NEWS FROM OTHER JOURNALS SECTION

MARCH 2005  ISSUE

Editorial note:

This section contains items culled from various Internet news services, discussion lists and other announcements.  Unless specifically noted, I have not visited the sites, used any of the software, reviewed the literature, or written the news items.  I present this digest to you in good faith but cannot vouch for the accuracy of its content.  

Kerry Smith

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ALISE News

Vol 2005, issue 1

Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU]; on behalf of; Susanne Dupes [sdupes@IIAWEB.COM]                   Thu 17/03/2005 2:33 AM        New issue of ALISE Newsletter

 

A new issue of ALISE News is available at http://www.alise.org/newsletter/issue1_2005/index.html.  This issue contains a number of photos from the ALISE annual conference.

 

*****************************

Susanne Dupes

ALISE Assistant Director

P.O. Box 4219

Oak Ridge, TN  37831-4219

sdupes@iiaweb.com

Voice:  865.425.0155

Fax:  865.481.0390

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ARIADNE

issue 41, 30 October 2004

From: Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [mailto:PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU] On Behalf Of Richard Waller

Sent: Wednesday, 3 November 2004 1:40 AM

To: PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU

Subject: Ariadne issue 41 was published 30 October 2004

With apologies for any cross-posting:

Dear Colleagues,

Issue 41 of  Ariadne was published on 30 October 2004: http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue41/

 

Main Articles:

* What Do Application Profiles Reveal about the Learning Object Metadata Standard?

- Jean Godby assesses the customised subsets of metadata elements that have been defined by 35 projects using the LOM standard to describe e-learning resources.

 

*  ISBN-13: New Number on the Block

- Ann Chapman outlines the planned changes to the ISBN standard and its impact on the information community and the book trade.

 

*  The Tapir: Adding E-Theses Functionality to DSpace

- Richard Jones demonstrates how the Theses Alive Plugin for Institutional Repositories (Tapir) has provided E-Theses functionality for DSpace.

 

* Improving Communications within JISC through News Aggregation

- Paul Davey explains what JISC is doing to improve communications through more effective news promotion. Roddy MacLeod and Malcolm Moffat examine the technology EEVL has developed in this area.

 

* Developing Portal Services and Evaluating How Users Want to Use Them: The CREE Project

 - Chris Awre, Matthew J Dovey, Jon Hunter, William Kilbride and Ian Dolphin describe the JISC-funded Contextual Resource Evaluation Environment (CREE) Project and its user and technical investigations to examine how users wish to use library search services.

 

* How the Use of Standards Is Transforming Australian Digital Libraries

- Debbie Campbell explains how the exploitation of recent standards has allowed the National Library of Australia to digitise its collections and host federated search services and provide an improved service.

 

* The Dawning of DARE: A Shared Experience

- Annemiek van der Kuil and Martin Feijen describe the first year of the DARE Project and its foundation of the OAI repositories of Dutch academic output.

 

 Get Tooled Up:

*Virtual Rooms, Real Meetings

- Andy Powell takes a brief look at VRVS, a desktop video-conferencing tool that can be used to support collaborative activities between groups of geographically distributed researchers.

 

Workshop and Conference Reports: At the Event:

 

* ECDL 2004: A Digital Librarian's Report

- Jessie Hey reports on the 8th European Conference on

Research and Advanced Technology for Digital Libraries

held at the University of Bath in September 2004.

 

* ECDL 2004: 4th International Web Archiving Workshop

- Michael Day reports on the 4th International Web Archiving Workshop held at the University of Bath as part of ECDL 2004.

 

 

* The Institutional Web Management Workshop 2004

- Tracey Stanley reports on the 8th Institutional Web Management Workshop at the University of Birmingham over 27-29 July.

 

* The JIBS Workshop on Resource/Reading List Software: The Reality

- Frances Boyle reports on the one-day workshop on the current state of play in the Resource/Reading List software market, held at University of Oxford.

 

* Digital Resources for the Humanities

- Alastair Dunning reviews for us this year's conference on Digital Resources in the Humanities at the University of Newcastle.

 

* Sense of the South West Conference: Collaboration for Sustainability

- Katie Lusty reports on a one-day conference on the sustainability of digitisation projects, held in Bath on 8 October 2004.

 

 

* e-Culture Horizons: Salzburg, September 2004

- Andreas Strasser reports on a two-day symposium hosted and organised by Salzburg Research in Salzburg, Austria.

 

 

Ariadne Reviews:

 

* Libraries Without Walls 5

- David Parkes reviews the fifth compilation of the biennial Library Without Walls Conference. He finds how far we have come and how far we have to go in delivering services to distributed learners.

 

* Knowledge Management Lessons Learned - What works and what doesn't

 - Martin White praises the work of the editors on the 32 essays covering how KM initiatives can deliver tangible outcomes and takes a practical and balanced view of their overall value.

 

* Information Representation and Retrieval in the Digital Age

- Chris Awre finds a useful if limited introduction for those coming new to the field of information representation and retrieval, but is unconvinced by its overall coverage and depth.

 

* The Web Library: Building a World Class Personal Library with Free Web Resources

- Lina Coelho looks at a book she feels is destined to repay its purchase price even if you never manage to read it all.

 

* The Information Society: A study of continuity and change

- Lise Foster finds this a useful scene setter for the novice and valuable reminder for the professional of the challenges facing today's librarian.

 

.Plus our regular columns and expanded newsline.

 

Contributions to Ariadne issues 42 and 43 are being arranged and prepared; please send proposals for articles to our regular contact point:

  ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk

 

Kindly send books for review to the Editor's address (below),

 

  Best regards,

  Richard Waller

  Editor Ariadne

  UKOLN

  The Library

  University of Bath

  Bath BA2 7AY

  UK

  tel +44 (0) 1225 383570

  fax +44 (0) 1225 386838

  Email ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk

  Web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/

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BIOMEDICAL DIGITAL LIBRARIES

New issue

Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [JESSE@listserv.utk.edu]; on behalf of; Ellen Detlefsen [ellen@MAIL.SIS.PITT.EDU]                        JESSE@listserv.utk.edu           Thu 21/10/2004

announcing a new  journal: Biomedical Digital Libraries

I am sending this on behalf of Charles Greenberg (Yale University), editor in chief of Biomedical Digital Libraries.  Apologies for any duplication as this message is being sent to multiple lists ===================================================================

www.bio-diglib.com:  Biomedical Digital Libraries is an Open Access, peer-reviewed, online journal that considers manuscripts on research aspects of digital library content and usage in biomedical settings, including academic medical centers, research and development institutes, and health care institutions. The research results of collaborative initiatives with information technology and informatics partners are appropriate and encouraged. Non-research articles should conform to the alternative formats specified, each of which either synthesize previously published research or present an original argument, hypothesis, review, or method that acknowledge or challenge the current state of digital library knowledge and/or practice.

 

Biomedical Digital Libraries considers the following types of articles:

        Research

        Commentaries

        Debate articles

        Hypotheses

        Methodology articles

        Resource reviews

        Reviews

 

Reasons for publishing in Biomedical Digital Libraries:

 

All the articles published in Biomedical Digital Libraries are Open Access, universally accessible online without charge.  They are immediately deposited and permanently archived in PubMed Central, as well as other national archives.

 

Authors retain the copyright of their articles and also grant any third party the right to use the article freely.

 

High visibility - anyone with Internet access can read your article, free of charge.

 

All articles are indexed for PubMed.

 

Articles are published immediately upon acceptance. Electronic submission and peer-review makes the whole process efficient.

 

Unlimited space for figures, extensive datasets and video footage. Professional formatting.

 

To submit your next article to Biomedical Digital Libraries go to http://www.bio-diglib.com/info/instructions/

===================================================================

 

Ellen Detlefsen {Member, Biomedical Digital Libraries Editorial Board}

 

Associate Professor, Department of Library & Information Science,

        School of Information Sciences

Core Faculty, Center for Biomedical Informatics, School of Medicine Chief, Information Dissemination Unit, Intervention Research Center for

        Late Life Mood Disorders, School of Medicine

University of Pittsburgh

135 N. Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh PA 15260

 

email: ellen@mail.sis.pitt.edu OR detlefseneg@upmc.edu

website: http://www2.sis.pitt.edu/~ellen/

phone messages to:  412-624-9444  -  Departmental FAX: 412-648-7001

 

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CURRENT CITES

October 2004

From: Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [mailto:PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU] On Behalf Of CITES Moderator

Sent: Saturday, 30 October 2004 12:48 AM

To: PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU

Subject: Current Cites, October 2004

Current Cites

 

                      Volume 15, no. 10, October 2004

 

                          Edited by [2]Roy Tennant

 

                             ISSN: 1060-2356 -

       http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/2004/cc04.15.10.html

 

      Contributors: [3]Charles W. Bailey, Jr., [4]Terry Huwe, [5]Shirl

                   Kennedy, Jim Ronningen, [6]Roy Tennant

 

     [7]2004 Information Format Trends: Content, Not Containers

     Dublin, OH: OCLC, October 2004.

     (http://www.oclc.org/info/2004trends/). - OCLC demonstrates once

     again that it is capable of spotting trends and discussing their

     implications for libraries. As OCLC did in the 2003 Environmental

     Scan: Pattern Recognition report, this longish paper pulls from

     sources as diverse as the Pew Internet Trust and Billboard in the

     quest to understand societal information trends. The top trends

     identified here are the: "legitimacy of open source publishing

     (e.g., blogs), rapidly expanding economics of microcontent,

     repurposing of "old" content for new media, and multimedia content

     as a service for an array of devices." You may not agree with

     everything you read, or even the issues that OCLC surfaces in this

     report, but if you're interested in the information environment of

     which libraries are a part, you should not miss this. - [8]RT

 

     "[9]Wiki Wars"  [10]Red Herring   (14 October 2004)

     (http://www.redherring.com/Article.aspx?a=10909). - The

     [11]Wikipedia is one of those venerable Internet resources that's

     always just sort of been there. A noble undertaking to create a

     free online encyclopedia, it is somewhat of a mixed bag, as any

     information professional will tell you. Some of the entries are

     eloquently written and contain high quality information. Other

     stuff...well...as this article points out, the Wikipedia has become

     "the latest battleground in the presidential election as

     users...squabble over entries related to President George W. Bush

     and Democratic challenger John Kerry, the junior senator from

     Massachusetts." Since anyone is free to edit a Wiki article, you

     can see the potential for problems galore. And it's not just

     election-related material that is under a cloud. "Some users have

     even deliberately inserted errors into Wikipedia entries to test

     how quickly users can detect and remove them." Ugh! The article

     points out that "Wikipedia has become a popular online reference

     for students, academics, and even journalists." A friend passed

     along a [12]legal document just this past week in which a real live

     sitting judge actually cited the Wikipedia. (See page 16.) Long

     story short, editors may be coming to the Wikipedia. Jimmy Wales,

     president of the [13]Wikimedia Foundation, "said that next year he

     will begin using editors to review the web site's content for

     accuracy and allow users to rate contributions to the encyclopedia

     for their quality." - [14]SK

 

     Cole, Timothy W., and Sarah L.  Shreeves.  "[15]The IMLS NLG

     Program: Fostering Collaboration"  [16]Library Hi Tech   22(3)

     (2004):  246-248.

     (http://lysander.emeraldinsight.com/vl=885645/cl=77/nw=1/rpsv/cgi-b

     in/linker?ini=emerald&reqidx=/cw/mcb/07378831/v22n3/s1/p246). - If

     you are interested in the important work of the Institute of Museum

     and Library Services (IMLS), check out a new [17]special issue of

     Library Hi Tech that provides descriptions of seven projects funded

     by IMLS' National Leadership Grant program. Issue guest editors

     Timothy W. Cole and Sarah Shreeves overview the contents of the

     special issue in this article. They have selected articles that

     represent three categories of grant activity: (1) "state-wide and

     regional collaborations between multiple types of organizations" (3

     articles), (2) "communities of interest that have coalesced to

     spawn successful and wide-ranging collaborations between

     information specialists (librarians, curators, and information

     technologists) and subject specialist end-users (students,

     teachers, and scholars)" (2 articles), and (3) "ongoing research

     into and demonstrations of key infrastructure components that take

     advantage of the opportunities afforded by new technologies to

     facilitate and enable collaboration in digital library building at

     a high level between experts with diverse skills and backgrounds

     and widely dispersed geographically" (2 articles). The issue also

     includes an article by Joyce Ray, the IMLS Associate Deputy

     Director for Library Services, that overviews IMLS activities.

     Access to this issue is currently free. - [18]CB

 

     Kohno, Tadayoshi, et. al. "Analysis of an Electronic Voting

     System"  [19]IEEE Computer Society: Proceedings of the 2004 IEEE

     Symposium on Security and Privacy   (May 2004) - Not one of our

     usual topics, but this critique of an information technology is of

     obvious importance. If you're the type of person who gets asked the

     tech questions, "Why don't people trust e-voting?" has a more than

     adequate response in this paper. The authors thoroughly pick apart

     the Diebold AccuVote-TS DRE (direct recording electronic) system,

     which has a substantial share of the e-voting market. From the

     hackability of the voter card which the voter inserts into the

     reader, to the ease of access to administrator functions, to

     tampering with system configuration, to the ability to tell the

     machine to stop accepting votes, it's clear that current security

     in this and other e-voting systems is probably more wide open than

     your library's circulation files. Most of the analysis centers on

     elements of the source code, but each cause and effect is described

     in plain English which non-coders find accessible. This is a

     stellar example of the public service performed by exposing

     security flaws and the subject is treated with the serious tone

     which it deserves, without a trace of the mayhem glee common to the

     work of the 2600 crowd. The scariest thing about this long list of

     attacks, whether you find them likely or unlikely to ever be used,

     is that it only takes one to call into question the reliability of

     a machine or even of an entire polling place. And after the breach

     is discovered, the chance of getting back to an accurate count of

     one person - one vote is slim to none. - JR

 

     Loban, Bryn.  "[20]Between Rhizomes and Trees: P2P Information

     Systems"  [21]First Monday   9(10) (4 October 2004)

     (http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_10/loban/). - Loban

     offers a comprehensive overview of information retrieval that

     relies on "Peer-to-Peer"(P2P)information systems -- more famously

     known for music file sharing. He evaluates five desktop P2P

     information systems: Napster with its clones (OpenNap and eDonkey),

     and Gnutella and FastTrack (more famously known as Kazaa). What's

     good about this article is that it gives the reader a very detailed

     explanation of what P2P is all about: its "self-organizing"

     characteristics, the emergence of hierarchies of users, etc. We

     cite it here because recent regulatory events in California draw

     new attention to P2P file sharing, which also forms the basis for

     many digital preservation strategies (such as LOCKSS, or Lots of

     Copies Keeps Stuff Safe). While the author's goal is to compare

     these various systems and offer suggestions for further study, he

     simultaneously maps online life in the P2P environment, which comes

     at a good moment in time for digital librarians who are concerned

     with "persistent" resource building. He concludes with an

     evaluation of "ethics" in the P2P community, which, of course,

     draws upon the very public battles of music file sharing. This

     article is a good overview piece for anyone who wants to check in

     on - [22]TH

 

     OCLC/RLG PREMIS Working Group, . [23]Implementing Preservation

     Repositories for Digital Materials: Current Practice and Emerging

     Trends in the Cultural Heritage Community   Dublin, OH: OCLC, 2004.

     (http://www.oclc.org/research/projects/pmwg/surveyreport.pdf). -

     This report by the joint OCLC/RLG Working Group Preservation

     Metadata: Implementation Strategies (PREMIS) is based on a survey

     about existing practices in digital preservation of forty-eight

     organizations conducted in late 2003 and early 2004. There were a

     number of specific survey findings that informed the following

     trends and conclusions: "store metadata redundantly in an XML or

     relational database and with the content data objects. Use the METS

     format for structural metadata and as a container for descriptive

     and administrative metadata; use Z39.87/MIX for technical metadata

     for still images. Use the OAIS model as a framework and starting

     point for designing the preservation repository, but retain the

     flexibility to add functions and services that go beyond the model.

     Maintain multiple versions (originals and at least some normalized

     or migrated versions) in the repository, and store complete

     metadata for all versions. Choose multiple strategies for digital

     preservation." Highly recommended for anyone interested in digital

     preservation. - [24]RT

 

     Poynder, Richard.  "[25]Ten Years After"  [26]Information Today

     21(9) (2004) (http://www.infotoday.com/it/oct04/poynder.shtml). -

     No, this article is not about the famous rock band that shook

     Woodstock with "I'm Going Home." Rather, it's about how Stevan

     Harnad shook-up the scholarly publishing world in the ten years

     after his famous "[27]subversive proposal." Poynder says that ". .

     . while Harnad cannot claim to have invented the OA movement, his

     phenomenal energy and determination, coupled with a highly focused

     view of what is needed, undoubtedly earns him the title of chief

     architect of open access." But this article is a not just a paean

     to Harnad's many notable accomplishments, it is also an

     interesting, very concise history of the open access movement that

     touches on its struggles as well as its triumphs. - [28]CB

 

     Pressman-Levy, Nancy.  "[29]Searching RedLightGreen at Princeton

     University Library"  [30]RLG Focus   (69) (August 2004)

     (http://www.rlg.org/en/page.php?Page_ID=17921#article4). - If you

     haven't yet used the [31]RedLightGreen system from the Research

     Libraries Group, then stop reading this screed and go try it out.

     RLG took their Eureka system, a rather huge library catalog, and

     actually made it usable by normal human beings. There is, in other

     words, hope for the rest of us that our library catalogs do not

     need to be as obtuse and painful to use as they are now. This piece

     by the coordinator of RedLightGreen testing at Princeton discusses

     how the system has been used by Princeton students to great

     success, and in so doing she covers all the innovations that

     RedLightGreen has introduced. As Pressman-Levy puts it, "The staff

     and the students exploring RedLightGreen at Princeton gave high

     marks to all of these special features." Whether or not we point

     our users to this system, there is much to learn here that we can

     nonetheless apply to our own (sadly inadequate) systems. - [32]RT

     _________________________________________________________________

 

                      Current Cites - ISSN: 1060-2356

   Copyright (c) 2004 by the Regents of the University of California All

                              rights reserved.

 

   Copying is permitted for noncommercial use by computerized bulletin

   board/conference systems, individual scholars, and libraries.

   Libraries are authorized to add the journal to their collections at no

   cost. This message must appear on copied material. All commercial use

   requires permission from the editor. All product names are trademarks

   or registered trade marks of their respective holders. Mention of a

   product in this publication does not necessarily imply endorsement of

   the product. To subscribe to the Current Cites distribution list, send

   the message "sub cites [your name]" to

   [33]listserv@library.berkeley.edu, replacing "[your name]" with your

   name. To unsubscribe, send the message "unsub cites" to the same

   address.

 

References

 

   Visible links

   1. LYNXIMGMAP:http://sunsite/CurrentCites/2004/cc04.15.10.html#head

   2. http://roytennant.com/

   3. http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm

   4. http://iir.berkeley.edu/faculty/huwe/

   5. http://www.uncagedlibrarian.com/

   6. http://roytennant.com/

   7. http://www.oclc.org/info/2004trends/

   8. http://roytennant.com/

   9. http://www.redherring.com/Article.aspx?a=10909

  10. http://www.redherring.com/

  11. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page

  12. http://www.ca11.uscourts.gov/opinions/ops/200216886.pdf

  13. http://wikimediafoundation.org/wiki/Home

  14. http://www.uncagedlibrarian.com/

  15. http://lysander.emeraldinsight.com/vl=885645/cl=77/nw=1/rpsv/cgi-bin/linker?

ini=emerald&reqidx=/cw/mcb/07378831/v22n3/s1/p246

  16. http://lysander.emeraldinsight.com/vl=885645/cl=77/nw=1/rpsv/cw/www/mcb/0737

8831/contp1.htm

  17. http://lysander.emeraldinsight.com/vl=885645/cl=77/nw=1/rpsv/cw/www/mcb/0737

8831/v22n3/contp1-1.htm

  18. http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm

  19. http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/

  20. http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_10/loban/

  21. http://www.firstmonday.org/

  22. http://iir.berkeley.edu/faculty/huwe/

  23. http://www.oclc.org/research/projects/pmwg/surveyreport.pdf

  24. http://roytennant.com/

  25. http://www.infotoday.com/it/oct04/poynder.shtml

  26. http://www.infotoday.com/

  27. http://www.arl.org/scomm/subversive/toc.html

  28. http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm

  29. http://www.rlg.org/en/page.php?Page_ID=17921#article4

  30. http://www.rlg.org/en/page.php?Page_ID=17921

  31. http://redlightgreen.com/

  32. http://roytennant.com/

  33. mailto:listserv@library.berkeley.edu

 

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November 2004

 

From: Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [mailto:PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU] On Behalf Of CITES Moderator

Sent: Wednesday, 1 December 2004 4:15 AM

To: PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU

Subject: Current Cites, November 2004

 

Current Cites

 

                      Volume 15, no. 11, November 2004

 

                          Edited by [2]Roy Tennant

 

                             ISSN: 1060-2356 -

       http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/CurrentCites/2004/cc04.15.11.html

 

      Contributors: [3]Charles W. Bailey, Jr., [4]Terry Huwe, [5]Shirl

        Kennedy, [6]Leo Robert Klein, Jim Ronningen, [7]Roy Tennant

 

     [8]OCLC Top 1000   Dublin, OH: OCLC, November 2004.

     (http://www.oclc.org/research/top1000/). - This web site isn't the

     usual thing you see reviewed here in Current Cites, but neither is

     it hard to justify highlighting it. OCLC Research staff plumbed the

     depths of the largest bibliographic database in the world and

     discovered the 1,000 most widely held books among member libraries.

     Be careful, though, the site is interesting enough to keep you

     glued to your computer screen for more time than you likely have to

     spare. The U.S. focus is clear, with the 2000 U.S. Census topping

     the list by far -- beating out the Holy Bible by a substantial

     margin. But close on the heels of those come such works as Mother

     Goose (#3), The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (#7). and Garfield

     (yes, Garfield, at #18). But don't stop at surveying the list for

     your personal favorites, be sure to visit the [9]About page that

     describes how they used the principles of FRBR to create the list,

     the [10]Factoids page with a bunch of interesting facts about the

     list, and the [11]Lagniappes page for a couple unexpected gifts.

     Rock on, OCLC! - [12]RT

 

     Ayers, Edward L..  "The Academic Culture & the IT Culture: Their

     Effect on Teaching and Scholarship"  [13]Educause Review   39(5)

     (November/December 2004):  48-62. - A reflective and sometime

     humorous assessment of the degree to which information technology

     has been adopted by academics: not much. The author, Dean of the

     College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at the University

     of Virginia and a professor of history there, bases his comments

     upon what he's observed personally, and he contrasts concisely the

     cultural differences between academe and IT. He reminds those of us

     fascinated by information media that most faculty regard it as

     extraneous to their own work, and will embrace it only to the

     degree that it facilitates (as effortlessly and transparently as

     possible) their primary research. And once their writing is ready

     for publication, few are interested in exploiting the possibilities

     of networks to disseminate their scholarship, though Ayers sees a

     gradual change there. He describes the development of his own

     web-enhanced presentation of his Civil War scholarship, and his

     satisfacation at being able to present digital versions of the

     primary source documents which would normally be inaccessible to

     his readers. After giving that concrete example of what could be

     achieved on a larger scale, Ayers concludes unsurprisingly with a

     call for increased dialogues between the two cultures. - JR

 

     Carnevale, Dan.  "[14]Don't Judge a College by Its Internet

     Address"  [15]Chronicle of Higher Education   51(14) (26 November

     2004):  A29. (http://chronicle.com/free/v51/i14/14a02901.htm). -

     True or false: If a college or university has an Internet address

     that ends in .edu, it must be a bona fide, accredited institution

     of higher learning. Uh, not actually...and potential students could

     well be suckered into signing on with a diploma mill, since a

     startling number of unaccredited institutions have found virtual

     homes in the .edu domain. [16]Educause, overseen by the U.S.

     Department of Education, is the administrator for the .edu domain.

     But at the top of the food chain is the U.S. Department of

     Commerce, which makes the rules as to who can get a .edu address.

     Part of the problem is that many of these unaccredited entities

     were given .edu addresses by [17]Network Solutions, the domain

     registration company that assigned the addresses before Educause

     took over. Educause maintains it "would be too costly and

     difficult" to track down and revoke the .edu registrations of these

     unaccredited institutions. Also, accreditation itself is fluid --

     an institution could easily lose its accreditation...or vice versa.

     At any rate, the director of policy and networking programs says

     Educause "does not have the authority to take away .edu addresses

     from institutions that were granted them before Educause took over,

     even if the institutions lose their accreditation or change their

     names." Many college officials say that since so many unaccredited

     institutions have .edu addresses, more effort should be made to

     educate the public about how to determine the accreditation status

     of a particular institution. The State of Oregon Office of Degree

     Authorization keeps a [18]comprehensive list of unaccredited

     institutions, as does the [19]State of Michigan (pdf). - [20]SK

 

     David, Shay.  "[21]Opening the Sources of Accountability"

     [22]First Monday   9(11) (1 November 2004)

     (http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_11/david/). - David takes

     a hard look at "FLOSS" (Free/Libre Open Source Systems) from the

     perspective of accountability. He argues that increasing

     accountability improves the value of FLOSS to society -- in

     essence, by their works ye shall know them. He goes on to say that

     open source computing has already fostered a collaborative culture

     that has brought some results, but the journey has just begun.

     Accountability in a digital society has taken on a life of its own,

     he argues, and he analyzes the open environment of FLOSS to find

     hidden meanings. Electronic voting and digital medical records are

     two excellent tests of his thesis, as correct and reliable

     information is critical for success in each case, yet trust is in

     short supply if recent history is any guide. He argues that code

     "visibility" -- a self-imposed standard of care and sensible

     licensing arrangements -- is a potential alternative to the

     liability remedies that some scholars offer as the safest bet. If

     developers can craft "sensible licensing agreements" and

     accommodate collaborative activity through social versus legal

     mechanisms, there is a reasonable hope that the barriers to

     accountability will diminish. He adds that developers should begin

     to think of ways to build a framework for moral and ethical

     deliberations to guide open source design, too. - [23]TH

 

     Fister, Barbara, and Niko  Pfund.  "[24]We're Not Dead Yet! "

     [25]Library Journal   (15 November 2004)

     (http://libraryjournal.com/article/CA479162). - This is actually

     two pieces -- one by a librarian and another by a university press

     publisher. The librarian's tongue-in-cheek piece highlights the

     fact that libraries have been raiding their book funds to pay for

     increasingly expensive journals, thereby potentially harming the

     viability of university presses. Library purchases can be a

     significant percentage of the potential sales of university press

     books, so the recent decline in monographic purchasing can have a

     devastating impact on their bottom line. The publisher's piece is

     less playful but no less thought-provoking. - [26]RT

 

     Hernandez, Javier C..  "[27]Google Offers Journal Searches"

     [28]The Harvard Crimson   (23 November 2004)

     (http://www.thecrimson.com/article.aspx?ref=504709). - Big, big

     news in both the search engine and academic library worlds this

     month. Google launched a new beta called [29]Google Scholar, which

     "enables you to search specifically for scholarly literature,

     including peer-reviewed papers, theses, books, preprints, abstracts

     and technical reports from all broad areas of research." The buzz

     among information professionals, as well as the media, has been

     loud and raucous. One main issue -- If the average user thinks he

     or she is going to get free access to a wealth of full-text

     articles from academic journals, he or she is in for a rude

     awakening. Many of the results are citations, or citations and

     abstracts only. The searcher will have to pay to obtain the full

     article. Alternately, he or she could inquire at a public, special

     or academic library where affiliation permits full access to to a

     set of proprietary online databases, and obtain the information

     being sought for free. Cheryl M. LaGuardia, head of instructional

     services for Harvard College libraries, notes in this article that

     Google Scholar seems to do a better job with science searches than

     humanities-related queriest. She said she is looking forward to

     engaging [30]CrossRef's technology "to blend the ease of Google

     with existing library systems." - [31]SK

 

     Novotny, Eric.  "I Don't Think I Click: A Protocol Analysis Study

     of Use of a Library Online Catalog in the Internet Age. "

     [32]College and Research Libraries   65(6) (November 2004):

     525-563. - There's something magical about interface design. The

     research done to determine user behavior that leads to design

     decisions is positively fascinating. This time round we have a

     group at Penn State testing the proficiency of users on their brand

     new OPAC. The users were divided into two groups, "experienced" and

     "first-time". Results confirm other studies in this area, namely,

     that when confronting an OPAC, users both experienced and not,

     assume they're in front of something similar to Google. They go for

     keywords by default, expect results ranked by relevancy (as opposed

     to chronology), make no use of Boolean Operators, have no idea of

     what information is actually indexed, and lack the curiosity or

     time to "learn the system". "We can either abandon this

     population," the author stresses, "or design systems that do not

     require expert knowledge to be used effectively." - [33]LRK

 

     Sosteric, Michael.  "The International Consortium for the

     Advancement of Academic Publication--An Idea Whose Time Has Come

     (Finally!)"  [34]Learned Publishing   17(4) (2004):  319-325. - In

     this article, Sosteric, founder of the [35]International Consortium

     for the Advancement of Academic Publication (as well as of the

     Electronic Journal of Sociology), describes how this not-for-profit

     organization fosters the publication of scholarly e-journals with

     low production and operation costs. How low? How about as low as

     $3,000 for a new quarterly journal that's up in less than a month?

     But even with this cost structure, the ICAAP faces challenges since

     it "targets low-circulation and niche journals that cannot survive

     in an environment where first-tier journals suck all the finances

     from general library subscriptions." Scholars who want to publish

     these journals may have difficulty paying the ICAAP's modest fees

     without external support. In Canada, social science and humanities

     journals can receive up to CAD$90,000 over three years from a

     special funding program; however, the gotcha is that, to qualify,

     journals must have at least 200 paid subscribers, and, in the small

     Canadian market, publishers are afraid that switching from print to

     electronic might cause a subscription drop below this level. One

     can't help but wonder what could be accomplished with relatively

     modest subsidies from some other source, perhaps combined with the

     idea of open access. - [36]CB

 

     Thomas, Charles F.  "Memory institutions as digital publishers: a

     case study on standards and interoperability"  [37]OCLC Systems &

     Services   20(3) (2004):  134-139. - Everyone loves standards. Who

     doesn't? Oftentimes however, they're presented as a sort of

     one-dimensional cure-all for all that ails us. The author of this

     article suggests a far more complicated picture. First there isn't

     only one set of standards but a proliferation, and the individual

     standards themselves aren't necessarily set in stone but are

     continually evolving. That's the reality. The author proposes a

     number of considerations, given this, so that we can make the

     "right standards choices". He even sees room, once core standards

     have been identified, for local innovations. - [38]LRK

 

     van der Kuil, Annemiek, and Martin  Feijen.  "[39]The Dawning of

     the Dutch Network of Digital Academic REpositories (DARE): A Shared

     Experience"  [40]Ariadne   (41) (2004)

     (http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue41/vanderkuil/). - Funded by a

     government grant, the SURF Programme Digital Academic Repositories

     (DARE) is establishing institutional repositories at Dutch

     universities and harvesting metadata from them using the OAI-PMH

     protocol to create a demonstrator portal called [41]DAREnet.

     Participating universities are utilizing diverse software,

     including ARNO, DSpace, i-Tor, and proprietary software. The

     project uses Dublin Core metadata (version 1.0). The Koninklijke

     Bibliotheek (Royal Library) will preserve data from the

     participating institutional repositories. The project has dealt

     with a variety of issues, such as how can digital objects (vs.

     metadata) be harvested, what should the dc:identifier link to

     (e.g., the digital object or the repository record for the object),

     how should objects be identified (OpenURL, the CNRI handle, or

     DOI), and other issues. - [42]CB

     _________________________________________________________________

 

                      Current Cites - ISSN: 1060-2356

   Copyright (c) 2004 by the Regents of the University of California All

                              rights reserved.

 

   Copying is permitted for noncommercial use by computerized bulletin

   board/conference systems, individual scholars, and libraries.

   Libraries are authorized to add the journal to their collections at no

   cost. This message must appear on copied material. All commercial use

   requires permission from the editor. All product names are trademarks

   or registered trade marks of their respective holders. Mention of a

   product in this publication does not necessarily imply endorsement of

   the product. To subscribe to the Current Cites distribution list, send

   the message "sub cites [your name]" to

   [43]listserv@library.berkeley.edu, replacing "[your name]" with your

   name. To unsubscribe, send the message "unsub cites" to the same

   address.

 

References

 

   Visible links

   1. LYNXIMGMAP:http://sunsite/CurrentCites/2004/cc04.15.11.html#head

   2. http://roytennant.com/

   3. http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm

   4. http://iir.berkeley.edu/faculty/huwe/

   5. http://www.uncagedlibrarian.com/

   6. http://leoklein.com/

   7. http://roytennant.com/

   8. http://www.oclc.org/research/top1000/

   9. http://www.oclc.org/research/top1000/about.htm

  10. http://www.oclc.org/research/top1000/factoids.htm

  11. http://www.oclc.org/research/top1000/lagniappes.htm

  12. http://roytennant.com/

  13. http://www.educause.edu/pub/er/

  14. http://chronicle.com/free/v51/i14/14a02901.htm

  15. http://chronicle.com/

  16. http://www.educause.edu/

  17. http://www.networksolutions.com/

  18. http://www.osac.state.or.us/oda/unaccredited.html

  19. http://www.michigan.gov/documents/Non-accreditedSchools_78090_7.pdf

  20. http://www.uncagedlibrarian.com/

  21. http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_11/david/

  22. http://www.firstmonday.org/

  23. http://iir.berkeley.edu/faculty/huwe/

  24. http://libraryjournal.com/article/CA479162

  25. http://libraryjournal.com/

  26. http://roytennant.com/

  27. http://www.thecrimson.com/article.aspx?ref=504709

  28. http://www.thecrimson.com/

  29. http://scholar.google.com/

  30. http://www.crossref.org/

  31. http://www.uncagedlibrarian.com/

  32. http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlpubs/crljournal/

  33. http://leoklein.com/

  34. http://www.alpsp.org/journal.htm

  35. http://www.icaap.org/

  36. http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm

  37. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/oclc.htm

  38. http://leoklein.com/

  39. http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue41/vanderkuil/

  40. http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/

  41. http://www.darenet.nl/en/

  42. http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm

  43. mailto:listserv@library.berkeley.edu

 

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DIGICULT

Digicult.info    Issue 9

digicult-forum@digicult.info                   Tue 30/11/2004 9:47 PM                    

[DIGICULT] Release of  DigiCULT.Info Issue 9 - A Newsletter on Digital Culture

DigiCULT announces the release of DigiCULT.Info Issue 9

A Newsletter on Digital Culture November 2004, ISSN 1609-3941

 

The acceptance of DigiCULT.Info as a voice for the sector is once again illustrated in this issue, not only in the large number of contributions received but also in the quality and diversity of themes presented.

 

Some of the themes examined in this issue include: digital contextualisation for knowledge acquisition - reproducing Greek masks for performance - Austrian digital heritage - e-readiness check for small heritage institutions - news from DigiCULT's Regional Correspondents - examining technologies and cultural heritage - Te Ara digital encyclopedia - thoughts on born-digital art - DiVA academic archive - new guides on digitisation - DSpace in a university trial - event reports.

 

Download DigiCULT.Info Issue 9:

Link HiRes (17 MB) http://www.digicult.info/downloads/digicult_info_9.pdf

 

Link LoRes (1,5 MB) http://www.digicult.info/downloads/digicult_info_9_xs.pdf

 

 

DigiCULT Publications offer a valuable resource of mission-critical information in the selection and use of digital technologies for Europe’s heritage organisations:

 

- DigiCULT Thematic Issues: results of expert fora http://www.digicult.info/pages/Themiss.php

 

- DigiCULT Technology Watch Reports: in-depth technology evaluation http://www.digicult.info/pages/techwatch.php

 

- DigiCULT.Info Newsletter: articles about services, studies, technologies, and activities http://www.digicult.info/pages/newsletter.php

 

 

DigiCULT Services:

 

DigiCULT Events Service: DigiCULT provides a list of international events that concentrate on theoretical and practical issues of digital culture. Cutting across the different cultural heritage domains and practises, the selection highlights established as well as new opportunities for exchanging knowledge, community networking, and co-operation. http://www.digicult.info/pages/events.php

 

DigiCULT Resources Service: DigiCULT Resources offer an aggregation of information sources on topics that are on DigiCULT's radar. Each resource is shortly described and linked. Submitted links are moderated for content and relevance. http://www.digicult.info/pages/resources.php

 

DigiCULT CV Service: DigiCULT is providing the user community with access to the CVs of Cultural Heritage Professionals. We neither endorse individuals nor certify their abilities or claims of experience and skills. This is an information service only. Personal and Institutional users of the service will need to conduct their own authentication and verification processes. http://www.digicult.info/pages/digicv.php

 

DigiCULT Jobs Service: DigiCULT is providing the user

community with access to available jobs within the Cultural Heritage sector. We do not endorse the jobs listed on these pages. This is an information service only. Personal and Institutional users of the service will need to conduct their own authentication and verification processes. http://www.digicult.info/pages/digijob.php

 

Subscribe to the Newsletter DigiCULT.Info http://www.digicult.info/pages/subscribe.php

 

(c) DigiCULT Forum 2002-2004

 

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Thematic Issue 7

digicult-forum@digicult.info                   Thu 9/12/2004 4:57 PM

[DIGICULT] DigiCULT Thematic Issue 7 - The Future Digital Heritage Space - An Expedition Report

DigiCULT Thematic Issue 7 - Now Available

The Future Digital Heritage Space. An Expedition Report, December 2004

 

This report summarises the results of an expedition into the possible future of digital heritage in the next 10-15 years.

 

It is based on contributions from researchers, heritage experts and professionals to a DigiCULT online forum as well as the project's ongoing research.

 

The report is intended as a navigation tool for boards and directors of heritage organisations and research centres, IT project managers, and curators of digital collections, virtual exhibitions and environments. It cautions that the next waves of innovative ICT systems and applications may significantly shape and re-shape the digital landscape in which heritage organisations reside. For many organisations this could result in becoming 'blind spots' in an emerging ambient intelligence environment. As the places and roles of digital heritage in this environment need to be discussed and prepared, the report also gives recommendations which may be useful for ensuring the creation of a thriving and inclusive future digital heritage space.

 

Download Thematic Issue 7: (10 MB) http://www.digicult.info/downloads/dc_thematic_issue7.pdf

 

DigiCULT Publications offer a valuable resource of mission-critical information in the selection and use of digital technologies for Europe's heritage organisations:

 

- Thematic Issues: results of expert forums http://www.digicult.info/pages/Themiss.php

 

- DigiCULT Technology Watch Reports: in-depth technology evaluation http://www.digicult.info/pages/techwatch.php

 

- DigiCULT.Info Newsletter: articles about services, studies, technologies, and activities http://www.digicult.info/pages/newsletter.php

 

Subscribe to the Newsletter DigiCULT.Info http://www.digicult.info/pages/subscribe.php

(c) DigiCULT Forum 2002-2004

 

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Technology Watch Report 3

digicult-forum@digicult.info                   Thu 24/02/2005 8:27 PM                     [DIGICULT] DigiCULT: Technology Watch Report 3 - Now Available

DigiCULT: Technology Watch Report 3 - Now Available

"Core Technologies for the Cultural and Scientific Heritage Sector", January 2005

 

As in previous TWRs, this volume examines six core technologies. Those covered here underlie a wide range of future applications, and include: Open Source Software, Natural Language Processing, Information Retrieval technologies, Location Based Systems (especially GIS and GPS), Visualisation of Data, and Telepresence, Haptics and Robotics.

 

This report builds on our earlier two reports: TWR1 (2003) examined Customer Relationship Management Systems, Digital Asset Management Systems, Virtual Reality, Human Computer Interface technologies, Smart Tags and Labels, and Games. TWR2 (2004) examined Application Service Models, the XML family of technologies, Cultural Agents and Avatars, Mobile Access technologies, Rights Management and Payment technologies, and Collaborative Mechanisms and Technologies.

 

Download Technology Watch Report 3:

Hi-Res (30 MB) http://www.digicult.info/downloads/TWR3-highres.pdf

Lo-Res (6 MB) http://www.digicult.info/downloads/TWR3-lowres.pdf

 

DigiCULT Publications offer a valuable resource of mission-critical information in the selection and use of digital technologies for Europe's heritage organisations:

 

- Thematic Issues: results of expert forums http://www.digicult.info/pages/themiss.php

- DigiCULT Technology Watch Reports: in-depth technology evaluation http://www.digicult.info/pages/techwatch.php

- DigiCULT.Info Newsletter: articles about services, studies, technologies, and activities http://www.digicult.info/pages/newsletter.php

 

Subscribe to the Newsletter DigiCULT.Info http://www.digicult.info/pages/subscribe.php

(c) DigiCULT Forum 2002-2004

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D-LIB

October 2004

Asis-l] [Dlib-subscribers] The October 2004 issue of D-LibMagazine is now available 

Mon 18/10/2004 8:15 PM

[Forwarded.  Dick Hill]

 

Greetings:

 

The October 2004 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now

available.

 

This issue contains three articles, five conference and workshop

reports, the 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and

news of upcoming conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and

Pointers'.  The Featured Collection for October 2004 is The Charles W.

Cushman Photograph Collection, courtesy of Kristine Brancolini, Indiana

University.

 

The articles include:

 

E-Books: Challenges and Opportunities

John Cox, National University of Ireland, Galway

 

Visualizing Bibliographic Metadata - A Virtual (Book) Spine Viewer Naomi Dushay, Cornell University

 

An Orderly Retreat from the Big Deal: Is It Possible for Consortia? Jeffrey N. Gatten, Kent State University and Tom Sanville, OhioLINK

 

The Conference Reports are:

 

Developing a Web Analytics Strategy for the National Science Digital Library Casey Jones and Michael Wright, University Corporation for Atmospheric

Research; Sarah Giersch, iLumina Digital Library; Tamara Sumner,

University of Colorado, Boulder; Anita Coleman, University of Arizona;

and Laura Bartolo, Kent State University

 

Report on the 8th European Conference on Digital Libraries (ECDL 2004):

12 - 16 September 2004, Bath, United Kingdom

Jonas Holmström, Swedish School of Economics and Business Administration doi:10.1045/october2004-holmstrom

 

Cross-Language Evaluation Forum - CLEF 2004: 15 - 17 September 2004,

Bath, United Kingdom

Carol Peters, ISTI-CNR

 

Healthcare Digital Libraries Workshop - HDL 2004: 16 September 2004,

Bath, United Kingdom

Anne Adams, University College London and Patty Kostkova, City

University, London

 

ECDL 2004 Workshop Report - Networked Organization Systems/Services

(NKOS): User-centred Approaches

Marianne Lykke Nielsen, Royal School of Library and Information Science,

Denmark

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

 

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

 

The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia http://dlib.anu.edu.au/

 

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen,

Goettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

 

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

 

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

 

BN - National Library of Portugal, Portugal

http://purl.pt/302

 

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the October 2004

issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is

a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States

and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

                                   

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

November 2004

 

dlib-subscribers-admin@dlib.org; on behalf of; D-Lib [dlib@cnri.reston.va.us]

Tue 16/11/2004 10:01 PM             DLib-subscribers

[Dlib-subscribers] The November 2004 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available.

 

Greetings:

 

The November 2004 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now

available.

 

This issue contains five articles, one workshop report, the 'In Brief'

column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming

conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  The

Featured Collection for October 2004 is Astronomy Picture of the Day

hosted by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

 

The articles include:

 

Archiving and Accessing Web Pages: The Goddard Library Web Capture Process Alessandro Senserini and Robert B. Allen, University of Maryland; and

Gail Hodge, Nikkia Anderson, and Daniel Smith, Jr., Information

International Associates, Inc.

 

Toward a Metadata Generation Framework: A Case Study at Johns Hopkins

University

Mark Patton, David Reynolds, G. Sayeed Choudhury, and Tim DiLauro, Johns

Hopkins University

 

A Web Service Interface for Creating Concept Browsing Interfaces Tamara Sumner, Faisal Ahmad, and Qianyi Gu, Universtiy of Colorado,

Boulder; Francis Molina and Stedman Willard, American Association for

the Advancement of Science; Michael Wright, Lynne Davis, and Sonal

Bhushan, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, and Greg

Janee, University of California, Santa Barbara

 

Assessing the Durability of Formats in a Digital Preservation

Environment: The INFORM Methodology

Andreas Stanescu, OCLC Online Computer Library Center, Inc.

 

A Service-Oriented Framework for Bibliography Management

Jose H. Canos, Manuel Llavador, Carlos Solis, and Enrique Ruiz,

Technical University of Valencia

 

The Workshop Report is:

 

Report on the 4th International Web Archiving Workshop (IWAW): 16

September 2004, Bath, United Kingdom

Julien Masanès, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, and Andreas Rauber,

Vienna University of Technology, Austria

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

 

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

 

The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia http://dlib.anu.edu.au/

 

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen,

Goettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

 

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

 

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

 

BN - National Library of Portugal, Portugal

http://purl.pt/302

 

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the November 2004

issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is

a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States

and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

                                 

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

December 2004

 

dlib-subscribers-admin@dlib.org; on behalf of; Bonnie Wilson [bwilson@cnri.reston.va.us]

Thu 16/12/2004 3:39 AM        [Dlib-subscribers] The December 2004 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

 

The December 2004 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now

available.

 

This issue contains four articles, two conference reports, the 'In

Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming

conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  The

Featured Collection for December 2004 is the Library of Congress

collection: By the People, For the People: Posters from the WPA, 1936-1943.

 

The articles include:

 

The Role of RSS in Science Publishing: Syndication and Annotation on the Web Tony Hammond, Timo Hannay and Ben Lund, Nature Publishing Group

 

Resource Harvesting within the OAI-PMH Framework

Herbert Van de Sompel, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Research Library;

Michael L. Nelson, Old Dominion University; and Carl Lagoze and Simeon

Warner, Cornell University

 

A Repository of Metadata Crosswalks

Carol Jean Godby, Jeffrey A. Young, and Eric Childress, OCLC Online

Computer Library Center, Inc.

 

Metadata Development in China : Research and Practice

Jia Liu, Peking University, China

 

The Conference Reports are:

 

How Fares the Wired Museum? Report on the 32nd Annual Conference of the

Museum Computer Network (November 10-13, 2004)

David Green, Knowledge Culture

 

ISMIR 2004: International Conference on Music Information Retrieval,

October 10-14, 2004, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain Michael Droettboom, Johns Hopkins University

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

 

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

 

The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia http://dlib.anu.edu.au/

 

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen,

Goettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

 

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

 

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

 

BN - National Library of Portugal, Portugal

http://purl.pt/302

 

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the December 2004

issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is

a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States

and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

                                  

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

January 2005

 

dlib-subscribers-admin@dlib.org; on behalf of; Bonnie Wilson [bwilson@cnri.reston.va.us]

Tue 18/01/2005 8:26 AM                    [Dlib-subscribers] The January 2005 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

 

Greetings:

 

The January 2005 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now

available.

 

This issue contains four articles, one conference report, the 'In Brief'

column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming

conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  The

Featured Collection for January is 'Linus Pauling and the Nature of the

Chemical Bond: A Documentary History' from the Oregon State University

Libraries.

 

The articles include:

 

Building Educational Portals atop Digital Libraries

Sean Fox, Cathy Manduca, and Ellen Iverson, Carleton College

 

Trend Analysis of the Digital Library Community

Johan Bollen, Michael L. Nelson, Giridhar Manepalli, Giridhar Nandigam,

and Suchitra Manepalli, Old Dominion University

 

Understanding Faculty to Improve Content Recruitment for Institutional

Repositories

Nancy Fried Foster and Susan Gibbons, University of Rochester

 

Transparent Format Migration of Preserved Web Content

David S. H. Rosenthal, Thomas Lipkis, Thomas S. Robertson, and Seth

Morabito, Stanford University

 

The Conference Report is:

 

Report on the 7th International Conference on Asian Digital Libraries

(ICADL 2004): 13 - 17 December 2004, Shanghai, China

Su-Shing Chen, University of Florida

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

 

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

 

The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia http://dlib.anu.edu.au/

 

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen,

Goettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

 

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

 

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

 

BN - National Library of Portugal, Portugal

http://purl.pt/302

 

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the January 2005

issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is

a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States

and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

                                 

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

February 2005

 

dlib-subscribers-admin@dlib.org; on behalf of; Bonnie Wilson [bwilson@cnri.reston.va.us]

Wed 16/02/2005 9:26 PM              DLib-subscribers

[Dlib-subscribers] The February 2005 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

 

Greetings:

 

The February 2005 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now

available.

 

This issue contains four articles, the 'In Brief' column, excerpts from

recent press releases, and news of upcoming conferences and other items

of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  The Featured Collection for

February is 'Silk Road Seattle' courtesy of Daniel Waugh at the

University of Washingon.

 

The articles include:

 

SRW/U with OAI: Expected and Unexpected Synergies

Robert Sanderson, University of Liverpool; and Jeffrey Young and Ralph

LeVan, OCLC Online Computer Library Center, Inc.

 

A Metadata Search Engine for Digital Language Archives

Baden Hughes and Amol Kamat, University of Melbourne

 

Concepts and a Design for Fair Use and Privacy in DRM

Pasi Tyrvainen, University of Jyvaskyla, Finland

 

The eXtensible Past : XML as a Means for Access to Historical Datasets

and a Strategy for Digital Preservation

Annelies van Nispen, Rutger Kramer and Rene van Horik, Netherlands

Institute for Scientific Information Services

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

 

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

 

The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia http://dlib.anu.edu.au/

 

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen,

Goettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

 

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

 

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

 

BN - National Library of Portugal, Portugal

http://purl.pt/302

 

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the February 2005

issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is

a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States

and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

                                 

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

March 2005

 

dlib-subscribers-admin@dlib.org; on behalf of; Bonnie Wilson [bwilson@cnri.reston.va.us]       Wed 16/03/2005 12:24 AM                  [Dlib-subscribers] The March 2005 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available.

 

Greetings:

 

The March 2005 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now

available.

 

This issue contains four articles, two conference reports, the 'In

Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming

conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  The

Featured Collection for March is 'The Maine Music Box' courtesy of the

Folger Library at the University of Maine.

 

The articles include:

 

The NSF National Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

Education Digital Library (NSDL) Program: New Projects from Fiscal Year 2004 Lee L. Zia, National Science Foundation

 

NSDL MatDL: Exploring Digital Library Roles

Laura M. Bartolo and Cathy S. Lowe, Kent State University; Donald R.

Sadoway and Adam C. Powell, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and

Sharon C. Glotzer, University of Michigan

 

OCLC Research Publications Repository

Shirley Hyatt and Jeffrey A. Young, OCLC Online Computer Library Center, Inc

 

Renewing the Information Infrastructure of the Koninklijke Bibliotheek Theo van Veen, Koninklijke Bibliotheek

 

The conference reports include:

 

Issues in Federating Repositories: A Report on the First International

CORDRA(TM) Workshop

Wilbert Kraan, UK Centre for Educational Technology Interoperability

Standards (CETIS); and Jon Mason, education.au limited

 

The Implementation of the Berlin Declaration on Open Access: Report on

the Berlin 3 Meeting Held 28 February - 1 March 2005, Southampton, UK Stevan Harnad, Universite du Quebec a Montreal

 

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

 

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

 

The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia http://dlib.anu.edu.au/

 

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen,

Goettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

 

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

 

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

 

BN - National Library of Portugal, Portugal

http://purl.pt/302

 

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the March 2005

issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is

a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States

and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

                                 

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

 

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

FIRST MONDAY

December 2004

asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]        Tue 7/12/2004 4:02 AM

[Asis-l] FW: First Monday December 2004

Richard B. Hill

Executive Director

American Society for Information Science and Technology

1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510

Silver Spring, MD  20910

Fax: (301) 495-0810

Voice: (301) 495-0900

-----Original Message-----

From: Readership of First Monday [mailto:FIRSTMONDAY@LISTSERV.UIC.EDU] On Behalf Of Edward J. Valauskas

Sent: Monday, December 06, 2004 2:38 PM

To: FIRSTMONDAY@LISTSERV.UIC.EDU

Subject: First Monday December 2004

 

Dear Reader,

 

 

The December 2004 issue of First Monday (volume 9, number 12) is now available at http:// firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_12/

 

 

-------

 

 

Table of Contents

 

 

Volume 9, Number 12 - December 6th 2004

 

 

Gifting technologies

by Kevin McGee and Jorgen Skageby http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_12/mcgee/

 

 

Abstract:

 

 

File-sharing has become very popular in recent years, but for many this has become synonymous with file-getting. However, there is strong evidence to suggest that people have strong giving (or

gifting) needs. This evidence suggests an opportunity for the development of gifting technologies - and it also suggests an important research question and challenge: what needs and concerns do gifters have and what technologies can be developed to help them? In this paper, we discuss the existing literature on gifting, report on an initial study of gifting in an online sharing community, and suggest some ways the study results can inform future research into gifting desires - as well as the design of specific gifting technologies.

 

 

-------

 

 

Open access to law in developing countries by Daniel Poulin http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_12/poulin/

 

 

Abstract:

 

 

Securing a widespread and, whenever possible, free, access to legal information has become important everywhere. Open access has higher stakes in developing countries where access to law is often difficult. In this particular context, free access to statutes and case law could significantly contribute to a better establishment of the rule of law and an overall consolidation of national legal institutions.

 

 

Never before have better conditions existed for a wider circulation of law. The Internet and related technologies have dramatically revolutionized the possibilities of cheaply providing high-quality, low-cost access to national legal documentation. In this article, elements of a strategy aimed at developing open access to law in developing countries are put forth.

 

 

-------

 

 

Pulling sense out of today's informational chaos: LiveJournal as a site of knowledge creation and sharing by Kate Raynes-Goldie http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_12/raynes/

 

 

Abstract:

 

 

The informational overload currently facing Western society is changing the way we understand the world as well as rendering obsolete our current ways of managing information and creating knowledge. With these changes in mind, I will examine the blogging service LiveJournal as a new and more applicable way of managing information and creating knowledge in today's society.

 

 

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SDP-city against a vicious circle!

by Erzsebet Angster http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_12/angster/

 

 

Abstract:

 

 

This paper characterizes the software development craft's vicious circle and proposes the first steps required to get out of it. As long as future software developers have no exemplary software (with patterns, design, and

documentation) to study, the present software developers will not produce exemplary software. To overcome this, the first step is to make exemplary software widely available, and help developers to produce them. Despite most open source software being accessible, finding exemplary and qualified work is hard.

 

 

A software city is proposed for teaching and learning purposes, where (1) all works are open; (2) there is a pattern repository with the most important building elements and principles; (3) the patterns are underpinned by concrete, complete, running and documented examples (Software Development Pack or SDP); and, (4) experts help builders, and qualify the works. Only quality works are easy to use and easy to reuse. Let's build an SDP-city where, besides cathedrals and bazaars, you can also find a city hall, schools, and exhibitions!

 

 

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Libraries and university presses can collaborate to improve scholarly communication or "Why can't we all just get along?" by Mary Alice Ball http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_12/ball/

 

 

Abstract:

 

 

Scholarly communication is evolving to meet the challenges and opportunities of the current technological era. Research universities expect academic libraries and presses to overcome cultural differences and collaborate to improve the production and dissemination of scholarship. This paper examines the separate worlds of libraries and presses and explores the common ground between the two where collaborations occur, particularly those related to monographic publications.

 

 

-------

 

 

Changing patterns of Internet usage and challenges at colleges and universities by Tena F. McQueen and Robert A. Fleck, Jr. http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_12/mcqueen/

 

 

Abstract:

 

 

Increased enrollments, changing student expectations, and shifting patterns of Internet access and usage continue to generate resource and administrative challenges for colleges and universities. Computer center staff and college administrators must balance increased access demands, changing system loads, and system security within constrained resources.

 

 

To assess the changing academic computing environment, computer center directors from several geographic regions were asked to respond to an online questionnaire that assessed patterns of usage, resource allocation, policy formulation, and threats. Survey results were compared with data from a study conducted by the authors in 1999. The analysis includes changing patterns in Internet usage, access, and supervision. The paper also presents details of usage by institutional type and application as well as recommendations for more precise resource assessment by college administrators.

 

 

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Libraries and national security: An historical review by Joan Starr http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_12/starr/

 

 

Abstract:

 

 

The September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks launched the United States into a new era of defensive preparedness. The U.S. federal government's first legislative action in October 2001 was the passage of the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (USA PATRIOT Act). The USA PATRIOT Act introduced a greatly heightened level of government intrusion into many aspects of ordinary life, including library use. When, in the past, authorities called upon the library profession to serve national security interests in these ways, individual librarians and the profession as a whole have experienced an evolving tension between their roles as guardians of public well-being and as protectors of intellectual freedom. This is a fundamental issue, one that reflects upon the profession's view of itself and of its place in American life. Librarians once again face this challenge. An inquiry into the similarities and differences with the past may aid in suggesting a response that is both professionally sound and individually appropriate.

 

 

-------

 

 

FM Interviews: McKenzie Wark http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_12/wark/

 

 

McKenzie Wark teaches media and cultural studies at the New School University in New York City. His most recent book is "A Hacker Manifesto" (Harvard University Press, 2004). For many years he was an active participant in the nettime listserve, and also on fibreculture, syndicate, and a few other experiments in "collaborative filtering." "A Hacker Manifesto" grows out of that experience, and attempts to provide a theory to go with the practice of creating and sharing free knowledge in a digital gift economy. He is the author of a number of other books, including "Dispositions" (Salt Books, 2002) and "Virtual Geography" (Indiana University Press, 1994) and was a co-editor of the nettime anthology "Readme!" (Autonomedia).

 

 

This interview was conducted with First Monday's Chief Editor Ed Valauskas, stimulated in part by "A Hacker Manifesto."

 

Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

February 2005

 

asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; 'Richard Hill' [rhill@asis.org]     Wed 9/02/2005 5:39 AM

 

sigdl-l@asis.org; asis-l@asis.org; sigtis-l@asis.org

 

[Asis-l] First Monday February 2005

 

Dear Reader,

 

The February 2005 issue of First Monday (volume 10, number 2) is now available at http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_2/

 

-------

 

Table of Contents

 

Volume 10, Number 2 - February 7th 2005

 

The media's portrayal of hacking, hackers, and hacktivism before and after September 11 by Sandor Vegh http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_2/vegh/

 

Abstract:

 

This paper provides a thorough analysis of the mainstream media representation of hackers, hacking, hacktivism, and cyberterrorism. The intensified U.S. debate on the security of cyberspace after September 11, 2001, has negatively influenced the movement of online political activism, which is now forced to defend itself against being labeled by the authorities as a form of cyberterrorism. However, these socially or politically progressive activities often remain unknown to the public, or if reported, they are presented in a negative light in the mass media.

 

In support of that claim, I analyze five major U.S. newspapers in a one-year period with 9-11 in the middle. I argue that certain online activities are appropriated for the goals of the political and corporate elite with the help of the mass media under their control to serve as pretext for interventions to preserve the status quo. Thus, the media portrayal of hacking becomes part of the elite's hegemony to form a popular consensus in a way that supports the elite's crusade under different pretexts to eradicate hacking, an activity that may potentially threaten the dominant order.

 

-------

 

The social structure of free and open source software development by Kevin Crowston and James Howison http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_2/crowston/

 

Abstract:

 

Metaphors, such as the Cathedral and Bazaar, used to describe the organization of FLOSS projects typically place them in sharp contrast to proprietary development by emphasizing FLOSS's distinctive social and communications structures. But what do we really know about the communication patterns of FLOSS projects? How generalizable are the projects that have been studied? Is there consistency across FLOSS projects? Questioning the assumption of distinctiveness is important because practitioner-advocates from within the FLOSS community rely on features of social structure to describe and account for some of the advantages of FLOSS production.

 

To address this question, we examined 120 project teams from SourceForge, representing a wide range of FLOSS project types, for their communications centralization as revealed in the interactions in the bug tracking system. We found that FLOSS development teams vary widely in their communications centralization, from projects completely centered on one developer to projects that are highly decentralized and exhibit a distributed pattern of conversation between developers and active users.

 

We suggest, therefore, that it is wrong to assume that FLOSS projects are distinguished by a particular social structure merely because they are FLOSS. Our findings suggest that FLOSS projects might have to work hard to achieve the expected development advantages which have been assumed to flow from "going open." In addition, the variation in communications structure across projects means that communications centralization is useful for comparisons between FLOSS teams. We found that larger FLOSS teams tend to have more decentralized communication patterns, a finding that suggests interesting avenues for further research examining, for example, the relationship between communications structure and code modularity.

 

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A framework for Internet archeology: Discovering use patterns in digital library and Web-based information resources by Scott Nicholson http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_2/nicholson/

 

Abstract:

 

Archeologists use artifacts to make statements about occupants of a physical space. Users of information resources leave behind data-based artifacts when they interact with a digital library or other Web-based information space. One process for examining these patterns is bibliomining, or the combination of data warehousing, data mining and bibliometrics to understand connections and patterns between works. The purpose of this paper is to use a research framework from archeology to structure exploration of these data artifacts through bibliomining to aid managers of digital libraries and other Web-based information resources.

 

-------

 

Reflecting on the digit(al)isation of music

by David Beer

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_2/beer/

 

Abstract:

 

This paper is a collection of notes written in response to the main themes contained in Martin Kretschmer's essay "Artists' earnings and copyright: A review of British and German music industry data in the context of digital technologies" (2005), which was published recently in First Monday. These notes are intended to focus briefly on the exploration of these themes with the intention of generating and developing questions that may open doors for future study. The objective of this piece is not the review of Kretschmer's essay; rather it is an attempt to probe, to examine, and to question its findings and guiding themes. These notes, therefore, are left as a set of open suggestions rather than defining statements. It is hoped that this fits with the emergent and yet to be embedded field of study to which they relate.

 

----------------------------

 

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First Monday Editorial Group

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March 2005

 

asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]        Tue 15/03/2005 11:29 PM

asis-l@asis.org; sigvis-l@asis.org; sigpub-l@asis.org    [Asis-l] FW: First Monday March 2005

 

-----Original Message-----

From: Readership of First Monday [mailto:FIRSTMONDAY@LISTSERV.UIC.EDU] On Behalf Of Edward J. Valauskas

Sent: Tuesday, March 08, 2005 6:03 PM

To: FIRSTMONDAY@LISTSERV.UIC.EDU

Subject: First Monday March 2005

 

Dear Reader,

 

The March 2005 issue of First Monday (volume 10, number 3) is now available at http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_3/

 

-------

 

Table of Contents

 

Volume 10, Number 3 - March 7th 2005

 

New approaches to television archiving

by Jeff Ubois

http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_3/ubois/

 

Abstract:

 

Worldwide, more than 30 million hours of unique television programming are broadcast every year, yet only a tiny fraction of it is preserved for future reference, and only a fraction of that preserved footage is publicly accessible. Most television broadcasts are simply lost forever, though television archivists have been working to preserve selected programs for fifty years. Recent reductions in the cost of storage of digital video could allow preservation of this portion of our culture for a small fraction of the worldwide library budget, and improvements in the distribution of online video could enable much greater collaboration between archival institutions.

 

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Free software and open source: The freedom debate and its consequences by Mathias Klang http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_3/klang/

 

Abstract:

 

Recently the University of Goteborg held an online course in the theory and philosophy of free software and open source. During this course a lively discussion on terminology took place, in particular the concept of freedom was discussed. Without arriving at particular conclusions the posts included views in part on the lack of user awareness on what was property within the computer, on the difference between free, gratis, and libre in different languages and cultures and the need for both a common terminology and infrastructure. This paper is not an attempt to resolve these issues but to bring these questions to the attention of a wider audience in the hope that the discussion will continue.

 

To most outsiders the ethics of software is not something usually considered. To most proficient computer users with a passing interest in this question the ethics of software is recognised as one of the fundamental questions in the digital rights area. To most of the latter, terms such as free software, open source, and their derivatives (FLOSS, FOSS, Software Freedom) are interchangeable. Choosing one over the other is a matter of taste rather than politics. However, to most insiders the question is not one of taste. There is a fundamental difference between the two areas even if they share a similar root. Free software is not the same as open source. The two groups differ in their fundamental philosophical approach to software and its importance to society as a whole. This paper examines the two groups' differing philosophies and explores how their actions have affected software development, access to fundamental software infrastructure, and the development of the concept of freedom.

 

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Economics of scientific and biomedical journals: Where do scholars stand in the debate of online journal pricing and site license ownership between libraries and publishers? by Haekyung Jeon-Slaughter, Andrew C. Herkovic, and Michael A. Keller http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_3/jeon/

 

Abstract:

 

The emergence of e-journals brought a great change in scholarly communication and in the behavior of scholars. However, the importance of scholars' behavior in the pricing of scientific journal has been largely ignored in the recent debate between libraries and publishers over site license practices and pricing schemes. Stanford's survey results indicate that sharply increasing costs are the main reason for individual subscription cancellation, driving users to rely on library or other institutional subscriptions. Libraries continue to be a vital information provider in the electronic era and their bargaining power in the market and the importance of roles in scholarly communication will be increased by branding and a strong relationship with users. Publishers' strategy for thriving in the electronic era is not to lose personal subscribers. Cooperation among the three sectors - scholars, libraries, and publishers - promises optimal results for each sector more than ever.

 

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Re-approaching Nearness: Online communication and its place in Praxis by Ulises A. Mejias http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_3/mejias/

 

Abstract:

 

An interesting transposition has happened. It used to be that the farther things were, the more difficult it was to know them. Today, thanks to communication technologies, we often develop relationships with what is far at the expense of what is immediately around us. This paper explores the increased irrelevancy that the near acquires through our use of online technologies. But by proposing a model of praxis that incorporates our actions online as well as offline, this paper also argues that online technologies can play an important part in bringing the epistemologically far near to us, and making the physically near relevant again.

 

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Al Qaeda and its affiliates: A global tribe waging segmental warfare? by David Ronfeldt http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_3/ronfeldt/

 

Abstract:

 

Al Qaeda and its affiliates are operating much like a global tribe waging segmental warfare. This paper describes the dynamics of classic tribes: what drives them, how they organize, how they fight. Al Qaeda fits the tribal paradigm quite well. Thus, continuing to view Al Qaeda mainly as a cutting-edge, post-modern phenomenon of the information age misses a crucial

point: Al Qaeda and affiliates are using the information age to reiterate ancient patterns of tribalism on a global scale. The war they are waging is more about virulent tribalism than religion. The tribal paradigm should be added to the network and other prevailing paradigms to help figure out the best policies and strategies for countering these violent actors.

 

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The Iraq insurgency: Anatomy of a tribal rebellion

by William S. McCallister http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_3/mac/

 

Abstract:

 

The answers to what motivates and sustains the insurgency in Iraq are not readily found in traditional insurgency literature. Much better answers can be found by reexamining something deemed anachronistic in the information age: the dynamics of traditionally networked tribes and clans. This paper provides such a reexamination, and shows that tribal dynamics are particularly evident among insurgents in Fallujah and other parts of the so-called Sunni triangle.

 

----------------------------

 

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GOVERNMENT INFORMATION QUARTERLY

Volume 21, number 4 (2004)

asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; John Bertot [jbertot@fsu.edu]    Sat 8/01/2005 1:18 AM

[Asis-l] New Issue of Government Information Quarterly

 

The editors (see below) of _Government Information Quarterly:  An International Journal of Information Technology Management, Policies, and Practices_ are pleased to announce the release of Volume 21, number 4 (2004). The issue, guest edited by Jeffrey W. Seifert and Harlod C. Relyea, contains a number of articles that explore information policy and practice issues in a homeland security context.

 

Issue 4 articles include:

 

Do you know where your information is in the homeland security era? Pages 399-405 Jeffrey W. Seifert and Harold C. Relyea

 

Electronic government: Government capability and terrorist resources

Pages 406-419

L. Elaine Halchin

 

Homeland security and information sharing: Federal policy considerations

Pages 420-438

Harold C. Relyea

 

FOIA, federal information policy, and information availability in a post-9/11 world

Pages 439-460

Lotte E. Feinberg

 

Data mining and the search for security: Challenges for connecting the dots and databases

Pages 461-480

Jeffrey W. Seifert

 

Old issues, new context: Privacy, information collection, and homeland security

Pages 481-497

Priscilla M. Regan

 

Privacy and security: Assessing database derivative activities

Pages 498-504

Robert Gellman

 

Issue 4 reviews include:

 

Homeland Security

Pages 505-513

Roger Anderson

 

In: Ralph G. Carter, Editors, Contemporary Cases in U.S. Foreign Policy:

>From Terrorism to Trade vol. xiv, CQ Press, Washington, DC (2002) ISBN

1-56802-646-3 418 pp. $29.95 (paper). 

Pages 514-515

Sarah C. Holmes

 

==========================================================

 

Government Information Quarterly is a quarterly publication of Elsevier Science.  The journal explores such topics as information and telecommunications policy; access to and use of government information; information technology management, implementation, planning, and evaluation; information services development, management, and provision in a distributed networked environment; e-commerce in governments; service quality assessment, benchmarking, and performance measurement; and, governing and governance in a networked environment.

 

Additional information regarding the journal and journal submissions is available at:  http://www.elsevier.com/locate/govinf

 

John Carlo Bertot <bertot@lis.fsu.edu>, School of Information Studies, Florida State University serves as the journal editor.

 

Charles R. McClure <cmcclure@lis.fsu.edu>, School of Information Studies, Florida State University serves as the journal associate editor.

 

John A. Shuler <alfred@uic.edu>, Documents, Maps, Microforms, & Curriculum Department, Univeristy of Illinois Chicago serves as the journal assistant editor.

 

Aimee C. Quinn <aquinn@uic.edu>, Government Documents Department, Univeristy of Illinois Chicago serves as the journal reviews editor.

 

 

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx  

 

Volume 22, number 1 (2005)    

 

asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; John Bertot [jbertot@mailer.fsu.edu]      Fri 4/03/2005 7:06 PM

[Asis-l] New Issue of Government Information Quarterly

 

The editors (see below) of _Government Information Quarterly:  An International Journal of Information and Technology Management, Policies, and Practices_ are pleased to announce the release of Volume 22, number 1 (2005). The issue contains a number of articles that explore issues and strategies related to international information policies, practices, and e-government.

 

 

Issue 1 articles include:

 

Government information: New challenges in the internet age

John Carlo Bertot, Charles R. McClure, John A. Shuler and Aime C. Quinn

 

Executive order no. 13,233: A threat to government accountability Anne N. Barker

 

E-government in China: Bringing economic development through administrative reform Lianjie Ma, Jongpil Chung and Stuart Thorson

 

Citizen interaction with e-government: From the streets to servers? Christopher G. Reddick

 

Challenges in e-government development: Lessons from two information kiosk projects Anna Ya Ni and Alfred Tat-Kei Ho

 

Public information provision about policy intentions: The Dutch and Belgian experience Dave Gelders

 

Why Australia needs a SAGE: A security architecture for the Australian government environment Nigel Martin

 

Democracy through access to legal information for newly democratizing

nations: The Kenyan perspective and lessons from the American experience John N. Gathegi

 

 

Issue 1 reviews include:

 

Primary Source Media's World Government Documents Archive. Declassified Documents Reference System: The United States Jeffrey M. Wilhite

 

The September 11 Digital Archive

Bill Sleeman

 

Broadening Asia's Security Discourse and Agenda: Political, Social, and Environmental Perspectives Bert Chapman

 

Review EssayDepartment of Defense (DoD) and Center for Defense Information

(CDI) Web Sites

Roger Anderson

 

Population and Development Report: Water Scarcity in the Arab World Charles D. Bernholz

 

In: Paul A. Djupe and Laura R. Olson, Editors, Encyclopedia of American Religion and Politics xiv , Facts on File, New York (2003) ISBN 0-8160-4582-8 512 pp. $85.00 (cloth). Mardi Mahaffy

 

==========================================================

 

Government Information Quarterly is a quarterly publication of Elsevier Science.  The journal explores such topics as information and telecommunications policy; access to and use of government information; information technology management, implementation, planning, and evaluation; information services development, management, and provision in a distributed networked environment; e-commerce in governments; service quality assessment, benchmarking, and performance measurement; and, governing and governance in a networked environment.  GIQ articles are available through ScienceDirect at http://www.sciencedirect.com.

 

Additional information regarding the journal and journal submissions is available at:  http://www.elsevier.com/locate/govinf.

 

John Carlo Bertot <jbertot@fsu.edu>, School of Information Studies, Florida State University serves as the journal editor.

 

Charles R. McClure <cmcclure@lis.fsu.edu>, School of Information Studies, Florida State University serves as the journal associate editor.

 

John A. Shuler <alfred@uic.edu>, Documents, Maps, Microforms, & Curriculum Department, Univeristy of Illinois Chicago serves as the journal assistant editor.

 

Aimee C. Quinn <aquinn@uic.edu>, Government Documents Department, Univeristy of Illinois Chicago serves as the journal reviews editor.

 

*************************************************************************

* John Carlo Bertot, Ph.D.                        Phone: (850) 644-8118 *

* Professor                                         Fax: (850) 644-4522 *

* School of Information Studies             Email: bertot@lis.fsu.edu   *

* Florida State University        http://slis-two.lis.fsu.edu/~jcbertot *

* 101 Shores Building                                                   *

* Tallahassee, FL 32306-2100                                            *

*************************************************************************

 

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THE GREY JOURNAL

Volume 1, Number 1, Spring 2005

The Grey Journal [journal@greynet.org]            Fri 25/02/2005 6:13 PM          journal@greynet.org

TGJ Contents - Spring 2005, Volume 1, Number 1

  ________________________

T h e   G r e y   J o u r n a l

              An International Journal on Grey Literature

 

                    Spring 2005, Volume 1, Number 1

             ‘P u b l i s h   G r e y   o r   P e r i s h’

 

 

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C O N T E N T S     http://www.greynet.org/pages/5     ISSN 1574-1796

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· Research Output Publications and CRIS

  Anne Asserson (Norway), Keith G. Jeffery (United Kingdom)

 

· Old WWWine in New Bottles? Developments in electronic information and

  communication: Structural change & and functional inertia

  Helmut M. Artus (Germany)

 

· Impact of the Inclusion of Grey Literature on the Scholarly

  Communication Patterns of an Interdisciplinary Specialty

  Kathel Dunn (United States)

 

· Two Worlds: About Bars and Stars in Scientific Information Publishing:

  An Analysis of Open Source Ideology As a Means of Self-controlled

  Publishing

  Cees de Blaaij (Netherlands)

 

· Citation Analysis and Grey Literature: Stakeholders in the Grey Circuit

  Joachim Schöpfel, Christine Stock (France)

  Dominic J. Farace, Jerry Frantzen (Netherlands)

 

· Grey Literature Survey 2004: A research project tracking developments

  in the field of grey literature

  Albert K. Boekhorst, Dominic J. Farace, Jerry Frantzen (Netherlands)

 

· A Review of the GL6 Conference in New York

  Laurence Seidenberg (United States)

 

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E d i t o r i a l   A d d r e s s:

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The Grey Journal

An International Journal on Grey Literature

Beysterveld 251

1083 KE Amsterdam

The Netherlands

 

Tel/Fax +31(0)20-672.1217

journal@greynet.org

http://www.greynet.org

 

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INFORMATION RESEARCH

v. 10 no. 1, October 2004

New issue of Information Research       Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU]; on behalf of; Tom Wilson [wilsontd@gmail.com]  Wed 20/10/2004

Go to http://InformationR.net/ir/ for the October issue of the journal

 

Introduction

 

With this issue, Information Research enters its tenth year of existence. It's been an interesting journey from Volume 1 No. 1, which included papers only from the Department of Information Studies at the University of Sheffield, to the present: we now publish papers from all around the world and have a readership that is also international in scope. The rise in the number of registered readers to well over 3,000 suggests that the journal fills a genuine need and that its open access character is appreciated. I look forward to being to comment on Volume 20 No. 1! This issue

 

This issue is devoted entirely to papers delivered at the fifth Information Seeking in Context conference held in Dublin in September

- rapid publication of papers is another example of the benefit of electronic publishing. Half of the full papers are presented in this issue, together with the summaries of the research notes (ten-minute presentations); the remaining papers will be published in the Volume 10 No. 2. Papers based on the research notes may appear in future issues of the journal, but they will go through the normal refereeing process.

 

Of course, all of the papers (except the Keynote Addresses, which are invited papers) have been through a double-blind review process for acceptance for the conference, and those accepted have also been subject to thorough review by the Editor. I think that this process has been beneficial in improving the quality of papers delivered at the conference, as well as ensuring that the high standards of reviewing for the journal have been maintained.

 

The papers in this issue begin with one of the Keynote Addresses: this one by Kalervo Järvelin of the University of Tampere is deliberately provocative, and deals with what the author sees as a failure of research on information seeking behaviour to engage with problems of interactive information retrieval. Personally, I would put the blame in the other quarter - information retrieval researchers failing to pay attention to some research that offers direct prescriptions for the design of IR systems. But, then, we all have our point of view! [To be fair - Kalervo reminds me that he also attributes blame to the IR community :-)]

 

The remaining papers cover a variety of topics, and the careful reader may perceive some kind of organization on the contents page. The first four, by Johnson, Pharo, Fidel and Pejtersen, and Wilson all adopt a general, theoretical perspective: Johnson explores the concept of social capital, Pharo offers another model of information seeking behaviour, Fidel and Pejtersen present the Cognitive Work Analysis framework, and Wilson derives a model of the motivations to seek help in searching from interviews carried out before mediated searches.

 

The next six papers all deal with some specialised community of information users, from Hispanic farm workers and their families in the Pacific Northwest (Fisher, et al.), through heart surgery patients and their spouses (Tuominen), genealogists and family historians (Yakel), engineering and law students (Kerins, et al.) and theatre directors and midwives (Davies and McKenzie) to undercover, female police officers (Baker).

 

The final four papers all have something to do with electronic information resources and their users: Talja, et al. explore scholarly mailing lists, Savolainen identifies varieties of Internet use in the context of everyday life information seeking, Bruce and Jones have researched the kinds of actions people take in searching the Web to ensure that they can rediscover things that they've found, while Törmä, and Vakkari investigate the use of the Finnish National Electronic Library

 

Whether the final set of papers falls into such nicely defined categories remains to be seen! These were simply the first papers received, so the structure I have produced is entirely serendipitous.

 

This was an excellent conference to attend: with around 100 participants it was not so huge that one had difficulty in finding the lecture theatres, and small enough to encourage a genuine sense of community among those attending. I trust that the readers of Information Research will find the papers as interesting to read as I found them to listen to.

 

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v. 10 no 2  January 2005,

Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU]; on behalf of; Prof. Tom Wilson [t.d.wilson@SHEFFIELD.AC.UK]        Tue 25/01/2005 8:11 PM

New issue of Information Research

 

The new issue of Information Research (Volume 10 No.2) is now available at the

Website: http://InformationR.net/ir/index.html

 

This issue contains the remaining papers from the 2004 Information Seeking in Context conference, as well as the usual book reviews.

 

Tom Wilson

Editor in Chief

 

___________________________________________________

Professor T.D. Wilson, PhD

Publisher/Editor in Chief

Information Research

InformationR.net

University of Sheffield

Sheffield S10 2TN,  UK

e-mail: t.d.wilson@shef.ac.uk

Web site: http://InformationR.net/

 

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ISSUES IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY LIBRARIANSHIP

 

Fall 2004

istl-updates-admin@library.ucsb.edu; on behalf of; Andrea Duda [duda@library.ucsb.edu]

Tue 30/11/2004 6:47 AM                    [ISTL-updates] ISTL - Fall 2004

 

The Fall 2004 issue of Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship is now available at

      http://www.istl.org/

 

CONTENTS:

 

Theme: Nontraditional Reference Services

 

* The Arizona Instructional Atlas: A New Reference and Instructional Tool

  by Jeanne Pfander and Danielle Carlock, University of Arizona

 

* "I Wouldn't Have Asked for Help if I had to go to the Library":

  Reference Services On Site

  by Jennifer Lee, K. Alix Hayden, and Don MacMillan, University of

  Calgary

 

* Project: Information Oasis

  by Katherine Clemens, Emalee Craft, Jennifer Duvernay, Sheila

  Hofstetter, and Linda Shackle, Arizona State University

 

* References as Knowledge Management

  by Erik Wilde, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich

 

Refereed Articles

 

* The 2003 STS Continuing Education Survey: Selected Analyses of Science

  Librarians' Interests

  by Marilyn Christianson, Auburn University

 

Database Reviews and Reports

 

* Databases of the Academic Support Program of the Canadian Center for

  Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS)

  by Ian Gordon and Kimberly Lee, Brock University

 

 

          ===========================================================

                                Andrea L. Duda

                         Sciences-Engineering Library

                    University of California, Santa Barbara

                         E-mail: duda@library.ucsb.edu

      

 

 

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JEDLET JOURNAL NEWSLETTER

November 2, 2004    Vol. 3, Issue 11

 

November 2, 2004

 

Vol. 3, Issue 11

JEDlets are informative, interactive, and entertaining online tutorials
for today's busy learners.
www.jedlet.com

 

Insider Insights

The silence in libraries these days is anything but golden. E-learning can help.

The JED New Media Team

 

 

In this issue

Reader Reward Challenge

Feature: Libraries can no longer operate "by the book".

Partners' Podium: Gibson Library Connections Inc.

Standing Ovation

Megatrends: Training, Education and Libraries

Industry Ink

Feedback Forum

Today's Quote

"A library is a repository of medicine for the mind."

Greek proverb

(Quote courtesy of IdeaBank. Visit www.idea-bank.com for a complimentary trial.)

 

 

Reader Reward Challenge

 

Thanks to all entrants of last issue's challenge. Enjoy your complimentary JEDlet tutorials. Here is one alternative to "global village":
"Intertownal: combination of Internet and towns." Vicky Giroux,
Washington, DC.

This challenge we ask for your favorite quote on "knowledge".
Email entries to journalcontest@jedlet.com


BACK TO TOP

Feature: Libraries can no longer operate "by the book".

 

Libraries are feeling the crunch lately with dwindling memberships and resources. Confronted with affordable e-books and easily obtained online information, today's library associations are searching for ways to revitalize their operations. One solution is to embrace e-learning.

An excerpt from the OCLC white paper entitled "Libraries and the Enhancement of E-learning" enlightens us:
"E-learning integration offers libraries a powerful medium for reaching faculty and students directly as they engage in teaching, learning, research and outreach. In turn, this integration provides enriched services for an academic community that has used traditional library services and it offers a way to reach those faculty and students who have begun to ignore the library and go directly to the web for their information needs."
Download entire paper at www.oclc.org/index/elearning/default.htm
OCLC: Online Computer Library Center is a nonprofit, membership, computer library service and research organization. Visit www.oclc.org

E-learning vendors and library system operators must work together to adapt to this new learning landscape. In that spirit, JED New Media offers all libraries greatly discounted rates for annual licenses. How else can we help? Email info@jedlet.com

Related Links

Urban Libraries Association (ULC) "The Coolness Factor – Ten Libraries Listen to Youth" at www.urbanlibraries.org/coolnessfactor.html

Great book! "Teens & Libraries: Getting It Right" by Virginia A. Walter and Elaine Meyers at www.amazon.com

Visit NETDAY, a non-profit organization dedicated to helping educators meet educational goals through technology at www.netday.org

Visit the Association of Educational Publishers at www.edpress.org


BACK TO TOP

Partners' Podium: Gibson Library Connections Inc.


JED New Media is delighted to work with affiliate Gibson Library Connections to promote increased e-learning adoption in library settings. President Gary Gibson says, "The role of the public library in our communities is changing. Offering library patrons access to high quality e-learning tutorials is a natural expansion of their activities. The web-delivered resources offered by JEDLet.com provide real value without requiring direct patron interaction with overburdened library staff." Gibson Library Connections represents a growing number of international publishers of electronic products, and provides Canadian libraries with a trusted local source for selection and acquisition of valuable electronic resources.
Meet all our collaborators at www.jedlet.com/partners.asp


BACK TO TOP

Standing Ovation


This issue we tip our hats to author John Riddle, founder of what is christened the "world's largest party for writers". November 15, 2004 marks the third annual I Love to Write Day, an event that challenges everyone to improve their writing skills. John says, "People of all ages are encouraged to write something: poems, a short story, an essay, a letter to the editor, start a novel, finish a novel… the possibilities are endless. I simply want people to take the time to put their thoughts down on paper."
Last year, over 12,000
US schools held special writing activities and events. Bookstores, libraries and community centers also participated. This year the goal is to go international and involve even more people. There will be prizes for organizations that present the most creative ways to get their community involved. JED New Media is proud to be a sponsor of this unique event offering complimentary JEDlet writing skills tutorials as prizes. Get involved! Visit: www.ilovetowriteday.org

John Riddle has written for over 50 magazines and over 100 websites. He is also the author of 34 books and a frequent presenter at writers' conferences.
Would you like to nominate a candidate for a "Standing Ovation"? Email info@jedlet.com


BACK TO TOP

Megatrends: Training, Education and Libraries

 

René J. Aerdts, Ph.D., EDS Fellow, EDS

Today's libraries can no longer remain mere repositories of books. Rather they must progress and embrace technology as part of the delivery mechanism. As the younger generation demands technology, libraries must adopt new operating methods to capture and retain young minds.

Libraries of the future will deploy many technologies that are currently leading edge. Remote experts will be available through the use of three-dimensional projection units; books will be translated in real-time in any language, and alternate mechanisms for information display (such as heads-up display and virtual reality) will be incorporated.

Tomorrow's library will become a source for real-time information in the form of real-time translation, real-time text-to-voice, and access to history information as it occurs, transforming the way in which we think about information. Soon, rather than going to the library, the library will come to us through the use of high-speed wireless Internet connectivity.


BACK TO TOP

Industry Ink

 

News

JED New Media now offers complimentary gift certificates to our writing skills section to qualified writers' ezines to give as rewards for their literary contests. Email info@jedlet.com

New in the JEDlet library: "Freelance Writing: Formulas for Success," "Spice Up Your Writing," "Navigating the Seas of Change," and "Understanding Financial Statements: The Basics". Browse all titles at www.jedlet.com

Events

TechLearnNovember 14-17, 2004,
Marriott Marquis,
New York, New York.

This is the definitive event to network with and meet executives involved in the human capital management of the world's leading enterprises. Visit www.techlearn.com

ECEL 2004November 25-26, 2004, Paris, France. Visit www.academic-conferences.org/ecel2004/ecel04-home.htm

Noteworthy Snippets

The Training & Online Learning Virtual Expo is a comprehensive interactive resource for training and online learning. Visit www.virtualtrainingexpo.com

JEDlet Tutorials are showcased at www.e-learningguru.com/showcase.htm

JED New Media is now registered as content producers for British schools through Curriculum Online. Visit www.curriculumonline.gov.uk


BACK TO TOP

Feedback Forum

 

"It's always a pleasure to receive the JEDlet Journal. It is full of really interesting information. I feel privileged to have access to this content. Thanks and bravo!"

Hélène Turmel
Reponse-à-Tout
Montreal, Quebec.

Thanks, Hélène!
Have feedback?

Email info@jedlet.com


BACK TO TOP

Browse the entire library at www.jedlet.com

JEDlets are Brain Food for Better Business.

If you do not wish to continue receiving the JEDlet Journal, send an email to unsubscribejournal@jedlet.com
with the subject: Unsubscribe Journal
and message: unsubscribe k.smith@curtin.edu.au .

Our Privacy Policy
We never share, lease, or sell your personal information.

JED New Media    111 Duke Street  Suite 3500    Montreal, Quebec    Canada H3C 2M1

 

 

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JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY INFORMATICS

Second issue

asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; Michel J. Menou [Michel.Menou@wanadoo.fr]             Sat 5/03/2005 10:33 PM                        ASIS-L; sigifp-l; sigiii-l            

[Asis-l] Fwd: [JoCI] FW: The Journal of Community Informatics:The"Sustainability of Community ICTs" Issue

The second issue of the on-line peer reviewed Journal of Community Informatics http://ci-journal.net is now available.  This issue takes as its theme the "Sustainability of Community ICTs". 

 

Simpson provides a thorough and wide-ranging analysis of the relationship between "Sustainability" and "Social Capital" and a very

useful theoretical introduction to both sets of concepts.  

 

Hearn et al  discuss the variety of organizational, and contextual issues  as well as larger technical and industry issues which all impact on "sustainability". 

 

Rideout and Reddick  present how, within the Canadian  context sustainability has to be understood as evolving within a broad policy (and government funding) framework. 

 

Tanner adds a most interesting and provocative discussion of the role of "emotion" in (ICT-enabled) community "sustainability". 

 

Ripamonti, de Cindio and Benassi  provide a broad-based set of observations and analyses exploring the sustainability issues which cross-cut between on-line community networking and the physical presence

and organization of community networks .   

 

Van Belle and Trusler present an analytic case study of an on-going community ICT project in a Developing Country context, warts and all, and provide very useful insights into the "real world" of development and community ICT .

 

Musgrave approaches these same issues but at a portal and e-Government level within a Developed Country context but interestingly reveals somewhat similar institutional constraints on community ICT initiatives.

 

Schauder and his colleagues provide a most useful discussion of the broader challenges and difficulties of "sustainability" of a government funded ICT program in the Australian context.

 

The case studies presented from Merkel et al  (faith based organizations in the USA) and Thompson  (universities and communities in Australia) further our knowledge of how these issues are being handled in quite specific institutional and economic contexts while the happy conjuncture of the documents presented in the "Notes from the Field",  (including WiFi in the Amazonian jungle, First Nations and Broadband in Canada, and a WiFi Manifesto from the USA) indicates some of the dimensions and broadly perceived significance of the applications and strategies we are discussing. 

 

Points of View presented by Day and Gurstein address Community Informatics and Community Research and Community Informatics and Disaster Management respectively.

 

Articles are still being accepted for the April issue of the Journal (until March 7) and for the July issue (until May 15) which will have the theme of "Community ICT's: Assessment, Evaluation and Knowledge Aggregation".

 

Michael Gurstein, Ph.D.

Editor in Chief: Journal of Community Informatics http://ci-journal.net

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LIBRARY HI TECH NEWS

21 no. 7 (September/October 2004)

From: Forum of the IFLA Social Science Libraries section [mailto:SOC-LIB@NIC.SURFNET.NL] On Behalf Of Hans-Christoph Hobohm

Sent: Thursday, 28 October 2004 10:01 PM

To: SOC-LIB@NIC.SURFNET.NL

Subject: Fwd: [DIGLIB] Open Archives Data Providers: Part III. Social Sciences and Humanities

 

Open Archives Data Providers: Part III. Social Sciences and

Humanities_

 

Colleagues/

 

I am pleased and proud to announce the publication and availability of

the third part of my Open Archives Data Provider Trilogy:

 

"Open Archives Initiative Data Providers. Part III. Social Sciences and

Humanities," _Library Hi Tech News_ 21 no. 7 (September/October 2004):

30-39.

 

I have self-archived a copy of this eProfile at:

 

[ http://www.public.iastate.edu/~gerrymck/OAI-DP-III.pdf ]

 

In this last, but not least section, I profile the following OA Data

Providers:

 

1. David Rumsey Historical Map Collection

[ http://www.davidrumsey.com/ ]

 

2. Documenting the American South

[ http://docsouth.unc.edu/ ]

 

3. Ethnologue

[ http://www.ethnologue.com/ ]

 

4. Perseus Digital Library

[ http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/ ]

 

Enjoy!

 

/Gerry

 

Gerry McKiernan

Documented Librarian

Iowa State University

Ames IA 50011

 

gerrymck@iastate.edu

***

You receive this mail because you are subscribed to

SOC-LIB - The Forum of the Social Science Librarians of IFLA. Your reply will reach about 200 specialists around the world.

 

You can join or leave the list or have a look at the archives at: http://listserv.surfnet.nl/archives/soc-lib.html

***

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LIBRARY LINK NEWSLETTER

October 2004

Library Link [librarylink@emeraldinsight.com]               Mon 1/11/2004 8:04 PM

Knowledge & Networks

October 2004

 

Welcome

 

To the October issue of Knowledge and Networks, the official newsletter of Emerald Library Link. We publish monthly and include a round up of interesting papers currently available at the Library Link website as well as a summary of the newest articles published by Emerald.

 

'Knowledge and Networks' will keep you up to date with links to useful articles, case studies, and practical advice on managing your library and increasing its appeal to library users.  We also pinpoint other websites and news items that may be of interest to you.

 

A subscription to Knowledge Networks is free to members of Library Link and comprises 12 online issues per annum.

 

1. New on Site

 

* Management Resources

 

Creating customer loyalty among library users

By Professor Gary Gorman

 

Libraries are losing customers to a variety of competitors, many of them web-based. This is a review of "Establishing meaningful customer

relationships: why some companies and brands mean more to their customers" which outlines one solution to this problem, written by Professor James Barnes. To read the full review  please click here: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management/articles/article139.htm

 

* Information Management

 

Culture matters in information and knowledge management

By David J Pauleen

 

This viewpoint argues that an understanding of the influence of culture is now of critical importance in the understanding and implementation of successful information and knowledge management in global contexts.  To read the full viewpoint please click: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/info/viewpoint.htm

 

- How to get published

 

A new column 'Publish don't Perish!' by Rachel Singer Gordon, author of the Librarians Guide to writing for Publication. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/published/perish.htm

 

Publish, don't perish banishes some of the mystique surrounding the library publishing process, giving practical tips for improving your writing, improving your odds, and breaking through the self-imposed barriers that keep too many of us from writing and submitting our work.

 

To read the first instalment please click http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/published/perish/aug2004.htm

 

To read the second instalment please click http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/published/perish/sept2004.htm

 

Written by experienced librarian author and editor Rachel Singer Gordon, Publish, don't perish encourages all librarians and information professionals to think about what they want to say and what they have to contribute. Your comments and suggestions for future topics are welcome at mailto:rachel@lisjobs.com.

 

2. Emerald Features

 

* Noteworthy papers

 

By highlighting papers from our LIS journals, which we think are interesting or even controversial we believe we can inform you about the best, save you time and effort and encourage dialogue.

 

 

"Web usage statistics and web site evaluation: a case study of a government publications library website" Susan Xie, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA OIR Vol. 28 No. 3, 2004 http://www.emeraldinsight.com/cw/www/mcb/14684527/v28n3/contp1-1.htm

 

"Licence to deny?: publisher restrictions on docdel from e-licenced journals" Lynn Wiley, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, USA ILDS Vol. 32 No. 2, 2004 http://www.emeraldinsight.com/cw/www/mcb/02641615/v32n2/contp1-1.htm

 

"Clinical medical librarian to clinical informationist"

Helen Ann Brown

RSR Vol 32 No. 1, 2004 http://www.emeraldinsight.com/cw/www/mcb/00907324/v32n1/contp1-1.htm

 

3. Services Highlight

 

To register for your FREE 30 day trial please select the appropriate database by clicking on the link:

 

* Emerald Fulltext http://www.emeraldinsight.com/cgi-bin/emft.pl

Instant access to 170,000 peer-reviewed articles, from over 100 of the most prestigious management journals. The fulltext database also includes Emerald's extensive portfolio of library and information services journals.

 

* Emerald Management Reviews http://www.emeraldinsight.com/cgi-bin/emre.pl

A database containing over 142,000 independent reviews of articles from the world's top 400 management publications.

 

* Emerald Abstracts http://www.emeraldinsight.com/cgi-bin/emab.pl

Emerald Abstracts is a collection of article abstracts taken from the world's very best publications brought together in 4 databases accessed via the internet.

 

 

4. Subscriber Information

 

Emerald Library Link is published by Emerald Group Publishing Limited, leading English language publisher of academic and professional literature in the fields of management and Library & Information services and is a globally recognized source of online management information.

 

For more information about anything included within the newsletter please

contact:

 

Andrea Watson-Lee, Editor: Knowledge and Networks, Emerald Group Publishing

Limited, 60/62 Toller Lane, Bradford, West Yorkshire, England.   Tel:  44

1274 777700, mailto:awatsonlee@emeraldinsight.com.

 

Knowledge and networks is produced monthly and is free to members of Library Link.  To receive Knowledge and Networks on your desktop each month click on the link:  http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/join.htm

 

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November 2004

Library Link [librarylink@emeraldinsight.com]               Wed 25/11/2009 10:44 PM

Library Link Newsletter - November 2004

Knowledge & Networks

November 2004

 

Welcome

 

To the November issue of Knowledge and Networks, the official newsletter of Emerald Library Link. We publish monthly and include a round up of interesting papers currently available at the Library Link website.

 

'Knowledge and Networks' will keep you up to date with links to useful articles, case studies, and practical advice on managing your library and increasing its appeal to library users.  We also pinpoint other websites and news items that may be of interest to you.

 

A subscription to Knowledge Networks is free to members of Library Link and comprises 12 online issues per annum.

 

1. New on Site

 

- Marketing your Library

 

Creating customer loyalty among library users

By Professor Gary Gorman

 

Libraries are losing customers to a variety of competitors, many of them web-based. This is a review of "Establishing meaningful customer

relationships: why some companies and brands mean more to their customers" which outlines one solution to this problem, written by Professor James Barnes. To read the full review please click here:

 

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management/articles/article139.htm

 

- Information Management

 

Professional Praxis and Publication: A Challenge

By Associate Professor Peter Clayton

 

This viewpoint encourages those new to the information profession to publish their work. It offers useful guidance on how to start with suggestions of what work could be adapted for publication.  To read this viewpoint please click on the link below.

 

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/info/viewpoint.htm

 

- Management Resources

 

Do we communicate better than in the past?

By Professor Gary E Gorman

 

Professor Gorman reviews two articles, both dealing with communication within organisations but from different perspectives. The first deals with communication within a company, such as ineffective communication from senior management.  The second covers communication difficulties within multinational or multicultural organisations.  To read the full reviews please click on the link below.

 

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/management/articles/article140.htm

 

- How to get published

 

A new column 'Publish don't Perish!' by Rachel Singer Gordon, author of the Librarians Guide to writing for Publication. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/published/perish.htm

 

Publish, don't perish banishes some of the mystique surrounding the library publishing process, giving practical tips for improving your writing, improving your odds, and breaking through the self-imposed barriers that keep too many of us from writing and submitting our work.

 

To read the first instalment please click http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/published/perish/aug2004.htm

 

To read the second instalment please click http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/published/perish/sept2004.htm

 

Written by experienced librarian author and editor Rachel Singer Gordon, Publish, don't perish encourages all librarians and information professionals to think about what they want to say and what they have to contribute. Your comments and suggestions for future topics are welcome at rachel@lisjobs.com.

 

2. Emerald Features

 

- IFLA 2005 Call for Papers

 

In time for the 2005 World Library and Information Congress, the IFLA LIS Journals section has issued a call for papers on the theme "LIS Journals - A Voyage of Discovery beyond Anglo-American shores".

 

The IFLA LIS Journals Section Interim Standing Committee invites Library and Information Science journal users, authors, editors, LIS educators and publishers to submit paper proposals dealing with strategies to optimise the international impact of the research and professional expertise of countries with national languages spoken by relatively small numbers.

 

For further details please go to http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/ifla_lis.htm

 

- Emerald launches Emerald Management Xtra at Online

 

Emerald Group Publishing Limited announces the launch of its flagship knowledge portal Emerald Management Xtra.  As the largest, most comprehensive collection of peer reviewed management and LIS journals and online support, Emerald Management Xtra has been created to meet the specific needs of educators, students, researchers, and information professionals working in the business management community.

 

Emerald invites Online attendees to the official launch and ribbon cutting ceremony on the booth number 170, Grand Hall, Olympia, London on December 1st at 12:30, and to the Emerald Management Xtra product presentation on December 2nd in the London Room from 10:00-11:00 a.m.

 

- Emerald Publishing Policy

 

Emerald believes that our growth as an international publisher is based on our adherence to three guiding principles which address the needs of our consumers and customers: 1. Provision of high quality, management content delivered in ways which give value for money. 2. Provision of easy access to that content, continuously improving service levels to customers. 3. Enabling world-wide dissemination of papers for authors.

 

Our publishing policy makes us different and unique among scholarly publishers.  To read this and our ten core principles please follow the link

below:

 

http://images.emeraldinsight.com/emerald/pdfs/epp.pdf

 

- European Foundation for Management Development (EFMD) Partners with Emerald for Annual Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards

 

Launched in June 2004, the Annual Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards seek to encourage, celebrate and reward excellence in international management research.  The Awards are open until March 2005 and will be made in 12 management-related subject areas - each sponsored by a leading journal from the Emerald Portfolio. The Information Management category is being sponsored by the Journal of Documentation.  For more information please click on the link below:

 

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/efmd.htm

 

3. Services Highlight

 

- Reader Discussion Forum

 

This forum provides the opportunity to brainstorm, share concerns, create strategies and to form networks with like-minded information professionals. The Library Link discussion forum will feature a new discussion thread each month on a hot subject in the field. Members are able to post their own specific questions/issues or announcements, which after moderating will be automatically sent to all members of the Library Link discussion forum

 

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/discussion/index.htm

 

4. Subscriber Information

 

Emerald Library Link is published by Emerald Group Publishing Limited, leading English language publisher of academic and professional literature in the fields of management and Library & Information services and is a globally recognized source of online management information.

 

For more information about anything included within the newsletter please

contact:

 

Andrea Watson-Lee, Editor: Knowledge and Networks, Emerald Group Publishing

Limited, 60/62 Toller Lane, Bradford, West Yorkshire, England.   Tel:  44

1274 777700, mailto:awatsonlee@emeraldinsight.com.

 

Knowledge and networks is produced monthly and is free to members of Library Link.  To receive Knowledge and Networks on your desktop each month click on the link:  http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/join.htm

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

December 2004

 

Library Link [librarylink@emeraldinsight.com]         Thu 23/12/2004 10:35 PM

Library Link Newsletter - December 2004

 

Knowledge & Networks

December 2004

 

Welcome

 

To the December issue of Knowledge and Networks, the official newsletter of Emerald Library Link. We publish monthly and include a round up of interesting papers currently available at the Library Link website.

 

'Knowledge and Networks' will keep you up to date with links to useful articles, case studies, and practical advice on managing your library and increasing its appeal to library users.  We also pinpoint other websites and news items that may be of interest to you.

 

A subscription to Knowledge Networks is free to members of Library Link and comprises 12 online issues per annum.

 

1. New on Site

 

- Marketing your Library

 

Inspired! Award-winning library marketing by Anthony Brewerton of Oxford Brookes University Library

 

Anthony Brewerton is a member of the SCONUL Advisory Committee on Communications and Marketing. On a more day-to-day level, he is the Convenor of the Oxford Brookes University Library Marketing Group, the Group that won the CILIP: Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals/Emerald Public Relations and Publicity Award for a "promotional campaign with a budget under £500" for its imaginative Inspiration Campaign, the inspiration for this article.

 

To read the award winning article click here: http://images.emeraldinsight.com/emerald/pdfs/pabrewerton.pdf

 

To view related links please click here: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/marketing/editors.htm

 

- How to get published

 

A new column 'Publish don't Perish!' by Rachel Singer Gordon, author of the Librarians Guide to writing for Publication.

 

Publish, don't perish banishes some of the mystique surrounding the library publishing process, giving practical tips for improving your writing, improving your odds, and breaking through the self-imposed barriers that keep too many of us from writing and submitting our work.

 

To read the third instalment 'Banishing rejection' please click http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/published/perish/nov2004.htm

 

To read the fourth instalment 'Where do you get your ideas?' please click http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/published/perish/dec2004.htm

 

Written by experienced librarian author and editor Rachel Singer Gordon, Publish, don't perish encourages all librarians and information professionals to think about what they want to say and what they have to contribute. Your comments and suggestions for future topics are welcome at mailto:rachel@lisjobs.com.

 

If you've missed the first and second instalments please click here: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/published/perish.htm

 

2. Emerald Features

 

- IFLA 2005 Call for Papers

 

In time for the 2005 World Library and Information Congress, the IFLA LIS Journals section has issued a call for papers on the theme "LIS Journals - A Voyage of Discovery beyond Anglo-American shores".

 

The IFLA LIS Journals Section Interim Standing Committee invites Library and Information Science journal users, authors, editors, LIS educators and publishers to submit paper proposals dealing with strategies to optimise the international impact of the research and professional expertise of countries with national languages spoken by relatively small numbers.

 

For further details please go to http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/ifla_lis.htm

 

- Emerald launches Emerald Management Xtra

 

Emerald Group Publishing Limited announces the launch of its flagship knowledge portal Emerald Management Xtra.  As the largest, most comprehensive collection of peer reviewed management and LIS journals and online support, Emerald Management Xtra has been created to meet the specific needs of educators, students, researchers, and information professionals working in the business management community.

 

To preview Emerald Management Xtra please click here http://www.emeraldinsight.com/emx/index.htm

 

- Emerald Publishing Policy

 

Emerald believes that our growth as an international publisher is based on our adherence to three guiding principles which address the needs of our consumers and customers: 1. Provision of high quality, management content delivered in ways which give value for money. 2. Provision of easy access to that content, continuously improving service levels to customers. 3. Enabling world-wide dissemination of papers for authors.

 

Our publishing policy makes us different and unique among scholarly publishers.  To read this and our ten core principles please follow the link

below:

 

http://images.emeraldinsight.com/emerald/pdfs/epp.pdf

 

 

3. Services Highlight

 

- Forthcoming events

 

Forthcoming events contains two comprehensive and very useful sections which are both updated monthly so you always have the most up to date information at the click of a mouse:

- Training opportunities

- Conferences, exhibitions and meetings

 

The training opportunities cover everything from copyright, metadata, usage statistics, licences to how to use GoogleTM effectively and much more. With information on training courses from January 2005 through to March 2005.

 

The conferences, exhibitions and meetings list the most relevant and interesting conferences from January 2005 through to August 2006.

 

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/events.htm

 

4. Subscriber Information

 

Emerald Library Link is published by Emerald Group Publishing Limited, leading English language publisher of academic and professional literature in the fields of management and Library & Information services and is a globally recognized source of online management information.

 

For more information about anything included within the newsletter please

contact:

 

Andrea Watson-Lee, Editor: Knowledge and Networks, Emerald Group Publishing

Limited, 60/62 Toller Lane, Bradford, West Yorkshire, England.   Tel:  44

1274 777700, mailto:awatsonlee@emeraldinsight.com.

 

Knowledge and networks is produced monthly and is free to members of Library Link.  To receive Knowledge and Networks on your desktop each month click on the link:  http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/join.htm

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

January 2005

 

Library Link [librarylink@emeraldinsight.com]               Wed 26/01/2005 4:36 PM

Library Link Newsletter - January 2005

 

 

Knowledge & Networks

January 2005

 

Welcome

 

To the January issue of Knowledge and Networks, the official newsletter of Emerald Library Link. We publish monthly and include a round up of interesting papers currently available at the Library Link website.

 

'Knowledge and Networks' will keep you up to date with links to useful articles, case studies, and practical advice on managing your library and increasing its appeal to library users.  We also pinpoint other websites and news items that may be of interest to you.

 

A subscription to Knowledge Networks is free to members of Library Link and comprises 12 online issues per annum.

 

1. New on Site

 

- Marketing your Library

 

A Question to Librarians . . .

 

We asked a number of librarians that have consistently high Emerald Fulltext usage and appear in Emerald's top 10 user group how they achieved their results.

 

To read their responses and maybe pick up a few tips please visit: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/marketing/casestudies.htm

 

If you have any tips and ideas that you would like to share with other colleagues, or if you would like any help to promote Emerald's products in your library please contact Carol Robertson at mailto:crobertson@emeraldinsight.com

 

Customer Loyalty and Libraries

A learning curve by Philip J Calvert

 

'Do you have a "favourite" type of wristwatch, running shoe, make of computer, or even a preferred high street bank?  If so, you are displaying customer loyalty and there are people in the marketing departments of those companies who love you for it.  So what does a librarian need to know about customer loyalty?

 

Read the following article to find out: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/marketing/curves/curves2.htm

 

- Information Management

 

Unanswered Questions about Open Access

Viewpoint by Professor Gary E Gorman

 

A recent issue of CLIR News (Number 42, Dec 2004) contains a brief, interesting article by Nancy Davenport "Open Access is the Buzz".  This viewpoint looks at the questions raised in Ms Davenport's article and suggests some answers to these questions.

 

To read the full viewpoint please click on the link below: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/info/viewpoint.htm

 

Web Citation Analysis

Learning Curve by Mike Thelwall

 

"Web citation analysis is a quick and free way to gain insights into the sphere of influence of journals and journal articles.  It is based around exploring the results of advanced search engine searches, exploiting the vast quantity of information that is already on the web".

 

To read the full article click on the link below: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/info/curves/curves7.htm

 

- How to get published

 

A column 'Publish don't Perish!' by Rachel Singer Gordon, author of the Librarians Guide to writing for Publication.

 

Publish, don't perish banishes some of the mystique surrounding the library publishing process, giving practical tips for improving your writing, improving your odds, and breaking through the self-imposed barriers that keep too many of us from writing and submitting our work.

 

To read the fifth instalment 'To Niche or Not to Niche' please click http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/published/perish/jan2005.htm

 

Your comments and suggestions for future topics are welcome at mailto:rachel@lisjobs.com.

 

If you've missed any of the previous four instalments please click here: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/published/perish.htm

 

2. Emerald Features

 

- 6th Northumbria International Conference on Performance Measurement in Libraries and Information Services - Call for Papers

 

22nd-25th August, 2005, Collingwood College, Durham, UK

 

The Impact and Outcomes of Library and Information Services: Performance measurement for a changing information environment

 

Conference topics - Conference presentations are sought in, but not limited to the following areas:

 

- The Digital Library

- Measuring Electronic Services

- The Internet as Information Source

- Libraries and Information Services - Value and Impact

- Methodologies

- Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis

- Research Projects

- Benchmarking

- Evaluating Performance Measurement

- Measuring the Effectiveness of Collaborative Working

- Building a Culture of Continuous Improvement

- The Human Dimension

 

For further details please go to http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/impact.htm

 

- IFLA 2005 Call for Papers

 

The deadline for proposals has been extended to 10 February 2005.

 

In time for the 2005 World Library and Information Congress, the IFLA LIS Journals section has issued a call for papers on the theme "LIS Journals - A Voyage of Discovery beyond Anglo-American shores".

 

For further details please go to: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/ifla_lis.htm

 

- Emerald launches Emerald Management Xtra

 

Emerald Group Publishing Limited announces the launch of its flagship knowledge portal Emerald Management Xtra.  As the largest, most comprehensive collection of peer reviewed management and LIS journals and online support, Emerald Management Xtra has been created to meet the specific needs of educators, students, researchers, and information professionals working in the business management community.

 

To preview Emerald Management Xtra please click here http://www.emeraldinsight.com/emx/index.htm

 

- Emerald Publishing Policy

 

Emerald believes that our growth as an international publisher is based on our adherence to three guiding principles which address the needs of our consumers and customers: 1. Provision of high quality, management content delivered in ways which give value for money. 2. Provision of easy access to that content, continuously improving service levels to customers. 3. Enabling world-wide dissemination of papers for authors.

 

Our publishing policy makes us different and unique among scholarly publishers.  To read this and our ten core principles please follow the link

below:

 

http://images.emeraldinsight.com/emerald/pdfs/epp.pdf

 

3. Subscriber Information

 

Emerald Library Link is published by Emerald Group Publishing Limited, leading English language publisher of academic and professional literature in the fields of management and Library & Information services and is a globally recognized source of online management information.

 

For more information about anything included within the newsletter please

contact:

 

Andrea Watson-Lee, Editor: Knowledge and Networks, Emerald Group Publishing

Limited, 60/62 Toller Lane, Bradford, West Yorkshire, England.   Tel:  44

1274 777700, mailto:awatsonlee@emeraldinsight.com.

 

Knowledge and networks is produced monthly and is free to members of Library Link.  To receive Knowledge and Networks on your desktop each month click on the link:  http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/join.htm

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

February 2005

 

Library Link [librarylink@emeraldinsight.com]   Mon 28/02/2005 4:50 PM       Library Link Newsletter - February 2005

 

Knowledge & Networks

February 2005

 

Welcome

 

To the February issue of Knowledge and Networks, the official newsletter of Emerald Library Link. We publish monthly and include a round up of interesting papers currently available at the Library Link website.

 

'Knowledge and Networks' will keep you up to date with links to useful articles, case studies, and practical advice on managing your library and increasing its appeal to library users.  We also pinpoint other websites and news items that may be of interest to you.

 

A subscription to Knowledge Networks is free to members of Library Link and comprises 12 online issues per annum.

 

1. New on Site

 

- Information Management

 

Unanswered Questions about Open Access

Viewpoint by Professor Gary E Gorman

 

A recent issue of CLIR News (Number 42, Dec 2004) contains a brief, interesting article by Nancy Davenport "Open Access is the Buzz".  This viewpoint looks at the questions raised in Ms Davenport's article and suggests some answers to these questions.

 

To read the full viewpoint please click on the link below: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/info/viewpoint.htm

 

- How to get published

 

A column 'Publish don't Perish!' by Rachel Singer Gordon, author of the Librarians Guide to writing for Publication.

 

Publish, don't perish banishes some of the mystique surrounding the library publishing process, giving practical tips for improving your writing, improving your odds, and breaking through the self-imposed barriers that keep too many of us from writing and submitting our work.

 

To read the sixth instalment 'Online is fine - Part 1' please click http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/published/perish/feb2005.htm

 

To read the seventh instalment 'Online is fine - Part 2' please click http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/published/perish/march2005.htm

 

Your comments and suggestions for future topics are welcome at mailto:rachel@lisjobs.com.

 

If you've missed any of the previous five instalments please click here: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/published/perish.htm

 

2. Emerald Features

 

- Internet Librarian International 2005

10-11 October 2005

Copthorne Tara Hotel, London

 

The 7th annual Internet Librarian International - the only conference for information professionals and librarians who are using, developing, and implementing internet, intranet, and web-based strategies in their daily work as information navigators, webmasters, web managers, content evaluators, internet strategists, portal creators, product developers, searchers, library managers, and educators - will be held Monday and Tuesday, 10-11 October, at a new venue for 2005 - London's Copthorne Tara Hotel in Kensington.

 

Internet Librarian International provides a stimulating forum for inquiring delegates and experienced speakers to explore the exciting range of issues and challenges that information professionals face today.

 

For further details please go to http://www.internet-librarian.com/index.shtml

 

The Electronic Library journal is a sponsor or the Internet Librarian International Conference.

 

- Forthcoming Special Issues

 

Library and Information Science and the Philosophy of Science Journal of Documentation Volume 61 Number 1

 

This issue is concerned with metatheories in Library and Information Science

(LIS) and especially with the philosophy of science of LIS. Metatheories are theories about the description, investigation, analysis or criticism of the theories in a domain. They are mostly internal to a domain, and may also be termed "paradigms", "traditions" or "schools". This issue is termed "Library and Information Science and the Philosophy of Science" to indicate that the emphasis is on basic approaches developed and generally well known outside of LIS (such as critical realism, empiricism, hermeneutics and pragmatism). Here these general views are interpreted and investigated within the context of LIS. Such approaches deal with how knowledge is understood and acquired and are important in discourses of the foundations of any domain. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/cw/www/mcb/00220418/v61n1/contp1-1.htm

 

Special Issue: Repository print libraries: vital strategies in the digital world Library Management Volume 26 Number 1/2 2005 Guest Editor Stephen O'Connor For more information please go to: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/cw/www/mcb/01435124/v26n1/contp1-1.htm

- Journal of the Week - Forthcoming

 

Emerald's Journals of the Week offer provides free full text access to the past 3 issues of a different journal every week. It's the best way to find out more about individual journals and experience the many benefits of online access - a key part of Emerald's comprehensive subscription package.

 

The Bottom Line is scheduled for week commencing 21/03/05 http://www.emeraldinsight.com/cw/www/mcb/0888045x/contp1.htm

 

3. News

 

The Editor of Reference Services Review, Dr Ilene Rockman, has received an award from the American Library Association. This award recognizes an individual librarian who has made an especially significant contribution to the advancement of instruction in a college or research library environment. The award honors Miriam Dudley, whose pioneering efforts in the field of bibliographic instruction led to the formation of the ACRL Instruction Section (formerly ACRL Bibliographic Instruction Section). For further information see http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlawards/miriamdudley.htm

 

4. Subscriber Information

 

Emerald Library Link is published by Emerald Group Publishing Limited, leading English language publisher of academic and professional literature in the fields of management and Library & Information services and is a globally recognized source of online management information.

 

For more information about anything included within the newsletter please

contact:

 

Andrea Watson-Lee, Editor: Knowledge and Networks, Emerald Group Publishing

Limited, 60/62 Toller Lane, Bradford, West Yorkshire, England.   Tel:  44

1274 777700, mailto:awatsonlee@emeraldinsight.com.

 

Knowledge and networks is produced monthly and is free to members of Library Link.  To receive Knowledge and Networks on your desktop each month click on the link:  http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/join.htm

 

 

 

Library Link

mailto:librarylink@emeraldinsight.com

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

LIBRARY QUARTERLY

Special issue on Discursive Approaches to Information Seeking in Context

Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU]; on behalf of; p. mckenzie [pmckenzi@UWO.CA]            Wed 12/01/2005 3:12 AM       JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU

Call for papers

Library Quarterly Special issue on Discursive Approaches to Information Seeking in Context

 

Information seeking, like other human activities, arises not only out of behavior, but also out of the meanings and values that people attach to their practices and to the methods, means, and technologies available for locating information.  In recent years, LIS researchers have begun to explore information practices by focusing on how people give accounts of their information behavior or construct the meanings of  technical artefacts in work and everyday life. The issue of how information practice related topics, actors, and technologies are constructed in discourse and conversation is important for understanding information seeking and technology use from a broader sociological perspective. This special issue invites papers that apply constructionist, discourse, or conversation analytic methods and theories to information seeking in context research. In particular, we invite papers that explore information practices in interactional and collaborative settings, be they face-to-face or textual encounters.

 

Papers should be prepared in accordance with the Library Quarterly Instructions to Authors

(http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/LQ/instruct.html) and submitted to Pam McKenzie, (Faculty of Information and Media Studies, North Campus Building, Room 240, University of Western Ontario, London, Ont. N6A 5B7, email pmckenzi@uwo.ca) or Sanna Talja (Department of Information Studies FIN-33014 University of Tampere, Finland  mail sanna.talja@uta.fi) no later than Jan. 1, 2006.

 

 

Pamela J. McKenzie

Assistant Professor

Programme in Library and Information Science

Faculty of Information and Media Studies

North Campus Building Room 225

The University of Western Ontario

London, Ontario

N6A 5B7

(519) 661-2111 ext. 88514

(519) 661-3506 (fax)

pmckenzi@uwo.ca

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

LIBRARY TRENDS

53(1), Summer 2004

asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; GSLIS Publications Office [puboff@alexia.lis.uiuc.edu]

Sat 4/12/2004 1:43 AM           [Asis-l] New Issue of Library Trends Available

Now available from the University of Illinois Graduate School of Library and Information Science Publications Office:

 

Library Trends, 53(1), Summer 2004

"Organizational Development and Leadership" edited by Keith Russell and Denise Stephens

 

Single copies are $28, including postage. Subscription rates for the quarterly are: Institutional, $105 per volume ($112 for international subscribers); Individual, $75 per volume ($82 for international subscribers); and Student, $30 per volume ($37 for international subscribers). ISSN 0024-2594 Order single copies or subscriptions from the University of Illinois Press, Journals Department, 1325 S. Oak Street, Champaign, IL 61820; 1-866-244-0626; fax: 217-244-9910; e-mail: journals@uillinois.edu.

 

development (OD) philosophy, processes, and tools on a regular basis. Consequently, we have developed this issue of Library Trends to provide an overview of organizational development as it is practiced in libraries, and to explore leadership development within the OD context. This issue covers a wide range of topics and draws on the literature of many disciplines. It is meant to serve as a resource for every person who believes that libraries can be improved in many ways, including how they acquire, organize, manage, and provide access to information; assess the needs of customers and provide appropriate services; manage human and financial resources; plan for the future; fulfill their mission; develop leadership skills in the staff; and initiate and manage change.

 

---From the Introduction by Keith Russell and Denise Stephens

 

Articles and Authors Include:

 

"The Significance of Organizational Development in Academic Research Libraries," Karen Holloway

 

"Innovation and Strategy: Risk and Choice in Shaping User-Centered Libraries," Kathryn J. Deiss

 

"Organizational Cultures of Libraries as a Strategic Resource," Michelle L. Kaarst-Brown, Scott Nicholson, Gisela M. von Dran,

and Jeffrey M. Stanton

 

"Transitioning to the Learning Organization," Joan Giesecke and Beth McNeil

 

"The System Design Approach to Organizational Development: The University of Arizona Model," Shelley E. Phipps

 

"Developing a Team Management Structure in a Public Library," Betsy A. Bernfeld

 

"From Measurement to Management: Using Data Wisely for Planning and Decision-Making," Steve Hiller and James Self

 

"Organization and Staff Renewal Using Assessment," Gail V. Oltmanns

 

"Redesigning Library Human Resources: Integrating Human Resources Management and Organizational Development," Pat Hawthorne

 

"Learning to Lead: An Analysis of Current Training Programs for Library Leadership," Florence M. Mason and Louella V. Wetherbee

 

"The Promise of Appreciative Inquiry in Library Organizations," Maureen Sullivan

 

"Facilitative Leadership: One Approach to Empowering Staff and Other Stakeholders," Thomas L. Moore

 

"Organizational Development, Leadership, Change, and the Future of Libraries," Denise Stephens and Keith Russell

 

The Publications Office

Graduate School of Library and Information Science

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

501 E. Daniel Street

Champaign, IL 61820-6211

 

(217) 333-1359 phone, (217) 244-7329 FAX puboff@alexia.lis.uiuc.edu http://www.lis.uiuc.edu/puboff

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

53(2) Fall 2004   and 53(3), Winter 2005

asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; GSLIS Publications Office [puboff@alexia.lis.uiuc.edu] 

Tue 15/03/2005 2:47 AM        [Asis-l] New issues of Library Trends available

Now available from the University of Illinois Graduate School of Library and Information Science Publications Office:

 

Library Trends, 53(2) and 53(3), Fall 2004 and Winter 2005 "Consumer Health Issues, Trends, and Research: Parts 1 & 2" Edited by Tammy L. Mays

 

Single copies are $28, including postage. Subscription rates for the quarterly are: Institutional, $105 per volume ($112 for international subscribers); Individual, $75 per volume ($82 for international subscribers); and Student, $30 per volume ($37 for international subscribers). ISSN 0024-2594 Order single copies or subscriptions from the University of Illinois Press, Journals Department, 1325 S. Oak Street, Champaign, IL 61820; 1-866-244-0626; fax: 217-244-9910; e-mail: journals@uillinois.edu.

 

The Internet has propelled the consumer health movement to the forefront of libraries. Academic health sciences, clinical, hospital, consumer health, and public librarians across the country are seeing a continuous growth in the number of requests for health information from their patrons. Internet savvy consumers are completing their own online health information searches. Patrons are seeking free, quality, electronic health information written in lay terminology, though both Internet and non-Internet users are seeking librarians for what they cannot find. An exploration of consumer health issues, trends, and research is covered in these issues of Library Trends. In part 1--Strategic Strides toward a Better Future--contributors examine the many facets that comprise consumer health information services; part 2--Applicable Research in the 21st Century--promotes creative partnerships and models between agencies and library institutions and delivers strategies for achieving health literacy in a variety of communities.

 

Articles and Authors Include:

 

Part 1

"Meeting the Health Information Needs of Diverse Populations," Kristine M. Alpi and Barbara M. Bibel

 

"Where Am I to Go? Use of the Internet for Consumer Health Information by Two Vulnerable Communities," Ellen Gay Detlefsen

 

"Working with Immigrant and Refugee Populations: Issues and Hmong Case Study," Margaret (Peg) Allen, Suzanne Matthew, and Mary Jo Boland

 

"Watch Your Language," Heidi T. Sandstrom

 

"Medical Textbooks: Can Lay People Read and Understand Them?" Lynda M. Baker and Claudia J. Gollop

 

"Why Develop Web-Based Health Information Workshops for Consumers?" Diane K. Kovacs

 

"Training the Health Information Seeker: Quality Issues in Health Information Web Sites," Javier Crespo

 

"MedlinePlus®: The National Library of Medicine® Brings Quality Information to Health Consumers," Naomi Miller, Rebecca J. Tyler, and Joyce E. B. Backus

 

Part 2

"Providing Health Information to Community Members Where They Are: Characteristics of the Culturally Competent Librarian," Nancy Ottman Press and Mary Diggs-Hobson

 

"Collaboration and Marketing Ensure Public and Medical Library Viability," Stephanie Weldon

 

"Health Information Literacy: A Library Case Study," Erica Burnham and Eileen Beany Peterson

 

"Access to Electronic Health Information for the Public: Analysis of Fifty-Three Funded Projects," Angela B. Ruffin, Keith Cogdill, Lalitha Kutty, and Michelle Hudson-Ochillo

 

"Building Community Bridges for Health: Consumer Health Librarians as Health Advocates," Michele A. Spatz

 

"Philly Health Info: The College of Physicians of Philadelphia’s Regional Community Health Information Project," Andrea Kenyon

 

"Consumer Health Information from Both Sides of the Reference Desk," Gail Kouame, Margo Harris, and Susan Murray

 

"Factors Affecting the Provision of Consumer Health Information in Public

Libraries: The Last Five Years," Mary L. Gillaspy

 

"Consumer Health Information Services at Iowa City Public Library," Candice Smith, Kara Logsden, and Maeve Clark

 

The Publications Office

Graduate School of Library and Information Science

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

501 E. Daniel Street

Champaign, IL 61820-6211

 

(217) 333-1359 phone, (217) 244-7329 FAX puboff@alexia.lis.uiuc.edu http://www.lis.uiuc.edu/puboff

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

LIBRI

54 (3)  September 2004

----Original Message-----
From: i.m.johnson@rgu.ac.uk [mailto:i.m.johnson@rgu.ac.uk]   Sent:
Thursday, 21 October 2004 8:20 PM

Contents of LIBRI, September 2004

 

Contents of LIBRI: international journal of libraries and information services, 54 (3) September 2004

 

Information flow and peripherality in remote island areas of Scotland

National identity and the digital library: a study of the British Library and the Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

The Shift from Apartheid to Democracy: Issues and Impacts on Public Libraries in Cape Town, South Africa

Evaluation of Public Libraries: The 2001 IFLA Standards and the 2003 Standards for Provincial Libraries in China

Exploration of the Field of Knowledge Management for the Library and Information Professional

Exploring information ‘context’ in the published literature of menopausal hormone therapy

 

ABSTRACTS FOLLOW:

 

INFORMATION FLOW AND PERIPHERALITY IN REMOTE ISLAND AREAS OF SCOTLAND

Sue Beer

Winner of LIBRI Best Student Paper Award 2004

Communities in the more remote parts of areas which themselves are considered to be peripheral may feel doubly isolated. Access to information can help reduce negative effects of living and working in such communities, but, in turn, this peripherality creates barriers to information access. The purpose of this PhD research is to gain a greater understanding of the relationship between access to information and the effects of peripherality; using four remote communities in each of Shetland and The Western Isles of Scotland as case studies. To this end, interviews were conducted with representatives of just over a hundred businesses, community and voluntary groups from these peripheral communities, and with information providers serving them. The research was not concerned with a particular type of information, such as business, market or community information; but with all types of information need from within the target communities. This paper examines some of the findings, which point to a strong interdependency between geographical peripherality and exclusion from information, in remote communities where accessing information is described as being both more difficult and more necessary. These findings were presented at the ‘Europe at the Margins: EU Regional Policy, Peripherality and Rurality’, Regional Studies Association Conference, at Angers, France in April 2004.

 

NATIONAL IDENTITY AND THE DIGITAL LIBRARY: A STUDY OF THE BRITISH LIBRARY AND THE LLYFRGELL GENEDLAETHOL CYMRU

Charlotte Priddle

This paper examines the digital presence of two national libraries, the British Library and the Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru (National Library of Wales), and the means by which the perceptions of national identity and heritage can be seen to influence the choices made regarding the digitization of specific collections.  It begins with an examination of the constructed nature of national identity and heritage. Then a brief study is made of the histories of the two nations in question, Britain and Wales, and the connections and struggles between the two that have influenced formations of identity. Using this historical background, a study is made as to the digital holdings of each institution, including a comparison of the type, amounts and means by which items have been digitized, as well as the stated aims of the institutions as to their own understanding of their mission and remit in terms of the audience they perceive they serve. Finally, a comparison is made of the two institutions, and conclusions reached as to the ways in which the historically constructed myths of national identity can be seen as reflected in the individual choices made regarding the preservation and digitization of their collections.

 

THE SHIFT FROM APARTHEID TO DEMOCRACY: ISSUES AND IMPACTS ON PUBLIC LIBRARIES IN CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA

Nicole Brown

Providing all citizens with free and equal access to information allows democracy to flourish. Integral to democratic governments, public libraries have both social and political responsibilities. South Africa’s 1994 shift from apartheid to a democratic republic makes it an ideal nation through which to investigate the struggles and issues faced as a public library system adapts to a new political structure. South Africa’s public libraries did not automatically receive the assumed benefits of the shift from apartheid’s oppressive regime of segregation and inequality to a democratic government. Rather, it is a work in progress. South African libraries face social, political, and economic issues such as: unfair allocation of resources, severe social conditions and problems with support from the government including problematic rhetoric within the New Constitution. LIASA (Library & Information Association of South Africa) has admirably begun to fulfill an important role in library development in South Africa. With appropriate funding and support from all levels of government and from local, national, and international library organizations, the public libraries in South Africa can become the beacons of democracy that they are intended to be.

 

EVALUATION OF PUBLIC LIBRARIES: THE 2001 IFLA STANDARDS AND THE 2003 STANDARDS FOR PROVINCIAL LIBRARIES IN CHINA

Beverly P. Lynch and Wenxiang Yang,

The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA), guided by the interests of UNESCO in assisting libraries to improve their services, continues to develop statements on standards for public libraries. The most recent statement was adopted in 2001. IFLA, while working tirelessly at the international level to develop standards, also recognizes the importance of national, regional and local standards. The diffusion world wide of knowledge and information about library standards development has been useful in the preparation of standards at the regional and national levels. This paper summarizes and compares the components of the current IFLA standards for public libraries, adopted in 2001, and the new standards for provincial public libraries in China, adopted in 2003. The comparison attests to the similarities in the evaluation of library services around the world. The continuing work on library standards at the international level is very important as it identifies the critical variables needed in evaluation of library services. While setting the general direction for such standards work, it also enables the important issue of values, and the consideration of those values in the evaluation of library services, to be made at the local, regional, and national levels.

 

EXPLORATION OF THE FIELD OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT FOR THE LIBRARY AND INFORMATION PROFESSIONAL

Michelle Sinotte

This study is an attempt to isolate and describe the field of knowledge management in terms of its relevance for library and information science professionals. In addition to readings, several interviews were completed with people who are working in the knowledge management field. It is intended to be an overview to assist LIS professionals in grasping the essence of this subject and suggesting ways in which knowledge management may continue to affect the LIS field in the near future. First, a brief overview of the origins of the field and some suggestions of why it persists in the face of numerous challenges will be provided. Following that will be an attempt to deconstruct the terminology surrounding knowledge management and give shape to its basic components. Next, the aforementioned numerous challenges will be considered, and finally the role of the LIS professional will be discussed.

 

EXPLORING INFORMATION ‘CONTEXT’ IN THE PUBLISHED LITERATURE OF MENOPAUSAL HORMONE THERAPY

Shelagh K. Genuis

Using content analysis, this study explores information context as expressed in medical and consumer articles, and the role of the literature in influencing the innovation-decision process. Changing practices related to hormone therapy for menopausal and postmenopausal women, and the expression of biomedical and normal life transition models within published literature provided context for the study; ‘diffusion of innovations’ theory provided the theoretical framework that informed the investigation. Findings suggest that both medical and consumer health literature is dominated by the biomedical model; that context may influence the presentation of information, thus impacting innovation decision-making; and that published literature not only provides information and reinforces knowledge, but, through information context, it also produces and shapes meaning, and creates belief. Librarians and information professionals are encouraged to recognize the influence of context within published literature; to facilitate access by both professionals and consumers to the diversity of information that informs human knowledge; and to enhance appreciation for the contribution of diverse theoretical perspectives and research methods.

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LITERATI CLUB NEWSLINE and Doctoral Awards reminder

3rd issue 2004

Chris Perry [cperry@emeraldinsight.com]                                             Fri 8/10/2004 9:41 PM

The third Literati Club Newsline of 2004 is now available at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/literaticlub/whatsnew/newsline.htm

We celebrate 60 years of the Journal of Documentation; Margaret Adolphus previews the authors' resources she will be compiling for Emerald Management Xtra; there are conference reports and an update on Emerald journals' performances in the recently released ISI citation tables.

 

The 2005 Emerald Outstanding Doctoral Research Awards are still accepting nominations. There are 12 awards in different subject areas, each sponsored by an Emerald journal. Young researchers who have just completed (or are just about to complete) a doctoral programme can apply. The prize in each case is £1,000 and the chance for a related paper to be considered by the sponsoring journal. Full details are at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/awards/

 

Two completely new journals are ready for launch in 2005 and are currently accepting submissions. Critical Perspectives on International Business

(http://www.emeraldinsight.com/cpoib.htm) is a major, multi-disciplinary title engaging with issues of globalization, production and consumption, the environment, economics, society, politics and power. The International Journal of Managerial Finance (http://www.emeraldinsight.com/ijmf.htm)

offers a fast moving, rigorous examination of all aspects of financial decision making. Does either of these match your latest research?

 

 

Best regards,

 

Chris Perry

Commissioning Editor, Literati

mailto:cperry@emeraldinsight.com

 

VISIT THE LITERATI CLUB WEB SITE

the world's leading collection of resources

for journal authors and editors. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/literaticlub

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PROCEEDINGS OF THE IEEE

 

January 2005 Special Issue

asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; j.platt@ieee.org Thu 6/01/2005 3:49 AM

STS-L@listserv.utk.edu; Asis-l@asis.org; eldnet-l@U.WASHINGTON.EDU

[Asis-l] Proceedings of the IEEE Assesses Future of Video Streaming

(x-posted. Please excuse duplication.)

 

PROCEEDINGS OF THE IEEE ASSESSES FUTURE OF VIDEO STREAMING

 

The January 2005 Special Issue of Proceedings of the IEEE, the flagship journal of the IEEE, assesses the pervasive presence of the Internet and wireless technologies and addresses the challenge of video streaming in real-time through wireless networks.

 

This special issue, entitled "Advances in Video Coding and Delivery," reviews the challenge of producing high-definition images over heterogeneous networks and provides a compelling look into the future of all-IP networks.

 

Through references to key contributions to video coding and delivery, the special issue documents timely innovations that could lead to further advances in wireless video transmissions.

 

For more information, or to read the guest editors' introduction to this Special Issue, visit:

 

http://www.ieee.org/pubs/proceedings/current.xml

 

Subscribers will be able to access the entire contents of this issue online through IEEE Xplore at:

 

http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/RecentIssue.jsp?puNumber=5

 

 

************************************************************

John R. Platt

IEEE Business Communications Manager

445 Hoes Lane, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA

Phone: +1 732 981 3449     Email: j.platt@ieee.org

************************************************************

 

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PUBLIC LIBRARIES JOURNAL  

 

January 2005

Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU]; on behalf of; Dale Silver [isilver@UIUC.EDU]                                                Mon 3/01/2005 5:26 AM         JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU

PLA Public Libraries Journal - Jan 05 Theme Issue Available

 

Attn:  Library School Deans, Faculty, Public Library Directors, Librarians, and Students:

 

The premier journal of the public library profession, "Public Libraries," a publication of the Public Library Association (PLA), is making available its January 2005 theme issue on Reader's Advisory Service.  PLA is offering to sell single or multiple copies of the theme issue to any interested parties, such as individual students, faculty, libraries, and librarians, at a rate of $10 per issue, or $7 each for five or more copies.  You can order single or multiple copies.  To order on-line, by fax, or mail-in, visit www.pla.org ,  "Publications and Reports",  and then "Public Libraries" .

 

Interested parties might also want to consider membership in the PLA, which includes a full subscription to Public Libraries.  To join PLA visit  www.pla.org membership rates are as follows: Student member: $10 Regular member: $50

 

All PLA members must also be members of ALA.  Membership rates for ALA are as follows: Student member: $25 Regular member/first year $50

--

 

*Isabel Dale Silver*

 

Assistant Dean, Academic Affairs

 

Graduate School of Library and Information Science

 

104 Library and Information Science Building

 

501 East Daniel Street

 

Champaign, Illinois 61820-6211

 

(217) 265-6416, fax (217) 244-3302

 

isilver@uiuc.edu

 

url: www.lis.uiuc.edu

 

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SCHOLARLY ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING BIBLIOGRAPHY

Version 55

asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; Charles W. Bailey, Jr. [cbailey@uh.edu]           

ASIS-L@asis.org         Wed 27/10/2004 2:42 AM    [Asis-l] Version 55, Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

Version 55 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography is now available.  This selective bibliography presents over 2,225 articles, books, and other printed and electronic sources that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing efforts on the Internet.

 

     HTML: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html

 

     Acrobat: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf

    

The HTML document is designed for interactive use.  Each

major section is a separate file.  There are links to sources that are freely available on the Internet.  It can be can be searched using Boolean operators.

 

The HTML document includes three sections not found in

the Acrobat file:

 

(1) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog (biweekly list of new resources; also available by mailing list--see second

URL)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepw.htm

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepwlist.htm

 

(2) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources (directory of over 270 related Web sites)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepr.htm

 

(3) Archive (prior versions of the bibliography)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/archive/sepa.htm

 

The Acrobat file is designed for printing.  The printed bibliography is over 180 pages long.  The Acrobat file is over 430 KB.

 

The bibliography has the following sections (revised sections are marked with an asterisk):

 

Table of Contents

 

1 Economic Issues*

2 Electronic Books and Texts

     2.1 Case Studies and History

     2.2 General Works*

     2.3 Library Issues

3  Electronic Serials

     3.1 Case Studies and History

     3.2 Critiques

     3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals*

     3.4 General Works*

     3.5 Library Issues*

     3.6 Research*

4 General Works*

5 Legal Issues

     5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*

     5.2 License Agreements

     5.3 Other Legal Issues

6  Library Issues

     6.1 Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*

     6.2 Digital Libraries*

     6.3 General Works*

     6.4 Information Integrity and Preservation*

7 New Publishing Models*

8 Publisher Issues*

     8.1 Digital Rights Management*

9 Repositories, E-Prints, and OAI*

Appendix A. Related Bibliographies

Appendix B. About the Author

 

Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources includes

the following sections:

 

Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*

Digital Libraries*

Electronic Books and Texts*

Electronic Serials*

General Electronic Publishing*

Images*

Legal

Preservation*

Publishers*

Repositories, E-Prints, and OAI*

SGML and Related Standards

 

An article about the bibliography has been published

in The Journal of Electronic Publishing:

 

http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/07-02/bailey.html

 

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Version 56

 

Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [JESSE@listserv.utk.edu]; on behalf of; Charles W. Bailey, Jr. [cbailey@UH.EDU]                        Wed 15/12/2004 5:17 AM

JESSE@listserv.utk.edu                       Version 56, Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

 

Version 56 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography is now available.  This selective bibliography presents over 2,275 articles, books, and other printed and electronic sources that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing efforts on the Internet.

 

     HTML: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html

 

     Acrobat: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf

 

The HTML document is designed for interactive use.  Each

major section is a separate file.  There are links to sources that are freely available on the Internet.  It can be can be searched using Boolean operators.

 

The HTML document includes three sections not found in

the Acrobat file:

 

(1) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog (biweekly list of new resources; also available by mailing list--see second

URL)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepw.htm

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepwlist.htm

 

(2) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources (directory of over 270 related Web sites)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepr.htm

 

(3) Archive (prior versions of the bibliography)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/archive/sepa.htm

 

The Acrobat file is designed for printing.  The printed bibliography is over 185 pages long.  The Acrobat file is over 440 KB.

 

The bibliography has the following sections (revised sections are marked with an asterisk):

 

Table of Contents

 

1 Economic Issues

2 Electronic Books and Texts

     2.1 Case Studies and History

     2.2 General Works*

     2.3 Library Issues*

3  Electronic Serials

     3.1 Case Studies and History*

     3.2 Critiques

     3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals

     3.4 General Works

     3.5 Library Issues*

     3.6 Research*

4 General Works*

5 Legal Issues

     5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*

     5.2 License Agreements*

     5.3 Other Legal Issues

6  Library Issues

     6.1 Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*

     6.2 Digital Libraries*

     6.3 General Works*

     6.4 Information Integrity and Preservation*

7 New Publishing Models*

8 Publisher Issues

     8.1 Digital Rights Management*

9 Repositories, E-Prints, and OAI*

Appendix A. Related Bibliographies

Appendix B. About the Author

 

Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources includes

the following sections:

 

Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*

Digital Libraries*

Electronic Books and Texts

Electronic Serials

General Electronic Publishing*

Images

Legal*

Preservation

Publishers

Repositories, E-Prints, and OAI*

SGML and Related Standards

 

An article about the bibliography has been published

in The Journal of Electronic Publishing:

 

http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/07-02/bailey.html

 

 

Best Regards,

Charles

 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

Version 57

 

asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; Charles W. Bailey, Jr. [cbailey@uh.edu]                        Fri 18/02/2005 12:23 AM                        ASIS-L@asis.org        

[Asis-l] Version 57, Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

 

Version 57 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography is now available.  This selective bibliography presents over 2,325 articles, books, and other printed and electronic sources that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing efforts on the Internet.

 

     HTML: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html

 

     Acrobat: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf

    

The HTML document is designed for interactive use.  Each

major section is a separate file.  There are links to sources that are freely available on the Internet.  It can be can be searched using Boolean operators.

 

The HTML document includes three sections not found in

the Acrobat file:

 

(1) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog (biweekly list of new resources; also available by mailing list--see second

URL)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepw.htm

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepwlist.htm

 

(2) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources (directory of over 270 related Web sites)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepr.htm

 

(3) Archive (prior versions of the bibliography)

 

     http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/archive/sepa.htm

 

The Acrobat file is designed for printing.  The printed bibliography is over 190 pages long.  The Acrobat file is over 450 KB.

 

The bibliography has the following sections (revised sections are marked with an asterisk):

 

Table of Contents

 

1 Economic Issues

2 Electronic Books and Texts

     2.1 Case Studies and History

     2.2 General Works*

     2.3 Library Issues*

3  Electronic Serials

     3.1 Case Studies and History

     3.2 Critiques

     3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals

     3.4 General Works*

     3.5 Library Issues*

     3.6 Research*

4 General Works*

5 Legal Issues

     5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*

     5.2 License Agreements*

     5.3 Other Legal Issues

6  Library Issues

     6.1 Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*

     6.2 Digital Libraries*

     6.3 General Works*

     6.4 Information Integrity and Preservation*

7 New Publishing Models*

8 Publisher Issues*

     8.1 Digital Rights Management

9 Repositories, E-Prints, and OAI*

Appendix A. Related Bibliographies

Appendix B. About the Author

 

Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources includes

the following sections:

 

Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata

Digital Libraries*

Electronic Books and Texts

Electronic Serials

General Electronic Publishing*

Images

Legal*

Preservation

Publishers*

Repositories, E-Prints, and OAI*

SGML and Related Standards

 

An article about the bibliography has been published

in The Journal of Electronic Publishing:

 

http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/07-02/bailey.html

 

 

Best Regards,

Charles

 

Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Assistant Dean for Digital Library Planning and Development, University of Houston, Library Administration, 114 University Libraries, Houston, TX 77204-2000.  E-mail: cbailey@uh.edu.

Voice: (713) 743-9804.  Fax: (713) 743-9811. http://info.lib.uh.edu/cwb/bailey.htm

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WEBOLOGY: an OPEN ACCESS journal

New Issue

asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; AliReza Noruzi [anouruzi@yahoo.com]  Wed 5/01/2005 11:33 PM

asis-l@asis.org; sigkm-l@asis.org; sigtis-l@asis.org; siguse-l@asis.org; eurchap@asis.org; asis-l-bounces@asis.org; air-l-aoir.org@listserv.aoir.org; DIG_REF@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU; lis-forum@ncsi.iisc.ernet.in; diglib@infoserv.inist.fr; ifla-l@infoserv.inist.fr; BUSLIB-L@LISTSERV.BOISESTATE.EDU; SIGMETRICS@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU

[Asis-l] Webology: an OPEN ACCESS journal, New Issue

 

Dear All,

[Apologies for cross-postings]

We are pleased to inform you that the second issue of Webology, an international OPEN ACCESS journal, is published and is available ONLINE now. It serves as a forum for discussion and experimentation. Webology publishes scholarly articles, essays and reviews, and encourages the participation of academics and practitioners alike. The journal is available at: http://www.webology.ir/  

The second issue of Webology contains the following papers:

 

Title: Editorial Note

Author: Yazdan Mansourian

URL: http://www.webology.ir/2004/v1n2/editorial2.html  

 ----------------------------------------------

 

Title: A Study of Web Search Trends

Author: Dr. Amanda Spink & Dr. Bernard J.! Jansen

URL: http://www.webology.ir/2004/v1n2/a4.html 

 ----------------------------------------------

 

Title: Personal Homepages as an Information Resource

Author: Shant Narsesian

URL: http://www.webology.ir/2004/v1n2/a5.html

 ----------------------------------------------

 

Title: Shifts in search engine development: A review of past, present and future trends in research on search engines

Author: Saeid Asadi & Hamid R. Jamali M.

URL: http://www.webology.ir/2004/v1n2/a6.html

 ----------------------------------------------

 

Title: Metadata and the Web

Author: Mehdi Safari

URL: http://www.webology.ir/2004/v1n2/a7.html

 ----------------------------------------------

 

Title: Application of Ranganathan's Laws to the Web

Author: AliReza Noruzi

URL: http://www.webology.ir/2004/v1n2/a8.html

 ----------------------------------------------

 

Title: Book Review of: Web Search: Public Searching of the Web / by Dr. Amanda Spink & Dr. Bernard J. Jansen

Author: Yazdan Mansourian

URL: http://www.webology.ir/2004/v1n2/bookreview1.html   

 ----------------------------------------------

 

Subscribe to the journal of Webology: 
http://www.webology.ir/eTOCs.html  
------------------------------------------------

 

Yours sincerely,

 

A. Noruzi

Department of Information Science

University of Paul Cezanne, France

noruzi  @  crrm.u-3mrs.fr

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