel at this point, as it is a slow business going through the file and editing each message, but at least 60% have been dealt with.

 

Now - if only I could persuade more people to submit messages to the Weblog...

 

Tom Wilson

 

___________________________________________________

Professor T.D. Wilson, PhD

Publisher/Editor in Chief

Information Research

InformationR.net

University of Sheffield

Sheffield S10 2TN,  UK

e-mail: t.d.wilson@shef.ac.uk

Web site: http://InformationR.net/

 

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The Information Society (TIS)

 

C. Courtright [ccourtri@indiana.edu]                                              Sat 7/06/2003 2:36 AM

[Asis-l] Update on journal The Information Society (TIS)

 

Forwarded by request:

---------------------

The Information Society (TIS) update

 

Rob Kling's sudden passing away on May 15th was a shock for everybody,

especially so for those of us who had been interacting with him almost

on a daily basis. It felt so unreal.  For a while we kept TIS humming on

an ad hoc basis.  We now have a more formal arrangement for TIS

operations. I will be serving as the interim editor till the end of this

year.  I will do my best to preserve the orientation that Rob gave to TIS.

 

Since I had the privilege of working with Rob over the last three years,

I have been asked: What was Rob's vision for TIS?  In my opinion, it was

not so much a vision but an attitude that Rob brought to TIS that made

all the difference.  He had no methodological fetish and welcomed works

from any perspective as long as they opened a window in the mind.  The

results of this openness are evident on the pages of TIS where

juxtaposition of papers drawn from disparate research traditions

generates a surprising harmony.  We are promoted to think beyond the

confines of our own cubbyholes.

 

Our challenge is to prolong this moment of openness for as long as

possible.   TIS continues to welcome good ideas from diverse sources.

If you have an exciting project going, we look forward to hearing about it.

 

Harmeet Sawhney

Interim Editor, The Information Society

 

Associate Professor

Department of Telecommunications                                                                      

Indiana University, 1229 E. 7th St.                                                             

Bloomington, IN 47405-5501

 

Phone:  (812) 855-0954                                                                              

Fax:  (812) 855 - 7955                                                                                

URL: http://www.indiana.edu/~telecom/faculty/sawhney.html

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Call for papers

 

C. Courtright [ccourtri@indiana.edu]                                  Wed 2/07/2003 7:03 AM

[Asis-l] Call for Papers (TIS)

 

Forwarded by request of the editor:

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

The Information Society (TIS) special issue on

 

SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF PUBLIC POLICY IN THE INFORMATION AGE

 

Edited by Milton Mueller (Syracuse University) and Becky Lentz (Ford

Foundation)

 

If the 1990s was the decade of market liberalization in media and

telecommunication industries, what will the next decade be? What will

define the agenda for communication and information policy in the next

decade?

 

Current policy discourse is focused on relatively narrow regulatory or

legal issues, such as broadband regulation, the proper scope of

intellectual property rights, interconnection and competition in

telecommunications, and media concentration. While recognizing the

importance of issue-specific policy research, this special issue would

attempt to shift some attention to the underlying social determinants of

public policy.  The objective is to encourage the development of revised

conceptions of the public interest appropriate to a transformed

industrial and political environment. Interdisciplinary papers that

bring together insights from political science, sociology, economics,

and cultural studies are especially welcome.   Ideally, papers would

shed light on current developments and place them in perspective that

has relevance for the future.

 

As more specific examples of the type of papers/research we seek:

 

  * Analyses of long-term change in media and telecommunications

institutions that draw upon any relevant literature of institutional

change (e.g., the New Institutional Economics, the Old Institutional

Economics, social movement theory, property rights economics,

organizational repertoires and innovation).

 

  * Papers exploring changes in the way citizens, consumers, business

groups or other constituencies are organizing to influence communication

and information policy, including new analyses of how so-called global

civil society or transnational advocacy networks are involved in

communication and information issues.

 

  * Papers that assess the impact of globalization on communication and

information policies, and explore the relationship between national

policies, constituencies, and institutions on the one hand and

international organizations and constituencies on the other.

 

  * How conceptions of the public interest in communication and

information policy have changed in response to new technologies, new

industry conditions and political and social developments. Are new

theories of the public interest in communications and information policy

being formed?

 

  * Explorations of the role of ideas and scholarly research in shaping,

fomenting or resisting changes in policy. How are normative principles

responding to the changing landscape?

 

Manuscripts prepared according to the TIS guidelines should be submitted

by October 1, 2003.  Please send the manuscripts to: Milton Mueller

<mueller@syr.edu>.  Authors are encouraged to discuss their ideas with

the guest editors.

 

 

 

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Information Technology Newsletter

 

July - December 2003

jsundstrom@idea-group.com                                                          Fri 22/08/2003 10:17 PM

 

Information Technology Newsletter Now Available: July - December 2003

 

Information Technology Newsletter:

An international newsletter of information technology in libraries

Did you know?

A complimentary copy of ITN is now available from our website.

 

Simply click here to download the latest issue of ITN.

July – December 2003

Description

This is a publication especially designed for librarians in the management of information resources. Published twice a year, this newsletter is a forum for librarians and library staff in public, university and corporate libraries to ask questions and get answers. Previously published articles include: Trends and Issues in Library and Information Science; From the One-Person Library to Corporate Cybrary Networks; Voice Notification Systems; Sources of Information for Research in Global Telecommunications Management; Who Owns the Software Copyright?; and many more.

Additional Information

Guidelines for Manuscript Submissions | Editorial Review Board

Interested in having your library subscribe to ITN? Click here!

Download our newly released 2003 catalog, featuring all Idea Group Inc. publications.

Idea Group Publishing

Publishers of IT books, journals and cases since 1988.

 

Hershey • London • Melbourne • Singapore

Tel: 717-533-8845 • Fax 717-533-8661 • E-mail: cust@idea-group.com

 

TO UNSUBSCRIBE: «EmailAddress»

 

Please send an email to jsundstrom@idea-group.com with the word

"UNSUBSCRIBE" in the subject line.

 

NOTE:  Please unsubscribe by sending your request from the email address to

which this message was sent.

 

 

 

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The Informed Librarian Online

 

Arlene Eis [aeis@carroll.com]                                                         Thu 21/08/2003 9:51 PM

press release- current awareness for info. Professionals

 

PRESS RELEASE - please share with your readers!

 

THE INFORMED LIBRARIAN ONLINE now has its own free web site at

www.informedlibrarian.com

The web site is the information professional's one-stop site for all of

their professional reading. At the end of each month, an issue is posted

linking to all of the tables of contents and full-text (where available) of

the journals, magazines, newsletters and electronic publications that came

out during the month. Over 275 different journals addressing all aspects of

librarianship and information science are covered by this service. It is a

easy, time-saving way to keep up with the professional literature. The

issues are emailed to subscribers each month, with a link to the web site.

         In addition to presenting the current issue and archives of THE

INFORMED LIBRARIAN ONLINE, the web site features an article, specially

written for the site, on an important issue facing librarians today. The

August Guest Forum, as it is called, is "Librarianship: The Invisible

Profession" by Judith A. Siess. The web site also offers discounts on new

books of interest to librarians that will help them in their work, and a

full-text article from the current journals selected for our readers.

         Many more exciting enhancements are planned for the site.

Subscriptions are free, and passwords are provided free to subscribers to

access the site. To sign up, go to

http://www.informedlibrarian.com/ilofreesubscribe.cfm

The list of journals covered in THE INFORMED LIBRARIAN ONLINE can be viewed

at http://www.informedlibrarian.com/ilojnltitles.cfm

The subject collections of journals covered in THE INFORMED LIBRARIAN

ONLINE can be viewed at http://www.informedlibrarian.com/subjcoll.cfm

 

Arlene L. Eis

 

Infosources Publishing

140 Norma Road

Teaneck, NJ 07666

Phone: 201-836-7072 Fax: 201-836-9591

URL: http://www.infosourcespub.com

Serving the Information Professional since 1981

 

 

 

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Informing Science Journal

 

Dr. Eli Cohen [Eli_Cohen@acm.org]                                             Sat 7/06/2003 12:29 PM

JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU

Informing Science Journal (http://inform.nu) Vol. 6 part 2 Now Available Free Online

 

Vol. 6 part 2

 

The authors, editors, and publisher are pleased to announce That the following papers have been accepted and published in Informing Science: The International Journal of an Emerging Transdisciple.

 

All papers will be available in the print version

at the start of 2004 and are available for download, right now, free of charge, at http://inform.nu.

 

1. Applications of Geographical Information Systems

   in Understanding Spatial Distribution of Asthma,

   Mohammad A. Rob

 

Introduction to the Special Series on

                                 Social Informatics,

Eugene J. Rathswohl, Editor

 

2. Foot and Mouth Disease: Informing the Community?,

   Briony J Oates

 

3. Navigation Assistance in Virtual Worlds,

   Betsy van Dijk, Rieks op den Akker, Anton Nijholt, & Job Zwiers

 

4. The Development of Consumer-Driven Human Services Information

   Technology Initiatives: The Lake County Indiana Experience,

   Thomas W. Pavkov & Charles Winer

 

5. Human Services Information Technology: A Shared System,

   Charles Winer & Thomas W. Pavkov

 

6. Information and Communication Technology: Gender Issues

   in Developing Nations,

   Kimberly Betz Leahy & Ira Yermish

 

7. Can E- Commerce Enable Marketing in an African Rural Women's

   Community Based Development Organization?, Jo Rhodes

 

8. The Importance of Addressing Accepted Training Needs When

   Designing Electronic Information Literacy Training,

   Nicole Fahey

 

9. Information Literacy:  A Community Service-Learning Approach,

   Eugene J. Rathswohl

 

In addition, six other papers were published earlier this year.

 

Publication of this journal and the Journal of IT Education

(http://jite.org) free of charge on the web is made possible through the generosity of the Founding Members of the Informing Science Institute. Thank You!

 

-eli

Eli COHEN

Editor-in-Chief

 

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Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship

 

Andrea Duda [duda@library.ucsb.edu]                                          Thu 29/05/2003 10:14 PM

[ISTL-updates] Spring 2003 Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship

 

Spring 2003

 

Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship

Spring 2003

http://www.istl.org/

 

Theme: Information Literacy for Science & Technology

 

Bioinformatics Training by Librarians and for Librarians: Developing the Skills Needed to Support Molecular Biology and Clinical Genetics Information Instruction

   by Kristine Alpi, Weill Medical College of Cornell University

 

Connecting Engineering Students with the Library: A Case Study in Active Learning

   by Brian D. Quigley and Jean McKenzie, University of California,

   Berkeley

 

Hands-on Learning for Freshman Engineering Students

   by Julie Arnold, Robert Kackley, and Stephen Fortune, University of

   Maryland

 

The Business of Science: Cross-Disciplinary Information Literacy in the Applied Sciences and Business

   by Mary Feeney and Jim Martin, University of Arizona

 

Using a WebCT to Develop a Research Skills Module

   by Kelli Bellew Martin and Jennifer Lee, University of Calgary

 

Low Stress Opportunity for Research Students to Explore Information

Resources: Information Literacy for the Physical Scientist

   by Leah Solla, Cornell University

 

A Tale of Two Classes: Teaching Science and Technology Reference Sources both Traditionally and through Distance Education

   by Susan B. Ardis, The University of Texas at Austin

 

Developing an Information Skills Curriculum for the Sciences

   by Eleanor M. Smith, North Carolina State University

 

 

 

Refereed Articles

 

Leaving Science for LIS: Interviews and a Survey of Librarians with Scientific and Technical Degrees

   by Julie Hallmark, The University of Texas at Austin and Mary Frances

   Lembo, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

 

Suiting Library Instruction to the Myers-Briggs Personality Types and Holland Vocational Personality Types of Engineering Students

   by Jeanine Williamson, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

 

 

 

Science and Technology Resources on the Internet

 

Forensic Science Resources on the Internet

   by Cynthia Holt, The George Washington University

 

 

 

Database Reviews

 

ViFaTec Engineering Subject Gateway

   Reviewed by Thomas G. De Petro, Texas A&M University

 

 

 

Book Reviews

 

Using the Agricultural, Environmental, and Food Literature

   Reviewed by K.T.L. Vaughan, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

The MIT Guide to Science and Engineering Communication

   Reviewed by Robin N. Sinn, Bowling Green State University

 

Genomes and Databases on the Internet: A Practical Guide to Functions and Applications

   Reviewed by Victoria Shelton, George Mason University

 

 

 

          ===========================================================

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Summer 2003

Andrea Duda [duda@library.ucsb.edu]                                          Thu 28/08/2003 5:10 AM

[geonet] ISTL: Summer 2003 Issue

 

The Summer 2003 issue of Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship is now available:

            http://www.istl.org/

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

 

ARTICLES

 

     Information-Seeking Behavior of Meteorologists and Other Atmospheric

     Scientists: Access and Retrieval of Cited References by Julie

     Hallmark, The University of Texas at Austin

 

     Digital Archiving: Journey from Books to Analytical Informatics by

     Marie Scandone, Eric Melanson, and Deborah Kernan, Bio-Rad

     Laboratories, Inc.

 

     A Fault-Tolerant Architecture for Supporting Large Scale Digital

     Libraries by Mariella Di Giacomo, Mark Martinez, Jeff Scott, and Rick

     Luce, Los Alamos National Laboratory

 

REFEREED ARTICLES

 

     Information-Seeking Habits of Environmental Scientists: A Study of

     Interdisciplinary Scientists at the Environmental Protection Agency

     in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina by Janet Murphy, University

     of New Orleans

 

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES ON THE INTERNET

 

     Mathematics Education Resources on the Internet by Mary DeCarlo,

     Syracuse University

 

DATABASE REVIEWS

 

     Ulrich's Serials Analysis System Reviewed by Chew Chiat Naun and

     Michael Norman, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 

BOOK REVIEWS

 

     Biopharma: Biopharmaceutical Products in the U.s. Reviewed by D. Lynn

     Koenig, University of Kansas

 

 

 

          ===========================================================

                                Andrea L. Duda

                         Sciences-Engineering Library

                    University of California, Santa Barbara

                         E-mail: duda@library.ucsb.edu

          ===========================================================

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JASIST

 

Volume 54, Number 7 TOC. Special Issue, Web Retrieval & Mining

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]                          Tue 8/04/2003 12:48 AM

 

Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology JASIST VOLUME 54, NUMBER 7

 

[Note: at the end of this message are URLs for viewing contents of JASIST from past issues.  Below, the contents of Bert Boyce's "In this Issue" and portions of  Hsinchun Chen's Introduction to the JASIST Special Topic Section on Web Retrieval and Mining: A Machine Learning Perspective has been cut into the Table of Contents.]

 

 

IN THIS ISSUE

Bert L. Boyce p. 593

 

RESEARCH

 

The Connection Between the Research of a University and Counts of Links to Its Web Pages: An Investigation Based upon a Classification of the Relationships of Pages to the Research of the Host University Mike Thewall and Gareth Harries pp. 594-602 Published online 13 March 2003

         Given evidence that patterns of web linking between Universities can be strongly associated with research productivity, Thelwall and Harries attempt to identify reasons for this association by looking at characterization (the nature of linked to

pages) and the effect of different link counting models.

Using Thelwall's database of the link structures of 107 major universities, a file for each university was created containing all pages in its web site that were targets of links from other universities in the database. All pages that had at least 5% as many links as the home page were categorized into a four part classification: not locally created, not academic content, high link pages like databases or gateway pages, and other. From this grouping new link structure databases for each category were constructed, and 56 lists of link counts were created and correlated with published research productivity scores for 108 UK universities using several different counting models. Both the models and the categorization effect the correlation coefficients, and it appears that choosing categories most related to a university's research will result in stronger associations.

 

 

Type/Token-Taken Informetrics

Leo Egghe

Published online 24 March 2003 pp.603-610

         Egghe terms the study of the relationship of items to sources as, first, dual informatics, and then, after the linguistic usage, type/token informatics. If one studies the use of a type, one finds that typically high token types are chosen over low token types, and one can make assertions about this use relative to average (expected) use. Such study is termed type/token-taken (or

T/TT) informetrics as opposed to the dual (T/T) informetrics exemplified by Lotka's law and (T/TT) describes the source/item relationship as it is experienced by users. The searcher will find more hits than could be expected from the database, and will find that more books have been checked out than could be expected from the database, since it can be shown that the average number of user observed items per source is larger than the real existing number. It can also be shown that for each fixed Lotkaian exponent the T/TT mean is an increasing function of the T/T mean.

 

Adapting Measures of Clumping Strength to Assess Term-Term Similarity Abraham Bookstein, Vladimir Kulyukin, Timo Raita and John Nicholson Published online 13 March 2003 pp. 611-620

         Bookstein, et alia, construct measures of semantic term association based upon a statistical model of language and the capture of the peculiarities to be found in text generation. The theory is that terms that share the same content will be found together, or clump within a document in the places where that semantic content is discussed, and that variation from random term distribution will indicate such text segments. If one computes a clumping measure for a term only over those portions of text where a second term is present, it is likely to differ from that same measure computed for the first term over the whole text. In fact, if they carry the same content when measured together, the first term may appear to occur at random by the clumping measure in the context of the second term, even though it is strongly clumped outside this context, and thus a comparison of the two measurements should indicate term association. A basic association is shown in this manner which takes into account not only the number of documents in which a term occurs, but also the number of occurrences, although it is also possible to design a measure that takes into account the clumping measure that is generated when the second term is specifically excluded. This would cover the case where the first term's clumping strength is dependent upon the second term's strength. An experiment using twenty content terms from the Columbia Encyclopedia data base found their association scores with all other terms and the 100 pairs with the highest scores. Judges then ranked the term associations as "successes," "failures," or "can't says." Precision type measures were then computed both with "can't says" not counted, and counted as failures and were quite high. It appears to be possible to distinguish between symmetric and asymmetric associations purely on a statistical basis since each term in a pair may either influence the others clumping behavior in the same manner or one may influence the other but not the reverse.

 

 

SPECIAL TOPIC SECTION: WEB RETRIEVAL AND MINING

Guest Editor: Hsinchun Chen

 

Introduction to the JASIST Special Topic Section on Web Retrieval and Mining: A Machine Learning Perspective Hsinchun Chen Published online 13 March 2003 pp. 621-624

         This special issue consists of six papers that report research in web retrieval and mining. Most papers apply or adapt various pre-web retrieval and analysis techniques to other interesting and challenging web-based applications.

         The Web has become the world's largest knowledge repository. Extracting knowledge from the Web efficiently and effectively is becoming increasingly important for various Web applications.  The current Web still consists of more information than knowledge. Also, most of the Web mining activities are still in their early stages and will continue to develop as the Web evolves.  We hope this collection of research papers will help advance our knowledge and understanding of this fascinating and evolving field of web retrieval and mining.

 

Client-Side Monitoring for Web Mining

Kurt D. Fenstermacher and Mark Ginsburg pp. 625-637

Published online 17 March 2003

         Client-Side Monitoring for Web Mining, by Fenstermacher and Ginsburg, proposes a client-side monitoring system that is unobtrusive and supports flexible data collection. Moreover, the proposed framework encompasses client-side applications (such as standard office productivity tools) beyond the Web browser.

 

Relevant Term Suggestion in Interactive Web Search Based on Contextual Information in Query Session Logs Chien-Kang Huang, Lee-Feng Chien and Yen-Jen Oyang pp.638-649 Published online 13 March 2003

         Relevant Term Suggestion in Interactive Web Search Based on Contextual Information in Query Session Logs, by Huang, Chien, and Oyang, proposes a query log-based term suggestion approach to interactive Web search. Using this approach, relevant terms suggested for a user query are those that co-occur in similar query sessions from search engine logs, rather than in the retrieved documents. Their experiments showed that the proposed approach can exploit the contextual information in a user query session to make useful suggestions.

 

DocCube: Multi-Dimensional Visualisation and Exploration of Large Document Sets Josiane Mothe, Claude Chrisment, Bernard Dousset, and Joel Alaux pp. 650-659 Published online 13 March 2003

         DocCube: Multi-Dimensional Visualization and Exploration of Large Documents Sets, by Mothe, Chrisment, Dousset, and Alaux, presents a novel user interface that provides global visualization of large document sets to help users formulate query and access documents. Concept hierarchies are introduced to facilitate browsing.

 

A Novel Method for Discovering Fuzzy Sequential Patterns Using the Simple Fuzzy Partition Method Ruey-Shun Chen and Yi-Chung Hu Published online 28 March 2003 pp. 660-670

         A Novel Method for Discovering Fuzzy Sequential Patterns Using the Simple Fuzzy Partition Method, by Chen and Hu, proposes a fuzzy data mining technique to discover fuzzy sequential patterns.

 

Automatic Generation of English/Chinese Thesaurus Based on a Parallel Corpus in Laws Christopher C. Yang and Johnny Luk Published online 28 March 2003 pp. 671-682

         Automatic Generation of English/Chinese Thesaurus Based on a Parallel Corpus in Laws, by Yang and Luk, describes a project that aims to address cross-lingual semantic interoperability by developing a cross-lingual thesaurus based on an English/Chinese parallel corpus. Their experiments showed that such a thesaurus is useful in suggesting relevant terms in a different language.

 

HelpfulMed: Intelligent Searching for Medical Information over the Internet Hsinchun Chen, Ann M. Lally, Bin Zhu, and Michael Chau Published online 13 March 2003 pp. 683-694

         HelpfulMed: Intelligent Searching for Medical Information over the Internet, by Chen, Lally, Zhu, and Chau, describes an intelligent, web-based medical portal that supports meta searching, vertical search engine creation, term suggestion, and knowledge map browsing, all in an integrated web-based architecture. Initial user evaluations of the system were promising in comparison to other traditional medical search engines.

 

BOOK REVIEW

 

Looking for Information: A Survey of Research on Information Seeking, Needs and Behavior, by Donald O. Case Reviewed by Reijo Savolainen Published online 24 March 2003 pp. 695-697

 

CALLS FOR PAPERS

Published online 24-28 March 2003 pp. 698-699

 

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Volume 54, Issue 8, 2003

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]                                                              Thu 5/06/2003 9:43 PM

[Asis-l] JASIST TOC  Vol 54, #8

 

JASIST, Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology Volume 54, Issue 8, 2003

 

[Note: at the end of this message are URLs for viewing contents of JASIST

from past issues.  Below, the contents of Bert Boyce’s “In this Issue” has

been cut into the Table of Contents.]

 

CONTENTS

 

EDITORIAL

 

IN THIS ISSUE

Bert L. Boyce

704

 

RESEARCH

 

Graph Structure in Three National Academic Webs: Power Laws with Anomalies Mike Thelwall and David Wilkinson Published online 16 April 2003 706

         Thelwall and Wilkinson use crawls of university web sites in the

UK, Australia, and New Zealand to generate all links targeted at same

country university web sites which they then use to create a graph

structure for study. Using Broder's study as a model they identify a

strongly connected component, SCC, where one could start anywhere in the

set and reach every other page, and an Out component whose pages can be

reached from all strongly connected pages but provide no link back to that

set. The other components in the Broder model are not accessible except

with access to a major search engine database. In link and out link counts

for all three university systems in both the Out and SCC components when

graphed logarithmically display the linear nature which would indicate that

power laws, and a success breeds success phenomena, are generally in

effect. However, automatically generated pages, non-HTML web pages, and

large resource-driven sites all were associated with anomalies in this

observation.

 

Efficient Single-Pass Index Construction for Text Databases Steffen Heinz and Justin Zobel Published online 16 April 2003 713

         Zobel and Heinz review file inversion processes for the creation

of text indices and suggest an efficient single pass approach. Complete in

memory indexing remains impractical for very large files. Current rapid

algorithms require that the entire vocabulary of the collection be kept in

memory. This approach creates inverted files in memory for sequences of

documents until memory resources are exhausted, then transferring the

lexicon and inverted file in lexicographical order to disk for subsequent

merger. Each term is assigned a dynamic in-memory bi-vector that

accumulates postings in a compressed d-gap format. The lexicon is

maintained in a burst trie file structure where leaves are containers of

strings with common prefixes. Performance on five gigabyte to twenty

gigabyte files is fifteen to twenty percent faster than a sort based approach.

 

 

Automatic Construction of English/Chinese Parallel Corpora Christopher C. Yang and Kar Wing Li Published online 16 April 2003 730

         Yang and Li describe the automatic matching of English and Chinese

document titles, by character and word matching based upon the study of web

pages within a site where some pages exist separately in each language.

Word and character alignment is followed by redundancy resolution, and then

title alignment takes place. English words are translated into Chinese

character string words by dictionary lookup and the various possibilities

matched with the Chinese titles using the longest common sequence of

characters. Using Hong Kong Special Administrative Region government press

releases and releases from the Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation,

they find 31,567 in the Chinese language and 30,810 in English, but only

23,701 released in parallel. There are no links between the versions. With

Recall as the number of system correct matches over the actual matches in

the file, and Precision the number of correct system matches over the

number of system matches, a test yields Precision in the range of .998 to

1.00 and recall from .806 to .948. Thus links to parallel documents in the

other language could quite likely be automatically generated.

 

Mning Longitudinal Web Queries: Trends and Patterns

Peiling Wang, Michael W. Berry, and Yiheng Yang

Published online 16 April 2003

743

         Wang, Berry and Yang log hit counts and date stamped queries to

the University of Tennessee website for a four year period as entered

through the SWISH search engine as Boolean statements where spaces were

considered to be AND operators. Queries were parsed into words and word

pairs of adjacent words or words separated by one other word. (94% of

queries contained three words or less) URLs were not parsed but treated as

unusual queries. Null outputs exceed 30%. Queries averaged 2 words or 13

characters. Number of queries and the vocabulary used grow over time but

the vocabulary is relatively small and includes a large number (26%) of

misspelled words and personal names. Log plots of frequencies and ranks for

both all words and words with unique frequencies overlap in the upper

portion which is quadratic polynomial and diverge in the lower portion

where the all word line becomes linear. Topics and search behavior vary

little over the four year period. Websites could be improved by containing

content identified from queries.

 

Students' Conceptual Structure, Search Process, and Outcome While Preparing

a Research Proposal: A Longitudinal Case Study

Mikko Pennanen and Pertti Vakkari

Published online 16 April 2003

759

         Pennanen and Vakkari use 22 undergraduate psychology students

doing Boolean searches on PsycINFO, a system with which they were

unfamiliar, to investigate the relationship between their conceptual

structure of their topic and their search process, and whether these

relations vary depending upon their stage in the Kuhlthau model. Students

searched both at the beginning and the end of their construction of a

proposal, and each search was proceeded and followed by an interview. The

thought process during search was vocalized and recorded, and transaction

logs were also retained. They recorded the number of concepts used by a

student, the proportion of sub-concepts included, and the proportion of

concepts expressed in query terms. Retrieved useful references were

recorded. The two main tactics used by the subjects were the adding of a

conjoined term, and the replacement of an existing term with another. The

students were able to translate into query terms only slightly more than

half the concepts they identified. The subjects advanced significantly in

terms of the Kuhthau model between their search sessions. Their conceptual

structure was richer, search terms used increased, but references accepted

as useful decreased. The proportion of concepts articulated in the query

correlated significantly with the number of useful references found.

 

Information Science Abstracts: Tracking the Literature of Information

Science. Part 2: A New Taxonomy For Information Science

Donald T. Hawkins, Signe E. Larson and Bari Q. Caton

Published online 16 April 2003

771

         Using 3000 Information Science Abstracts abstracts, Hawkins,

Larson, and Caton test the validity of a new ISA classification structure

for information science leading to the revision and fine-tuning of the

structure. The structure was produced by collecting terms from available

vocabularies grouped into 13 main headings. Each abstract was given only

one classification number representing a main heading and a single

sub-heading by each of the researchers. A review of the distribution of

abstracts over section indicated the combination of some closely related

categories and the presence of unclassifiable abstracts pointed to

uncovered gaps. Only in 19% of the cases did all three disagree on the

assignment of a main heading. A second test with 1265 abstracts showed that

the abstracts were well distributed over what were now 11 main sections.

Low posted sub-headings were examined but retained as growing areas. The

taxonomy is included as an appendix.

 

Improving the Search Environment: Informed Decision Making in the Search

for Statistical Information

Stephanie W. Haas

Published online 16 April 2003

782

         Studying the Bureau of Labor Statistics' LABSTAT database, Haas

looks for searching decision points at which assistance for the searcher

may be of value. A searcher has some measure of both search and domain

knowledge and will need some knowledge of the way information is provided

to make effective decisions. Transition points are identified between user

vocabulary and Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) concepts, between BLS

concepts and BLS data and information products, and between these products

and the actual query. This suggests the need for help in concept

definition, ambiguity resolution, and synonym usage which is not uncommon

in retrieval systems, but also assistance in the choice of products through

a matrix of specifiable categories with available surveys and series. The

need to express a query for a chosen survey/series suggests a need for

variable displays, information on the interaction of variable-value

choices, and warnings of unusual situations.

 

BRIEF COMMUNICATION

 

Using the Mann-Whitney Text on Informetric Data

John C. Huber and Roland Wagner-Döbler

Published online 16 April 2003

798

         Huber and Wagner-Dobler demonstrate a relatively simple procedure

for implementing, using a spreadsheet, a Mann-Whitney test of the

difference of two bibliometric samples which will take into account the

large number of ties normally present in such data. Sources with the same

count of publications are assigned the same rank where the value is the

median of the number of such sources in both samples. The lower the p-level

the higher the probability the samples are from different distributions. It

is thus possible to determine if a change in productivity is due to factors

beyond the change in number of sources. However, small samples with small

differences will appear to be from the same distribution, and larger

samples are necessary to overcome the effect of multiple ties.

 

 

BOOK REVIEW

 

Patents, Citations & Innovations: A Window on the Knowledge Economy, by

Adam B. Jaffe and Manuel Trajtenberg

Reviewed by Chaomei Chen

Published online 16 April 2003

802

 

 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Empirical Evidence of Self-Organization” a rejoinder

Loet Leydesdorff

804

 

Arguments for Epistemology in Information Science

Birger Hjorland

805

------------------------------------------------------

The ASIS web site <http://www.asis.org/Publications/JASIS/tocs.html>

contains the Table of Contents and brief abstracts as above from January

1993 (Volume 44) to date.

 

The John Wiley Interscience site <http://www.interscience.wiley.com>

includes issues from 1986 (Volume 37) to date.  Guests have access only to

tables of contents and abstracts.  Registered users of the interscience

site have access to the full text of these issues and to preprints.

 

 

------------------------------------------------------

The ASIS web site <http://www.asis.org/Publications/JASIS/tocs.html>

contains the Table of Contents and brief abstracts as above from January 1993 (Volume 44) to date.

 

The John Wiley Interscience site <http://www.interscience.wiley.com>

includes issues from 1986 (Volume 37) to date.  Guests have access only to tables of contents and abstracts.  Registered users of the interscience site have access to the full text of these issues and to preprints.

 

Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

Volume 54, Issue 11, 2003.

Richard Hill [rhill@ASIS.ORG]                                             Wed 13/08/2003 3:08 AM

 

JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU

TOC, JASIST Vol. 54 # 11

 

 

Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology Volume 54, Issue 11, 2003.

 

[Note: at the end of this message are URLs for viewing contents of JASIST from past issues.  Below, the contents of Bert Boyce's "In this Issue" has been cut into the Table of Contents.]

 

Editorial

 

987

In this issue

Bert R. Boyce

Published Online: 6 Aug 2003

 

Research Article

 

989

Quality Control in Scholarly Publishing: a New Proposal

Stefano Mizzaro

Published Online: 4 Jun 2003

         Mizzaro presents a model for scholarly communication that permits the use of electronic journals, removes the reviewing process, while  maintaining quality of papers,  and measures the quality of researchers' contributions. Journal subscribers, both as authors and as readers, have scores associated with them, as do contributed papers.  An author's score increases with the publication of papers judged positively by readers, and a reader's score decreases when a judgement highly at variance with the mean judgement is expressed, and paper's scores depend upon cumulated reader's judgements. A steadiness score is associated with each of the other scores. Judgements on papers lead to update of the paper's score, and thus the scores of its authors and readers. A paper's score is the mean of the judgements of its readers, each weighted by that reader's score. An author's score is the weighted mean of the papers previously published, and a reader's the weighted mean of the goodness of previously expressed judgements.

 

1006

Peripheral Social Awareness Information in Collaborative Work Michael B. Spring, Vichita Vathanophas Published Online: 12 Jun 2003

         Spring and. Vathanophas investigate the effect of awareness by team members of the work of other members of their team on productivity. Sixty undergraduates were assigned to twenty groups of three all using the CASCADE collaborative authoring system.  Each subject in a group worked in a different location on assigned tasks communicating with the team only by e-mail. Information on the number of actions taken by a team member, the percentage of required minutes actually worked, and a measure commitment to the project were collected and available to half the participant teams. The use of the awareness tool is associated with a decrease in work quality and intergroup communication. It is possible that the tool reduced the need for communication and that it negatively influences the effort of some subjects. 1014 Performance measurement framework for hierarchical text classification Aixin Sun, Ee-Peng Lim, Wee-Keong Ng Published Online: 4 Jun 2003

         The evaluation of automatic classification of documents normally has taken place in flat schemes where hierarchical structure is not taken into account. Since partial success is possible if a document is classified correctly at a high level but mis-classified at a lower level, new measures should reflect hierarchical information. The traditional recall and precision based measures will not indicate that classification into classes similar to the correct ones is superior to classification into totally unrelated groupings. Sun, Lim, and Ng advocate maintenance of pair-wise category similarity values and an average category similarity. If wrong assignment occurs the values in the contingency table for recall and precision are modified using the similarity values but limited to a zero to one range. Category similarity can be replaced with number of links between categories in the hierarchical tree if an acceptable distance is specified by a user. Since in a  hierarchical classification, mis-categorization at a higher level will lead to mis-categorization by a lower level classifier, the number of such documents blocked as a proportion of those that should be classified at a low level is termed the blocking factor for the higher level. This value can provide valuable information on the performance of subtree classifiers.  Using the Reuters 21,578 document news collection which is organized into 135 categories, three category trees were manually derived.  Binary classifiers were trained at each level of hierarchy, and when run on the test portion of the collection, the new measures computed. Support Vector Machine classifiers out performed Naive Bayes classifiers.

 

1029

A Comparison of Youngsters' Use of Cd-rom and the Internet as Information Resources Andrew K. Shenton, Pat Dixon Published Online: 12 Jun 2003

         Shenton and Dixon draw a sample from six high preforming English schools in the town of Whitley Bay. Three were first schools, two middle schools and one a high school. Choosing at random from one class in each year group 188 subjects were selected all of whom had been exposed to CD-ROM searching and some to Internet search. Twelve focus groups and 121 individual interviews were utilized to gather subjects' articulations on their own information behavior. Subjects generally attempted to converge upon a particular article of interest or even mere specifically, material in such an item. The target item in CD-ROMs was often an encyclopedia entry, and with the Internet, a web page. Subjects often had favorite encyclopedias or search engines which they used repeatedly, and often had a favorite website for awareness of developments in an area of interest. Single word or short phrase searches were the norm without Boolean operations in either medium. There was an expectation of quick satisfaction and little concern for accuracy or authority of retrieved sources. Home use of CD-ROM files was common while many children had no home internet access, or had such access restricted by their parents. Internet use increased with respondent age but older subjects found it slow, noisy, and less than user friendly. CD-ROM usage decreases with age.

 

1050

Relevance Data for Language Models Using Maximum Likelihood David Bodoff, Bin Wu, K. Y. Michael Wong Published Online: 12 Jun 2003

         Bodoff, Wu, and Wong use a relevance feedback model that requires the searcher to establish hypothetical distributions for the relevance assessments for each document query pair, the hypothetical distribution of documents in the true document vector, and the distribution of queries in the true query vector. They then use a maximum likelihood estimation to find optimized document and query representations and thus adjust both document and query vectors. One such a model might use the cosine (D,Q) for relevant documents and 1- cosine (D,Q) for non-relevant documents, while assuming normal distributions for document and query error and using maximum likelihood to minimize the angles between document vectors, query vectors and between document  and query vectors, with the resulting new values used for later queries.  It would also be possible to assume both true and observed vectors to be of unit length so that the distributions all depend upon the angle between observation and mean resulting in a (cosine, cosine, cosine) model rather that a (cosine, normal, normal) model which would result in a maximum likelihood function similar to the traditional Rocchio heuristic. Using five vector space models ( tf*idf, plus four feedback methods - Rocchio heuristic, Bartell, maximum likelihood, and alpha-beta heuristic, which adjusts documents toward adjusted rather than original queries) with the Cranfield and CISI data two thirds of the queries were randomly chosen for training, the document indexes trained for each method, and the remaining one third tested. Both maximum likelihood models ran rapidly and  resulted in highly significant improvement over the baseline and both heuristics using average precision.

 

1062

An IP-level Analysis of Usage Statistics for Electronic Journals in

Chemistry: Making Inferences about User Behavior

Philip M. Davis, Leah R. Solla

Published Online: 4 Jun 2003

         Davis and Solla study downloads of 29 ACS electronic journals at Cornell University during a three month period by individual IP addresses rather than unidentifiable individual users. Chemistry and Chemical Engineering accounted for 42% of downloads, followed by other Engineering departments at 12.5%, Medical College at 6.5%, Food Science at 4.9%, and Molecular Biology at 2.6%.  Libraries accounted for 3.4% and the remote modem pool only 1.5%. Three percent of users downloaded more than 100 articles, 14% more than 20, and 38% downloaded 1 or 2 articles during the sample period. With the exception of two outliers, JACS and Biochemistry, the relationship between number of downloads and number of IP addresses is linear. A thousand downloads will lead to an expectation of 114 using addresses. The relationship between number of journals consulted and number of articles downloaded is quadratic and outliers are heavy users of one or two journals. Journals consulted per IP address seems to fit a Lotka distribution. The system appears to be used heavily for print on demand copies.

 

1069

Greeklish: an Experimental Interface for Automatic Transliteration Alexandros Karakos Published Online: 12 Jun 2003

         In script transliteration the generated character string may not always be pronounced as was the source character string, since the phonetic habits of those using the alphabet of the generated string will govern. Since the Internet normally uses ASCII and thus is restricted to the Roman alphabet, transliteration is a problem for users of non-roman alphabets but none-the-less string conversion is useful. Greeklish is the expression of Greek words in the Roman alphabet, and in this paper, the name for a herein described C++ Windows application provided by Karakos that transcribes any text's characters on the Windows clipboard from Greek to English or vice versa.

 

Letter to the Editor

 

1075

The Sample Size Dependency of Statistical Measures and Synchronic Potentiality in Informetrics. Some Comments on Some Comments by Professor Burrell Fuyuki Yoshikane, Kyo Kageura, Keita Tsuji Published Online: 25 Jun 2003

 

1076

The Sample Size Dependency of Statistical Measures in Informetrics? Some Comments Quentin L. Burrell Published Online: 12 Jun 2003

 

------------------------------------------------------

The ASIS web site <http://www.asis.org/Publications/JASIS/tocs.html>

contains the Table of Contents and brief abstracts as above from January 1993 (Volume 44) to date.

 

The John Wiley Interscience site <http://www.interscience.wiley.com>

includes issues from 1986 (Volume 37) to date.  Guests have access only to tables of contents and abstracts.  Registered users of the interscience site have access to the full text of these issues and to preprints.

 

Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Volume 54, Number 12

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]                                      Tue 26/08/2003 2:37 AM

[Asis-l] JASIST TOC, Volume 54, #12

 

 

Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology Volume 54, Number 12.  October 2003

 

[Note: at the end of this message are URLs for viewing contents of JASIST

from past issues.  Below, the contents of Bert Boyce's "In this Issue" and

from Loren Mendelsohn's Introduction to "Perspectives on...Chemistry

Journals: The Transition from Paper to Electronic with Lessons for Other

Disciplines"  has been cut into the Table of Contents.]

 

CONTENTS

 

EDITORIAL

      In This Issue

      Bert R. Boyce

1079

 

RESEARCH

      Bibliomining for Automated Collection Development in a Digital

Library Setting: Using Data Mining to Discover Web-Based Scholarly Research

Works

       Scott Nicholson

      Published online 7 July 2003

1081

         Nicholson suggests the use of data mining techniques to discover

patterns in the world wide web's pages needed for automated collection

development for academic digital libraries. Possible techniques include

logistic regression, where the variable combinations that best predict

classes are discovered and used to predict membership of new observations;

memory-based reasoning, like N-neighbor non-parametric analysis, where a

distance function between new and existing observations allows a choice

among pre-classified neighbors; Decision/classification trees, where rules

for dividing a large set are made on the basis of the best discriminating

variable; and neural networks, where neurons accept 0-1 measurements for

each variable and weigh and combine variables until the optimal weight

combination for the training set is determined..

         Forty two librarians ranked selection criteria from the literature

and suggested additional criteria. Low ranked criteria were removed and new

suggestions added with iterations until consensus was reached. These

criteria were made operational in a Perl program that analyzed web pages.

4500 scholarly pages were identified for use as a training set, and 500

from other sites as a test set. An additional 4500 non-scholarly pages were

identified for the training set and 500 for the test set. Values were

collected by the program for each criteria creating surrogate records for

the pages. Logistic regression correctly classified 463 scholarly pages

and  473 random pages.  N-neighbor non-parametric analysis correctly

classified 438 scholarly pages and  475 random pages. The classification

tree method correctly classified 478 scholarly pages and 480 random pages.

Neural networks correctly classified 465 scholarly pages and 469 random

pages. Accuracy (precision) varied between 93.75% and 96%, while return

(recall) varied form 87.6% to 95.6%.While the classification tree method

provided the highest values all models were effective.

 

      Overlap in Bibliographic Databases

       William W. Hood and Concepcion S. Wilson

      Published online 16 June 2003

1091

         From over 100 DIALOG databases Hood and Wilson locate about 15,600

records for a period from 1965 to 1993 on Fuzzy Set Theory by searching

"fuzzy" and extracting by hand a list of pertinent records. The data was

then cleaned and standardized and a combination of two duplicate detection

keys were used to locate overlapping records found in more than one

database.  The frequency distribution shows no overlap occurs for 63.26% of

the records, 12.29% were duplicated once, and .03% were duplicated 12

times, the highest rate.  The distribution would appear to fit the inverse

power law but an exponential curve provides a better fit. Looking at the

papers found in only one database, 42% of the 5815 found in SCISEARCH are

unique and represent 15.7% of the total record set. Intra-database

duplicates were found in 28 databases. MATHSCI, which retains originals

when they are amended, had a 17.8% duplication rate in the fuzzy set

literature. While the PASCAL double indexing accounted for its .5%

duplication rate, the .4% rate in SCISEARCH resulted from new records with

references being added when the original had been previously entered

without references.       Overall intra-database duplication is quite low.

Overlapping records correlate with overlapping DIALOG OneSearch categories.

 

      The Experience of Libraries Across Time: Thematic Analysis of

Undergraduate Recollections of Library Experiences

       Jacqueline Kracker and Howard R. Pollio

      Published online 11 June 2003

1104

         Kracker and Pollio look at the patron's impressions of libraries

by way of the qualitative research techniques of content analysis and

phenomenological inquiry in which one identifies reoccurring themes in

recorded dialogs concerning a topic and the ground upon which they occur.

Thus the meaning of the concept for that individual may be identified in

terms of their direct experience.  One hundred and eighteen undergraduate

students enrolled in a freshman psychology course volunteered as subjects.

Each was asked to provide, along with basic demographic data, a short

description of three specific incidents related to libraries, and a longer

description of one of these incidents. The incidents were categorized into

six school level categories and five type of library categories resulting

in 708 coded events. With the self considered as the ground themes having

to do with atmosphere, size and abundance, organization /rules and their

effect, what I do in a library, and memories were identified. This allows

one to formulate a typical library experience for a 19 year old college

student, an experience that changes during different educational periods.

 

      Intermediary's Information Seeking, Inquiring Minds, and Elicitation

Styles

       Mei-Mei Wu and Ying-Hsang Liu

      Published online 18 July 2003

1117

         Wu and Lui are concerned with finding the linguistic styles used

by intermediaries in their conduct of interactions with those with

information needs, and with determining if certain mind sets can be

associated with such styles. Thirty patrons' interactions with one of five

different intermediaries were video and audio taped while an observer kept

notes.  Participants responded to questionnaires on their perceptions of

the process and general user satisfaction and users were interviewed on

audio tape post search. Using seven categories of linguistic form, ten

categories of elicitation purpose, and seven categories of communication

function, the texts were analyzed and a chi- square test showed differences

in each among intermediaries and identified three styles termed situational

(differing with user needs), functional (no functional differences), and

stereotypical (purposes, functions and forms are constant). The mind set of

the intermediary determined by analysis of discourse led to three types;

problem detection (focus on reexpressing and understanding the need), query

formulation (focus on terminology), and database instruction (focus on

proper selection and use of databases). No linkage between styles and mind

sets was established.

 

PERSPECTIVES ON ...

CHEMISTRY JOURNALS: THE TRANSITION FROM PAPER TO ELECTRONIC WITH LESSONS

FOR OTHER DISCIPLINES

 

      Introduction and Overview: Chemistry Journals: The Transition From

Paper to Electronic With Lessons for Other Disciplines

       Loren D. Mendelsohn

      Published online 18 July 2003

1136

         The articles in this Perspectives have been en selected from

papers presented at the Tri-Society Symposium, held on June 9, 2002, in Los

Angeles, California, this Symposium. They discuss a broad spectrum of

issues that have been raised as an increasing number of libraries convert

from paper to online journal subscriptions, ranging from broad questions

addressing the process of the changeover to studies of more specific

issues. Taken together, they provide a useful overview of the process and

contribute significantly to the scholarship in this field. Moreover, these

articles have broader applications. The questions raised by the transition

from print to electronic are not related solely to chemical information or

even science and technology information; since scholarly journals in all

disciplines are making the transition from print to electronic, similar

questions can be raised with regard to all disciplines.

 

      New Knowledge Management Systems: The Implications for Data

Discovery, Collection Development, and the Changing Role of the Librarian

       David Stern

      Published online 18 July 2003

1138

         David Stern's introductory essay raises several questions

concerned with the trend toward electronic journals. By highlighting such

issues as complex differential pricing plans, the development of new and

complex tools for data manipulation, and how these factors affect the role

of the librarian, he provides a framework for reading and understanding

many of the issues discussed in the subsequent articles.

 

      Making the Transition From Print to Electronic Serial Collections: A

New Model for Academic Chemistry Libraries?

       Tina E. Chrzastowski

      Published online 18 July 2003

1141

         In examining the feasibility of moving from paper to electronic

journals in a particular library, Tina E. Chrzastowski proposes and

evaluates a new model for the academic chemistry library. In so doing, she

establishes a list of basic factors and criteria that must be evaluated by

any institution considering this transition.

 

      Changing Use Patterns of Print Journals in the Digital Age: Impacts

of Electronic Equivalents on Print Chemistry Journal Use

       K. T. L. Vaughan

      Published online 18 July 2003

1149

         K.T.L. Vaughan examines the transition from a different

perspective, focusing instead on how the use of paper copies of journals is

affected by making available electronic copies of those same journals. By

exploring this particular aspect of the question, she provides data that

will help library administrators evaluate the utility of retaining paper

copies in an increasingly electronic environment.

 

      Linking of Errata: Current Practices in Online Physical Sciences Journals

      Emily L. Poworoznek

      Published online 18 July 2003

1153

         One of the central questions raised by the change from paper to

electronic has to do with the nature of the copy of record. Emily L.

Poworoznek examines the treatment of errata in electronic journals by a

large group of commercial and professional society publishers, pointing out

the significance of this issue for the integrity of the scientific record.

She further compares these new approaches with the traditional manner of

handling errata in printed journals, and discusses indexing under both

systems, recommending the necessity of standards that will function under

the electronic serials rubric.

 

      Managing Tradeoffs in the Electronic Age

       A. Ben Wagner

      Published online 18 July 2003

1160

         A. Ben Wagner's historical analysis provides an excellent wrap-up,

reviewing the introduction and development of electronic resources over the

past three decades and analyzing the gains and losses involved in the

transition. His paper provides a framework for decision-making in this area.

 

BOOK REVIEWS

      The Accidental Systems Librarian, by Rachel Singer Gordon

      Lisa A. Ennis

      Published online 7 July 2003

1165

 

      Library Information Systems: From Library Automation to Distributed

Information Access Solutions, by Thomas R. Kochtanek and Joseph R. Matthews

      Brenda Chawner

      Published online 7 July 2003

1166

 

      Impact of Digital Technology on Library Collections and Resource

Sharing, edited by Sul H. Lee

      William J. Wheeler

      Published online 7 July 2003

1167

 

      Persuasive Technology: Using Computers to Change What We Think and

Do, by B. J. Fogg

      Anastasis D. Petrou, Ph.D.

      Published online 7 July 2003

1168

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

Special Topic Issue of JASIST: Multilingual Information Systems

      Published online 12 June 2003

 

------------------------------------------------------

The ASIS web site <http://www.asis.org/Publications/JASIS/tocs.html>

contains the Table of Contents and brief abstracts as above from January

1993 (Volume 44) to date.

 

The John Wiley Interscience site <http://www.interscience.wiley.com>

includes issues from 1986 (Volume 37) to date.  Guests have access only to

tables of contents and abstracts.  Registered users of the interscience

site have access to the full text of these issues and to preprints.

 

 

Executive Director

American Society for Information Science and Technology

1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510

Silver Spring, MD  20910

FAX: (301) 495-0810

PHONE: (301) 495-0900

 

http://www.asis.org

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

JOHO KANRI

-----Original Message-----

From: joho_jimu [mailto:johojimu@mr.jst.go.jp]

Sent: Tuesday, 13 May 2003 2:34 PM

To: ifla-l@infoserv.inist.fr

Subject: Asking cooperation to write an article for JOHO KANRI

 

This is to ask your cooperation in writing an article.

 

I am an editor of a monthly journal covering information management and

processing including library matters.  The title is JOHO KANRI published by

the Japan Science and Technology Corporation with more than 46years of

issuance.  Most of our subscribers are librarians and information

specialists who are belonging to organizational libraries or information

centers.  50% of them are from private firms. One of my duties is to trace

or keep up with the things going on in the fields concerned in order to find

the candidate subjects of articles to be put on our journals.  Currently we

are very interested in how libraries in private firms or information centers

are doing  in terms of staffing, staff training, roles of staff, management

including towards efficient management and operation, tips or keys for

efficient management or library services, matters related to digitization,

future direction, so on.  Those subjects are ones our subscribers really

want to know.  Since we covered so far the Japanese cases, I like to cover

overseas situation of those subjects.  The articles will be compiled as case

studies or introductory articles as series, probably titled  $B!H (Bcases of

libraries or information centers affiliated with organizations including

private firms overseas. $B!I (B  Our journal is written in Japanese, so that the

articles will be translated into Japanese by our side.  If you are

interested in writing an article, please contact me.  For the details I

lwould like to talk with you in emails. According to our policy, the copy

fee will be remitted to writers.

 

Please contact:  Taeko Kato

 

                 Senior Staff, Editorial Office of JOHO KANRI

 

                 Japan Science and Technology Corporation JST

 

                 Email: tkato@jst.go.jp

 

                http://johokanri.jstage.jst.go.jp/ja/  or

http://johokanri.jstage.jst.go.jp/en/

 

Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Journal Of Digital Information Management

 

Volume 1  Number 2  June 2003

ppich@VSNL.NET                                                   Tue 1/07/2003 7:27 PM

JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU

 

JOURNAL OF DIGITAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT

Volume 1  Number 2  June 2003

 

 

Contents

 

Interfacing in Heterogeneous Digital Environment

Indexing for XML-based Articles - Canan F. Pembe and Taflan I. Gündem

 

Extension of CommonKads for Virtual Organizations - Hafida Bouarfa,  Mohamed Abed

 

An Empirical Approach to Automated Web Site Evaluation  - Melody Y. Ivory-Ndiaye

 

Bible Information Modelling - Patrick van Bommel

 

Special Issue

 

Web-based Collaboratories (Wbc-2003) - from centres without walls to virtual communities of practice

 

 

 

URL: http://www.dirf.org/jdim

email:  info@dirf.org

 

 

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Journal of Information and Knowledge Managment (JIKM)

Suliman Hawamdeh (Assoc Prof) [ASSuliman@ntu.edu.sg]                  Tue 29/04/2003 7:02 AM

 

 

The Journal of Information and Knowledge Managment (JIKM) is now published by World Scientific. See call for paper and subscription information at: http://www.worldscinet.com/jikm/jikm.shtml

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

Library Hi Tech News

            Vol. 20 No. 3

Gerry Mckiernan [gerrymck@iastate.edu]                                     Wed 30/04/2003 11:13 PM

[Asis-l] Scholar-based Innovations in Publishing. Part II

 

Scholar-based Innovations in Publishing.

               Part II: Library and Professional Initiatives

 

    I am proud to announce the publication of the second in a three-part series on "Scholar-based Innovations in Publishing" in _Library Hi Tech News_:

 

Gerry McKiernan (2003) "Scholar-based Innovations in Publishing. Part II: Library and Professional Initiatives," _Library Hi Tech News_ Vol. 20 No. 3 (April), pp. 19-27

 

    Among the initiatives profiled in this Second Part are:

 

*Library*

 

DSpace(tm) (http://dspace.org) [MIT]

 

E-Print Repository (http://eprints.anu.edu.au/) [Australian National University]

 

University of Michigan University Library Scholarly Publishing Office [ http://spo.umdl.umich.edu]

 

*Professional*

 

SPARC: The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition [http://www.arl.org/sparc/ ]

 

ELSSS -The ELectronic Society for Social Scientists

[ http://www.elsss.org.uk/]

 

The Stoa: A Consortium for Electronic Publication in the Humanities [ http://www.stoa.org]

 

   Part I in the series was devoted to Individual and Institutional initiatives and was published in LHTN 20(2) [ Gerry McKiernan (2003) "Scholar-based Innovations in Publishing. Part I: Individual and Institutional Initiatives," _Library Hi Tech News_ Vol. 20 No. 2 (March), pp. 19-26] .  The last part, Part III, covers organizational and national initiatives and is scheduled for publication in LHTN 20(5).

 

   Part II (as well as Part I) are also available electronically  for subscribers to LHTN via Emerald:

 

  ( http://www.emeraldinsight.com/vl=1/cl=3/nw=1/rpsv/lhtn.htmC)

 

NB: Please note each of these articles are contributions in my eProfile column for LHTN.

 

   Enjoy!

 

/Gerry

 

Gerry McKiernan

Associate Professor

and

Science and Technology Librarian and Bibliographer

Iowa State University

Ames IA 50011

 

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Library Link Newsletter

April/May 2003

Library Link [librarylink@emeraldinsight.com]                                           Thu 8/05/2003 11:31 PM

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

                    Library Link Newsletter

                    April/May 2003

                    http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

                    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Contents

----------

 

1. Library Collection & Development Management - Viewpoint and Article 2. Library Management & Information Services - Viewpoint and Article 3. Library Technology - Viewpoints & Articles 4. Library Link News & Links 5. Emerald Acquires VINE 6. IFLA Interlending and Document Supply International Conference 7. Easier Access for Aslib Corporate Members 6. Feedback

 

*****

 

1. Library Collection & Development Management

 

Viewpoint & Article - April 2003

 

Collaboration and Cooperation: Not So Much 'Who Pays the Piper' as 'Will the Piper Still Be Playing'? Professor G E Gorman

 

One of the few pleasures retained by journal editors in these days of publishing conglomerates is that we still have the luxury of reading 'good books' and reflecting on issues they raise - something that busy practitioners increasingly are unable to do. It was thus that I was able to spend some hours in the past months reading a recent Facet release, Co-operation in Action: Collaborative Initiatives in the World of Information, edited by Stella Pilling and Stephanie Kenna.

 

Click here to read the full viewpoint http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection

 

Free Article

A weighted decision matrix for outsourcing library services Ball, D. (2003) The Bottom Line: Managing Library Finances, Vol.16, No.1: 25-30. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection/index.htm#article

 

*****

 

2. Library Management & Information Services

Viewpoint - May 2003

 

Public Librarians and their public - Are we looking at the same thing? James H. Sweetland

 

One of the more important functions of the manager is to obtain funding for the organization. In the private sector this normally involves ensuring a profit; in the non-profit sector, this normally involves ensuring the funding agencies (taxpayers, foundations, etc.) provide the necessary money. While the comparisons between libraries and private business have been, in this writer's opinion, over-drawn, in fact there are some similarities in the two areas. Notably, to some degree managers of libraries do need to understand what their clients want and need, as well as what they think the clients want and need. With this in mind, a number of studies over the last decade provide food for thought-in this case, the thought that librarians do not have a very firm grasp on what the clients and funders expect from the library.

 

Click here to read the full viewpoint http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management

 

Free Article

Public Perception of the Role and Tasks of Library and Information Science Professionals in Croatia: An Overview of Recent Activities Petr, Kornelija and Tatjana Aparac-Jelusic New Library World, Vol.103, no. 10 (2002): 364-375. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management/index.htm#article

 

*****

 

3. Library Technology

 

Viewpoint - May 2003

 

Extending Access with Electronic Reserves Systems

Philip J Calvert

 

The technology behind electronic reserves systems in libraries isn't hugely complex, but there is one curious fact about them that I have never really understood. Electronic reserves systems have become fairly widespread in the United States, whilst their use in the rest of the world remains limited. To those of us who have spent most of our working lives looking at computerised systems for libraries this makes no sense, for the potential of electronic reserves to ease the workload of staff in the short-term loan collections of universities and other institutions, while at the same time providing better customer service, especially to remote students, is clear.

 

Click here to read the full viewpoint http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/technology

 

Free Article

Electronic reserves: the promise and challenge to increase accessibility Kathy Konicek, Joy Hyzny and Richard Allegra Library Hi Tech, Vol.21, No.1, 2003: pp. 102-108. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/technology/#article

 

Viewpoint - April 2003

 

Standards - What Are They And Why Are They So Important?

Dr Thomas R. Kochtanek

 

Library classification systems for cataloguing, such as Dewey Decimal or Library of Congress, are clear examples of tools that have been developed in a non-standardized fashion, but still allow patrons to find the materials they are looking for with relative ease. These tools lead to the interest in developing a more standardized means for representing information so that an inquiring patron might locate it. In recent years, the emergence of library information systems (see previous Library Talk by this contributor) has spawned the need for highly technical standards for the purpose of retrieving information from remote sources in a complex networked environment.

 

Click here to read the full viewpoint http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/technology/apr03.htm

 

Free Article

CrossRef and SFX: Complementary Linking Services for Libraries Walker, J. (2002) New Library World, Vol.103, No.3: 83-89. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/technology/apr03.htm#article

 

*****

 

4. Library Link News & Links

 

Keep up to date with the latest news and information in your field. Visit:

 

Press Releases http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/press.htm

 

Forthcoming Events http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/events.htm

 

Books & Journals - Announcements & Reviews http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/bandj.htm

 

Links

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/links.htm

 

 

*****

 

5. Emerald Acquires VINE

 

Emerald has recently acquired the well-respected library journal "VINE" from the Library Information Technology Centre, based at the South Bank University, London. An established quarterly journal, VINE provides timely and definitive overviews of important topics for information and library services. The stress is on informative, well-researched content that will be of immediate practical use to its busy, influential readers. VINE has traditionally proved popular with those seeking to keep abreast of developments in library and information service systems.

 

For full press release go to http://www.emeraldinsight.com/news/press/vine2003.htm

 

For VINE journal homepage go to http://www.emeraldinsight.com/vine.htm

 

 

*****

 

6. IFLA Interlending and Document Supply International Conference

 

Registration is now open for the IFLA Interlending and Document Supply International Conference, BREAKING BARRIERS: REACHING USERS IN A DIGITAL WORLD, to be held on 28-31 October 2003 in Canberra, Australia. It is only AUD$550.00 if you register before 31 July (see http://www.xe.net/ucc/ to check what this is your own currency).

 

Full registration details and form at: http://www.nla.gov.au/ilds/registration.htm

Please e-mail ildsconference@nla.gov.au if you would like a registration form posted to you.

 

*****

 

7. Easier Access for Aslib Corporate Members

 

Aslib and Emerald are pleased to announce that Aslib Corporate Members will soon be able to access their membership journals using direct IP access/Athens authentication.

 

Go to http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/aslib.htm for more information

 

*****

 

8. Feedback

 

We would like your feedback both on the structure and content of the site, what you would like to see on Library Link, as well as your thoughts on the viewpoints and topics covered. If you have any comments or suggestions you may send them to mailto:librarylink@emeraldinsight.com or complete our feedback form at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/librarylinkfeedback.htm

 

Thank you

 

Claire Jones

Library Link

E-mail: cjones@emeraldinsight.com http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

 

Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

June 2003

 

Library Link [librarylink@emeraldinsight.com]                                           Wed 18/06/2003 11:48 PM

Library Link Newsletter - June 2003

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

                    Library Link Newsletter

                    June 2003

                    http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

                    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Contents

----------

 

1. Library Technology - Viewpoints & Articles

2. Library Link News & Links

3. Turn your conference attendance to even greater advantage

4. IFLA Interlending and Document Supply International Conference 5. Easier Access for Aslib Corporate Members 6. Meetings to be held about LIS journals at major international conference 7. Feedback

 

*****

 

1. Library Technology

 

Viewpoint - June 2003

 

Keeping up-to-date with Metadata

Daniel G Dorner

 

Let's face it, as a librarian, archivist or records manager, you should be keeping up with what's happening with metadata. Keeping up to date with metadata will help you understand how to keep your current services relevant, how to improve them, and how you might be able to offer new services to help your users take advantage of digital resources.

 

Click here to read the full viewpoint http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/technology

 

Free Article

"Forintek's value added pathfinder: a case study".

Holder, B. (2003)

The Electronic Library 21(1): 49-55. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/technology/#article

 

 

*****

 

2. Library Link News

 

Keep up to date with the latest news and information in your field. Visit:

 

Press Releases http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/press.htm

 

Forthcoming Events http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/events.htm

 

Books & Journals - Announcements & Reviews http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/bandj.htm

 

 

*****

 

3. Turn your conference attendance to even greater advantage Consider writing up a report of the conferences you attend, for potential publication in Library Hi Tech News, which specialises in detailed reports of conferences covering new library technologies and applications. To submit your article to Library Hi Tech News please go to http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals/lhtn/cfp.htm

 

 

*****

 

4. IFLA Interlending and Document Supply International Conference

 

Registration is now open for the IFLA Interlending and Document Supply International Conference, BREAKING BARRIERS: REACHING USERS IN A DIGITAL WORLD, to be held on 28-31 October 2003 in Canberra, Australia. It is only AUD$550.00 if you register before 31 July (see http://www.xe.net/ucc/ to check what this is your own currency).

 

Full registration details and form at: http://www.nla.gov.au/ilds/registration.htm

Please e-mail ildsconference@nla.gov.au if you would like a registration form posted to you.

 

 

*****

 

5. Easier Access for Aslib Corporate Members

 

Aslib and Emerald are pleased to announce that Aslib Corporate Members will soon be able to access their membership journals using direct IP access/Athens authentication.

 

Go to http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/aslib.htm for more information

 

 

*****

 

6. Meetings to be held about LIS journals at major international conference

 

The World Library and Information Congress is the conference series of IFLA - the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions and takes place 1-9 August 2003 in Berlin, Germany.

 

See http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/iflacfp.htm for more information

 

 

*****

 

7. Feedback

 

We would like your feedback both on the structure and content of the site, what you would like to see on Library Link, as well as your thoughts on the viewpoints and topics covered. If you have any comments or suggestions you may send them to mailto:librarylink@emeraldinsight.com or complete our feedback form at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/librarylinkfeedback.htm

 

Thank you

 

Claire Jones

Library Link

mailto:cjones@emeraldinsight.com http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

July 2003

Library Link [librarylink@emeraldinsight.com]                               Fri 18/07/2003 10:11 PM

Library Link Newsletter - July 2003

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

                    Library Link Newsletter

                    July 2003

                    http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

                    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Contents

----------

 

1. Collection Management - Viewpoint & Article

2. Library Management - Viewpoint & Article

3. Library Link News

4. Collaboration in the Electronic Age Workshop

5. Meetings to be held about LIS journals at IFLA

6. See Emerald at IFLA

7. Feedback

 

*****

 

1. Collection Management Viewpoint - July 2003

 

Sense and Sensibility in selection - a dying art, a lost skill? Professor G E Gorman

 

All of us are well aware of how quickly electronic resources have come to mirror the variety of traditional format information resources after an initially slow start-up, when about all we could access electronically was bibliographic databases. At the time most of us maintained that electronic information would pretty much be limited to this sort of reference product, since 'no one' would want to read continuous text in electronic format - and how wrong we were proved in such a short space of time! Without even the decency of a doffed cap as the miscalculated judgement flew past, we were suddenly being flooded with full-text databases, then e-journals - and now the distant sound of an e-book tsunami can begin to be detected. In my view this has happened so fast that we have rather lost sight of our professional responsibilities, and almost without our knowledge a key professional function is withering.

 

Click here to read the full viewpoint http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection

 

Free Related Article

Dauphiné, N.; Ochs, M.A.; and Joos, N.K. (2003)

'Bringing Scientific Literature to the Developing World: The Essential Electronic Agricultural Library'. Online Information Review 27, 1: 51-54. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection/#article

 

 

*****

 

2. Library Management Viewpoint - July 2003

 

'Howsit Gng Y'all'; or, Learning to Live with Text

Philip Calvert

 

When I was a boy - yes, as you've already guessed, this will be one of those columns in which some fading fogey bashes on about how things were better in the old days.  When I was a boy the speed of technological innovation just about matched our ability to learn how to use it.  As some new machinery or service appeared, we had enough time to use it and learn its ways before the 'next big thing' came along.  Microfiche readers would be one example of this.  Though probably no one realised it at the time, this was a blessing for library managers, because it meant that they could learn the new ways just as fast as any other member of staff and so retain what management writers call 'expert' power.  Ah, but that was the old days, and it's all different now.

 

Click here to read the full viewpoint http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management

 

Free Related Article

Rettig, J. (2003)

'Technology, Cluelessness, Anthropology, and the Memex: The Future of Academic Reference Service'.  Reference Services Review 31,1: 17-21. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management/#article

 

*****

 

3. Library Link News

 

Keep up to date with the latest news and information in your field. Visit:

 

Press Releases http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/press.htm

 

Forthcoming Events http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/events.htm

 

Books & Journals - Announcements & Reviews http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/bandj.htm

 

*****

 

4. Collaboration in the Electronic Age Workshop

 

A free Emerald/Library Link Lunch, Workshop and Discussion for IFLA attendees.

 

Monday 4th August 2003

12.00 - 15.00 at the Kempinski Hotel Bristol, Berlin.

 

Transportation will depart from the main entrance of ICC Berlin at 11.45am

 

"Collaboration in the Electronic Age" will provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and information between practising librarians. The format of the workshop will be a light lunch followed by a brief presentation. There will then be a discussion of the challenges facing librarians, publishers and vendors - how can they work together to provide solutions and opportunities in the electronic age?

 

Discussions will include:

 

1. Open Access  - Focusing on the end user

2. Information overload for the LIS professional - sifting through the maze 3. Marketing Library Services 4. Quality in, quality out - editorial content and library services

 

The workshop will be carried out in the English language.

 

If you wish to attend the workshop e-mail Anna Foutsi at mailto:afoutsi@emeraldinsight.com

 

Please include a first and second preference of which of the four discussions you would like to participate in. Places are limited, so please send your reply as soon as possible. Note: A reply will not ensure a place at this workshop, please wait until you have been sent a message confirming your place.

 

For more information go to http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/workshops/ifla2003.htm

 

*****

 

5. Meetings to be held about LIS journals at IFLA

 

The World Library and Information Congress is the conference series of IFLA - the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (see http://www.ifla.org/IV/index.htm) - which is to take place 1-9 August 2003 in Berlin, Germany. Emerald is an IFLA Gold Corporate partner (see http://www.ifla.org/III/sponsors/index.htm#patron).

 

Emerald publishes more library and information management journals than anyone else, and so supports the work of the IFLA special interest group - the LIS Journals Section (see http://www.ifla.org/VII/s45/slisj.htm) - which represents the interests of this form of professional communication.  The Section has an exciting programme of events planned for Berlin and invites Library Link members who will be there to join in the debates and projects:

 

6th August

Open session: "Blurring the boundaries - changing the way in which we create, distribute and utilise knowledge in LIS journals" Pre-registration not required. All delegates welcome.

 

- New forms of publisher co-operation

ROGER BOWES (CEO, ASLIB, UK) and DIANE HEATH (Emerald, UK)

 

- eScholarship at the University of California: sustainable innovation for open access CAROL HUGHES (University of California, Irvine, USA)

 

- EBIB Electronic Library: from LIS e-journal to e-service. Bottom-up Initiative of Networked Library Service in Poland - a four-year perspective MARZENA MARCINEK (Library, Cracow University of Technology, Cracow, Poland)

 

- Research on development of library and information science journals in China YAFAN SONG (Library, Renmin University of China, Beijing, China)

 

7th August

Workshop

One full day, on-site: "Achieving Quality in LIS Journals" Conference delegates must register for this session when they arrive in Berlin.  Places are limited, so are on a first come-first served basis.

 

Designed to engage the interest of journal editors and authors; information professionals, lecturers and researchers; and also publishers of the librarian professional literature, it will comprise some introductory presentations by:

 

- DR G E GORMAN (Victoria University of Wellington, NZ) on the final results of the IFLA-funded research project (see http://www.ifla.org/IV/ifla68/papers/169-118e.pdf for the preliminary results).

- PROFESSOR JUDITH ELKIN (University of Central England in Birmingham, UK) with a UK higher education sector perspective.

- EILEEN BREEN (Emerald, UK) with a publisher perspective.

 

And then discussion groups which will debate the following questions from the perspective of author, editor, and user:

 

- What do you feel are the six most important determinants of article quality?

- How would you rank them in importance and why?

- How does this relate to journal quality?

- What would help to improve the situation?

 

Concluding with:

- Where do we go from here?

 

*****

 

6. See Emerald at IFLA

 

If you are attending the World Library and Information Congress, 69th IFLA General Conference and Council, yet cannot attend the workshop, please feel free to visit us at booth H27.

 

 

*****

 

7. Feedback

 

We would like your feedback both on the structure and content of the site, what you would like to see on Library Link, as well as your thoughts on the viewpoints and topics covered. If you have any comments or suggestions you may send them to mailto:librarylink@emeraldinsight.com or complete our feedback form at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/librarylinkfeedback.htm

 

Thank you

 

Claire Jones

Library Link

mailto:cjones@emeraldinsight.com http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

August 2003

Library Link [librarylink@emeraldinsight.com]                               Fri 22/08/2003 8:56 PM

Library Link Newsletter - August 2003

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

                    Library Link Newsletter

                    August 2003

                    http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

                    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Contents

----------

 

1. Collection Management - Viewpoint & Article

2. Library Management - Viewpoint & Article

3. Library Link News

4. Library Collection & Development Management Links

5. Collection Building available as a Journal of the Week

6. Emerald User & Librarian Toolkits

7. Feedback

 

*****

 

1. Collection Management Viewpoint - August 2003

 

Can Collection Management Bridge the Digital Divide?

Professor G E Gorman

 

At the 2003 IFLA General Conference in Berlin there was much talk about the Digital Divide and what libraries can do to help bridge it, especially in developing countries. The overwhelming view expressed by many delegates is that this Divide is an extension of the traditional gap between haves and have-nots that characterises developed-developing country relations. The have-nots are on the wrong side of the Digital Divide, and we in developed countries are on the other, digitally-enabled side.

 

Click here to read the full viewpoint http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection

 

Free Related Article

 

Salinas, Romelia (2003)

"Addressing the Digital Divide through Collection Development" Collection Building 22, 3: 131-136. Access this article at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection/#article

 

*****

 

2. Library Management Viewpoint - August 2003

 

Can Research Be Put to Work for Information Managers?

Professor G E Gorman

 

Research is a funny old business, at least in the information professions. In some countries, such as Australia and New Zealand, librarians and other information workers are remarkably research-averse. As one who teaches research to aspiring information professionals, I am acutely aware that so few university graduates these days have any familiarity with research methods or data analysis (psychologists may be the principal exception), and every year the majority of our masters' students (still predominantly from the humanities and social sciences) cringe at the mere thought of having to do research.

 

Read the full viewpoint at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management

 

Free Related Article

Shiri, Ali (2003)

"Digital Library Research: Current Developments and Trends Library Review 52, 5: 198-202. Read the full article at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management/#article

 

*****

 

3. Library Link News

 

Keep up to date with the latest news and information in your field. Visit:

 

Press Releases http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/press.htm

 

Forthcoming Events http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/events.htm

 

Books & Journals - Announcements & Reviews http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/bandj.htm

 

*****

 

4. Library Collection & Development Management Links

 

External web sites in this area are reviewed and linked to for your information at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection/links.htm

 

 

*****

 

5. Collection Building available as Journals of the Week

 

Emerald's Journals of the Week offer is providing free access to the current and past volumes of Collection Building between Monday 8th to Sunday 14th September.

 

To access this offer please go to the Journals of the Week website at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/jotw during this date. In the meantime, if you would like to find out more about Collection Building please go to the journal homepage at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/cb.htm

 

*****

 

6. Emerald User & Librarian Toolkits

 

Online databases are a major investment for any library, not just in terms of cost, but also in terms of the time needed to promote the services to library users and encourage them to be used effectively. To help ensure you have made a successful investment in subscribing to Emerald Fulltext, we have developed the Usage Toolkit as the definitive source of information to ensure that you and your institution are using your subscription to its fullest. To help meet specific requirements the Usage toolkit has been split into two: one to meet Librarians' exact requirements and the other tailored to meet the end-users needs.

 

To access the Toolkits please go to http://www.emeraldinsight.com/usagetoolkit/

 

 

*****

 

7. Feedback

 

We would like your feedback both on the structure and content of the site, what you would like to see on Library Link, as well as your thoughts on the viewpoints and topics covered. If you have any comments or suggestions you may send them to mailto:librarylink@emeraldinsight.com or complete our feedback form at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/librarylinkfeedback.htm

 

Thank you

 

Claire Jones

Library Link

mailto:cjones@emeraldinsight.com http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Library Trends

 

51(4), Spring 2003

GSLIS Publications Office [puboff@alexia.lis.uiuc.edu]                                       Sat 21/06/2003 3:49 AM

 

[Asis-l] New Issue of Library Trends

 

Now available from the University of Illinois Graduate School of Library and Information Science Publications Office:

 

Library Trends, 51(4), Spring 2003

"Research Questions for the Twenty-first Century" edited by Mary Jo Lynch

 

Single copies are $28, including postage. Subscription rates for the quarterly are: Institutional, $100 per volume ($107 for international subscribers); Individual, $70 per volume ($77 for international subscribers); and Student, $30 per volume ($37 for international subscribers). ISSN 0024-2594 Order single copies or subscriptions from the University of Illinois Press, Journals Department, 1325 S. Oak Street, Champaign, IL 61820; 1-866-244-0626; fax: 217-244-9910; e-mail: journals@uillinois.edu.

 

The context for this issue is that analog library service is in a period of dramatic change but is expected to continue well into the twenty-first century expanded by digital library service. Some would argue that research is essential and asks: What are the most important researchable questions for the next five to ten years and how might they be approached? Each of the authors-people who are well known and respected researchers-was asked to write an essay that:

 

*States three to five questions that the author believes could and should be answered through research in the next five to ten years;

 

*Describes why each question is important now;

 

*Describes what previous work exists for the researcher to build on;

 

*Indicates appropriate methodologies.

 

Authors were told that the questions they chose could come from any area of librarianship and that some overlap between articles was expected.

 

--From the Introduction by Mary Jo Lynch

 

Articles and Authors Include:

 

"Research in School Library Media for the Next Decade: Polishing the Diamond," Delia Neuman

 

"Improving Health Care through Information: Research Challenges for Health Sciences Librarians," Prudence W. Dalrymple

 

"Determining How Libraries and Librarians Help," Joan C. Durrance and Karen E. Fisher

 

"Public Library Service to Children and Teens: A Research Agenda," Virginia A. Walter

 

"Outcomes Assessment in the Networked Environment: Research Questions, Issues, Considerations, and Moving Forward," John Carlo Bertot and Charles R. McClure

 

"Electronic Publishing: Research Issues for Academic Librarians and Users," Carol Tenopir

 

"Research Questions for the Digital Era Library," Deanna B. Marcum

 

"The Invisible Library: Paradox of the Global Information Infrastructure," Christine L. Borgman

 

"Five Grand Challenges for Library Research," Michael K. Buckland

 

The Publications Office

Graduate School of Library and Information Science

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

501 E. Daniel Street

Champaign, IL 61820-6211

 

(217) 333-1359 phone, (217) 244-7329 FAX puboff@alexia.lis.uiuc.edu http://www.lis.uiuc.edu/puboff

 

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LIBRI: international journal of libraries and information

 

Ian Johnson (absimj) [i.m.johnson@rgu.ac.uk]                                          Fri 4/04/2003 4:29 PM

RE: NEW ISSUE OF LIBRI  - AVAILABLE NOW

 

53 (1) March 2003

 

Contents of LIBRI: international journal of libraries and information

> services, 53 (1) March 2003

>

> The Consortium Site License: A Sustainable Model?

> MARK ROWSE

> The spread of consortial licensing and the > '> Big Deal> '>  has been rapid and far-reaching. While there would appear to be many advantages associated with this purchasing model, there are also reservations about its impact on librarian choice and concerns that it may serve to further consolidate the dominant position of some of the biggest STM publishers. However, until recently little qualitative or quantitative research had been undertaken into the impact this purchasing model is having upon the scholarly communication system. This article summarises the findings of a research programme run by the Ingenta Institute in 2002 which consisted of three separate independent studies into the perceived advantages and disadvantages of the consortial site license for libraries, institutions, publishers and end-users Preliminary conclusions suggest that while this model has brought many benefits to all stakeholders, it is unlikely to continue in its current form, with significant adaptation and development anticipated at the next round of consortial license renewal. While the number of consortial deals may indeed increase in the future, these deals will not necessarily be > '> Big Deals> '> .

>

> Bits, Bytes, and User Comfort - The Digital Library (DigiBib) ERWIN

> HARDECK, TATJANA MROWKA, ANETTE SEILER AND HEIKO JANSEN The Digital

> Library (DigiBib) was founded in 1998 as a joint project of the

> University Library of Bielefeld and the Service Centre for University

> Libraries of North Rhine-Westphalia (HBZ), Cologne. The initial aim

> was to create an Internet portal furthering science, teaching and

> research for the libraries of universities and universities of applied

> sciences in North Rhine-Westfalia and northern Rhineland-Palatinate. A

> uniform work interface to access the relevant digital sources

> (catalogues and scientific abstract, index and full-text databases) is

> offered while allowing the participating libraries to develop their

> own specific profile on the basis of the common platform. With the

> initial setup established successfully, it is now planned to expand

> further and to integrate other user groups and libraries, such as

> public or school libraries. This article discusses different aspects

> pertaining to, and sections of, the DigiBib and shows the interaction

> of the modules with each other in order to achieve an integrated

> whole. In > "> Technical Administration and Development of the

> DigiBib> "> , Anette Seiler gives an overview over the development and

> maintenance of the different modules of the DigiBib software. The

> section on content and acquisition (> "> Acquisitions for the Digital

> Library> "> , by Erwin Hardeck) deals with the legal, financial,

> managerial and technical background of acquiring electronic media such

> as databases and e-journals in, and for, consortia. In > ">  Public

> libraries and the DigiBib> "> , Heiko Jansen describes a

> groundbreaking project to include public libraries as users of the

> DigiBib. The section on Interlibrary Loan and Document Delivery by

> Tatjana Mrowka (> "> The online-ILL module as an integral part of the

> Digital Library> "> ) presents one of the latest building blocks of

> the DigiBib offering users immediate and comfortable ordering

> facilities subsequent to successful searching.

>

> The Information Audit: Principles and Guidelines

> HANNERÍ BOTHA AND J.A. BOON

> Auditing is a recognised management technique providing managers with an overview of the present situation regarding specific resource(s) and services within an organisation. Many different types of audits currently exist in the commercial world, including audits of information resources. Currently, as far as the researchers could determine, there exists no single accepted methodology for performing an information audit. In view of this, the researchers investigate whether it is possible (and desirable) to develop a standardised information a> uditing methodology. Investigating the nature and characteristics of the information audit as well as how a number of other audit types do this, e.g. the financial audit, the communication audit. The researchers conclude that none of these are the same as the information audit, although similarities exist. Various information audit methodologies are discussed, evaluated and classified. The researchers conclude that even though the principles of the financial audit cannot be used to develop a standardised methodology for information auditing, information professionals can look towards the accounting profession for support in developing a standardised, universally accepted method for accurately determining the value of information entities. Guidelines for a standardised information audit methodology are identified.

>

> The Instructional and Motivational Effectiveness of a Computer Program

> in the Training of Cataloguing Students LINDA M CLOETE, RETHA (MMM)

> SNYMAN AND JC CRONJÉ The low level of interaction between lecturer and

> student has led to a number of problems in the education and training

> of cataloguers through distance education and training. Students often

> need an immediate answer to a question or problem in a practical

> exercise for them to continue to the next step. The case study is a

> response to the need to conduct research on the provision of

> additional practice opportunities to students. The program development

> included a needs analysis phase, design phase, development phase,

> implementation phase and formative evaluation phase. Students> '> 

> response to such a program is evaluated. The fact that an overwhelming

> majority of the students would use the program again and recommend it

> to others is an indication of the success of the program as well as

> the need to expand the program to include all the aspects pertaining

> to the cataloguing course.

>

> Card-Image Public Access Catalogues (CIPACs): Issues Concerned with

> their Planning and Implementation O. C. OBERHAUSER This article

> identifies and discusses the issues and problems that need to be

> considered in the process of planning and implementing card-image

> public access catalogues (CIPACs). CIPACs are online library

> catalogues based on databases of digitised catalogue cards with more

> or less sophisticated mechanisms for browsing or searching. Solutions

> of this kind have been implemented by a number of libraries in various

> countries since the mid-1990s, mainly as inexpensive alternatives to

> full retrospective conversion of their old catalogues. Based upon a

> questionnaire and relevant literature, the article looks at the

> following aspects: cost, conversion speed, universal access, saving of

> space, preservational aspects, software selection, preparing the card

> catalogue for conversion, scanning and quality control, image

> standards, optical character recognition, manual and intellectual

> input, technological aspects, administrative tools, organisational

> aspects, peculiarities of old catalogues, presentation of CIPACs to

> the users, and life expectancy of card-image catalogues.

 

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53 (2) June 2003

 

Ian Johnson (absimj) [i.m.johnson@rgu.ac.uk]                  Tue 12/08/2003 8:59 PM

[Asis-l] Contents of LIBRI

 

Contents of LIBRI: international journal of libraries and information services, 53 (2) June 2003

 

Libraries and Distance Education: a German View - RAFAEL BALL

 

On our way to an information-based society, the volume of data, of information and of knowledge will become ever greater. At the same time a technology is developing which, on the one hand, facilitates data processing but, on the other hand, requires competent handling and efficient management of information and knowledge. The existence of digital, multimedia information resources also support distance education and decentralized learning in our society. The library as a physical location for knowledge and wisdom is becoming increasing replaced by a library of electronic information, multimedia teaching and learning. As a consequence, clients and users must acquire sufficient information literacy and at the same time libraries must become actively involved and provide an appropriate range of services for distance learning. This article reviews the position of libraries and continuing distance education programs especially in Germany. Finally it provides a vision of a successful integration of distance education and library information environment as a qualitatively new form of learning and teaching.

 

Using Distance Education to Internationalize Library and Information Science Scholarship - CHARLES T. TOWNLEY, QIAN GENG, JING ZHANG

 

Library and information science educators have long sought to internationalize scholarship to enrich the quality of educational programs and professional practice. But many obstacles restrict the size and growth of traditional international education efforts, particularly in developing countries. This article presents a case study that uses emerging distance education techniques to deliver a graduate course on knowledge management in The Peoples' Republic of China and the United States. Sponsored by the U. S. Fulbright program, this demonstration project blends learning technologies, using Web-based WebCT software, videoconferencing, personal contacts and readings to create an international, virtual learning space. The article describes how faculty and students achieved the three course goals: (1) learning to learn internationally, (2) bilateral communication and (3) knowledge management. Findings and recommendations support the following

conclusions: using active learning pedagogies that engage the students in the learning process; applying multiple technologies that can be supported internationally; maximizing the use of two-way, asynchronous and synchronous communication to encourage individual and group learning; and focusing on broad, interdisciplinary content to facilitate participation in international learning environments.

 

Nationwide Library Consortia Life Cycle - PNINA SHACHAF

 

Library consortia development processes were examined from an ecological approach, combining historical perspective, dynamic developmental approach, and social structure, stressing the issues of permeable boundaries in library consortia and the manifestation of inter-organization relationships. A comparative analysis of several nationwide consortia (from Australia, Brazil, China, Israel, Italy, Micronesia, Spain and the U.K.) using six criteria enables delineation of a developmental pattern. Additional support for the model is based on a study of U.S. state-wide consortia conducted by Potter in 1997. A four-stage life cycle sequence is outlined: embryonic, early development, development, and maturation. In addition, the ecological approach stresses founding and disbanding processes, suggesting disbanding as a fifth stage. The contribution of this paper to developmental theories at other levels of analysis (individual, group,

organization) is in proposal of an inter-organizational life cycle model.

 

Cooperation in Context: Library Developments in Central and Eastern Europe - NADIA CAIDI

 

Major research and academic libraries in four Central and Eastern European countries (Hungary, Poland, Czech Republic and Slovakia) have undergone significant changes since their socio-political transformations that began in the early 1990s. In-depth interviews with forty-nine (49) key library policymakers were conducted in 1999. The data suggests that cooperation and resource sharing are at the heart of the institutional changes taking place in the libraries in the four countries. Commonalities and differences between and among the countries were identified along four dimensions: centralisation vs. decentralisation, individual vs. collective goals, product vs. process orientation, and global vs. local considerations. A typology of cooperation models ('artificial,' 'contested,' 'directed,' and 'voluntary' cooperation) was devised that reflects the changing nature and visions of cooperation as reported by the respondents interviewed. The results raise questions about the exogenous vs. endogenous forces that contribute to the adoption of new attitudes and values toward cooperation and resource sharing.

 

Design and Development of an Academic Portal - HEILA PIENAAR

 

A Web portal can be defined as a Web site for a specific audience that aggregates an array of content and provides a variety of services including search engines, directories, news, e-mail and chat rooms. This article investigates the factors that must be considered during the design and development of an academic portal. Personal interviews were conducted with academics in order to identify the content, functions, appearance and value of an academic portal. A working academic portal, the Infoportal, was developed to support academics' task performance.

 

The Development of Digital Libraries in South Korea - WONTAE CHOI

 

As information technologies have developed, the digital library is making the library undergo a changing paradigm of its role to create, organize, and distribute information resources. Digital libraries have created and promoted innovative information services with digitization of resources. The development of digital libraries has been attracting the attention of many countries and South Korea is no exception. This article provides an overview of recent developments in digital libraries in South Korea. To build the digital library, various innovative projects are currently in progress involving a range of different libraries and institutions. This article also discusses information policies, standards, and technical issues in South Korea in recent years. Until now, the various projects involving digital collections and digital libraries in South Korea have been carried out with very little coordination. If a more coordinated and coherent approach to building digital libraries is to succeed in South Korea, all libraries and institutions will need to work closely together to establish the appropriate framework for cooperation.

 

Durning-Lawrence Online: Benefits of a Retrospective Catalogue Conversion Project - K. E. ATTAR

 

The University of London Library has recently undertaken a project to catalogue one of its special collections online, that of Sir Edwin Durning-Lawrence (1837-1914), a protagonist of the Baconian theory in the controversy over the authorship of the works attributed to Shakespeare. The collection is especially rich in editions of Bacon's works and other Baconiana and in seventeenth-century English drama, with other strengths being emblem books and early editions of the works of Daniel Defoe. This article places the retrospective cataloguing project in the context of the international drive for retrospective conversion of antiquarian material and of the Library's mission to support research within the federal University of London and the region and internationally. It describes the method used for cataloguing, focuses on the benefits of the project both academically for researchers and administratively. In addition to the commonly acknowledged benefits of multiple access points in online catalogue records and speed and precision of searching from anywhere in the world, others include the opportunity as part of the project to conduct a preservation survey with little extra cost of time or handling, the establishing of the rarity of particular items and classes of items in the collection, and the insight into the collector provided especially by provenance notes in the catalogue records, enabling scholars to learn a considerable amount about Durning-Lawrence and his collecting patterns from direct electronic access. The value of projects conducted along similar lines may easily be inferred.

 

 

 

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Prism

Spring Edition available

Karen O'Brien [kobrien@ALA.ORG]                                              Tue 22/04/2003 2:23 AM

JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU

 

The spring edition of Prism, the newsletter of the American Library Association's Office for Accreditation, is now available at http://www.ala.org/prism. This edition includes the latest accreditation actions and more. (It functions better using Explorer than

Netscape)

 

 

Karen O'Brien, Assistant Director

Office for Accreditation

American Library Association

50 E. Huron,  (4th Fl., 40 E.)

Chicago, IL 60611-2795

Phone 800-545-2433, ext. 2434

Facsimile 312-280-2433

kobrien@ala.org

http://www.ala.org/accreditation

 

 

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Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

           

Charles W. Bailey, Jr. [cbailey@UH.EDU]                                     Mon 21/04/2003 2:50 AM

JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU

 

Version 48

 

Version 48 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography is now available.  This selective bibliography presents over 1,850 articles, books, and other printed and electronic sources that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing efforts on the Internet.

 

     HTML: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html

     Acrobat: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf

 

The HTML document is designed for interactive use.  Each

major section is a separate file.  There are links to sources that are freely available on the Internet.  It can be can be searched using Boolean operators.

 

The HTML document includes three sections not found in

the Acrobat file:

 

(1) Archive (prior versions of the bibliography)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/archive/sepa.htm

 

(2) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources (over 230 related Web sites)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepr.htm

 

(3) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog (list of new

resources)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepw.htm

 

The Acrobat file is designed for printing.  The printed bibliography is over 150 pages long.  The Acrobat file is over 410 KB.

 

The bibliography has the following sections (revised sections are marked with an asterisk):

 

Table of Contents

 

1 Economic Issues*

2 Electronic Books and Texts

     2.1 Case Studies and History

     2.2 General Works*

     2.3 Library Issues*

3  Electronic Serials

     3.1 Case Studies and History

     3.2 Critiques

     3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals*

     3.4 General Works*

     3.5 Library Issues*

     3.6 Research*

4 General Works*

5 Legal Issues

     5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*

     5.2 License Agreements*

     5.3 Other Legal Issues

6  Library Issues

     6.1 Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*

     6.2 Digital Libraries*

     6.3 General Works*

     6.4 Information Integrity and Preservation*

7 New Publishing Models*

8 Publisher Issues*

     8.1 Digital Rights Management*

9 Repositories and E-Prints*

Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author

Appendix B. About the Author

 

Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources includes

the following sections:

 

Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata

Digital Libraries

Electronic Books and Texts*

Electronic Serials

General Electronic Publishing

Images

Legal*

Preservation

Publishers

Repositories and E-Prints*

SGML and Related Standards*

 

An article about the bibliography has been published

in The Journal of Electronic Publishing:

 

http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/07-02/bailey.html

 

 

Best Regards,

Charles

 

Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

Version 49

 

Charles W. Bailey, Jr. [cbailey@uh.edu]                            Fri 6/06/2003 11:15 PM

[Asis-l] Version 49, Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

 

Version 49 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography is now available.  This selective bibliography presents over 1,900 articles, books, and other printed and electronic sources that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing efforts on the Internet.

 

     HTML: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html

 

     Acrobat: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf

    

The HTML document is designed for interactive use.  Each

major section is a separate file.  There are links to sources that are freely available on the Internet.  It can be can be searched using Boolean operators.

 

The HTML document includes three sections not found in

the Acrobat file:

 

(1) Archive (prior versions of the bibliography)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/archive/sepa.htm

 

(2) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources (over 230 related Web sites)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepr.htm

 

(3) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog (list of new

resources)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepw.htm

 

The Acrobat file is designed for printing.  The printed bibliography is over 155 pages long.  The Acrobat file is over 430 KB.

 

The bibliography has the following sections (revised sections are marked with an asterisk):

 

Table of Contents

 

1 Economic Issues*

2 Electronic Books and Texts

     2.1 Case Studies and History

     2.2 General Works*

     2.3 Library Issues*

3  Electronic Serials

     3.1 Case Studies and History

     3.2 Critiques

     3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals

     3.4 General Works*

     3.5 Library Issues*

     3.6 Research*

4 General Works*

5 Legal Issues

     5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*

     5.2 License Agreements

     5.3 Other Legal Issues

6  Library Issues

     6.1 Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*

     6.2 Digital Libraries*

     6.3 General Works*

     6.4 Information Integrity and Preservation*

7 New Publishing Models*

8 Publisher Issues

     8.1 Digital Rights Management*

9 Repositories and E-Prints*

Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author

Appendix B. About the Author*

 

Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources includes

the following sections:

 

Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*

Digital Libraries*

Electronic Books and Texts

Electronic Serials*

General Electronic Publishing*

Images*

Legal*

Preservation

Publishers

Repositories and E-Prints*

SGML and Related Standards*

 

An article about the bibliography has been published

in The Journal of Electronic Publishing:

 

http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/07-02/bailey.html

 

 

Best Regards,

Charles

 

Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Assistant Dean for Systems,

University of Houston, Library Administration,

114 University Libraries, Houston, TX 77204-2000.

E-mail: cbailey@uh.edu.  Voice: (713) 743-9804.

Fax: (713) 743-9811.  http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm

 

 

 

Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

Version 50

From: Charles W. Bailey, Jr. [mailto:cbailey@UH.EDU]

Sent: Saturday, 30 August 2003 2:49 AM

To: PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU

Subject: Version 50, Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

 

 

Version 50 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography is now available.  This selective bibliography presents over 1,950 articles, books, and other printed and electronic sources that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing efforts on the Internet.

 

     HTML: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html

 

     Acrobat: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf

 

The HTML document is designed for interactive use.  Each

major section is a separate file.  There are links to sources that are freely available on the Internet.  It can be can be searched using Boolean operators.

 

The HTML document includes three sections not found in

the Acrobat file:

 

(1) Archive (prior versions of the bibliography)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/archive/sepa.htm

 

(2) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources (over 230 related Web sites)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepr.htm

 

(3) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog (list of new

resources)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepw.htm

 

The Acrobat file is designed for printing.  The printed bibliography is over 160 pages long.  The Acrobat file is over 440 KB.

 

The bibliography has the following sections (revised sections are marked with an asterisk):

 

Table of Contents

 

1 Economic Issues*

2 Electronic Books and Texts

     2.1 Case Studies and History

     2.2 General Works*

     2.3 Library Issues*

3  Electronic Serials

     3.1 Case Studies and History

     3.2 Critiques

     3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals*

     3.4 General Works

     3.5 Library Issues*

     3.6 Research*

4 General Works*

5 Legal Issues

     5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*

     5.2 License Agreements*

     5.3 Other Legal Issues

6  Library Issues

     6.1 Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*

     6.2 Digital Libraries*

     6.3 General Works*

     6.4 Information Integrity and Preservation*

7 New Publishing Models*

8 Publisher Issues*

     8.1 Digital Rights Management*

9 Repositories and E-Prints*

Appendix A. Related Bibliographies by the Same Author

Appendix B. About the Author*

 

Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources includes

the following sections:

 

Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata

Digital Libraries*

Electronic Books and Texts*

Electronic Serials*

General Electronic Publishing*

Images

Legal*

Preservation

Publishers

Repositories and E-Prints*

SGML and Related Standards*

 

An article about the bibliography has been published

in The Journal of Electronic Publishing:

 

http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/07-02/bailey.html

 

 

Best Regards,

Charles

 

Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Assistant Dean for Digital Library Planning and Development, University of Houston, Library Administration, 114 University Libraries, Houston, TX 77204-2000.  E-mail: cbailey@uh.edu.

Voice: (713) 743-9804.  Fax: (713) 743-9811. http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm

 

 

 

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Singapore Journal of Library & Information Management

Arlene Cohen [acohen@uog9.uog.edu]                                         Fri 4/04/2003 1:52 PM pacificlibrary@lists.uoregon.edu; paclib-l@libmail.anu.edu.au; PIALA; rscao-l@infoserv.inist.fr

The "Singapore Journal of Library & Information Management" is the official journal of the Library Association of Singapore (LAS) and is published annually.  It was published from 1971 (vol. 1) to 1998 (vol.27) as "Singapore Libraries".  The editorial board welcomes contributions on all topics related to library or information science and mangement, as well as the applications of information technology in information processing. Contributions may be of any length, from brief communications to full-length articles.

 

Please contact Narayanan Rakunathan <Narayanan_RAKUNATHAN@nlb.gov.sg> or Rajendra Munoo <Rajendra_MUNOO@nlb.gov.sg> for additional information.

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