NEWS FROM OTHER JOURNALS SECTION

MARCH 2004  ISSUE

 Editorial note:

This section contains items culled from various Internet news services, discussion lists and other announcements.  Unless specifically noted, I have not visited the sites, used any of the software, reviewed the literature, or written the news items.  I present this digest to you in good faith but cannot vouch for the accuracy of its content.  

Kerry Smith

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Ariadne

Issue 37

From: Richard Waller [mailto:lisrw@UKOLN.AC.UK]

Sent: Friday, 31 October 2003 11:38 PM

To: JISC-E-COLLECTIONS@JISCMAIL.AC.UK

Subject: Issue 37 (October 2003) of Ariadne is now available

Issue 37 of  Ariadne is now available at: http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue37/

 

 

Main Articles:

*Unicode and Historic Scripts

Deborah Anderson provides us with an overview of the progress made in bringing historic scripts to the Unicode Standard and warns of the danger of failing to pursue such work actively.

 

*Trends in Self-Posting of Research Material Online by Academic Staff Theo Andrew sheds some light on current trends in posting research material online with a case study from The University of Edinburgh.

 

*Updated JISC Guides Are Now Available

Emma Beer describes the JISC Resource Guide initiative, highlighting particularly the revamped format of the Guides, ready for the new academic term.

 

*Delivering OAI Records as RSS: An IMesh Toolkit module for facilitating resource sharing Monica Duke provides an overview of a means of providing records in RSS through the use of an IMesh Toolkit module that supports resource sharing.

 

*Ebooks in UK Libraries: Where are we now?

Penny Garrod returns to a topic that merits further review and brings us up to date on developments in a technology that still appears to be waiting in the wings.

 

*Experiences of Harvesting Web Resources in Engineering Using Automatic Classification Kjell Jansson,Jessica Lindholm and Tomas Schnthal describe the background to and the work involved in setting up Engine-e, a Web index that uses automatic classification as a means for the selection of resources in Engineering. Considerations in offering a robot-generated Web index as a successor to a manually indexed quality-controlled subject gateway are also discussed.

 

*Towards a Typology for Portals

Paul Miller looks at some of the services we call portals, and argues for better words to describe them.

 

*DAEDALUS: Initial experiences with EPrints and DSpace at the University of Glasgow William Nixon provides an overview of his project's initial experiences with the GNU EPrints and DSpace software and the decision to use both pieces of software.

 

 

At the Event reports:

ECDL-2003

Lesly Huxley shares her notes on the European Conference on Research and Advanced Technology for Digital Libraries.

 

ECDL-2003 Web Archiving

Michael Day reports on the 3rd ECDL Workshop on Web Archives held in Trondheim, August 2003.

 

OAI: The Fourth Open Archives Forum Workshop

Manjula Patel provides us with an overview of the 4th Open Archives Forum Workshop.

 

Metadata and Interoperability in a Complex World

Pete Johnston reflects on the 2003 Dublin Core conference, held in Seattle, Washington.

 

OpenURL Meeting

Linda Humphreys Frances Boyle and Andy Powell give us a description of the meeting held in London, September 2003.

 

Crime and Punishment

Andrew Charlesworth reports on a seminar seeking to protect ICT users and their information against computer crime and abuse.

 

 

Plus our regular columns, news and reviews.

 

Ariadne numbers 38 and 39 are already in preparation. Books for review should be sent to the Editor's address (below), and article proposals should be sent to our regular contact point: ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk

 

Best regards,

Richard Waller

Editor Ariadne

UKOLN

The Library

University of Bath

Bath BA2 7AY

UK

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Issue 38

 

From: Richard Waller [mailto:lisrw@UKOLN.AC.UK]

Sent: Monday, 9 February 2004 8:36 PM

To: PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU

Subject: Ariadne issue 38 is now available

 

Issue 38 of  Ariadne (30 January 2004) is now available at: http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue38/

 

Main Articles:

 

*Improving the Quality of Metadata in Eprint Archives

 -Marieke Guy, Andy Powell and Michael Day address the argument that the quality of service to end-users is markedly influenced by the quality of metadata being produced and provide suggestions.

 

*Building OAI-PMH Harvesters with Net::OAI::Harvester

 -Ed Summers describes Net::OAI::Harvester, the Perl package for easily interacting with OAI-PMH repositories as a metadata harvester. Ed provides examples of how to use Net::OAI::Harvester to write short programs which execute each of the 6 OAI-PMH verbs.

 

*The JISC 5/99 Programme: What's in a number?

 - Rachel Bruce and Balviar Notay give an overview of the outputs and influences of the JISC 5/99 Learning and Teaching and Infrastructure Programme.

 

*The Portole Project: Supporting e-learning

 -Tracey Stanley, Mina Sotiriou and Matthew Dovey provide an overview of a project to produce tools to discover information resources and deploy them within a university VLE.

 

*The AHDS is Evolving: Changes at the Arts and Humanities Data Service

 - Alastair Dunning describes the changes afoot at the AHDS and how it intends to adapt to the changes in both technology and the needs of its stakeholders.

 

*The European Library: Integrated Access to the National Libraries of Europe -Britta Woldering describes the findings of the recently completed EU Project The European Library, focusing on technical solutions and metadata development.

 

*DSpace vs. ETD-db: Choosing software to manage electronic theses and dissertations  -Richard Jones examines the similarities and differences between DSpace and ETD-db to determine their applicability in a modern E-theses service.

 

*What the Resource Discovery Network is Doing for Further Education  -Mark Williams highlights some of the services that the RDN provides for the benefit of FE users. Each RDN Hub has written about its plans in this area

 

Additionally two detailed articles on Web accessibility issues appear in this issue's  'Get Tooled Up' section:

 

*WebWatch: How Accessible Are Australian University Web Sites? -Dey Alexander reports on a recent study of the accessibility of Australian university Web sites.

 

*Developing and Publicising a Workable Accessibility Strategy -Lawrie Phipps, Sue Harrison, David Sloan and Betty Willder of TechDis look at the increasing need for developers of institutional and educational Web sites to develop and follow a strategy for ensuring optimal accessibility of online content.

 

At the Event reports:

*The OpenURL and OpenURL Framework: Demystifying Link Resolution -Ann Apps reports on a conference about current and future uses of the proposed OpenURL Framework Standard Z39.88-2004.

 

*Towards a User-Centred Approach to Digital Libraries

-Ken Eason reports on the five themes in the Digilib Conference, Espoo, Finland.

 

*Herding Tigers, Part II

-Sophie Clarke describes an event designed to share ideas on accessibility, evaluation and the use of learning technology standards.

 

*OSS inaugural conference: Open Source Deployment and Development -Sebastian Rahtz and Randy Metcalfe give an overview of the first conference of the Open Source Advisory Service.

 

*Reaching Out to Your Community: Policies and practice for public library service -Fiona Leslie gives an overview of this seminar which covered a variety of topics of interest to public library professionals.

 

...........................................................................

....

.Plus our regular columns, news and reviews.

 

 Ariadne numbers 39 and 40 are already in preparation. Books for review

  should be sent to the Editor's address (below), and article proposals should be sent to our regular contact point:

  ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk

 

  Best regards,

  Richard Waller

  Editor Ariadne

  UKOLN

  The Library

  University of Bath

  Bath BA2 7AY

  UK

  tel +44 (0) 1225 383570

  fax +44 (0) 1225 386838

  email ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk

  Web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/

 

 

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Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science (CJILS)

 

Request for research news

Heidi Julien [Heidi.Julien@UALBERTA.CA]  Tue 3/02/2004 5:30 AM  JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU

 

The Research News column in the Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science (CJILS) is intended to share significant news on the LIS research front in Canada, including work being done by Canadians abroad, and LIS work that relates to Canada. The column includes announcements of LIS SSHRC and NSERC award winners, Canadian ALISE award winners, and other research awards to Canadian academics and doctoral students. Please forward these types of announcements, as well as any other Canadian LIS research-related news that you think might be appropriate for the column. This column is intended to be as inclusive as possible, within allowable space parameters, and within the goals for the column.

 

If you have research news that relates to Canada or Canadians in LIS, please forward that to me by email. With your help, this column will continue to be a useful addition to CJILS.

 

Thanks,

 

Heidi Julien

*****************************************

Heidi Julien, Ph.D.

School of Library and Information Studies

University of Alberta

3-20 Rutherford South, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J4

Ph: 780 492 3934  Fax: 780 492 2430

Email: Heidi.Julien@ualberta.ca

Web: www.slis.ualberta.ca/people_groups.htm

 

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DigiBook Newsletter

October 17th, 2003

i2S DigiBook [info-bookscanner@i2s.fr]   Fri 17/10/2003 9:54 PM

 

DigiBook Newsletter (English) ==========================================

October 17th, 2003

 

Dear Reader,

 

Here is our new issue of the DigiBook e-newsletter, mainly dedicated to our automatic turn-page and digitisation system: DIGITIZING LINE. In addition we present the improvements of BOOK RESTORER V4.0 release and the testimony

of the University of Liège.

Download now our 6th issue of DigiBook Mag http://www.i2s-bookscanner.com/pdf/digibook_mag_no6_en.pdf

 

In this summary issue :

1 - i2S-DIGIBOOK markets the DIGITIZING LINE, an automatic digitising system for books, designed and developed by 4DIGITALBOOKS-ASSY SA, which implements our SUPRASCAN digital scanners. For more details, please read DigiBook Mag no.6 http://www.i2s-bookscanner.com/pdf/digibook_mag_no6_en.pdf

 

2 - Testimony in the University of Liège: More reliable than paper or when the most sophisticated technology (our DIGIBOOK 6002RGB scanner) puts itself at the service of the Belgium cultural heritage?

 

3 - DIGITIZING LINE : a revolution in the world of digitalisation. The automatic turn-page under all the seams: performances, general characteristics, technology, ergonomics, productivity and security. For more details, please read DigiBook Mag no.6 http://www.i2s-bookscanner.com/pdf/digibook_mag_no6_en.pdf

 

4 - BOOK RESTORER version V4.0 is now available. Our restauration software improves its user-friendliness thanks to new 'wizards', includes three new processing modules (finger masking, polarity detection, crop) plus a TWAIN interface. For more details please read DigiBook Mag no.6 http://www.i2s-bookscanner.com/pdf/digibook_mag_no6_en.pdf

 

5 - We try to improve our web site continuously. We thank you aforehand for sharing your feedback and suggestions with us: http://www.i2s-bookscanner.com/en/comments.asp

 

The DigiBook Team

Tel: +(33)(0)557 26 68 98

http://www.i2s-bookscanner.com

 

 

==========================================

DigiBook Newsletter (Français) ==========================================

17 octobre 2003,

 

Cher Lecteur,

 

Voici une nouvelle édition de la e-Newsletter DigiBook, largement consacrée à notre tourne-page automatique et système de numérisation : la DIGITIZING LINE. Nous présentons également les évolutions de la toute nouvelle version V4.0 de BOOK RESTORER ainsi que le témoignage de l'université de Liège. Téléchargez dès maintenant le sixième numéro de DigiBook Mag http://www.i2s-bookscanner.com/pdf/digibook_mag_no6_fr.pdf

 

Au sommaire de ce numéro :

1 - i2S-DIGIBOOK commercialise la DIGITIZING LINE un système automatique de numérisation de livre, conçu et développé par la société 4DIGITALBOOKS-ASSY, qui intègre nos scanners numériques SUPRASCAN. Pour plus de détails lisez DigiBook Mag n°6 http://www.i2s-bookscanner.com/pdf/digibook_mag_no6_fr.pdf

 

2 - Témoignage à l'Université de Liège : Plus fiable que le papier ou comment la technologie la plus sophistiquée (en l'occurrence notre scanner DIGIBOOK 6002RGB) se met au service du patrimoine culturel belge ?

 

3 - DIGITIZING LINE : une révolution dans le monde de la numérisation. Le tourne-page automatique sous toutes les coutures : performances, caractéristiques générales, technologie, ergonomie, productivité et sécurité. Pour plus de détails lisez DigiBook Mag n°6 http://www.i2s-bookscanner.com/pdf/digibook_mag_no6_fr.pdf

 

4 - BOOK RESTORER en version V4.0 est disponible. Notre logiciel de restauration améliore sa convivialité avec de nouveaux assistants, intègre trois nouveaux modules de traitement (Effacement des doigts, Détection de polarité, Cadrage amélioré) et une interface TWAIN. Pour plus de détails lisez DigiBook Mag n°6 http://www.i2s-bookscanner.com/pdf/digibook_mag_no6_fr.pdf

 

5 - Nous essayons de faire évoluer notre site en permanence. Pour répondre au mieux à vos attentes, merci de nous faire part de vos remarques, commentaires et suggestions quant au contenu de notre site : http://www.i2s-bookscanner.com/fr/comments.asp

 

L'équipe DigiBook

Tel : +(33)(0)557 26 68 98 www.i2s-bookscanner.com/fr/default.asp

 

To unsubscribe, please click on the following URL:

Pour vous désabonner, cliquer sur le lien suivant: http://cgi.dolist.net/u_fr.asp?id=5916804-703-191725-E13DC9E1

 

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Digicult

Thematic issue 4

 

DigiCULT Forum [digicult-forum@digicult.info]   Tue 4/11/2003 4:37 PM

digicult-forum@salzburgresearch.at

[DIGICULT-NEWSLETTER] DigiCULT Publications Announcement: Thematic Issue 4 - Now Available - Learning Objects from Cultural and Scientific Heritage Resources

 

Welcome to the latest DigiCULT Announcement.

 

Thematic Issue 4 - Now Available

Learning Objects from Cultural and Scientific Heritage Resources

 

Heritage institutions need to improve their relevance for the education sector and lifelong learners in attractive, efficient, and sustainable ways. Simply displaying collection objects, considered useful for informal learning in some way or another online, is not enough.What is called for are learning objects: highly Interoperable and reusable modular building blocks for e-learning content based on widely shared specifications or standards.

 

Provision of such objects demands closer collaboration between the heritage and e-learning sectors that concentrates on the enhancement of e-learning Interoperability, both in terms of technical standards and in terms of appropriate forms of learning. DigiCULT regards such collaboration as crucial to unlocking the richness and diversity of Europe's cultural and scientific heritage for e-learning within our knowledge-based society.

 

Download DigiCULT Thematic Issue 4:

Low-Res (1.4 MB) http://www.digicult.info/downloads/digicult_thematicissue4_lres.pdf

High-Res (19 MB) http://www.digicult.info/downloads/digicult_thematicissue4_hres.pdf

 

 

DigiCULT Publications offer a valuable resource of mission-critical information in the selection and use of digital technologies for Europe’s heritage organisations:

- Thematic Issues: results of themed expert fora

- DigiCULT Technology Watch Reports: in-depth technology evaluation

- DigiCULT.Info Newsletter: articles about services, studies, technologies, and activities

- DigiCULT Website: info, events, links, all publications online for download

[more http://www.digicult.info/pages/publications.php...]

 

Comment on the Technology Watch Briefings: Each briefing for the upcoming DigiCULT Technology Watch Reports are made available for comment online. The first draft of the latest briefings The XML Family of Technologies, Technologies and New Socio-economic Business Models, and Collaboration and Virtual Communities are online. Comments and suggestions to be implemented in the final draft are cordially invited.

[more...] http://www.digicult.info/pages/download.php?doc=1065619917&twb=y

 

 

Subscribe to the Newsletter DigiCULT.Info http://www.digicult.info/pages/subscribe.php

Read and comment on the Technology Watch Briefings

http://www.digicult.info/pages/publications.php

Submit an Event

http://www.digicult.info/pages/events.php

 

(c) DigiCULT Forum 2003 http://www.digicult.info/pages/index.php

 

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Theme Issue 5 – October 2003

 

DigiCULT Forum [digicult-forum@digicult.info]  Wed 12/11/2003 5:44 PM

IFLA_L 

DigiCULT Announces the release of Issue 5 - A Newsletter on Digital Culture

 

Issue 5 - A Newsletter on Digital Culture

October 2003, ISSN 1609-3941  

 

 

Please welcome to the next edition in a series of e-journals from DigiCULT. Heritage Informatics continues to emerge as an exciting area for both the application of new technologies and as a source for research challenges that promote innovative technological developments.

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

An extra day in Berlin after IFLA2003 provided an opportunity to visit the Museumsinsel, one of the finest museum complexes in the world. Currently many of its buildings are undergoing extensive renovations. As on my right I passed the reopened Alte Nationalgalerie I noticed one of the buildings currently wrapped for restoration was covered by a massive poster. In the words Weltkultur beflügelt (world culture gives wings) it asks all who pass to consider the liberating power of the cultural heritage. Articles in this issue of DigiCULT.Info all show the power of new technologies in helping cultural heritage institutions in achieving their objective of improving the care, understanding and benefits of cultural heritage to individuals and society. Reflecting on the phrase Weltkultur beflügelt, we are reminded that technology is an enabler and not an end in itself.

Seamus Ross

 

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Download DigiCULT.Info Issue 5 (1.3 MB) http://www.digicult.info/pages/pubpop.php?file=http://www.digicult.info/downloads/digicultinfo_issue5_october_2003.pdf

 

DigiCULT Publications offer a valuable resource of mission-critical information in the selection and use of digital technologies for Europe’s heritage organisations:

- Thematic Issues: results of themed expert fora

- DigiCULT Technology Watch Reports: in-depth technology evaluation

- DigiCULT.Info Newsletter: articles about services, studies, technologies, and activities

- DigiCULT Website: info, events, links, all publications online for download [more...] http://www.digicult.info/pages/publications.php

 

Comment on the Technology Watch Briefings: Each briefing for the upcoming DigiCULT Technology Watch Reports are made available for comment online. The first draft of the latest briefings The XML Family of Technologies, Technologies and New Socio-economic Business Models, and Collaboration and Virtual Communities are online. Comments and suggestions to be implemented in the final draft are cordially invited. http://www.digicult.info/pages/publications.php

 

Subscribe to the Newsletter DigiCULT.Info / http://www.digicult.info/pages/subscribe.php

 

Submit an Event / http://www.digicult.info/pages/addevent.php

 

(c) DigiCULT Forum 2003 / http://www.digicult.info/

 

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Theme Issue 5 – January 2004

 

Digicult Forum [digicult-forum@digicult.info]  Tue 3/02/2004 10:15 PM  ASIS-L List 

[Asis-l] DigiCULT Thematic Issue 5 - Now Available - Virtual Communities and Collaboration in the Heritage Sector

 

*DigiCULT Thematic Issue 5 - Now Available

Virtual Communities and Collaboration in the Heritage Sector

 

*

 

This fifth Thematic Issue concentrates on the question of how heritage

institutions might benefit from fostering virtual communities related to

core activities such as exhibitions, educational programmes or in

support of scholarly communities.

 

There is growing volume of evidence to suggest that cultural heritage

institutions' adoption of virtual communities will broaden the reach,

value and relevance of cultural heritage. The vision to link the

collections and work of heritage insitutions with virtual communities

promises to considerably change the way we access, communicate about,

share our understanding of, and participate in the experience of

cultural heritage.

 

But, for most cultural heritage institutions, the challenge will be

first to embrace the idea of co-operating with a (non-professional)

online community, and then to nurture an evolving and thriving community

that crosses the virtual as well as physical space.

 

*Download DigiCULT Thematic Issue 5 (3,5 MB)

<http://www.digicult.info/pages/pubpop.php?file=http://www.digicult.info/downloads/digicult_thematicissue5_january_2004.pdf>*

 

**http://www.digicult.info/pages/pubpop.php?file=http://www.digicult.info/downloads/digicult_thematicissue5_january_2004.pdf

 

*DigiCULT Publications* offer a valuable resource of mission-critical

information in the selection and use of digital technologies for

Europe’s heritage organisations:

*- **Thematic Issues <http://www.digicult.info/pages/Themiss.php>**:*

results of expert fora - http://www.digicult.info/pages/Themiss.php

*- **DigiCULT Technology Watch Reports

<http://www.digicult.info/pages/techwatch.php>**:* in-depth technology

evaluation - http://www.digicult.info/pages/techwatch.php

*- **DigiCULT.Info Newsletter

<http://www.digicult.info/pages/newsletter.php>**:* articles about

services, studies, technologies, and activities -

http://www.digicult.info/pages/newsletter.php

*- **DigiCULT Website <http://www.digicult.info>**:* info, events,

links, *all publications online for download - http://www.digicult.info/*

 

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Issue 6

 

DigiCULT Forum [digicult-forum@digicult.info]  Wed 17/12/2003 9:46 PM

digicult-forum@salzburgresearch.at

[DIGICULT] DigiCULT Announces the release of DigiCULT.Info Issue 6 / December 2003

 

Issue 6 - A Newsletter on Digital Culture

December 2003, ISSN 1609-3941

 

This is a rich issue of DigiCULT.Info covering topics in such areas as digitisation, asset management and publication, virtual reality, documentation, digital preservation, and the development of the knowledge society. We are pleased to announce the addition of two new sections in this Issue, "Action in the Preservation of Memory" featuring the National Library of Australia's activities as part of PANDORA Australia's Web Archive; and "News from DigiCULT's Regional Correspondents".

 

All of us at DigiCULT wish you and your family all the best for the festive season, and look forward to welcoming you back in 2004 with all the latest news and information from the Cultural Heritage Sector of Europe and beyond.

 

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

 

Download DigiCULT.Info Issue 6

(Link - 2.1 MB) http://www.digicult.info/pages/pubpop.php?file=http://www.digicult.info/downloads/dc_info_issue6_december_20031.pdf

 

DigiCULT Publications offer a valuable resource of mission-critical information in the selection and use of digital technologies for Europe’s heritage organisations:

- Thematic Issues: results of expert fora

- DigiCULT Technology Watch Reports: in-depth technology evaluation

- DigiCULT.Info Newsletter: articles about services, studies, technologies, and activities

- DigiCULT Website: info, events, links, all publications online for download

 

Comment on the Technology Watch Briefings: Each briefing for the upcoming DigiCULT Technology Watch Reports 2004 is online for comment. [more...] http://www.digicult.info/pages/techwatch.php

 

Subscribe to the Newsletter DigiCULT.Info http://www.digicult.info/pages/subscribe.php

Read and comment on the Technology Watch Briefings http://www.digicult.info/pages/techwatch.php

Submit an Event

http://www.digicult.info/pages/addevent.php

Submit a Web Resource http://www.digicult.info/pages/resources.php

(c) DigiCULT Forum 2002-2004

http://www.digicult.info

 

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D-Lib Magazine

September 2003

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]       Tue 16/09/2003 11:45 PM asis-l@asis.org

 

The dlib.org web site has been going through some behind the scenes

upgrades (servers and services). I hope you won't notice any problems, but

I did want to alert you that we moved the subscriber mailing list. One

effect of that move was that your password for your subscription to D-Lib

has changed. No action is required on your part to continue receiving the

notice whenever a new issue of D-Lib is released. However, should you wish

to make changes to your subscription, you will need to obtain your new

password. To do so, at the bottom of the web page at

http://www.dlib.org/mailman/listinfo/dlib-subscribers, enter your email

address in the open block to the left of "Edit Options". Click on the "Edit

Options" button, and on the next web page, click on the button "E-Mail my

Password to Me".

 

The September 2003 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now

available.

 

In this issue there are four articles, a report on the 7th European

Conference on Digital Libraries (ECDL 2003), a book review, a journal

review, several smaller features in D-Lib Magazine's 'In Brief' column

(including five brief ECDL 2003 workshop reports), excerpts from recent

press releases, and news of upcoming conferences and other items of

interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  The Featured Collection for September is

Digital History, courtesy of Steven Mintz, University of Houston.

 

The articles include:

 

The Intellectual Property Rights Issues Facing Self-archiving: Key Findings

of the RoMEO Project

Elizabeth Gadd, Charles Oppenheim, and Steve Probets, Loughborough University

 

Generation of XML Records across Multiple Metadata Standards Kimberly S. Lightle and Judy Ridgway, Eisenhower National Clearinghouse,

Ohio State University

 

The Digital Preservation of e-Prints

Stephen Pinfield, University of Nottingham; and Hamish James, King's

College London

 

Aggregate Record Management in Three Clicks

Terry Reese, Oregon State University

 

Also in this issue:

 

Report on the 7th European Conference on Digital Libraries, ECDL 2003: 17 -

22 August 2003, Trondheim, Norway

Andreas Rauber, Vienna University of Technology

 

A review of the book "Mapping Scientific Frontiers: The Quest for Knowledge

Visualization" by Chaomei Chen, Springer-Verlag London Ltd., 2003 Reviewed by: Kevin Boyack, Sandia National Laboratories

 

A review of the Palgrave Macmillan journal "Information Visualization"

edited by Chaomei Chen

Reviewed by: Andre Skupin, University of New Orleans

 

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

 

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

 

The Australian National University Sunsite, Canberra, Australia http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib

 

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen,

Goettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

 

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

 

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

 

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the September 2003

issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is a

delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States and

the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

 

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

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October 2003

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]    Fri 17/10/2003 8:11 AM    asis-l@asis.org; SIGDL-L@asis.org

 

 

The October 2003 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now

available.

 

In this issue there are four articles, an Opinion piece by Geneva Henry

(Rice University), several smaller features in D-Lib Magazine's 'In Brief'

column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming

conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  The

Featured Collection for October is eOneill.com: An Electronic Eugene

O'Neill Archive, courtesy of Dr. Harvey Hammerman, M.D.

 

The articles include:

 

Patterns of Journal Use by Faculty at Three Diverse Universities Donald W. King and Sarah E. Aerni, University of Pittsburgh; Carol Tenopir,

University of Tennessee; and Carol Hansen Montgomery, Drexel University

 

Who Uses What? Report on a National Survey of Information Users in Colleges

and Universities

Deanna B. Marcum, Library of Congress; and Gerald George, Council on

Library and Information Resources (CLIR)

 

The Digital Book: A Medial Revolution without a New Medium Volker Titel, University of Erlangen

 

Building a Digital Library the Commons-based Peer Production Way Aaron Krowne, Virginia Tech

 

The Opinion is:

 

On-line Publishing in the 21st Century: Challenges and Opportunities Geneva Henry, Rice University

 

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

 

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

 

The Australian National University Sunsite, Canberra, Australia http://sunsite.anu.edu.au/mirrors/dlib

 

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen,

Goettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

 

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

 

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

 

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the October 2003 issue

of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is a delay

between the time the magazine is released in the United States and the time

when the mirroring process has been completed.)

 

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

December 2003

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]    Tue 16/12/2003 10:12 PM

asis-l@asis.org; sigdl-l@asis.org  

[Asis-l] The December 2003 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

 

[Forwarded from Bonnie Wilsion <bwilson@cnri.reston.va.us>   Dick Hill]

 

Greetings:

 

The December 2003 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now

available.

 

In this issue there are three articles, a report of the ISMIR 2003

conference, a book review, several smaller features in D-Lib Magazine's 'In

Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming

conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  The

Featured Collection for December is Joseph Mussulman's collection,

Discovering Lewis and Clark(R).

 

The articles include:

 

Comparing Library Resource Allocations for the Paper and the Digital

Library: An Exploratory Study

Lynn Silipigni Connaway, OCLC Online Computer Library Center, Inc.; and

Stephen R. Lawrence, University of Colorado

 

 

NEP: Current Awareness Service of the RePEc Digital Library Heting Chu and Thomas Krichel, Long Island University

 

Open Archives Data Service Prototype and Automated Subject Indexing Using

D-Lib(R) Archive Content As a Testbed

Larry Mongin, Yueyu Fu, and Javed Mostafa, Indiana University

 

The conference report is:

 

Report on the 4th International Conference on Music Information Retrieval,

ISMIR 2003: 26 - 30 October 2003, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Brad Eden, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

 

The book review is:

 

Metadata Fundamentals for All Librarians

By Priscilla Caplan, American Library Association Editions, April 2003 Reviewed by: Stuart Sutton, University of Washington

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

 

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

 

The Australian National University Sunsite, Canberra, Australia http://dlib.anu.edu.au/

 

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen,

Goettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

 

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

 

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

 

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the December 2003

issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is a

delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States and

the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

 

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

January 2004

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]  Sat 17/01/2004 2:37 AM  asis-l@asis.org

[Asis-l] The January 2004 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

 

[Forwarded.  Dick Hill]

 

Greetings:

 

The January 2004 issue of D-Lib Magazine

(http://www.dlib.org/) is now available.

 

In this issue there are two articles, an opinion piece, a report of the ICADL 2003 conference, several smaller features in D-Lib Magazine's 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  The Featured Collection for January is the NASA JPL Mars Exploration Rover Mission web site.

 

The articles include:

 

Library Periodicals Expenses: Comparison of Non-Subscription Costs of Print and Electronic Formats on a Life-Cycle Basis Roger C. Schonfeld, Ithaka.; Donald W. King, University of Pittsburgh; Ann Okerson, Yale University; and Eileen Gifford Fenton, JSTOR

 

 

The Cost per Article Reading of Open Access Articles

Jonas Holmstrom, Swedish School of Economics and Business Administration, Helsinki, Finland

 

The Opinion Piece is:

 

Identifiers and Identification Systems: An Informational

Look at Policies and Roles from a Library Perspective

Giuseppe Vitiello, Istituto Superiore de Sanita

 

The conference report is:

 

Report on the 6th International Conference on Asian Digital Libraries (ICADL 2003): 8 - 11 December 2003, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Sally Jo Cunningham, University of Waikato, New Zealand

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

 

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

 

The Australian National University Sunsite, Canberra, Australia http://dlib.anu.edu.au/

 

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen, Goettingen, Germany http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

 

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

 

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

 

BN - National Library of Portugal, Portugal

http://purl/pt/302

 

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the January 2004 issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

 

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

February 2004

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]  Wed 18/02/2004 12:56 AM  asis-l@asis.org; sigdl-l@asis.org

Asis-l] FW: [Dlib-subscribers] The February 2004 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

 

[Forwarded for Bonnie Wilson.  Dick Hill]

 

-----Original Message-----

From: dlib-subscribers-admin@dlib.org [mailto:dlib-subscribers-admin@dlib.org] On Behalf Of Bonnie Wilson

Sent: Tuesday, February 17, 2004 9:56 AM

To: DLib-subscribers

Subject: [Dlib-subscribers] The February 2004 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

 

Greetings:

 

The February 2004 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now

available.

 

In this issue there are three articles, an opinion piece, several

smaller features in D-Lib Magazine's 'In Brief' column, excerpts from

recent press releases, and news of upcoming conferences and other items

of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  The Featured Collection for

February is How Everyday Things Are Made.

 

The articles include:

 

Using MPEG-21 DIP and NISO OpenURL for the Dynamic Dissemination of

Complex Digital Objects in the Los Alamos National Laboratory Digital

Library

Jeroen Bekaert, Lyudmila Balakireva, Patrick Hochstenbach, and Herbert

Van de Sompel, Los Alamos National Laboratory

 

Search and Retrieval in The European Library: A New Approach Theo van Veen, Koninklije Bibliotheek; and Bill Oldroyd, British Library

 

Supporting Member Collaboration in the Math Tools Digital Library: A

Formative User Study

Nicole Shechtman, Mark Chung, and Jeremy Roschelle, SRI International

 

The Opinion Piece is:

 

Fair Publisher Pricing, Confidentiality Clauses and a Proposal to Even

the Economic Playing Field

Philip M. Davis, Cornell University

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

 

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

 

The Australian National University Sunsite, Canberra, Australia http://dlib.anu.edu.au/

 

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen,

Goettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

 

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

 

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

 

BN - National Library of Portugal, Portugal

http://purl.pt/302

 

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the February 2004

issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is

a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States

and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

 

 

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

March 2004

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]    Tue 16/03/2004 10:03 PM   asis-l@asis.org; sigdl-l@asis.org; sigifp-l@asis.org

[Asis-l] FW: [Dlib-subscribers] The March 2004 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

 

[Forwarded on behalf of Bonnie Wilson.  Dick Hill]

 

------------

Richard Hill

Executive Director

American Society for Information Science and Technology

1320 Fenwick Lane, Silver Spring, MD  20910

FAX: (301) 495-0810

Voice: (301) 495-0900

www.asis.org

 

-----Original Message-----

From: dlib-subscribers-admin@dlib.org [mailto:dlib-subscribers-admin@dlib.org] On Behalf Of Bonnie Wilson

Sent: Tuesday, March 16, 2004 8:52 AM

To: DLib-subscribers

Subject: [Dlib-subscribers] The March 2004 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

 

Greetings:

 

The March 2004 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now

available.

 

In this issue there are three articles, a commentary, several smaller

features in D-Lib Magazine's 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent

press releases, and news of upcoming conferences and other items of

interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  The Featured Collection for March is

"Cosmic Evolution" from Tufts University.

 

The articles include:

 

The Right to Preserve: The Rights Issues of Digital Preservation Catherine Ayre and Adrienne Muir, Loughborough University

 

The NSF National Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

Education Digital Library (NSDL) Program: New Projects in Fiscal Year 2003 Lee L. Zia, National Science Foundation

 

A Developing Search Service: Heterogeneous Resources Integration and

Retrieval System

Lin Fang, Central China Normal University

 

The Commentary is:

 

The World Meets the Internet

Patrice A. Lyons, Law Offices of Patrice Lyons, Chartered

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

 

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

 

The Australian National University Sunsite, Canberra, Australia http://dlib.anu.edu.au/

 

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen,

Goettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

 

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

 

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

 

BN - National Library of Portugal, Portugal

http://purl.pt/302

 

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the March 2004

issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is

a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States

and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

 

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

 

_______________________________________________

DLib-Subscribers mailing list

DLib-Subscribers@dlib.org http://www.dlib.org/mailman/listinfo/dlib-subscribers

 

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

ERPANET Newsletter

 

From: Joy Davidson [mailto:british.editor@ERPANET.ORG]

Sent: Tuesday, 28 October 2003 7:54 PM

To: JISC-E-COLLECTIONS@JISCMAIL.AC.UK

Subject: ERPANET Newsletter

 

ERPANET

www.erpanet.org

 

To disseminate knowledge and best practice in digital preservation ERPANET encourages all organisations and individuals to utilise and explore the services and products now available.

 

Please visit http://www.erpanet.org/www/erpanews27_10_03.pdf to view the new ERPANET newsletter. It features information on upcoming ERPANET events, resources and services.

 

C A S E   S T U D I E S

How are companies and sectors dealing with digital preservation? What lessons can be learned? The studies include: * Publishing Sector * Pharmaceutical Sector * Broadcasting Sector * Telecommunications * National Archives of Scotland * Universal Postal Union

 

E P R I N T S

Have a paper you want to share on digital preservation? Deposit it with ERPAePRINTS.... http://eprints.erpanet.org

 

G U I D A N C E

Guidance for institutions to approach topics in digital preservation with confidence. * Risk Communication * Digital Preservation Policy * Selecting Technologies * Cost Orientation

 

S E M I N A R   R E P O R T S

Reports outlining practical experience, and training materials from past seminars. * OAIS Seminar * Policies for Digital Preservation . Web Archiving

 

W O R K S H O P   R E P O R T S

Reports outlining recommendations and outcomes of Expert Workshops on preservation topics. * Digitisation, Conservation and Quality Control * XML as a Preservation Strategy * The Long-term Preservation of Databases

 

A D V I S O R Y   S E  R V I C E

Got a question about digital preservation? Ask our experts or browse the answers to questions already posted.

 

A S S E S S M E N T S

An extensive range of authoritative commentaries on the key literature in the field.

 

C H A R T E R

Community-wide principles to approach digital preservation with consistency and clarity.

 

U P C O M I N G    E V E N T S

 Roma, 17-19 November 2003 'Trusted Digital Repositories for Preserving Cultural Heritage' . Lisboa, 15-17 December 2003 'Selection, Appraisal, and Retention of Digital Scientific Data'

 

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

First Monday

October 2003 (volume 8, number 10)

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]       Tue 7/10/2003 8:37 PM   asis-l@asis.org

 

Dear Reader,

 

The October 2003 issue of First Monday (volume 8, number 10) is now available at http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_10/

 

-------

 

Table of Contents

 

Volume 8, Number 10 - October 6th 2003

 

Factors of regional/national success in information society

developments: Information society strategies for candidate countries by Marc Bogdanowicz, Jean-Claude Burgelman, Clara Centeno, Elisaveta Gourova, and Gerard Carat http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_10/bogdanowicz/

 

Copyright and authors

by John Ewing

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_10/ewing/

 

Democratizing software: Open source, the hacker ethic, and beyond by Brent K. Jesiek http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_10/jesiek/

 

Where am I and who are 'we'?: Self-representation and the intersection of gender and ethnicity on the Web by Linda Leung http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_10/leung/

 

Using the Internet to enable developing country universities to meet the challenges of globalization through collaborative virtual programmes by Derek W. Keats, Maria Beebe, and Gunnar Kullenberg http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_10/keats/

 

Studying special collections and the Web: An analysis of practice by Lorriane Normore http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_10/normore/

 

Victims of cyberstalking: An exploratory study of harassment perpetrated via the Internet by Paul Bocij http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_10/bocij/

 

Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

November 2003 (volume 8, number 11)

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]   Tue 4/11/2003 8:47 PM  asis-l@asis.org; sigdl-l@asis.org

 

 

Dear Reader,

 

The November 2003 issue of First Monday (volume 8, number 11) is now available at http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_11/

 

-------

 

Table of Contents

 

Volume 8, Number 11 - November 3rd 2003

 

Coding the classroom: Technology and the practice of language by Claudia Herbst http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_11/herbst/

 

e-Government, e-Society and Jordan: Strategy, theory, practice, and assessment by Michael Blakemore and Roderic Dutton http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_11/blakemore/

 

The use of the Internet for political action by non-state dissident actors in the Middle East by W. Sean McLaughlin http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_11/mclaughlin/

 

Digital rights management and the breakdown of social norms

by Christopher May

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_11/may/

 

Acquiring goods and services via the Internet: Consumer shopping perceptions by Lori N. K. Leonard http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_11/leonard/

 

The open code market

by Jordi Carrasco-Munoz http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_11/munoz/

 

Book reviews

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_11/reviews/

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

December 2003 (volume 8, number 12)

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]     Tue 2/12/2003 7:53 PM

asis-l@asis.org; sigdl-l@asis.org 

[Asis-l] First Monday December 2003

 

[Forwarded from "Edward J. Valauskas" <ejv@UIC.EDU>   Dick Hill.]

 

 

Dear Reader,

 

The December 2003 issue of First Monday (volume 8, number 12) is now available at http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_12/

 

-------

 

Table of Contents

 

Volume 8, Number 12 - December 1st 2003

 

Internet gift economies: Voluntary payment schemes as tangible reciprocity by Kylie J. Veale http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_12/veale/

 

The Internet and the right to communicate

by William J. McIver, Jr., William F. Birdsall, and Merrilee Rasmussen http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_12/mciver/

 

Licence fees and GDP per capita: The case for open source in developing countries by Rishab Aiyer Ghosh http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_12/ghosh/

 

Hate and peace in a connected world: Comparing MoveOn and Stormfront by Noriko Hara and Zilia Estrada http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_12/hara/

 

The Linux managing model

by Federico Iannacci http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_12/iannacci/

 

The digital divide: Why the "don't-wants-tos" won't compute: Lessons from a New Zealand ICT project by Barbara Crump and Andrea McIlroy http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_12/crump/

 

Effective use: A community informatics strategy beyond the Digital Divide by Michael Gurstein http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_12/gurstein/

 

Phantom authority, self-selective recruitment and retention of members in virtual communities: The case of Wikipedia by Andrea Ciffolilli http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue8_12/ciffolilli/

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

February 2004

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]  Tue 10/02/2004 12:59 AM 

asis-l@asis.org; sigifp-l@asis.org; sigdl-l@asis.org; sigiii-l@asis.org

[Asis-l] FW: First Monday February 2004

 

[Forwarded.  Dick Hill]

-----Original Message-----

From: Readership of First Monday [mailto:FIRSTMONDAY@LISTSERV.UIC.EDU] On Behalf Of Edward J. Valauskas

Sent: Monday, February 09, 2004 10:50 AM

To: FIRSTMONDAY@LISTSERV.UIC.EDU

Subject: First Monday February 2004

 

Dear Reader,

 

The February 2004 issue of First Monday (volume 9, number 2) is now available at http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_2/

 

-------

 

Table of Contents

 

Volume 9, Number 2 - February 2nd 2004

 

Potential legal challenges to the application of the Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA) in public libraries: Strategies and issues by Paul T. Jaeger and Charles R. McClure http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_2/jaeger/

 

Factors affecting Internet development: An Asian survey

by Hao Xiaoming and Chow Seet Kay http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_2/hao/

 

Abstract identifiers, intertextual reference and a computational basis for recordkeeping by Stuart Frazier Allen http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_2/allen/

 

United Kingdom adoption agency Web sites

by Roger Fenton

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_2/fenton/

 

Factors affecting the use of open source software in tertiary education institutions by David G. Glance, Jeremy Kerr, and Alex Reid http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_2/glance/

 

Digital music and subculture: Sharing files, sharing styles

by Sean Ebare

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_2/ebare/

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

March 2004

Date: Wed, 3 Mar 2004 21:09:15 -0600

From: Edward J. Valauskas <ejv@UIC.EDU>

To: FIRSTMONDAY@LISTSERV.UIC.EDU

Subject: First Monday March 2004

 

Dear Reader,

 

The March 2004 issue of First Monday (volume 9, number 3) is now available at http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_3/

 

-------

 

Table of Contents

 

Volume 9, Number 3 - March 1st 2004

 

Finders, keepers? The present and future perfect in support of personal information management by William Jones http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_3/jones/

 

An analysis of regional and demographic differences in United States Internet usage by Alan R. Peslak http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_3/peslak/

 

The tensions of securing cyberspace: The Internet, state power and The National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace by Michael T. Zimmer http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_3/zimmer/

 

Black star: Ghana, information technology and development in Africa by G. Pascal Zachary http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_3/zachary/

 

Do you 'google'? Understanding search engine use beyond the hype by Eszter Hargittai http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_3/hargittai/

 

----------------------------

 

You've received this message because you're registered to First Monday's Table of Contents service. You can unsubscribe to this service by sending a reply containing the word unsubscribe in the body of the message or use the form at http://firstmonday.org/join.html

 

First Monday Editorial Group

 

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

Government Information Quarterly

Volume 20, number 4 (2003)

 

John Bertot [bertot@lis.fsu.edu]     Wed 17/12/2003 3:34 AM  asis-l@asis.org

[Asis-l] New Issue of Government Information Quarterly

 

The editors (see below) of _Government Information Quarterly:  An International Journal of Information Technology Management, Policies, and Practices_ are pleased to announce the release of Volume 20, number 4 (2003). The issue is a symposium issue, guest edited by Paul T. Jaeger, entitled "International Perspectives on E-government."  The issue explores e-government practice, policy, and issues in a global context.  The journal is available in print and through subscription-based ScienceDirect (http://www.sciencedirect.com).

 

Issue 4 Symposium articles include:

 

The endless wire: e-government as global phenomenon, Pages 323-331 Paul T. Jaeger

 

The adoption of electronic tax filing systems: an empirical study, Pages 333-352 Yi-Shun Wang

 

The digital divide and the quality of electronic service delivery in local government in the United Kingdom, Pages 353-363 George Kuk

 

E-government evaluation: a framework and case study, Pages 365-387 M. P. Gupta and Debashish Jana

 

E-government around the world: lessons, challenges, and future directions, Pages 389-394 Paul T. Jaeger and Kim M. Thompson

 

 

Additional articles:

 

Government secrecy: policy depths and dimensions, Pages 395-418 Harold C. Relyea

 

 

Reviews include:

 

Chronological History of U.S. Foreign Relations Lester H. Brune; Richard Dean Burns (Consulting Editor). New York: Routledge, 2003. 3 v. xix, 1549 pp. $295.00 (cloth). ISBN 0-415-93914-3, Pages 419-420 Ben Amata

 

Three International Web Sites--A Comparion Israel Ministry of Foreign

Affairs-- National Authority--  Swissinfo--  Visited June 2003, Pages 420-423 Charles D. Bernholz

 

Data Mining and Business Intelligence: A Guide to Productivity. Stephan Kudyba and Richard Hoptroff. Hershey, PA: Idea Group Publishing, 2001. 166 pp. $74.95 (cloth). ISBN: 1-930708-03-3, Pages 423-426 Sarah Holmes

 

Human Computer Interaction: Issues and Challenges Qiyang Chen, editor.

London: Idea Group Publishing, 2001. 255 pp. $74.95 isbn 1-878289-91-8

(paperback) also available as a pdf file $59.95, Pages 426-427 Martha Jo Sani

 

World at Risk: a Global Issues Sourcebook Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2002. xii, 692 pp. $162.00 ISBN: 1-568-02707-9 (hardcover), Pages 427-428 Denise Arial Dorris

 

Information and Secrecy: Vannevar Bush, Ultra, and the Other Memex  Colin Burke. Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow Press, Inc., 1994. xxvi, 466 pp. $52.00.

ISBN: 0-810-82783-2 (cloth), Pages 428-430 Maureen Olle

 

Protecting the American Homeland: One Year On Michael E. O'Hanlon, Peter R. Orszag, et al. Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution Press, 2003. xl, 188 pp. $17.95 (paper). ISBN 0-8157-6453-7, Pages 430-432 Julie Linden

 

The Accumulation of Capital Rosa Luxemburg. London and New York: Routledge, 2003. 453 pp. $14.95, (paper) ISBN 0-415-30445-8, Pages 432-435 Mae N. Schreiber

 

======================================================================

 

Government Information Quarterly is a quarterly publication of Elsevier Science.  The journal explores such topics as information and telecommunications policy; access to and use of government information; information technology management, implementation, planning, and evaluation; information services development, management, and provision in a distributed networked environment; e-commerce in governments; service quality assessment, benchmarking, and performance measurement; and, governing and governance in a networked environment.

 

Additional information regarding the journal and journal submissions is available at:  http://www.elsevier.com/locate/govinf

 

John Carlo Bertot <bertot@lis.fsu.edu>, School of Information Studies, Florida State University serves as the journal editor.

 

Charles R. McClure <cmcclure@lis.fsu.edu>, School of Information Studies, Florida State University serves as the journal associate editor.

 

John A. Shuler <alfred@uic.edu>, Documents, Maps, Microforms, & Curriculum Department, Univeristy of Illinois Chicago serves as the journal assistant editor.

 

Aimee C. Quinn <aquinn@uic.edu>, Government Documents Department, Univeristy of Illinois Chicago serves as the journal reviews editor.

 

 

*************************************************************************

* John Carlo Bertot, Ph.D.                        Phone: (850) 644-8118 *

* Associate Professor                               Fax: (850) 644-4522 *

* School of Information Studies             Email: bertot@lis.fsu.edu   *

* Florida State University        http://slis-two.lis.fsu.edu/~jcbertot *

* 101 Shores Building                                                   *

* Tallahassee, FL 32306-2100                                            *

*************************************************************************

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

Information Research

 

and ISI

 

Prof. Tom Wilson [t.d.wilson@SHEFFIELD.AC.UK]   Fri 19/09/2003 5:25 PM      JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU

 

ISI plays a significant role in the scholarly communication process and its citation records are often used to indicate the quality of a journal and the quality of the publications submitted by academics.

 

I'm glad, therefore, to be able to report that Information Research has been accepted for coverage in Social Science Citation Index with effect from Volume 8 No. 1 (October 2002). It will take a little time for this to come into effect, but the process is now in place.

 

Further information can be found at the 'About IR' page of Information Research - follow the link from http://InformationR.net/ir/

 

Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

October 2003, volume 9, no 1

 

Prof. Tom Wilson [t.d.wilson@SHEFFIELD.AC.UK] Thu 16/10/2003 2:50 AM

JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU

 

The new issue of Information Research is now on the site:

 

http://InformationR.net/ir/

 

There is no theme to this issue of Information Research, just a set of papers that happens to come together, ready for publication at this time. However, there is some commonality of topic among the papers. Two deal with models of information seeking and/or searching, one deals with the relationship between personality factors and information behaviour, and the 'invited paper' from Professor Brenda Dervin, deals with the issue of diverse methodological approaches to 'user studies'. In other words, these four papers are firmly in the 'information behaviour' part of the information science spectrum. The odd one out is the paper by Gary Burnett and his colleagues on an hermeneutic approach to the identification of 'virtual communities'.

 

Brenda Dervin is well known in the 'information behaviour' community: her Sense- Making Methodology has been adopted by many researchers in the field (although I suspect that, as with 'grounded theory', the method is not always implemented as rigorously as Brenda would expect) and her citations probably run into the thousands!

 

Here, in Human studies and user studies: a call for methodological interdisciplinarity, Brenda makes a call for a genuine inter-disciplinary approach to 'user studies', to overcome the boundaries that academic researchers erect around themselves. She notes that research in the field has tended to pile up rather than add up, and concludes: Without a coherent and methodologically informed approach to inter- disciplinarity applied within the field, it will become impossible, even self- defeating, to address the interdisciplinary information needs of constituencies amid the chaos of the cyber-spaced information confluence and collapsing disciplinary boundaries.

 

Gary Burnett and his colleagues, in Inscription and interpretation of text: a cultural hermeneutic examination of virtual community ...adopt an anthropological perspective, yoked with a methodology based in hermeneutics, to illustrate how language use both reflects and influences culture in a virtual community. This is done by examining four samples of textual communications from the Usenet newsgroup comp.security.firewalls. The authors conclude that: This study demonstrates that our conceptual model can provide the foundation for a richer understanding of culture in virtual environments that rely on text- based communication for their interaction.

 

On conceptual models for information seeking and retrieval research, by Kalervo Järvelin and myself has, perhaps, an unusual history in that it has been in the making for about three years, as each of us has grappled with other problems while exchanging ideas on the emerging text. It began when Kalervo and I shared an office while he was on study leave in Sheffield. Fortunately, we are pretty compatible personalities and the sharing involved a great deal of humourous interchange. However, there was also serious interchange and the paper is the result of this - possibly demonstrating the value of the inter-disciplinary work called for by Brenda Dervin, since Kalervo is a computer scientist working in the field of information retrieval and I am a sociologist working in information behaviour.

 

Barbara NiedŸwiedzka's Proposed general model of information behaviour is the by-product of her Ph.D research on the information needs of managers in local government. She employed Wilson's model of information behaviour and this is her account of how she needed to modify the model to make it appropriate for this particular user group.

 

Finally, Jannica Heinström explores the relationship between personality traits (using the five-factor model of personality) and information behaviour among Finnish university students in Five personality dimensions and their influence on information behaviour. Heinström's conclusions are interesting; for example: The final impact of personality on information seeking is dependent on the unique combination of traits which distinguish each individual. The more traits that incline towards certain information behaviour an individual possesses, the more likely it is that s/he will take on this behaviour. In some cases conflicting inclinations by different traits may neutralize the impact of personality traits, whereas in other situations, a strong personality characteristic may dominate and override other tendencies. This is the case for instance when a foremost conservative but conscientious person overcomes his/her cautious inclination towards confirming information by taking the effort to explore new challenging documents.

 

Once again, the authors reinforce the international character of the journal, representing Finland, Poland, the UK and the USA. The 'best-seller' list

 

At the end of my previous Editorial I commented that it was becoming an increasingly time-consuming task to record the 'most hit' papers, now that all of the papers have counters. Following the last issue, I recorded on the Weblog a ranking of papers by 'hits per month', which took into account the number of months the page had had a counter - this revealed that some papers from the early issues were among the most hit papers, even though the counters had only been added to the paper at the end of 2002. Once again, this confirms the value of open-access, electronic publication.

 

It is too time-consuming to update that list regularly, but a quick examination of the papers suggests that there has been very little change in the overall ranking. Most interesting is the fact that there are papers from Volumes 1 and 2 that appear in the top ten, even though those volumes have only had counters for less than a year. Again, the persistence of interest in the subjects represented by these papers confirms the value of open-access publication. It is worth noting that the 162 papers have now recorded a total of almost half a million hits (455,519), while the top page of the journal has recorded 154,461 since April 1998. This suggests that using the top page counter as the measure of use is not a very good idea! It is better to think of every paper in the journal receiving 113 hits a month, or 1,356 hits a year, or the journal as a whole receiving more than 220,000 hits a year.

 

I hope you all enjoy this new issue and, remember, you can discuss the papers by registering with IR-DISCUSS at http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/ir-

discuss.html

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Volume 9, no 2, January 2004

Prof. Tom Wilson [t.d.wilson@SHEFFIELD.AC.UK]         Mon 19/01/2004 11:13 PM

JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU

New issue of Information Research

 

A new issue of Information Research is now up and running at http://InformationR.net/ir/ - it's devoted mainly to papers from a recent conference on digital libraries, held in Finland last September.

 

I've just finished a bulk mail to the 2,684 people on the 'registered readers' database - and, of course, about 200 of the addresses turn out to be 'dead' - mainly, I think, because of people moving on to other jobs, or students leaving their university for work. However, there are occasional other problems, like mail servers being changed and all the old addresses being dead. I'd have thought it was simple matter to re-route messages sent to the old address.

 

About 20% of the 'dead' mailboxes are either hotmail.com or various yahoo sites, so I'm thinking of barring such addresses from the database - they are more trouble than they are worth. However, if you are among those who signed up with a previous address, please remember to re-register.

___________________________________________________

Professor T.D. Wilson, PhD

Publisher/Editor in Chief

Information Research

InformationR.net

University of Sheffield

Sheffield S10 2TN,  UK

e-mail: t.d.wilson@shef.ac.uk

Web site: http://InformationR.net/

 

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Information Technology and Libraries

 

December 2003 (Volume 22, Number 4)

Scott Nicholson [srnichol@SYR.EDU]  Mon 1/03/2004 11:48 PM  JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU

Special issue of ITAL on bibliomining

 

he December 2003 (Volume 22, Number 4) issue of Information Technology and Libraries is a special issue dedicated to the bibliomining process, or the combination of data warehousing, data mining, and bibliometrics in libraries to aid decision-making and understanding of library use.

 

The issue is currently available in print, and can also be viewed through several full-text bibliographic databases such as Wilson Select Plus, and ProQuest - ABI-Inform.

 

Here are the articles in this special issue:

 

Guest Editorial: Introduction to this Special Issue on the Bibliomining Process by Scott Nicholson.

 

The Bibliomining Process: Data Warehousing and Data Mining for Library Decision-Making by Scott Nicholson.

 

Mining User Communities in Digital Libraries by Christos Papatheodorou, Sarantos Kapidakis, Michalis Sfakakis, and Alexandra Vassiliou.

 

Matching Subject Portals with the Research Environment by Irene Wormell.

 

An Architecture for Behavior-Based Library Recommender Systems by Andreas Geyer-Schulz, Andreas Neumann, and Anke Thede.

 

Traces in the Clickstream: Early Work on a Management Information Repository at the University of Pennsylvania by Joe Zucca.

 

Study of the Use of The Carlos III University of Madrid Library's Online Database Service in Scientific Endeavor by Carlos A. Suárez-Balseiro, Isabel Iribarren-Maestro, and Elías Sanz Casado.

 

Mapping the Output of Topical Searches in The Web of Knowledge and The Case of Watson-Crick by Eugene Garfield, A. I. Pudovkin, And V. S. Istomin.

 

More information about bibliomining can be found at http://www.bibliomining..org.

 

Scott Nicholson, Assistant Professor

Syracuse University School of Information Studies

 

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Information Technology Newsletter

 

January - June 2004

books@idea-group.com   Fri 12/03/2004 4:02 AM  

Information Technology Newsletter Now Available: January - June 2004

 

 

Information Technology Newsletter:
An international newsletter of information technology in libraries

Did you know?

A complimentary copy of ITN is now available from our website.

 

Simply click here to download the latest issue of ITN.

January – June 2004

Description
This is a publication especially designed for librarians in the management of information resources. Published twice a year, this newsletter is a forum for librarians and library staff in public, university and corporate libraries to ask questions and get answers. Previously published articles include: Trends and Issues in Library and Information Science; From the One-Person Library to Corporate Cybrary Networks; Voice Notification Systems; Sources of Information for Research in Global Telecommunications Management; Who Owns the Software Copyright?; and many more.

Additional Information
Guidelines for Manuscript Submissions | Editorial Review Board

Interested in having your library subscribe to ITN? Click here!

Download our newly released 2004 catalog, featuring all Idea Group Inc. publications.

Idea Group Publishing

Publishers of IT books, journals and cases since 1988.

 

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Tel: 717-533-8845 • Fax 717-533-8661
• E-mail: cust@idea-group.com

 

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Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship

 

Winter 2004

Andrea Duda [duda@library.ucsb.edu]  Thu 11/03/2004 9:35 AM    istl-updates@library.ucsb.edu

[ISTL-updates] ISTL - Winter 2004

 

The Winter 2004 issue of Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship is now available at

      http://www.istl.org/

 

CONTENTS

 

THEME ARTICLES:

Agricultural Information for the New Millennium: New Crops, Biotechnology, and Saving the Past:  Proceedings of the United States Agricultural Information Network (USAIN) Conference University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign April 25-28, 2003

 

I.  Libraries and "Out-Reach" -- Serving the World Around Us

 

    University of Maryland AgNIC Gateway -- Partnering to Provide

    Agricultural Biotechnology Information

       by Stuart Gagnon, National Agricultural Library; Alesia McManus,

       University of Maryland; Beth Roberts, University of Maryland

 

    Staying on Top of Agbiotech - An International Perspective

       by David Hemming, CABI Publishing

 

    Social Acceptability/Awareness of Genetically Modified Crops in

    Southeast Arkansas [Abstract only]

       by Tracy V. Dunbar, University of Arkansas - Pine Bluff

 

    AGORA: Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture [Abstract only]

       by Mary Ochs, Cornell University

 

    Partnering for Phytomedicine Research

       by Carla Long Casler, Arid Lands Information Center, University of

       Arizona

 

    Effective Communication Teaching Methods in Technology Transfer in

    Nigeria: Sweet Potato Processors Experience [Abstract only]

       by Stella O. Odebode, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

 

II.  Libraries and "In-reach" -- Taking a Look at How We Do What We Do

 

    Dynamics of Agriculture Subject Guides Usage at KSU Libraries

    [Abstract only]

       by Mohan Ramaswamy, Kansas State University

 

    Entomology Faculty Publications as a Source of Information for

    Collection Development: A Case Study at the University of Arkansas

    [Abstract only]

       by Lutishoor Salisbury and Vikramjit Bajwa, University of Arkansas

 

    Indexing of the 2002 Core Agriculture Serials [Abstract only]

       by Jodee Kawasaki, Montana State University

 

    Establishing a Core List of Journals for Forestry: A Citation Analysis

    [Abstract only]

       by Paul Kelsey and Tom Diamond, Louisiana State University

 

    Libraries Stuck in the Middle: Reactive vs. Proactive Responses to the

    Science Journal Crisis

       by Claudine Jenda, Auburn University, and Elaine Nowick, University

       of Nebraska

 

    Fairy Rings Grow Slowly: The Turfgrass Information Center,

    Not-for-Profit Alliances and an Endowment Campaign [Abstract only]

       by Pete Cookingham, Michigan State University

 

REFEREED ARTICLES

 

    Not Just Full-Text Articles: Comparing the Search Function Among

    Chemistry Electronic Journals' Web Sites

       by Song Yu, Columbia University

 

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES ON THE INTERNET

 

    Biological and Chemical Terrorism Information for Healthcare

    Professionals

       by Rachelle Ramsey, Washington-Centerville Public Library

 

DATABASE REVIEWS

 

    A Comparison of Updating Frequency Between Web of Science and Current

    Contents Connect

       By Nancy J. Butkovich, Helen F. Smith, and Claire E. Hoffman, The

       Pennsylvania State University

 

    The NASA Astrophysics Data System

       By Leith B. Woodall, The University of Queensland

 

    Info-Sci Online

       By Amy W. Shannon, University of Nevada, Reno

 

BOOK REVIEWS

 

    Effective Databases for Text & Document Management

       Reviewed by Jeff Alger, Kansas State University

 

    Google Hacks: 100 Industrial-Strength Tips & tools

       Reviewed by Russ Singletary, Cadence Group, Inc.

 

CONFERENCE REPORTS

 

    The Top Ten Things a new Sci/Tech Librarian Should Know: Developing

    Core Competencies

       by Victoria S. Mitchell, University of Oregon

 

    World Library and Information Congress: 69th IFLA Conference

       by Ray Schwartz, New Jersey Institute of Technology

 

 

          ===========================================================

                                Andrea L. Duda

                         Sciences-Engineering Library

                    University of California, Santa Barbara

                         E-mail: duda@library.ucsb.edu

          ===========================================================

 

 

 

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Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology

Volume 54, Number 13.  November 2003

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]    Sat 15/11/2003 4:26 AM  asis-l@asis.org; nancy@cni.org; journals@bubl.ac.uk; jesse@listserv.utk.edu; bwilson@cnri.reston.va.us; jhatzakos@asis.org; AMY.E.FRIEDLANDER@cpmx.mail.saic.com; Einat Amitay; irlist@sheffield.ac.uk

[Asis-l] JASIST TOC, 54, # 13; Nov. 2003

 

Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology Volume 54, Number 13.  November 2003

 

[Note: at the end of this message are URLs for viewing contents of JASIST

from past issues.  Below, the contents of Bert Boyce’s “In this Issue” has

been cut into the Table of Contents.]

 

CONTENTS

 

EDITORIAL

In This Issue

Bert R. Boyce

1173

 

RESEARCH

A Comprehensive and Systematic Model of User Evaluation of Web Search

Engines: I. Theory

      and Background

      Louise T. Su

      Published online 7 July 2003

      1175

In this issue Su presents an extensive literature review of web 1. search

engine evaluation from 1995 to 2000 concluding that the extensive progress

made does not extend to knowledge of end user motives, backgrounds,

information needs, strategies, success rates, or judgements concerning

engine effectiveness. An evaluation model is suggested which includes lists

of performance measures based upon relevance, efficiency, utility, user

satisfaction, and the number of good links provided; and also participant

measures based upon background, experience, needs, and search behavior. The

steps for a test of the model are then outlined.

 

A Comprehensive and Systematic Model of User Evaluation of Web Search

Engines: II. An

      Evaluation by Undergraduates

      Louise T. Su

      Published online 10 July 2003

      1193

In her second paper she tests her model on 36 volunteer junior and senior

students at the University of Pittsburgh, each of whom had an information

need and some online search experience. AltaVista, Excite, Infoseek, and

Lycos were run under Netscape 4.0 with each subject searching on all four

engines and each engine searched in all four possible order positions. Relevance judgements were made in a second session with the five

most user relevant drops ranked. Both online questionnaires and post search

interviews were utilized and a log program recorded times, terms, and

search results. ANOVA tests were run to find the effect of engine and

participant discipline, while system and user rankings were tested for

correlation, and non-parametric tests run on nominal and ordinal data.

Disciplines are significantly different as to their requirement for

comprehensiveness. Engine effect is significant for precision and relative recall with the ranking for all measures being AltaVista, Excite, Infoseek,

Lycos. The ranking provided by Lycos was closest to the participants

(Pearson’s .28) with AltaVista and Infoseek following closely. Infoseek had

the lowest mean search times and participants used between 3 and 5 queries

on each engine, but efficiency measures did not vary significantly. User

satisfaction ratings vary depending upon the measure utilized, but

valuation of results as a whole find both AltaVista and Excite

significantly better than Lycos. Content analysis of interview data indicate four user criteria for satisfaction: interaction, value,

precision, and overall performance.

 

A Summarization System for Chinese News from Multiple Sources

      Hsin-Hsi Chen, June-Jei Kuo, Sheng-Jie Huang, Chuan-Jie Lin, and

Hung-Chia Wung

      Published online 29 July 2003

      1224

Chen, et alia, receive online news from six Chinese online newspapers,

cluster the stories together based first upon predefined topics and then

named entities extracted from the text, partition this text into meaningful

units, link the meaningful units which denote the same event using noun and verb similarity measures, and finally display the results by

selecting only the longest sentence from a set of similar meaningful units

ordered by their original position. Presentation should be improved by

moving meaningful units to the fore that have the most informative words.

These are words of both high document and high term frequency. Nine events occurring over a one month period were selected as a test corpus.

Using a baseline of similarity measures computed with thesaurus assistance,

with each term matched only once and order not considered, several matching

strategies were compared with small variations. The presentation techniques

were tested by evaluators answering questions with various designs while

degree or reduction, precision, and interaction times were recorded. Use of

informative words did not increase performance and removal of lightly

covered stories did not reduce performance. A larger scale test without

human users indicates informative words may in fact improve performance.

 

Interdisciplinarity in Science: A Tentative Typology of Disciplines and

Research Areas

      Fernanda Morillo, Mar­a Bordons, and Isabel G›mez

      Published online 8 July 2003

      1237

Morillo, Bordons and Gomez make use of ISI’s practice of multi-assignment

of journals to topical categories to indicate the existence of cognitive

links among disciplines. The categories, excluding Multi-disciplinary

science and Education/Scientific disciplines, were grouped into nine

general research areas. They then determined the percentage of

multi-assigned journals per category, the number of such links for a

category within a research area and also external to its assigned research

area, and the number of different links in a category normalized by

category size in journals. The strength of the relationship was also

measured by dividing the number of journals in common in two categories by

the square root of product of the number of journals in each category. On

average 53% of journals in each category were multi-assigned but categories varied from no multi-assigned journals to 100%. Bio-medicine and Technology

appear to be highly multi-disciplinary while Humanities is far less so. New

disciplines tend to be highly interdisciplinary and show considerable

linkage with external research areas.

 

Author Cocitation Analysis and Pearson's r

      Howard D. White

      Published online 18 July 2003

      1250

White responds to a previously published criticism of the use of Pearson’s

r as similarity measure in author co-citation analysis which suggested that

r over responds to dissimilarity when a second group of authors with

minimal co-citation to an initial group is combined with that group. Cosine

and chi square were suggested as replacements. The criticism appears to

focus on the simultaneous study of disjoint literatures, which seems an

unlikely circumstance. Large blocks of cells with zero co-citation will

destabilize Pearson’s r but such have not appeared in actual data and are

likely only do so when author-pairs are chosen for lack of co-citation or a

less than cohesive set of authors has been chosen rather than a literature.

Using the disjoint data with

Pearson’s r, the cosine measure and chi square, multidimensional scaling

and hierarchical clustering routines yield maps that are all very similar.

 

BRIEF COMMUNICATION

"Type/Token-Taken" Informetrics: Some Comments and Further Examples

      Quentin L. Burrell

      Published online 8 July 2003

      1260

Finally, in a brief communication, Burrell develops

Egghe’s  Type/Token-Taken model of sources generating items as a discrete

rather than continuous formulation and finds some results simpler and more

clear-cut. He also illustrates the development of the log normal and

negative binomial distributions in these term.

 

BOOK REVIEW

Metadata Fundamentals for All Librarians, by Priscilla Caplan

      Wallace Koehler

      Published online 21 July 2003

      1264

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

Information Resources Management Association (IRMA)

15th Annual International Conference

Innovations Through Information Technology

Published online 8 September 2003

      1265

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Volume 54, Number 14.  December 2003

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]   Sat 15/11/2003 4:32 AM

asis-l@asis.org; nancy@cni.org; journals@bubl.ac.uk; jesse@listserv.utk.edu; bwilson@cnri.reston.va.us; jhatzakos@asis.org; AMY.E.FRIEDLANDER@cpmx.mail.saic.com; Einat Amitay; irlist@sheffield.ac.uk

 

[Asis-l] JASIST TOC, 54, # 14; Dec. 2003

 

Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology Volume 54, Number 14.  December 2003

 

[Note: at the end of this message are URLs for viewing contents of JASIST

from past issues.  Below, the contents of Bert Boyce’s “In this Issue” has

been cut into the Table of Contents.]

 

CONTENTS

 

EDITORIAL

      In This Issue

      Bert R. Boyce

      1267

 

 

RESEARCH

Automating Survey Coding by Multiclass Text Categorization Techniques

      Daniela Giorgetti and Fabrizio Sebastiani

      Published online 21 July 2003

      1269

In this issue Giorgetti, and Sebastiani suggest that answers to open ended

questions in survey instruments can be coded automatically by creating

classifiers which learn from training sets of manually coded answers. The

manual effort required is only that of classifying a representative set of documents, not creating a dictionary of words that

trigger an assignment. They use a naive Bayesian probabilistic learner from

Mc Callum’s RAINBOW package and the multi-class support vector machine

learner from Hsu and Lin’s BSVM package, both examples of text

categorization techniques. Data from the 1996 General Social Survey by the

U.S. National Opinion Research Center provided a set of answers to three

questions (previously tested by Viechnicki using a dictionary approach),

their associated manually assigned category codes, and a complete set of

predefined category codes. The learners were run on three random disjoint subsets of the answer sets to create the classifiers and a remaining set

was used as a test set. The dictionary approach is out preformed by 18% for

RAINBOW and by 17% for BSVM, while the standard deviation of the results is

reduced by 28% and 34% respectively over the dictionary approach.

 

Network Influences on Scholarly Communication in Developmental Dyslexia: A

Longitudinal

Follow-up

      Claudia A. Perry

      Published online 25 July 2003

      1278

Perry collects co-citation data for the years 1994 to 1998 on 74

Developmental Dyslexia researchers whose co-citation patterns and

personally reported interactions she originally studied form 1976 to 1993.

The original study indicated discrepancies between sociometric and

bibliometric networks of interaction, delays in the emergence of new

perspectives and the possibility of the convergence of perspectives

facilitated by central researchers. Mapping for the present study was done

by multi-dimensional scaling rather than the principle components factor

analysis in the earlier study, but both clustering techniques and factor

analysis were applied to the new data. Researchers with phonological and

with neuroscience perspectives area associated with different co-citation

patterns. Research groups grow more distinct over time with the

neuroscience-vision subgroup increasing in density, but other sub-groups

showing some tendency toward integration. The personal networks differences

with the co-citation network persist and the assumption that one reflects

the other is not supported.

 

Nodes of Topicality: Modeling User Notions of On Topic Documents

      Howard Greisdorf and Brian O'Connor

      Published online 25 July 2003

      1296

Griesdorf and O’Connor attempt to determine the aspects of a retrieved item

that provide a questioner with evidence that the item is in fact on the

topic searched independent of its relevance. To this end they collect data

from 32 participants, 11 from the business community as well as 21 doctoral

students at the University of North Texas each of whom were asked to state

if they considered material that approaches a topic in each of 14 specific

manners as “ on topic” or “off topic.” Chi-square indicates that the

observed values are significantly different from expected values and the

chi-square residuals for on topic judgements exceed plus or minus two in eight cases and plus two in five cases. The positive values which

indicate a percentage of response greater than that from chance suggest

that documents considered topical are only related to the problem at hand,

contain terms that were in the query, and describe, explain or expand the topic of the query. The chi-square residuals for off topic judgements

exceed plus or minus two in ten cases and plus two in four cases. The

positive values suggest that documents considered not topical exhibit a

contrasting, contrary, or confounding point of view, or merely spark

curiosity. Such material might well be relevant, but is not judged topical.

This suggests that topical appropriateness may best be achieved using the

Bruza, et alia, left compositional monotonicity approach.

 

 

Bibliographic Index Coverage of a Multidisciplinary Field

      William H. Walters and Esther I. Wilder

      Published online 28 July 2003

      1305

Walters and Wilder describe the literature of later-life migration, a

multi-disciplinary topic, and evaluate its bibliographic coverage in seven

disciplinary and five multi-disciplinary databases. Multiple database

searches and reviews of the references of found items discovered over 500

papers published between January 1990 and December 2000. These were then

read to determine if late-life migration was their central focus, and to

select those which presented noteworthy findings, innovative approaches, or

were covering topics unseen elsewhere, and also were understandable to a

broad readership, and generally available. One hundred and fifty five

journal articles met these criteria and are the focus of the study. The

core journals of sociology, economics, and demography are not major

contributors, but three gerontology journals are in the top five. The top

two journals have broad coverage, but the others tend to concentrate on one of five themes. The top five journals account for 40 % of papers and the

top twelve 70%. Of nine papers cited 30 or more times seven appeared in the

top 12 contributing journals. The median article in the study was indexed

by six of the twelve databases, and 12% were indexed by more than 7

databases. The correlation between citation and number of databases

indexing a paper is very low. Social Sciences Citation Index will 73%

coverage. Typical overlap in the 12 databases is about 45%.

 

 

Bibliographic and Web Citations: What Is the Difference?

      Liwen Vaughan and Debora Shaw

      Published online 21 July 2003

      1313

Vaughn, and Shaw look at the relationship between traditional citation and

Web citation (not hyperlinks but rather textual mentions of published

papers). Using English language research journals in ISI’s 2000 Journal

Citation Reportƒ  s ƒ  Information and Library Scienceƒ  category 1209

full length papers published in 1997 in 46 journals were identified. Each

was searched in Social Science Citation Index and on the Web using Google

phrase search by entering the title in quotation marks, and followed for

distinction where necessary with sub-titles, authorƒ  s names, and journal

title words. After removing obvious false drops, the number of web sites

was recorded for comparison with the SSCI counts. A second sample from 1992 was also collected for examination. There were a total of 16,371 web

citations to the selected papers. The top and bottom ranked four journals

were then examined and every third citation to every third paper was

selected and classified as to source type, domain, and country of origin. Web counts are much higher than ISI citation counts. Of the 46 journals

from 1997, 26 demonstrated a significant correlation between Web and

traditional citation counts, and 11 of the 15 in the 1992 sample also

showed significant correlation. Journal impact factor in 1998 and 1999

correlated significantly with average Web citations per journal in the 1997

data, but at a low level. Thirty percent of web citations come from other

papers posted on the web, and 30percent from listings of web based

bibliographic services, while twelve percent come from class reading lists.

High web citation journals often have web accessible tables of content.

 

 

AUTHOR INDEX   1325

 

SUBJECT INDEX  1331

 

VOLUME CONTENTS     I

 

 

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Volume 55, Number 1; January 1, 2004

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]  Wed 19/11/2003 11:25 PM 

asis-l@asis.org; nancy@cni.org; journals@bubl.ac.uk; jesse@listserv.utk.edu; bwilson@cnri.reston.va.us; jhatzakos@asis.org; AMY.E.FRIEDLANDER@cpmx.mail.saic.com; Einat Amitay; irlist@sheffield.ac.uk

 

[Asis-l] JASIST Volume 5, # 1 TOC

 

Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology Volume 55, Number 1; January 1, 2004

 

[Note: at the end of this message are URLs for viewing contents of JASIST

from past issues.  Below, the contents of Bert Boyce’s “In this Issue” has

been cut into the Table of Contents.]

CONTENTS

 

EDITORIAL

In This Issue

Bert R. Boyce   1

 

RESEARCH

Mapping Information Policy Frames: The Politics of the Digital Millennium

Copyright Act

Terrence A. Maxwell

Published online 19 September 2003

3

          In this issue we begin with Maxwell who is interested in how

government representatives, authors, user advocates, content providers, and

internet service providers, stakeholders all in the debates over the

formulation of the Digital  Millennium Copyright Act, framed their

positions as shown in their testimony in the nine relevant congressional

hearings, as well as which groups were most effective.  All hearing

utterances by an individual were consolidated into a single document

resulting in 71 documents, 29 from congress and 42 from stakeholders.

Maxwell’s policy taxonomy which develops 8 classes: Communal Cohesion,

Marketplace of Ideas, Knowledge Creation, Individual Happiness, Information

Dissemination, Information Ownership, Global Village, and Global Hegemony,

was utilized as a framework. Concordance software produced 1537 words that

were consolidated into 88 coding terms assigned as indicators to the

appropriate  taxonomic class.  The documents were then auto-coded with

AtlasTi content analysis software generating a file of 4,441 content units

with at least one code. A factor analysis produced key terms in different

sectors of the taxonomy and an MDS run produced  4 clusters both indicating

participants expressed themselves across multiple taxonomic sectors. While

Congress displayed linkages indicating attempts to play a balancing role,

congressional framing tended to be closer to content providers than to

other groups.

 

Spatialization of Web Sites Using a Weighted Frequency Model of Navigation Data René F. Reitsma, Lehana Thabane, and J. Michael B. MacLeod Published online 23 October 2003 13

         Reitsma, Thabane, and MacLeod are interested in the display of

document sets as visualized geometric spaces. Such spaces can use metrics

and dimensions determined arbitrarily prior to analysis of data, or they

may use secondary data (logged website transaction counts, perhaps) with

techniques like factor analysis or MDS to find a structure. Using high

transaction volume between an origin and a destination as an indicator of a

small distance and a low volume as an indicator of a large distance, a

transaction log can provide input to MDS. One problem is the possible

origination of multiple sessions from the same address where one can not

determine if consecutive requests are part of the same transaction and thus

frequencies may be invalid.  They suggest the use of the probability that a

count is a transaction as a weight rather the count alone, with this

probability depending upon the time separation between an origin and a

destination with less time indicating a higher probability. A transaction

log for a website for undergraduate engineering learning was analyzed in

this manner and  weighted transaction counts were compared to the use

of  straight count inputs to MDS using the Euclidean metric and four

dimensions. Weighted results were not significantly different.

 

Localization in Modern Standard Arabic

Ahmed Abdelali

Published online 22 September 2003

23

         Abdelali points out that spoken Arabic variants can be large

enough to affect comprehensibility while Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) is

taught in schools, and used by the media in 21 Arab countries. He

investigates the degree of variation from country to country in MSA by

examining various Arabic language newspapers available in machine readable

form on the Web. While 48% of words collected are unique to their source,

most of these occur less than three times, and a threshold above three

decreases the uniqueness percentage dramatically indicating in general a

high degree of uniformity.   Differences are identified based upon

spelling, transliteration of English and French words, different degrees of

usage geographically, local only use of tribal names, and imported words.

 

Enhanced Web Document Retrieval Using Automatic Query Expansion M. Shamim Khan and Sebastian Khor Published online 19 September 2003 29

         Khan and  Khor want to expand the traditionally short web query

using contiguous term phrases of four or less non-verbs  extracted from the

first 40 sentences of initially retrieved documents.  A rule governed

tagging scheme is utilized to identify noun phrases. Each identified phrase

is then searched independently, so that the top of the retrieved list for

each can be skimmed. Using three questions obtained from questioning past

searchers, and doing their own category decisions for relevance judgements,

they ran the analysis on the top thirty documents retrieved for each query

and scored the documents retrieved by the initial and expanded searches

with a 1 or 0 depending upon the presence of the predetermined categories.

For two out of the three queries the relevance scores of the initial

queries are higher than the expanded queries, but expansion did succeed in

retrieving more categories than the initial queries.

 

Information Search Performance and Research Achievement: An Empirical Test

of the Anxiety-Expectation Mediation Model of  Library Anxiety Anthony J. Onwuegbuzie and Qun G. Jiao Published online 19 September 2003 41

         Onwuegbbuzie and Jiao have, with Bostick, presented an information

literacy process model of library anxiety, which they believe is a

significant problem in the use of academic libraries by students not

particularly anxious in other areas of their lives. The Anxiety-Expectation

Mediation or  AEM model is a structural equation model that  incorporates

library anxiety, research proposal writing achievement, age, GPA, learning

style, perfectionism, academic procrastination, hope, and academic self

perception. Here Onwuegbbuzie and Jiao  are interested in whether anxiety

effects educational outcomes. Using 225 graduate students from a

introductory level research methods course, scores were obtained on the

Library Anxiety Scale, Self-Perception Profile for College Students, the

Hope Scale, the Procrastination Assessment Scale-Students, Multidimensional

Perfectionism Scale, the Productivity Environmental Preference Survey, and

a Background Demographic form was completed. Library anxiety and academic

self-perception mediate the relationship between ability to write research

proposals and the other variables thus supporting the AEM model. Library

anxiety is related negatively to research performance while self-perception

is related positively.

 

Catalogers' Common Ground and Shared Knowledge

Alenka Sauperl

Published online 7 October 2003

55

         Sauperl believes that an indexer’s subject interpretation of a

document is dependent upon the sociologically constructed knowledge state

of the author, the likely user, and that of the indexer herself, and that

each such state can result in differing interpretations. She believes that

this places the source of indexing inconsistency with the indexer’s

background and culture and conducts think aloud observations and interviews

with twelve American academic library catalogers to construct a model of

the indexing process and to  determine if they are aware of the

inconsistency situation. Meaning is gathered from the document itself, but

also from public sources, the practice of the individual library,  and the

cataloger’s interest and experience. Catalogers are aware of the

multi-meaning problem and actively tried to limit its effects, but are more

oriented toward the cataloging community than toward readers or authors

viewpoints.

 

Literature Growth, Journal Characteristics, and Author Productivity in

Subject Indexing, 1977 to 2000

Ming-yueh Tsay

Published online 30 September 2003

64

         Ming-yueh Tsay conducts a bibliometric study of 24 years of the

literature of subject indexing as collected by searching LISA for the term

“subject indexing” from 1977 to 2000, identifying 14,382 items.  The

literature grew rapidly from 1978 to 1981, slows from 1983 to 1985, and

resumes strong growth from 1987 to 1991. There is a drastic reduction in

new papers in 1992, an even greater fall in 1993, and production then

continues at this level, providing a relatively good fit for a logistic

curve. Journal articles provide 78% of the items, proceedings 16.3%, and

books about 6%. Article distribution shows the typical Bradford

distribution. Authors of a single item constituted 76.7% of the set, with

an average production of 1.4 papers per author. The observed data on author

productivity do not conform with Lotka’s law.

 

An Experiment Using Coordinate Title Word Searches

Frederick G. Kilgour

Published online 4 November 2003

74

         Once again Kilgour looks at the efficacy of known item title word

search using the University of Michigan Online Public Access Catalog.  In

previous tests he found single screen display results 84% of the time using

surname and one title word, 96.1% of the time using surname plus both first

and last title word, and 98.5% of the time using surname and researcher

chosen significant title words.  Here he uses title words alone to search

for 749 records selected from those used at the University of North

Carolina Chapel Hill in the first half of 1993.       One fifth of these

items had no authors. Use of title words alone was successful 86.4% of the

time with items having personal authors and 91.5% of the time with

anonymous items. Use of title words is consistently more productive than

the 53.8% success rate of author alone search.

 

BRIEF COMMUNICATION

An Improved Fast Encoding Algorithm for Vector Quantization Li-Juan Liu, Xu-Bang Shen, and Xue-Cheng Zou Published online 22 September 2003 81

         Liu, Zou, and Shen provide an algorithm for image data compression

using a vector quantization technique which appears more efficient than the

previous vector quantization technique and which they claim will speed up a

code book searching process.

 

BOOK REVIEWS

Technology and the New Economy, edited by Chong-En Bai and Chi-Wa Yuen John Cullen Published online 19 September 2003 88

 

The Universal Computer: The Road From Leibniz to Turing, by Martin Davis Julian Warner Published online 28 October 2003 89

 

XML Data Management: Native XML and XML-Enabled Database Systems, edited by Akmal B. Chaudhri, Awais Rashid, and Roberto Zicari Nicholas Rhodes Published online 28 October 2003 90

 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR   92

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

Volume 55, Number 2.  January 15, 2004

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]  Thu 20/11/2003 12:00 AM

asis-l@asis.org; nancy@cni.org; journals@bubl.ac.uk; jesse@listserv.utk.edu; bwilson@cnri.reston.va.us; jhatzakos@asis.org; AMY.E.FRIEDLANDER@cpmx.mail.saic.com; Einat Amitay; irlist@sheffield.ac.uk

 

[Asis-l] JASIST, Volume 55, # 2.  January 15, 2004 TOC

 

Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology Volume 55, Number 2.  January 15, 2004

 

[Note: at the end of this message are URLs for viewing contents of JASIST

from past issues.  Below, the contents of Bert Boyce's "In this Issue" has

been cut into the Table of Contents.]

-------------

 

CONTENTS

 

EDITORIAL

In This Issue

Bert R. Boyce

95

 

RESEARCH

Metadata-Based Modeling of Information Resources on the Web

S. Ayse Ozel, I. Sengor Altingovde, Ozgur Ulusoy, Gultekin Ozsoyoglu, and

Z. Meral Ozsoyoglu

Published online 29 October 2003

97

         Ozel et al. suggest that small subsets of the Web may be accessed

by the creation of so-called "expert advice repositories," which appear to

be XML indexes created by experts in the field, who are creating metadata

records in an area where topics and meta-link types (roles) have been

predetermined by someone. They envision automatic extraction of the

concepts and matching of different expert terminology through existing Web

accessible ontology. User profiles are also maintained that include

repositories favored, detail levels desired, and other information

presumably collected from monitoring of system use. They have established a

limited implementation on the 200,000 documents in the DPLB bibliography,

which appears to allow searches using a small set of established relations.

 

 

Does Citation Reflect Social Structure? Longitudinal Evidence From the

"Globenet" Interdisciplinary Research Group

Howard D. White, Barry Wellman, and Nancy Nazer

Published online 13 November 2003

111

         White, Wellman, and Nazer investigate the inter-citation patterns

of the 16 international interdisciplinary members of a research group

established in 1993 to study human development with the hope of determining

whether citation is based on whom those who cite know, or upon what they

know, i.e., whether the patterns are social or intellectual in structure.

The members of the group are acquainted and the study of the 240 possible

pairs indicates that half collaborate and read each other's work, and 74%

consider themselves friends or colleagues. Inter-citation patterns were

studied prior to 1989, from 1989 to 1992, 1993 to 1996, and 1997 to 2000.

Co-citation is shown to predict inter- citation; one cites those with whom

one is co-cited. As members became better acquainted, citation of one

another increased. Inter-citation was not randomly distributed with a core

group of 12 pairs predominating. Friends cited friends more than

acquaintances, and inter-citers communicated more than non-inter- citers.

However, intellectual affinity, as shown by co-citation, rather than social

ties, leads to inter-citation.

 

 

The Real Stakes of Virtual Publishing: The Transformation of E-Biomed Into

PubMed Central

Rob Kling, Lisa B. Spector, and Joanna Fortuna

Published online 6 November 2003

127

         Kling, Spector, and Fortuna review the process by which the

National Institutes of Health's (NIH) proposed central Web-based electronic

archive for all biomedical research papers, supported by scientists by a

two-to-one margin, became PubMed, a facility without a preprint server and

one in which content is determined by commercial and scientific society

publishers. Their method is essentially historical; that is to say, based

upon analysis of the documents produced by the process including the

proposals themselves, stories concerning the proposals in the scientific

press, and postings to two electronic forms, 269 items on NIH's "archive of

comments on E-biomed," and 492 on the forum hosted by Sigma Xi, publisher

of  _American Scientist _. The NIH archive was subjected to quantitative

analysis. Official statements of professional societies had greater impact

than individual comments. Scientific society officers and publication

committee members did not express the opinions of readers and authors as

observed. The society's economic interests seem to override the author's

wishes for rapid dissemination and their communication channels with NIH

are not the public forums and do not reflect public forum opinion although

such public comment was clearly a very limited response. The Internet was

not here a powerful transforming force, but rather its use was shaped by

various groups to support their interests.

 

 

Do the Web Sites of Higher Rated Scholars Have Significantly More Online

Impact?

Mike Thelwall and Gareth Harries

Published online 28 October 2003

149

         Thelwall and Harries measure Web site impact in terms of the

number of external links pointing to a site, in order to determine if

higher-rated scholars produce higher-rated Web sites. They cluster together

all pages with the same domain name and count only unique links to each

domain found by a crawler applied to Web sites of universities in the

United Kingdom. High- rated scholars are determined by their institution's

place in the United Kingdom's 2001 Research Assessment Exercise, a peer

review based study, normalized for staff size. There were 7,493 domains

identified with 82,672 links. Spearman's rho was .082, significant at the

.1% level, between RAE rankings and inlink counts. Total domains for each

university correlate with research productivity at .762, significant at

.1%, indicating high productivity universities produce more domains. When

normalized by staff size, this falls to .509, still significant at .1%,

suggesting higher quality means more domains per staff member. It appears

that higher-rated scholars produce more Web content but of only slightly

higher quality (impact) and thus online impact is suspect as a quality

assessment measure.

 

 

Visible, Less Visible, and Invisible Work: Patterns of Collaboration in

20th Century Chemistry

Blaise Cronin, Debora Shaw, and Kathryn La Barre

Published online 3 November 2003

160

 

         Cronin, Shaw, and LaBarre continue their investigation of the

place of acknowledgment and co-authorship in learned communication with a

study of the literature of chemistry as found in the  _Journal of the

American Chemical Society _, from which a 2.6% random sample of research

papers was drawn from volumes 22 to 121. Extracted acknowledgments were

classified as conceptual 18%, editorial 1%, financial 46%, instrumental

34%, moral 0%, and unknown 1%, with 90% inter-coder reliability. Three

quarters of the 2,866 papers contained an acknowledgment of some kind, 29%

from 1930 to 1939, and 96% from 1990 to 1999. Co- authored papers

constituted 88% of the sample, rising from 44% in the first decade to 99%

in the last. Fourteen chemists received five or more acknowledgments, six

of whom were in the ISI's 10,858 most-cited chemists list. Acknowledgment

increases over time, is more intense in chemistry than in psychology or

philosophy, and co-authorship is more prevalent. Individual agency appears

to be a fading phenomenon in chemistry.

 

Non-Word Identification or Spell Checking Without a Dictionary Donald C. Comeau and W. John Wilbur Published online 28 October 2003 169

         Comeau and Wilbur use a measure of the strength of context of a

word, that is, how strongly it associates with other words in a document,

to detect misspellings. Misspellings are less frequent and appear to appear

randomly, while associated context words appear more frequently with the

correct version. The measure and frequency counts are computed for each

word and alternative word lists are generated for candidates by choosing

those words that differ by an instance of deletion, insertion,

substitution, or transposition. A classifier is then trained to use this

data to predict misspellings. From MEDINE 40,000 words with low context

measures were selected and 2,000 selected randomly were evaluated by judges

to determine if they were or were not misspellings. Half were used to train

classifiers and half were used as a test set. Data indicate that the more

frequently an alternative appears, the more likely the candidate is a

misspelling, and the log of the number of times alternatives appear is the

most important feature. The number of alternatives was the second most

important feature. The log of the frequency of the candidate itself has

little impact. The log of the probability of a word appearing in MEDLINE

verses in _The Wall Street Journal_ had some effect indicating a

misspelling. The use of trigrams was not useful alone, but was helpful in

combination with frequency of alternatives. The more common trigrams in a

word, the more likely it is misspelled. The context measure of alternative

words is not useful. Of the four categorization methods utilized, the CMLS

wide margin classifier out-performed the Mahalanobis distance method, a log

linear model, and linear boosting with an eleven point average precision of

.881.

 

BOOK REVIEWS

Introduction to Digital Libraries, by G. G. Chowdhury and Sudatta Chowdhury Reviewed by Min-Yen Kan Published online 29 October 2003 178

 

Exploring Artificial Intelligence in the New Millennium, edited by Gerhard

Lakemeyer and Bernhard Nebel

Reviewed by Jessie Walker

Published online 28 October 2003

180

 

Internet Entrepreneurship in Europe: Venture Failure and the Timing of

Telecommunications Reform, by Niko Marcel Waesche

Reviewed by Jochen Scholl

Published online 29 October 2003

181

 

LETTER TO THE EDITOR     183

 

CALL FOR PAPERS     185

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

Volume 55, Number 3.  February 1, 2004

 

Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]  Fri 12/12/2003 12:35 AM

asis-l@asis.org; nancy@cni.org; journals@bubl.ac.uk; jesse@listserv.utk.edu; bwilson@cnri.reston.va.us; jhatzakos@asis.org; AMY.E.FRIEDLANDER@cpmx.mail.saic.com; Einat Amitay; irlist@sheffield.ac.uk

 

Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology Volume 55, Number 3.  February 1, 2004

 

[Note: at the end of this message are URLs for viewing contents of JASIST

from past issues.  Below, the contents of Bert Boyce’s “In this Issue” has

been cut into the Table of Contents.]

-------------

 

CONTENTS

 

EDITORIAL

In This Issue

Bert R. Boyce

187

 

RESEARCH

Arabic Morphological Analysis Techniques: A Comprehensive Survey Imad A. Al-Sughaiyer and Ibrahim A. Al-Kharashi Published online 20 November 2003 189

         Al-Sughaiyer and Al-Kharashi provide definitions of standard

linguistic terms as they are seen in Arabic analysis and identify

efficiency, compactness, bi-directionality, success rate, and retrieval

performance as the measures of the effectiveness of morphological analysis

algorithms. After a review of the Arabic morphological analysis literature,

they suggest the approaches may be classified as table lookup (large

construction demands and space requirements), linguistic (require a large

number of lists and removing affixes by trial and error), combinatorial

(large space and time requirements), or rule based (the authors’ choice),

and they present a summary of the work in each area. The majority of work

is linguistic in nature, but little comparison of existing work exists.

Evaluation of suggested algorithms is weak. Use of a word’s root (the

single basic morpheme) in an Arabic index leads to invalid conflation.

 

Predicting Library of Congress Classifications From Library of Congress Subject Headings Eibe Frank and Gordon W. Paynter Published online 28 October 2003 214

         Frank and Paynter attempt to assign LC Classification number

ranges to INFOMINE documents based on their assigned LCSH headings in order

to provide a better browsing capability. Since they claim that

retrospective assignment of a class number is logistically impossible for

those librarians that already assign terms from LCSH to INFOMINE records,

they have devised a machine-learning technique to create the classification

number where, rather than creating virtual LCSH documents to represent each

LC class and using similarity measures to assign documents, they use a

support vector machine classifier to determine which of the top 21 nodes is

most likely and classifiers at each successive level until a leaf is

reached or the classifier chooses itself. They utilize LCSH terms without

subdivisions, and also make use of intervals from the LCC outline available

on the Pharos Web site, both processed and extracted from existing MARC

records to create a training set. The training set of 868,836 records was

drawn from the UC Riverside library catalog with 50,000 items reserved for

testing and the remainder used for training at different levels. Accuracy

increases with training set size but returns diminish. Accuracy increases

from 32% to 55% as the training set size increases from 10,000 to 800,000.

Less than 7% of errors are due to the classifier terminating too early or

too late. With the large test set 80% of the first array classification

decisions are correct and 16% at the seventh level. The learning algorithm

scales at the order of n instances to the 1.7, and test processing proceeds

at a rate of 21 instances per second.

 

A Nonlinear Model of Information-Seeking Behavior

Allen Foster

Published online 11 November 2003

228

         Foster disagrees with the conventional wisdom view of information

seeking as a linear process of identifiable stages and iteration,

particularly as it would apply to interdisciplinary information-seeking

behavior, and he attempts a non-linear model based on identifying the

processes, contexts, and behaviors of such interdisciplinary activity and

their relationships. In-depth structured interviews conducted in the

workplace environment were utilized to collect data on searching examples

provided by the subjects. Subjects were purposively selected from the

University of Sheffield across multiple faculties for their

interdisciplinary research and then used as the kernel for a snowball

sampling expansion resulting in 45 faculty-diverse participants. Transcript

coding took place in multiple iterations and the final results were

confirmed by participant review. Activities viewed in conjunction with time

lines did not support a linear stages model. The new model groups

activities into three core categories; “opening” (moving from orientation

to actual search), “orientation” (identifying existing research and a

direction for search), and “consolidation” (refining and knowing when to

stop). These operate with the boundaries of an “external context” which

incorporates social and organizational influences, time, project and access

constraints, and navigational issues. Within the external context one finds

an internal context which incorporates the individual’s experience, prior

knowledge, and feelings and which are individually unique. Four cognitive

approaches were identified: flexible and adaptable to other cultures, an

open approach with no prior framework, a nomadic approach which actively

seeks diverse ways of access, and a holistic approach which attempts to

bring diverse areas together. Interaction among the core activities was

cumulative, reiterative, holistic, and context-bound.

 

Indicators of Accuracy for Answers to Ready Reference Questions on the Internet Martin Frick‚ and Don Fallis Published online 19 November 2003 238

         Frické and Fallis explore the validity of proposed indicators of

the accuracy of ready reference information to be found in Web sites. Using

49 of the 60 questions previously used by Connell and Tipple, AltaVista

searches were run to identify potential answer sites, the first five of

which actually answered the question chosen, and then evaluated for answer

accuracy and checked for the presence of indicators of accuracy. This was

followed by a Google search to yield these and at most five additional

sites. Each site was manually scored as completely accurate, partially

accurate, partially inaccurate, or completely inaccurate and checked for

owner entity type, recency of update, presence of advertising, copyright

claim, appeal to authority, and the presence of any awards for quality, as

well as its ranked position by the search engine, its Google PageRank

(0–10) position, and the number of in-links found with the AltaVista link

command. Contingency tables were formed and chi-square used to determine

possible correlation. Likelihood ratios for presence and absence of

indicators and indicator pairs were also computed. Of 300 sites that

answered the questions, 214 were judged completely accurate and only 25

inaccurate. High display position, high Google PageRank, currency,

copyright and in-link count all yield a chi-square probability of less than

.05, suggesting a relationship to accuracy.

 

 

The Effects of Domain Knowledge on Search Tactic Formulation Barbara M. Wildemuth Published online 13 November 2003 246

         Wildemuth is interested in whether a growing understanding of the

knowledge domain covered by a database will affect the sequence of

searching moves (tactics) used by medical students searching that database.

Two random samples were drawn from entering medical school classes,

excluding those with advanced science degrees and those whose undergraduate

degree was in microbiology, the topic of the database. Each was asked to

address six specific clinical problems involving several specific

questions; first, prior to any instruction in microbiology, resulting in a

12.6% success rate; second, directly after the microbiology course,

resulting in a 48.1% success rate; and finally, six months after the

course, achieving a 27.3% success rate. In each instance subjects were

asked to respond from their own knowledge and then to search the database

for a question for which they had provided an incorrect response. The

nearly 1,300 searches were recorded by transaction logs and hand coded

according to an adaption of the Shute & Smith scheme incorporating

beginning moves, reduction moves, expansion moves, and term replacement. A

transition matrix showing the frequency of transitions from one coded move

to every other coded move was created and used to create a graphic

representation of transitions that accounted for at least 1% of all

occurrences. Maximal repeating patterns of moves were also extracted and

the most frequently occurring retained. The most common pattern was the

entry of a new concept followed by the addition of one or more concepts

prior to display. Number of moves decreased with experience. Database usage

increases performance at all three levels of experience.

 

A Graph Model for E-Commerce Recommender Systems

Zan Huang, Wingyan Chung, and Hsinchun Chen

Published online 14 November 2003

259

         Huang, Chung, and Chen are interested in maximizing the value of

the product and usage information available from online transactions for

those that supply material and those that interact with that supplied

material. Such information needs to be represented in a flexible manner,

since different recommendation approaches are typically used to create

recommender systems that find associations between users and items and use

discovered associations to recommend additional items to previous users. A

two-layer graph model is implemented with users and items as nodes in

separate layers and transactions and similarities as links. Nodes are kept

as relative similarity measures to other nodes. If links in the item layer

are activated, the approach is content-based. If user and inter-layer links

are activated, the approach is collaborative and activating all links gives

a hybrid approach. A direct retrieval approach retrieves items similar to

those used previously by a user or similar users. A collaborative

recommendation forms a list of similar users by either past common item

selection or by common demographics and recommends that list’s past

selections. An association mining method was used with the three

approaches, each generating a different set of association rules with

transitive rules in a Hopfield net utilized as an option to overcome sparse

user ratings. Testing on a Chinese online bookstore data set provided

records for 9,695 books, 2,000 customers, and 18,771 transactions. Books

and customers were described as feature vectors and similarity measures

computed and customers’ purchase lists were halved to provide a predicted

set from the first half allowing recall and precision-type measures.

Pairwise t-tests were then applied. The hybrid approach was the best

performer, but the spreading activation approach did not better

significantly the associative mining approach or direct search.

 

 

BOOK REVIEWS

 

Mining the Web: Discovering Knowledge From Hypertext Data, by Soumen Chakrabarti Chaomei Chen Published online 20 November 2003 275

 

 

The Library's Legal Answer Book, by Mary Minow and Tomas A. Lipinski Kenneth Einar

Himma

Published online 18 November 2003

276

 

 

The Internet in Everyday Life, edited by Barry Wellman and Caroline Haythornthwaite Pramod K. Nayar Published online 14 November 2003 278

 

The ASIS web site <http://www.asis.org/Publications/JASIS/tocs.html>

contains the Table of Contents and brief abstracts as above from January

1993 (Volume 44) to date.

 

The John Wiley Interscience site <http://www.interscience.wiley.com>

includes issues from 1986 (Volume 37) to date.  Guests have access only to

tables of contents and abstracts.  Registered users of the interscience

site have access to the full text of these issues and to preprints.

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Journal of the Association for Information Systems

Special issue

 

Ping Zhang [Pzhang@syr.edu]  Wed 4/02/2004 2:02 AM 

CHI-ANNOUNCEMENTS@ACM.ORG; asis-l@asis.org; AIS_HCI@listserv.syr.edu 

[Asis-l] [ais_hci] JAIS to publish special theme on HCI in MIS

 

Dear All,

 

The special theme papers based on expansions of the best papers from the first pre-ICIS workshop on "HCI Research in MIS", sponsored by AIS SIGHCI and held in Barcelona, Spain 2002, is finally to be published in the Journal of the Association for Information Systems, the flagship research journal of AIS!

 

The special theme is edited by Sirkka Jarvenpaa, Izak Benbasat and Ping Zhang. Among the 6 invited papers from the workshop, two papers made to the final selection and will be published in February and March respectively. They are:

 

Web Site Delays: How Tolerant are Users?

Dennis F. Galletta, Raymond Henry, Scott McCoy, and Peter Polak

 

Knowledge-based Support in a Group Decision Making Context: An Expert-Novice Comparison Fiona Fui-Hoon Nah and Izak Benbasat

 

 

JAIS' website is http://jais.isworld.org. You can find the introduction to the special theme at http://melody.syr.edu/hci/jais04

 

 

We thank the authors for their hard work, and reviewers for the constructive comments and suggestions along the process!

 

 

Sincerely,

 

Ping, on behalf of Sirkka and Izak

 

===========================================

Dr. Ping Zhang    Associate Professor   School of Information Studies

Syracuse University    Syracuse, NY 13244    

Phone: (315) 443-5617  Fax: (315) 443-5806   Email: pzhang@syr.edu

http://melody.syr.edu/pzhang    AIS SIGHCI: http://melody.syr.edu/hci

AMIS Volumes on HCI in MIS: http://melody.syr.edu/hci/amis

 

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Journal Of Digital Information Management

 

Volume 1, Number 3, September 2003

 

ppich@vsnl.net    Thu 9/10/2003 3:09 AM   asis-l@asis.org  

 

Metadata derivation from web search - P.Pichappan

 

Quality-Based Recommendation of XML Documents-Laure Berti-Equille

 

Handling overflow in integer addition in online computations- Eyas El-Qawasmeh

 

Management approach to Scalable Databases in Web - the impact of Object and Relational Models                  - Saravanan Muthaiyah, Jude Ernest

 

Inspiring creative talents - an example from an information portal for puppetry - Kurt Englmeier

 

URL: http://www.dirf.org/jdim

email: info@dirf.org

 

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Volume 2, Number 1, March 2004

 

ppich@vsnl.net  Mon 1/03/2004 11:19 PM  asis-l@asis.org

[Asis-l] Journal of Digital Information Management March 2004 is published

 

Journal of Digital Information Management  -   Volume  2 - Number 1 - March 2004 is published

 

(ISSN 0972 7272) (http://www.dirf.org/jdim)

 

Contents

 

Web-based collaboratories  from centres without walls to collaboratories in use - Hanne Albrechtsen

 

The Iter Gateway to the Middle Ages and Renaissance: Collaboration Between Information Specialists and Subject Specialists in the Arts and Humanities - Clare Beghtol

 

Supporting Collaborative Grid Application Development within the e-Science Community - Cornelia Boldyreff, Phyo Kyaw, David Nutter, and Stephen Rank

 

Collaboration, communication and categorical complexity: A case study in Collaboratory evaluation.- Bryan Richard Cleal, Hans H.K. Andersen,  Hanne Albrechtsen

 

Sites for Collaborative Work: Cuba / Norway - Katherine Goodnow

 

Collaborative Information Searching in an Information-Intensive Work Domain: Preliminary Results - Preben Hansen  and Kalervo Järvelin  

 

Collaborative Research and Documentation of European Film History: The COLLATE Collaboratory - Adelheit Stein, Jürgen Keiper, Laura Bezerra, Holger Brocks, Ulrich Thiel

 

http://www.dirf.org/jdim

 

email: service@dirf.org

 

 

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Journal of Digital Libraries

Call for papers

 

Katy Borner [katy@indiana.edu]   Tue 2/12/2003 3:45 AM

sigkm-l@asis.org; sigvis-l@asis.org; announcements@baychi.org; ah@listserver.tue.nl; cavernus@ncsa.uiuc.edu; cas@ptolemy.arc.nasa.gov; peterb@mail.sis.pitt.edu; infovis-digest@infovis.org; jm@indiana.edu

 

[Asis-l] Special Issue on Information Visualization Interfaces for Retrieval and Analysis in  JoDL

 

There will be a special issue of the Journal of Digital Libraries (http://www.dljournal.org) on

"Information Visualization Interfaces for Retrieval and Analysis"

 

Co-Editor: Katy Borner and Javed Mostafa

Submission deadline: May 1st, 2004

Notification of acceptance: July 31st, 2004

Final accepted papers due: August 31st, 2004

Publication date: October 2004

 

CfP is at http://www.dljournal.org/cfp/cfp_vis.pdf

 

Please feel free to contact Katy Borner at katy@indiana.edu if you have any questions concerning your submission. We are looking forward to a most interesting special issue. Javed Mostafa & Katy Borner

 

--

Katy Borner, Assistant Professor

Information Science & Cognitive Science

Indiana University, SLIS

10th Street & Jordan Avenue     Phone:  (812) 855-3256   Fax: -6166

Main Library 019                E-mail: katy@indiana.edu

Bloomington, IN 47405, USA      WWW:    ella.slis.indiana.edu/~katy

 

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Journal of Information Science and Technology (JIST

Call for Papers

 

Gretchen Whitney [gwhitney@UTK.EDU]       Mon 29/09/2003 10:39 PM JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU

 

 

---------- Forwarded message ----------

Date: Mon, 29 Sep 2003 10:24:52 -0400

From: "Steven John Simon, Ph.D." <simon_sj@Mercer.EDU>

 

 

Call for Papers

Journal of Information Science and Technology (JIST) www.JIST.info

 

Mission

 

The Journal of Information Science and Technology (JIST) is a unique and innovative publication of the Information Institute. JIST is founded on the premise that the wealth of our society is largely dependent on its ability to organize. This ability entails working with information and therefore handling it effectively. Information therefore is the lifeblood of organizations. The JIST mission is to significantly expand the domain of information research to a wide and eclectic audience of academics, consultants and executives who are involved in the management of organizations either for competitive advantage or service delivery enhancement.

 

JIST will publish original research and comments about the science of information and the application of technology for the successful management of organizations.  Contributions are particularly welcome which analyze the results of interdisciplinary research and relate to the intersection of theory, method and empirical findings.  Of interest will be manuscripts, which present the theoretical concepts of the acquisition, organization, and dissemination of information to support functional and cross-functional organizational operations, planning, and decision-making.  Further, publications will include the results of investigations that advance practice and understanding of the application of technology to support efficient and effective business operations.  JIST submissions will be double blind refereed and will provide a forum for high quality research, communication and debate on the subject of the science of information and its technology-enabled application.

 

Audience

 

JIST will be of value to both academic and practitioner audiences.  The audience will include those individuals who are interested in conducting research related to the consideration of information as a valuable corporate resource.  Manuscripts reflecting all research approaches will be encouraged, including those that are multi-disciplinary.  These will include information professionals who consider information to be a resource that they can leverage for organizational effectiveness. Such practitioners may reside in a broad spectrum of functions, including information technology, human resources, marketing, service delivery, supply chain management and logistics.

 

Submission

 

Papers submitted to JIST should be approximately twenty pages in length. Formatting instructions can be found at our website listed above.  The questions and electronic submissions should be sent to the Editor-In-Chief, Steven Simon (simon_sj@mercer.edu).

 

===

Steven John Simon, Ph.D.

Editor-in-Chief, Journal Information Science and Techonolgy

 

Associate Professor of Information Technology

Stetson School of Business and Economics

Mercer University

Atlanta, GA 30341

678-547-6118 (o)

====

Freedom is lost to those who take it for granted

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Journal of Library & Information Services in Distance Learning

Call for Papers

 

Daniel D. Barron [ddbarron@GWM.SC.EDU]  Fri 30/01/2004 9:31 PM  JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU  

Journal of Library & Information Services in Distance Learning

 

Greetings

 

As a member of the Editorial Board for JLISDL, I would like to encourage you and your colleagues to consider this journal as you develop publication pieces in this area.

 

Please consider the following note from the Editor, Dr. Stephen Dew.

 

"I have two issues of the Journal of Library & Information Services in

 

Distance Learning already in the hopper, and I am currently working on

 

getting the third issue together to send to the publisher.  As an Editorial Board member, you should be getting copies of the first issue soon  --  according to the Journal's Web site, the first issue is scheduled to out on February 6.  I think everyone will be very pleased with the first two issues.

 

So far, we have not received a manuscript related specifically to LIS distance learning, but I hope that we will be able to publish material

 

concerning LIS over the next year.  Whenever you complete a manuscript

 

concerning distance learning, I hope that you will consider submitting it to the Journal, and should you be aware of any colleagues working on similar manuscripts, please encourage them to submit to the Journal as

 

well.  If you have a manuscript that is almost complete and can get it to me very soon, there is a good possibility that we can include it in the

 

third issue of the Journal."

 

Contact

 

Stephen H. Dew, Ph.D., Editor

Journal of Library & Information Services in Distance Learning Coordinator of Library Services for Distance Education 100 Main Library University of Iowa Iowa City, IA  52242-1420

email: stephen-dew@uiowa.edu

Tel:    319-335-5069

Tel:    877-807-9587 (toll free)

FAX:  319-335-5900

http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/disted

 

Dr. Dan Barron, Ph.D.

Director and Professor

School of Library and Information Science

College of Mass Communications and Information Studies University of South Carolina Columbia, SC 29208

v: 803-777-3858

f: 803-777-7938

e: ddbarron@gwm.sc.edu

http://www.libsci.sc.edu/Dan/dan.htm

Grow or Die

 

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Library Link Newsletter

September 2003

 

Library Link [librarylink@emeraldinsight.com]         Tue 16/09/2003 7:04 PM

 Contents

----------

 

1. Collection Management - Viewpoint & Article

2. Library Link News

3. Library Collection & Development Management Links

4. Emerald User & Librarian Toolkits

5. Feedback

 

*****

 

1. Collection Management Viewpoint - September 2003

 

Collections for the Information Have-Nots

Professor Philip Calvert

 

Of all the concepts debated by information managers over the past decade and more, many have generated more heat than light, and one argument that seems to have been running for quite a while without too much light being shed on it is over the nature of the 'Digital Divide' and what can be done about it. In this column the potential for collection management as a tool for tackling Digital Divide issues will be addressed.

 

Click here to read the full viewpoint http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection

 

Free Related Article

 

Salinas, Romelia (2003)

"Addressing the Digital Divide through Collection Development" Collection Building 22, 3: 131-136.

 

Access this article at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection/#article

 

*****

 

2. Library Link News

 

Keep up to date with the latest news and information in your field. Visit:

 

Press Releases http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/press.htm

 

Forthcoming Events http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/events.htm

 

Books & Journals - Announcements & Reviews http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/bandj.htm

 

*****

 

3. Library Collection & Development Management Links

 

External web sites in this area are reviewed and linked to for your information at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection/links.htm

 

 

*****

 

4. Emerald User & Librarian Toolkits

 

Online databases are a major investment for any library, not just in terms of cost, but also in terms of the time needed to promote the services to library users and encourage them to be used effectively. To help ensure you have made a successful investment in subscribing to Emerald Fulltext, we have developed the Usage Toolkit as the definitive source of information to ensure that you and your institution are using your subscription to its fullest. To help meet specific requirements the Usage toolkit has been split into two: one to meet Librarians' exact requirements and the other tailored to meet the end-users needs.

 

To access the Toolkits please go to http://www.emeraldinsight.com/usagetoolkit/

 

 

*****

 

5. Emerald Management Reviews Publishes 2003 Accredited Journal List

 

Leading journals and periodicals in the management field have been selected for inclusion in Emerald Management Reviews' exclusive 2003 accredited journal coverage list. Formerly known as Anbar, Emerald Management Reviews is a database of independent reviews of every article from the top 400 management publications in the world. It is published by Emerald, leading international publisher in the management sector. The 2003 accredited journal list was selected by an accreditation board that includes top management gurus world-wide from Philip Kotler and Darrell Rigby to B. Joseph Pine II and Cary Cooper.

 

For more information see the full press announcement at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/news/press/emr2003.htm

 

*****

 

6. Feedback

 

We would like your feedback both on the structure and content of the site, what you would like to see on Library Link, as well as your thoughts on the viewpoints and topics covered. If you have any comments or suggestions you may send them to mailto:librarylink@emeraldinsight.com or complete our feedback form at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/librarylinkfeedback.htm

 

Thank you

 

Claire Jones

Library Link

mailto:cjones@emeraldinsight.com http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

October 2003

Library Link [librarylink@emeraldinsight.com]    Wed 8/10/2003 10:03 PM

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

                    Library Link Newsletter

                    October 2003

                    http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

                    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Contents

----------

 

1. Library Collection Development & Management - Viewpoint & Article 2. Library Management & Information Services - Viewpoint & Article 3. Library Technology - Viewpoint & Article 4. Library Link News 5. Library Technology Links 6. Emerald helping you to drive usage up 7. LIS Journals FREE for one week only 8. Feedback

 

*****

 

1. Library Collection Development & Management Viewpoint - October 2003

 

Collections and Services for Distance Learners - Are We Finally Waking Up? Professor G E Gorman

 

Ask a typical academic about the provision of information resources to off-campus students or distance learners, and these days the reply will probably be a somewhat unrealistic call for digitisation of everything. After all, once the information is available in e-format, everyone can have 24/7 access wherever they may be.... Ask a typical librarian about the same issue, and there will ensue a litany of problems associated with access to resources, the cost of document delivery, issues of information literacy education for off-campus students, service equity for on- and off-campus users, etc.

 

Click here to read the full viewpoint http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection

 

Free Related Article

 

Wang, C., and Liu, Z. (2003)

"Distance Education: Basic Resources Guide".

Collection Building 22, 3: 120-130.

 

Access this article at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection/#article

 

*****

 

2. Library Management & Information Services Viewpoint - October 2003

 

Can a Computer Be Sincere When It Says "Have a nice day"? Philip Calvert

 

Of all the concepts debated by information managers over the past decade and more, many have generated more heat than light, and one argument that seems to have been running for quite a while without too much light being shed on it is over the nature of the 'Digital Divide' and what can be done about it. In this column the potential for collection management as a tool for tackling Digital Divide issues will be addressed.

 

Click here to read the full viewpoint http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management

 

Free Related Article

 

Santos, J. (2003)

"E-service quality: a model of virtual service quality dimensions," Managing Service Quality, 13, 3, pp. 233-246.

 

Access this article at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management/#article

 

*****

 

3. Library Technology Viewpoint - October 2003

 

Standards Part II: Standards and XML

Dr Thomas R. Kochtanek

 

In a previous column we addressed the role and importance of information standards for the library community. We covered certain categories of primary technology-based standards and then went on to discuss and present certain bibliographic standards, including MARC, the Dublin Core metadata standard and RDF, or Resource Description Framework.

 

Click here to read the full viewpoint http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/technology

 

Free Related Article

 

Taylor, Stephanie. (2003)

"A Quick Guide to ... XML ".

Interlending & Document Supply 31, 3.

 

Access this article at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/technology/#article

 

*****

 

4. Library Link News

 

Keep up to date with the latest news and information in your field. Visit:

 

Press Releases http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/press.htm

 

Library Link Announcements http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/announce53.htm

 

Library Link Reviews http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/reviews37.htm

 

*****

 

5. Library Technology Links

 

External web sites in this area are reviewed and linked to for your information at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/technology/links.htm

 

 

*****

 

6. Emerald helping you to drive usage up

 

Visit the Academic Librarian home page at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/academic/librarian to find out about Emerald's free services for your library, news from Emerald and insight into what Emerald readers are downloading.

 

*****

 

7. LIS Journals FREE for one week only

 

Emerald's Library Hi Tech News and The Electronic Library journals are open for free access between Monday 13th-Sunday 19th October. To access the current and past volumes to these journals during this time please go to the Journals of the Week homepage at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/jotw

 

*****

 

8. Feedback

 

We would like your feedback both on the structure and content of the site, what you would like to see on Library Link, as well as your thoughts on the viewpoints and topics covered. If you have any comments or suggestions you may send them to mailto:librarylink@emeraldinsight.com or complete our feedback form at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/librarylinkfeedback.htm

 

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November-December 2003

 

Library Link [librarylink@emeraldinsight.com]  Mon 15/12/2003 11:30 PM

Library Link Newsletter - Nov-Dec 2003

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

                    Library Link Newsletter

                    November-December 2003

                    http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

                    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Contents

----------

 

1. Library Collection Development & Management - Viewpoints & Articles 2. Library Management & Information Services - Viewpoints & Articles 3. Library Link News 4. Library Management & Information Services Links 5. Emerald supports IFLA 6. Emerald helping you to drive usage up 7. Emerald - Supporting Consortia worldwide 8. Feedback

 

*****

 

1. Library Collection Development & Management Viewpoint

 

November 2003

 

Virtual delivery, Cross-sectoral borrowing and the inadequacy of Academic Library Collections Professor G E Gorman Read the full viewpoint at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection/nov03.htm

 

Free Related Article: Moyo, L.M., and Cahoy, E.S. (2003) "Meeting the Needs of Remote Library Users". Library Management 24, 6/7: 281-290. Access this article at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection/nov03.htm#article

 

December 2003

 

Using the Web to Expose the Cabalistic Mysteries of Collection Management by Professor G E Gorman Read the full viewpoint at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection

 

Free Related Article:

Level, A., and Myers, S. (2003) in 'Creating Internal Web Tools for Collection Development'. Collection Building 22, 4: 162-166. Access this article at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection/#article

 

*****

 

2. Library Management & Information Services Viewpoint

 

November 2003

 

Information literacy and the information competent organisation Professor G E Gorman Read the full viewpoint at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management/nov03.htm

 

Free Related Article: Joint, N. (2003) 'Information Literacy Evaluation: Moving towards Virtual Learning Environments'. The Electronic Library 21, 4: 322-334 Access this article at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management/nov03.htm#article

 

December 2003

 

Finding a Role for Libraries: Protecting Freedom

Philip Calvert

Read the full viewpoint at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management

 

Free Related Article: Stuart Hamilton, S., and Pors, N.O. (2003) "Freedom of Access to Information and Freedom of Expression: The Internet as a Tool for Global Social Inclusion". Library Management, Vol 24, Nos 8/9, 2003: 407-416. Access this article at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management/index.htm#article

 

 

*****

 

3. Library Link News

 

Keep up to date with the latest news and information in your field. Visit:

 

Press Releases http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/press.htm

 

Library Link Announcements http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/announce53.htm

 

Library Link Reviews http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/reviews37.htm

 

*****

 

4. Library Management & Information Services Links

 

External web sites in this area are reviewed and linked to for your information at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management/links.htm

 

 

*****

 

5. Emerald supports IFLA

 

A long-standing gold corporate sponsor http://www.ifla.org/III/sponsors/index.htm, Emerald Group Publishing Limited supports the work of the IFLA LIS Journals Section. The Section plans to hold a programme at the annual conference in Buenos Aires and invites potential speakers on the theme "LIS journals for continuing professional education" http://www.ifla.org/IV/ifla70/calllisj-e.htm

 

*****

 

6. Emerald helping you to drive usage up

 

Visit the academic librarian home page at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/academic/librarian to find out about Emerald's free services for your library, news from Emerald and insight into what Emerald readers are downloading most.

 

*****

 

7. Emerald - Supporting Consortia worldwide

 

For many librarians, the most difficult problem they have is servicing more customers while reducing spend in an environment of ever-decreasing budgets. Emerald consortium agreements aim to make it possible to meet the needs of library users by giving librarians a choice of purchasing models, budget stability, extended readership facilities, and substantial reductions on the cost of paper subscriptions.

 

To more information please go to http://www.emeraldinsight.com/consortia

 

*****

 

8. Feedback

 

We would like your feedback both on the structure and content of the site, what you would like to see on Library Link, as well as your thoughts on the viewpoints and topics covered. If you have any comments or suggestions you may send them to mailto:librarylink@emeraldinsight.com or complete our feedback form at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/librarylinkfeedback.htm

 

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January 2004

Library Link [librarylink@emeraldinsight.com]  Wed 14/01/2004 5:20 PM

Library Link Newsletter - January 2004

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

                    Library Link Newsletter

                    January 2004

                    http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

                    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Contents

----------

 

1. Library Collection Development & Management - Viewpoint & Article 2. Library Management & Information Services - Viewpoint & Article 3. Library Technology - Viewpoint 4. Library Link News 5. Library Collection & Development Management Links 6. Best Paper Award 2004 - Aslib Corporate Members VOTE NOW 7. Free access to OCLC Systems & Services 8. Feedback

 

*****

 

1. Library Collection Development & Management - Viewpoint & Article

 

Free Viewpoint:

Social Exclusion - Do Collections Matter?

Professor G E Gorman

Read the full viewpoint at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection

 

Free Related Article:

Suaiden, E.J. (2003) 'The Social Impact of Public Libraries'. Library Review 52, 8: 379-387. Access this article at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection/#article

 

*****

 

2. Library Management & Information Services - Viewpoint & Article

 

Free Viewpoint:

The Information Manager's Responsibility for Fostering a Research Culture Professor G E Gorman Read the full viewpoint at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management

 

Free Related Article:

Juznic, P., and Urbanija, J. (2003) 'Developing Research Skills in Library and Information Science Studies'. Library Management 24, 6/7: 324-331. Access this article at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management/index.htm#article

 

 

*****

 

3. Library Technology - Viewpoint

 

Free Viewpoint:

 

How Close Are We to Realizing Vannevar Bush's Dream of the Memex? Dr Thomas R. Kochtanek Read the full viewpoint at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/technology

 

*****

 

4. Library Link News

 

Keep up to date with the latest news and information in your field. Visit:

 

Press Releases http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/press.htm

 

Forthcoming Events http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/events.htm

 

Book Announcements http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/announce56.htm

 

Book Reviews http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/reviews40.htm

 

*****

 

5. Library Collection & Development Management Links

 

External web sites in this area are reviewed, this month on the topic of digital libraries, and linked to for your information at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/collection/links.htm

 

*****

 

6. Best Paper Award 2004 - Aslib Corporate Members VOTE NOW

 

Aslib and Emerald have launched the second annual award for best article in an Aslib-Emerald journal. Last year the winning paper was "Domain analysis in information science: 11 approaches - traditional as well as innovative" from Journal of Documentation Vol. 58 No. 4, 2003 by Birger Hjorland.

 

Let your voice be heard and VOTE NOW for the paper published during 2003 which made the biggest impact you.  Send your vote by e-mail to vote@aslib.com For further information: http://www.aslib.com/pr/aslib_emerald_award.htm

 

*****

 

7. Free access to OCLC Systems & Services

 

Emerald's Journals of the Week web site features two journals, every week, from our extensive portfolio of management titles available for free full text access to current and past volumes. This week one of our library titles, OCLC Systems & Services, is available for free access between 12/01-18/01/04. Focusing on topics such as cataloguing, document delivery, metadata standards, indexing, distributed digital libraries, user services and much more, OCLC Systems & Services can be accessed at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/jotw

 

*****

 

8. Feedback

 

We would like your feedback both on the structure and content of the site, what you would like to see on Library Link, as well as your thoughts on the viewpoints and topics covered. If you have any comments or suggestions you may send them to mailto:librarylink@emeraldinsight.com or complete our feedb ack form at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/librarylinkfeedback.htm

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

February 2004

Emerald Library Link [librarylink@emeraldinsight.com]  Tue 24/02/2004 7:36 PM 

Library Link Newsletter - February 2004

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

                    Library Link Newsletter

                    February 2004

                    http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

                    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Contents

----------

 

1. Library Link News

2. Free access to Emerald's Library Hi Tech journal

3. Library Hi Tech journal sponsors the ICDL 2004 conference

4. Emerald helping you to drive usage up

5. Feedback

 

*****

 

1. Library Link News

 

Keep up to date with the latest news and information in your field. Visit:

 

Press Releases http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/press.htm

 

Forthcoming Events http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/events.htm

 

Books Announcements http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/announce57.htm

 

Book Reviews http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/reviews41.htm

 

Publishing Opportunities http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/publishing.htm

 

*****

 

2. Free access to Emerald's Library Hi Tech journal

 

Emerald's Journals of the Week web site features two journals, every week, from our extensive portfolio of management titles available for free full text access to current and past volumes. This week one of our library titles, Library Hi Tech, is available for free access between 23rd-29th February and can be accessed at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/jotw

 

*****

 

3. Library Hi Tech journal sponsors the ICDL 2004 conference

 

The Editor of the Emerald journal Library Hi Tech (see http://www.emeraldinsight.com/lht.htm), Dr Michael Seadle, is presenting at the conference (which takes place 24-27 February in New Delhi, India

http://www.teriin.org/events/icdl/supporter.htm) on the intellectual property issues of digital libraries. Emerald/Library Hi Tech are Co-Associates of the conference.

 

To mark the occasion, the journal is open access between 23rd to 29th February. To access it go to http://www.emeraldinsight.com/lht.htm and click on "Table of contents".

 

Dr Seadle is author of a series of articles "Copyright in the networked world", published at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/copyright/column.htm

 

Prospective authors are invited to submit original manuscripts for possible publication in Library Hi Tech. It is distributed to 1,200 organizations worldwide, and is being used in more than 80 countries. A double-blind peer-reviewed academic journal on computing and technology for the library community, it is international in scope, and defines technology in the broadest possible terms to include the full range of tools that librarians and their customers employ. Research articles about new technologies or new uses of technologies are particularly welcomed. Case studies and scholarly literature reviews are also accepted.

 

Submissions should made as e-mail attachments in one of the following preferred formats: Word, Word Perfect, Rich Text Format, or Tex/LaTeX to:

 

Editor

Dr. Michael Seadle, 100 Library, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1048 USA

Tel: +1 517-432-6123 ex 292; Fax: +1 517-432-4795 mailto:seadle@msu.edu

 

Issues of the journal will be published in 2004 on Metadata and MARC (guest edited by Brad Eden), and National Leadership Grants (guest edited by Tim Cole).

 

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4. Emerald helping you to drive usage up

 

Visit the academic librarian home page at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/academic/librarian/ to find out about Emerald's free services for your library, news from Emerald and insight into what article and special issues Emerald readers are downloading.

 

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5. Feedback

 

We would like your feedback both on the structure and content of the site, what you would like to see on Library Link, as well as your thoughts on the viewpoints and topics covered. If you have any comments or suggestions you may send them to mailto:librarylink@emeraldinsight.com or complete our feedback form at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/librarylinkfeedback.htm

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March 2004

Library Link [librarylink@emeraldinsight.com]  Tue 23/03/2004 6:42 PM  

Library Link Newsletter - March 2004 

 

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                    Library Link Newsletter

                    March 2004

                    http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

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Contents

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1. Library Management & Information Services - Viewpoint & Article 2. Library Link News 3. Just published by Bernard F Reilly Jr in "Library Management" journal 4. Turn your conference attendance to even greater advantage 5. Emerald's new Copyright & Permissions web site 6. 2003 management journal rankings now available 7. Feedback

 

 

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1. Library Management & Information Services - Viewpoint & Article

 

Free Viewpoint:

Feminising Management Priorities: Can We Refocas the Principal Concerns of Senior Management in Libraries? Professor G E Gorman Read the full viewpoint at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management

 

Free Related Article:

Joint, N. (2003) "Staff Development and Training in the Digital Library Environment", Library Review, 52, 8/9: 417-421 Access this article at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management/index.htm#article

 

 

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2. Library Link News

 

Keep up to date with the latest news and information in your field. Visit:

 

Press Releases http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/press.htm

 

Forthcoming Events http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/events.htm

 

Book Announcements http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/announce58.htm

 

Book Reviews http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/reviews42.htm

 

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3. Just published by Bernard F Reilly Jr in "Library Management" journal: A report from the conference "Preserving America's Printed Resources: The Roles of Repositories, Depositories, and Collections of Record", organized by the Center for Research Libraries. This was a two-part event held in Chicago, 21-22 July 2003, and this report summarizes the second part, which was an extended discussion on the theme of repositories and collections of record, asking "How can libraries work together to optimize management of the nation's knowledge resources in printed form?" The intended outcome of the discussion was to be an agenda consisting of realistic near- and long-term national-level actions, and identifying the appropriate participants in those activities and the roles those participants might play.

 

Go to http://www.emeraldinsight.com/lm.htm and click on "Table of Contents" for subscriber access to the full text of the report.

 

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4. Turn your conference attendance to even greater advantage Consider writing up a report of the conferences you attend, for potential publication in Library Hi Tech News, which specialises in detailed reports of conferences which cover new library technologies and applications. See http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals/lhtn/cfp.htm  on how to submit.

 

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5. Emerald's new Copyright & Permissions web site http://www.emeraldinsight.com/copyright

 

Emerald is pleased to announce the launch of its new Copyright and Permissions Web Site which we believe is the most comprehensive and scholarship friendly copyright resource from any journal publisher on the Web.

 

It aims to provide tangible benefits for our authors and ensure the widest possible readership of their work, make it easy for people to comply with often confusing rules and regulations via our simple and quick permissions procedures and provide useful links and information to ensure that you are kept fully up to date on this fast moving and vitally important topic.

 

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/copyright - your first choice for information

on:

 

- Author rights and guidance including our innovative Authors' Charter

- Emerald Research Fund to promote the advancement of scholarly research

- Emerald Partnerships for content licensing and Web rights

- Premium Permission Service for authors and members of subscribing organisations

- Plagiarism policy and help

- Exclusive column from Library Hi Tech editor Michael Seadle

- Over 190 refereed articles on copyright published by Emerald

- Links to international copyright legislation and useful Web sites

 

For further information contact Jenny Pickles mailto:jpickles@emeraldinsight.com

 

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6. 2003 management journal rankings now available

 

Vital for librarians, editors, researchers and publishers, the latest Emerald Management Reviews annual journal performance rankings have just been made available at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/reviews/awards/golden.htm along with details of this year's Golden Page Award winners.

 

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7. Feedback

 

We would like your feedback both on the structure and content of the site, what you would like to see on Library Link, as well as your thoughts on the viewpoints and topics covered. If you have any comments or suggestions you may send them to mailto:librarylink@emeraldinsight.com or complete our feedback form at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/librarylinkfeedback.htm

 

If you think yo