Information Research

April 2005

Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU]; on behalf of; Tom Wilson [wilsontd@gmail.com]
Tue 19/04/2005 6:22 PM          JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU     New issue of Information Research

The April issue of Information Research is now available. Here is the
Editorial:

Introduction

It has been unusually fraught to get this issue out; the preparation process was interrupted at a crucial point by my visit to Japan, followed by a working trip to Dublin, and by delays in getting contributions into proper shape. As a result, the Abstracts in Spanish have been unavoidably delayed, and there may be more than one small glitch in the issue. My apologies to all.

Further changes in the Editorial Board

This quarter we say 'Goodbye' to Dr. Steve Robertson, who, unfortunately, has had to resign from the Editorial Board for personal reasons. Steve is well known in the information retrieval world and his expertise will be missed. I also hope to welcome a colleague from Japan to the Board in the near future, but we haven't actually tied up the details as we go to 'press'.

This issue

We present a diverse set of papers in this issue, both topically and in terms of the geographical distribution of the authors. We have papers from Portugal, Iran, the USA and Spain - it's curious how few submissions we get from the UK to the journal. There aren't so many quality journals in the field that are published in the UK, so the lack of output may have more to do with the state of research in the field than with anything else. The demise of the British Library Research and Development Department, some years ago, certainly seems to have reduced the opportunities for gaining research funds. The tranche of money available from the Arts and Humanities Research Board is also open to bids from other disciplines and the competition is high, so it is probable that the overall value of funds entering the field has reduced. Perhaps someone out there would like to submit a paper on the subject!

The papers themselves are a diverse lot: Zita Correia presents a 'stakeholder model' of the public-sector information system, noting that the key problem is how to engage stakeholders' commitment to the public-sector information system. She argues that:

Societies with high levels of social capital, where positive relations exist between the state and society, will probably need little more than exhortation and the incentive of best practice dissemination, or the adoption of codes of conduct. But societies with low levels of social capital, where negative relations exist between the state and society, will need not only to adopt codes of conduct but also directives, and possibly legal entrenchment of stakeholder rights and duties.

The paper from Iran is by Gholamreza Pezeshki-Rad and Naser Zamani of Tarbiat Modares University in Teheran and deals with the information-seeking behaviour of Iranian agricultural extension managers and specialists. Agricultural extension is one of those information-intensive areas of work that has been subject to a fair amount of research over the years, but often by researchers from the field of agriculture itself (as is the case here) rather than by information science researchers. Many years ago, I was involved in a UNESCO mission to Tunisia to prepare guidelines for the conduct of a 'user needs' survey of extension workers in that country. The work was never actually undertaken, largely, I think, because of political apathy in the agency, but it gave me an insight into the enormous opportunity for information service delivery in this context.

A complete change of pace is provided by Vaagen and Koehler, in their paper on ethical aspects of the DeCSS decryptation program. DeCSS was developed by a young Norwegian programmer, known as 'DVD-Jon', who earned the ire of the American movie industry by producing a program that would decrypt digital movie files. Court cases resulted, but, eventually, DVD-Jon was acquitted, the court ruling that it was not his intention that the program should be used for piracy. The question the authors raise in this paper relates to the ethics of the
situation: freedom of expression versus intellectual property rights.
They conclude:

'...there is a growing recognition that there may be access rights that supersede property rights. It remains to be seen to what extent this growing recognition in a globalized economy will affect copyright holder rights'.

Our contribution from Spain is in Spanish and deals with the development of systematic strategies for Web searching. Given the diverse range of sources available on the Web, ensuring comprehensiveness in the search is extremely difficult. The authors develop a decision-making model for the search and exemplify its use in the field of the psychology of health.

Next, we have Harry Bruce's paper on 'personal, anticipated information need', which is related to the habits we have of retaining and storing (or bookmarking) information sources that we think may be of relevance to us in the future. Personally, I gave up doing that a long, long time ago, when I realised that my chances of accurately predicting future need were pretty close to zero, and that my personal information management practices would not exactly aid retrieval. I now assume that, if something catches my attention as of possible future use, I'll be able to find it again. However, that 'personal, anticipated information need' exists and that it drives our squirrel-like behaviour, cannot be denied and Bruce's exposition of the concept is very welcome.

In addition, there is the usual clutch of book reviews, and on this occasion I'd like to draw attention to a couple that have very good things to say about the books concerned. One is a review of Lee Komito's, The information revolution and Ireland, which, as the reviewer says, is applicable to many more countries than Ireland; and the other is my own review of John Buschman's, Dismantling the public sphere. Situating and sustaining librarianship in the age of the new public philosophy, which says a number of things that have needed saying for some time, about the pernicious effect of the market-driven society on libraries in general. I recommend both books strongly.

Frank Miller

Readers who enjoyed Frank Miller's 'I=0' will be saddened to learn of his death on Wednesday 23rd February, at his home in Brisbane, Australia, following a long battle against cancer. Frank's contributions to the discussion list and the Weblog will be remembered for their wit and good sense.
Acknowledgments

My thanks, again, to Rae Ann Hughes, volunteer proof reader, for an excellent job, and to Jose Vicente Rodriquez and Pedro Diaz for coping with translating the abstracts into Spanish at unusually short notice, as well as to all those who have acted as referees for this and other issues.

Professor Tom Wilson, Publisher/Editor-in-Chief

http://InformationR.net/ir/
--

--------------------------------------------

Professor Tom Wilson, PhD
Publisher and Editor-in-Chief
Information Research: an international electronic journal
Website: http://InformationR.net/
E-mail: wilsontd@gmail.com

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Information Technology Newsletter

Volume 16, Issue 2

Journals [journals@cplx.net]          Mon 19/09/2005 11:48 PM          New Issue of Information Technology Newsletter

Dear Librarian,

Idea Group Publishing, an imprint of Idea Group Inc., is pleased to announce that the Information Technology Newsletter, Volume 16, Issue 2 is available for free download at www.idea-group.com/itn.

The Information Technology Newsletter (ITN) is published twice a year, providing librarians and library staff with the opportunity to learn what’s new in the information science and technology field. This journal features book reviews, interviews from IT experts, global coverage of IT topics, and a chance for librarians to express their views and opinions.

This international newsletter of information technology for libraries is a great way to keep you up-to-date with all the new trends in the IT area!

Should you have any questions about ITN or any of Idea Group Inc.’s books, encyclopedias, journals, and teaching cases, please contact Hannah Gordon at hgordon@idea-group.com or 717-533-8845 ext. 32.

Sincerely,

Hannah Gordon
Marketing Assistant
Idea Group, Inc.
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International Journal of Doctoral Studies
     
Call for Papers

Keith Harman [kharman@ncu.edu]          Tue 30/08/2005 8:48 AM          Call for Papers and Reviewers: International Journal of Doctoral Studies

<http://informingscience.org/images/islogoNoDate.gif>; International Journal of Doctoral Studies

Call for Papers / Call for Reviewers

PLEASE PRINT & POST THIS ANNOUNCEMENT

International Journal of Doctoral Studies <http://IJDS.org>; <http://IJDS.org>; (IJDS) is an academically peer reviewed journal. All submissions are blind refereed by three or more peers. IJDS is published in print by subscription and online free of charge at http://IJDS.org <http://IJDS.org>; .

IJDS, an official publication of the Informing Science Institute <http://informingscience.org/>; , is now accepting submissions and reviewer nominations.

The mission of the IJDS is to provide readers around the world with the widest possible coverage of developments in doctoral studies using the IS (Informing Science) discipline as a framework or paradigm to understand doctoral studies. IJDS especially encourages publications co-authored by doctoral students and doctoral faculty.

IJDS is an interdisciplinary forum that publishes high quality articles on theory, practice, innovation, and research that cover all aspects of doctoral studies. Book reviews are also welcome. Authors may use epistemologies from engineering, computer science, education, psychology, business, anthropology, and such. Papers that essentially cover "teaching tips" or unstructured anecdotal data are not considered for publication. IJDS provides those who submit manuscripts for publication with useful, timely feedback by making the review process constructive. IJDS strives to become the most authoritative journal on doctoral studies.

Please consider submitting a well-developed paper to IJDS. To view the author’s guide and submission site, visit http://www.ijds.org/submit.html <http://www.ijds.org/submit.html>; . Prior to submission, it is essential for prospective authors to read and to understand the mission <http://ijds.org/mission.html>; of IJDS.

--------------------------------------------

 

Call for Reviewers: The Editorial Review Board is a key part of the IJDS. Its role is to review and comment on manuscripts, thus providing the input to the editors who make the final decision on which papers are accepted and rejected.

Reviewers are ideally experienced members and/or chairs of doctoral dissertation committees. Those who aspire to work with doctoral students are also welcome to join the editorial board.

To nominate yourself to be a member of the IJDS editorial review board, visit http://review.ijds.org/review/signup.php <http://review.ijds.org/review/signup.php>;

For additional information contact: Keith Harman, Editor-in-Chief <mailto:kharman@ncu.edu?subject=International Journal of Doctoral Studies>


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Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship

Spring 2005
Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU]; on behalf of; Andrea Duda [duda@LIBRARY.UCSB.EDU]
Thu 19/05/2005 9:01 AM          PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU           ISTL - Spring 2005
The Spring 2005 issue of Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship is now available at http://www.istl.org/

Please note that with this issue of ISTL we inaugurate a new column entitled "Viewpoints." Its purpose is to provide a forum for informed opinion and editorials by and for our readers. There is no shortage of opinions among librarians, and we hope that those expressed in this column will be provocative and interesting, and will spark ideas and reactions.

CONTENTS:

Theme: Open Access Journals

* Scientific Research: The Publication Dilemma
by Victoria Shelton, George Mason University

* The Importance of Open Access, Open Source, and Open Standards for
Libraries
by Edward M. Corrado, The College of New Jersey

* Global Access To Indian Research: Indian STM Journals Online
by Lalitha Kumari, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology

Refereed Articles

* Survey of GIS Implementation and Use within Smaller Academic
Libraries
by JaNae Kinikin, Weber State University and Keith Hench, Kirkwood
Community College

* Evaluating Bibliographic Database Overlap for Marine Science
Literature Using an Ecological Concept
by Joan Parker, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories

Book Reviews

* Encyclopedia of Information Science and Technology
by Beverly Ryan, University of California, Santa Barbara

* Using the Mathematics Literature
by Brian Quigley, University of California, Berkeley

* Teaching Tips : Innovations in Undergraduate Science Instruction
by Julie T. Miran, Haverford College

Database Reviews and Reports

* Technology Research Database of Cambridge Scientific Abstracts (CSA)
by Megan Sapp, Purdue University

* GeoscienceWorld Millennium Collection -- A New Resource in the Earth
Sciences
by Yelena Pancheshnikov, University of Saskatchewan Libraries

Viewpoints

* Instruction: Teaching or Marketing?
by Susan Ardis, University of Texas

--------------------------------------------

Andrea L. Duda
Sciences-Engineering Library
University of California, Santa Barbara
E-mail: duda@library.ucsb.edu

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Summer 2005
istl-updates-admin@library.ucsb.edu; on behalf of; Andrea Duda [duda@library.ucsb.edu]          Wed 17/08/2005 2:35 AM
istl-updates@library.ucsb.edu     [ISTL-updates] Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship, Summer 2005
The Summer 2005 issue of Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship is now available at www.istl.org

CONTENTS:

Theme: All Topics

* Follow-up Survey of GIS at Smaller Academic Libraries
by JaNae Kinikin, Weber State University and Keith Hench, Kirkwood
Community College

* Comparing Journal Use Between Biology Faculty and Undergraduate Students
by Joseph R. Kraus, University of Denver

* Ask a Science Librarian
by Margaret Clifton, Library of Congress

* The National Science and Technology Library: A Chinese Model of
Collaboration
by Xue-Ming Bao, Seton Hall University

Refereed Articles:

* Citation Analysis: A Method for Collection Development for a Rapidly
Developing Field
by Kristen B. LaBonte, California State University, Channel Islands

Science and Technology Resources on the Internet:

* Open Access and Scholarly Communication -- A Selection of Key Web Sites
by Hanna Kwasik and Pauline O. Fulda, Louisiana State University Health
Sciences Center

Book Reviews:

* Evidence-Based Practice for Information Professionals: A Handbook
by Bette Anton, University of California, Berkeley

* Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints
and Open Access Journals
by Ann Jensen, University of California, Berkeley

Viewpoints:

* To Print or Not to Print Medical Textbooks: Is That the Question?
by Barbara Amelia Nace, Merck & Co., Inc

--------------------------------------------

Andrea L. Duda
Sciences-Engineering Library
University of California, Santa Barbara
E-mail: duda@library.ucsb.edu

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Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology

Volume 56, Issue 7, 2005.

asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]          Fri 8/04/2005 10:59 PM
asis-l@asis.org               

Richard B. Hill
Executive Director
American Society for Information Science and Technology 1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510 Silver Spring, MD 20910
Fax: (301) 495-0810
Voice: (301) 495-0900

--------------------------------------------

From: WileyInterScienceAlerts@wiley.com
[mailto:WileyInterScienceAlerts@wiley.com]
Sent: Friday, April 08, 2005 10:45 AM
To: alert recipient
Subject: Content Alert: Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 56, 7

Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology Volume 56, Issue 7, 2005.

Online ISSN: 1532-2890
Print ISSN: 1532-2882


Copyright C 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company

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Pages: 661-663
In this issue
Bert R. Boyce
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/110439990/ABSTRACT

Published Online: 8 Apr 2005
DOI: 10.1002/asi.20217

Pages: 664-668
Relations between the continuous and the discrete Lotka power function L Egghe http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/110429922/ABSTRACT

Published Online: 11 Mar 2005
DOI: 10.1002/asi.20157

Pages: 669-675
The power of power laws and an interpretation of Lotkaian informetric systems as self-similar fractals L. Egghe http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/110430942/ABSTRACT

Published Online: 16 Mar 2005
DOI: 10.1002/asi.20158

Pages: 676-683
Making an equality of ISI impact factors for different subject fields Narongrit Sombatsompop, Teerasak Markpin http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/110429927/ABSTRACT

Published Online: 11 Mar 2005
DOI: 10.1002/asi.20150

Pages: 684-694
Putting it together online: Information need identification for the domain novice user Charles Cole, John E. Leide, Andrew Large, Jamshid Beheshti, Martin Brooks http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/110430938/ABSTRACT

Published Online: 16 Mar 2005
DOI: 10.1002/asi.20156

Pages: 695-703
The impact of impermanent Web-located citations: A study of 123 scholarly conference publications Carmine Sellitto http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/110430936/ABSTRACT

Published Online: 16 Mar 2005
DOI: 10.1002/asi.20159

Pages: 704-714
Measuring similarity of concentration between different informetric
distributions: Two new approaches
Quentin L. Burrell
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/110431346/ABSTRACT

Published Online: 18 Mar 2005
DOI: 10.1002/asi.20160

Pages: 715-728
A linguistic analysis of question taxonomies Jeffrey Pomerantz http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/110430937/ABSTRACT

Published Online: 16 Mar 2005
DOI: 10.1002/asi.20162

Pages: 729-740
Effective invariant features for shape-based image retrieval Shan Li, Moon-Chuen Lee, Donald Adjeroh http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/110431347/ABSTRACT

Published Online: 18 Mar 2005
DOI: 10.1002/asi.20163

Pages: 741-756
Web search strategies and human individual differences: Cognitive and demographic factors, Internet attitudes, and approaches Nigel Ford, David Miller, Nicola Moss http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/110431341/ABSTRACT

Published Online: 18 Mar 2005
DOI: 10.1002/asi.20168

Pages: 757-764
Web search strategies and human individual differences: A combined analysis Nigel Ford, David Miller, Nicola Moss http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/110431340/ABSTRACT

Published Online: 18 Mar 2005
DOI: 10.1002/asi.20173

Pages: 765-768
Maintaining knowledge management systems: A strategic imperative Kevin C. Desouza, Yukika Awazu http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/110430933/ABSTRACT

Published Online: 16 Mar 2005
DOI: 10.1002/asi.20149

Pages: 769-772
Similarity measures, author cocitation analysis, and information theory Loet Leydesdorff http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/110429926/ABSTRACT

Published Online: 11 Mar 2005
DOI: 10.1002/asi.20130

Pages: 773-774
Windows and mirrors: Interaction design, digital art, and the myth of transparency Pramod K. Nayar http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/109921014/ABSTRACT

Published Online: 7 Feb 2005
DOI: 10.1002/asi.20129

Pages: 775
Papers on ethics for publication
Robert Hauptman
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/110431112/ABSTRACT

Published Online: 16 Mar 2005
DOI: 10.1002/asi.20212

 

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Copyright (c) 1999-2004 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

 

____

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Asis-l@asis.org
http://mail.asis.org/mailman/listinfo/asis-l

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Journal of Documentation

Call for Papers: Special Issue on HUMAN INFORMATION BEHAVIOR

Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU]; on behalf of; Amanda Spink [aspink@MAIL.SIS.PITT.EDU]
Tue 5/07/2005 12:47 AM          JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU     

CALL FOR PAPERS

Journal of Documentation Special Issue on HUMAN INFORMATION BEHAVIOR
Guest Editors:

Amanda Spink

School of Information Sciences

University of Pittsburgh

Allen Foster

Department of Information Studies

University of Wales Aberystwyth

IMPORTANT DATES:

Abstracts (500 words) due: ASAP

Full papers due: February 1 2006

Authors receive reviews: April 1 2006

Final papers due: July 1 2006

Anticipated publication: Late 2006

ISSUE FOCUS

Human information behavior (HIB) is a basic element of human existence. Humans have sought, organized and used information for millennia as they evolved and learned patterns of HIB to help resolve their human problems and continue to survive. The field of library and information science (LIS) has historically been a leading discipline in conducting research that seeks to understand human information related behaviors. Various interdisciplinary perspectives to HIB have emerged, including an information seeking-problem solving approach, a sense-making approach, an everyday life information seeking approach, information foraging approach, and a more holistic approach integrating various approaches with information use and organization.

This special issue will explore all aspects of HIB. Theoretical and empirical papers discussing information seeking, information foraging, sense-making, information use, information organizing, or other aspects of HIB are encouraged.

GUIDELINES FOR SUBMISSION

Potential authors should submit a preliminary proposal/abstract of 500 words by to the issue editor Amanda Spink (aspink@sis.pitt.edu) or Allen Foster (aef@aber.ac.uk) ASAP. Those interested in submitting an abstract are encouraged to contact the special issue editors with questions and ideas. The proposal should include the central research question, the theoretical and/or empirical basis for the paper and preliminary findings. Full papers are due by February 1 2006. Authors will receive reviews by April 1 and final papers will be due July 1.

Submissions should be emailed to the special issue editors, Amanda Spink at aspink@sis.pitt.edu or Allen Foster (aef@aber.ac.uk).

****************************************
Amanda Spink
School of Information Sciences
University of Pittsburgh

  1. Information Sciences Building
  2. N. Bellefield Avenue

Pittsburgh PA 15260
Tel: (412) 624-9454
Fax: (412) 648-7001
Email: aspink@sis.pitt.edu
http://www2.sis.pitt.edu <http://www2.sis.pitt.edu/>;
****************************************

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Journal of Education for Library and Information Science

Call for Papers

asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; ckmalone@email.arizona.edu     Mon 2/05/2005 11:38 PM
asis-l@asis.org          -JELIS call for papers


The _Journal of Education for Library and Information Science_ (JELIS) seeks high-quality papers reporting research related to education and training for the information professions. JELIS is a quarterly scholarly publication of the Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE). The ALISE Special Interest Groups (http://www.alise.org/about/sigs.html) and LIS Research Areas Classification Scheme (http://www.alise.org/research_class_guide.html)
suggest the broad scope of education-related topics of interest to JELIS readers.

Manuscripts reporting research using rigorous quantitative and/or qualitative methods are welcomed. A case study of a single institution, course, or project should draw on a wide variety of sources and analytic techniques to distinguish the work as a research article. JELIS welcomes purely theoretical and conceptual works as well as articles reporting original and empirical research. Manuscripts may offer theoretical insights developed from the author's synthesis and reassessment of a body of published research. A manuscript may critically reconsider the empirically based consensus about a phenomenon by contrasting it to the consensus that has emerged in a related but different discipline or area.
An article may provide a reasoned argument that draws on the work of philosophers, economists, organizational theorists, educational psychologists, linguists, systems theorists, literary critics, sociologists, historians, computer and information scientists, communication theorists, and all others whose research may be related to LIS education broadly construed.

JELIS uses the double-blind refereeing method of peer evaluation. Authors are encouraged to look at the Manuscript Evaluation Form
(http://www.alise.org/publications/alise_manuscript_eval_form_2005.pdf) that referees use when evaluating a submission to JELIS. Instructions for preparing and sending manuscripts are in the JELIS Submission Guidelines (http://www.alise.org/publications/jelis_submission_guidelines.html).

Cheryl Knott Malone
Anita Sundaram Coleman
Co-Editors, JELIS

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Vol. 46, No. 1 (Winter 2005)

Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU]; on behalf of; Cheryl Malone [ckmalone@EMAIL.ARIZONA.EDU]

Sat 23/04/2005 2:08 AM          JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU          JELIS issue announcement

The latest issue of the _Journal of Education for Library and Information Science_ is in the mail. The issue, Vol. 46, No. 1 (Winter 2005), features the following articles. Abstracts are available at http://www.alise.org/publications/jelis46_1.html.


Philip Hider and Rohaya Mohammed, "Ensuring Cataloging Students Meet the Mark:
Testing the Validity of a Cataloging Worksheet Marking Scheme"

Thomas P. Mackey, "Web Development in Information Science Undergraduate
Education: Integrating Information Literacy and Information Technology"

Hak Joon Kim and James Michael Kusack, "Distance Education and the New MLS: The Employer's Perspective"

Stephen T. Bajjaly, "Contemporary Recruitment in Traditional Libraries"

Gabriella Dotan and Irith Getz, "Library Directors' Perceptions of the Desirable LIS Education for Library Service to Schoolchildren"


International Library Education, Mohammed M. Aman, Editor
R.N. Sharma, "Development of Library and Information Science Education in South Asia with Emphasis on India: Strengths, Problems and Suggestions"


Cheryl Knott Malone
Anita Sundaram Coleman
JELIS Co-Editors

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Vol. 46, No. 1 (Winter 2005)

Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU]; on behalf of; Cheryl Malone [ckmalone@EMAIL.ARIZONA.EDU]

Sat 23/04/2005 2:08 AM          JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU          JELIS issue announcement

The latest issue of the _Journal of Education for Library and Information Science_ is in the mail. The issue, Vol. 46, No. 1 (Winter 2005), features the following articles. Abstracts are available at http://www.alise.org/publications/jelis46_1.html.


Philip Hider and Rohaya Mohammed, "Ensuring Cataloging Students Meet the Mark:
Testing the Validity of a Cataloging Worksheet Marking Scheme"

Thomas P. Mackey, "Web Development in Information Science Undergraduate
Education: Integrating Information Literacy and Information Technology"

Hak Joon Kim and James Michael Kusack, "Distance Education and the New MLS: The Employer's Perspective"

Stephen T. Bajjaly, "Contemporary Recruitment in Traditional Libraries"

Gabriella Dotan and Irith Getz, "Library Directors' Perceptions of the Desirable LIS Education for Library Service to Schoolchildren"


International Library Education, Mohammed M. Aman, Editor
R.N. Sharma, "Development of Library and Information Science Education in South Asia with Emphasis on India: Strengths, Problems and Suggestions"


Cheryl Knott Malone
Anita Sundaram Coleman
JELIS Co-Editors

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KM4D Journal
     
First issue
asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; Michel J. Menou [Michel.Menou@wanadoo.fr]          Sat 21/05/2005 6:40 PM
ASIS-L; sigiii-l; sigifp-l; sigkm-l@asis.org; eurchap; Euro_Student_ASIST@yahoogroups.com; ciresearchers
[Asis-l] [Fwd: [km4dev-l] Introducing KM4D Journal!]


Apologies for multiple postings


We are delighted to announce that the first issue of *KM4D Journal* is now available online! Check it out at www.km4dev.org/journal. The issue deals with the theme '*Supporting communities in development: tools and approaches*'.

**What is KM4D Journal?**
KM4D Journal might well be the first community of practice-based journal. It came into existence on the basis of a shared perceived need to capture more formally the knowledge generated within the KM4Dev-community. You will find KM4Dev'ers (and beyond) as authors, reviewers, editorial board members, chief editors, management team members, etc. etc., from all across the world, both researchers and practitioners, all of whom provided spontaneous support and contributions.

**What can you find in the first issue?** We have tried to compile a well-rounded and interesting first issue, containing a nice compilation of articles, case studies, a story, an interview, community notes... all in all, contributions from people in the North and in the South, working on different KM-related aspects in a development context. The issue captures an interesting cross-section of the KM-community, but the articles are accessible and interesting also for other people beyond this community.

The theme of issue 1 is 'Supporting communities in development - tools and approaches'. Topics covered in this issue include:
- Knowledge communities and the tsunami response: experience from the Crisis Prevention and Recovery Community of the UNDP
- Designing sustainable communities at CARE
- Communities of practice for development in the Middle East and North Africa
- Virtual knowledge communities: lessons learned in making them work

And much more!

Go to www.km4dev.org/journal to read the articles.

If all goes well, a paper version of this issue will be published for the upcoming KM4Dev event in Geneva (June 2005). It is likely that we will do an official launch of the journal there also.

Look forward to seeing you on the platform and hearing your responses!

Julie Ferguson & Sarah Cummings
Guest Editors for Issue 1
www.km4dev.org/journal

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Second issue

asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; Michel J. Menou [Michel.Menou@wanadoo.fr]          Thu 22/09/2005 4:32 PM          asis-l@asis.org; sigkm-l@asis.org; air-l-aoir.org@listserv.aoir.org; eurchap; Euro_Student_ASIST@yahoogroups.com          [Asis-l] [Fwd: [km4dev-l] second issue of the KM4Dev e-journal nowon-line]


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Subject:      [km4dev-l] second issue of the KM4Dev e-journal now on-line
Date:      Wed, 21 Sep 2005 19:48:36 -0500
From:      Staiger, Simone (CIAT) <s.staiger@cgiar.org>;
Reply-To:      KM for Development <km4dev-l@dgroups.org>;
To:      KM for Development <km4dev-l@dgroups.org>;

 

Dear KM4Dev community,

in the name of the guest editors of the second issue of the KM4D Journal I am happy to announce that the volume entitled "Approaches to promote knowledge sharing in international development organizations" is now on-line at www.km4dev.org/journal <http://www.km4dev.org/journal>; . (click on CURRENT on the top of the page).

This issue presents papers on experiences with knowledge sharing in international development organisations, highlighting strategies and approaches used to foster knowledge sharing in diverse settings and presenting their results.


We hope you enjoy this issue of the journal, and we look forward to the many fruitful discussions that it will stimulate.

Simone

Allison Hewlitt, Doug Horton, Nathan Russell and Simone Staiger-Rivas with Lucie Lamoureux Guest Editors, Approaches to promote knowledge sharing in international development organisations


Simone Staiger-Rivas
Communications Unit
Webpublishing
Knowledge Sharing - InforCom Project (Information and Communications for Rural Communities ) CIAT (Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical)
E-mail: s.staiger@cgiar.org
CIAT Web site: www.ciat.cgiar.org
InforCom Web site: www.ciat.cgiar.org/inforcom Knowledge Sharing Web site: http://www.ciat.cgiar.org/cgiar/knowledge_sharing/home.htm


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Library Link Newsletter

April 2005

Library Link [librarylink@emeraldinsight.com]          Fri 29/04/2005 11:14 PM          
Knowledge & Networks
April 2005

Bonjour,

I have recently been appointed editor of the Library Link website and as such I would like to welcome you all to this April edition of Knowledge and Networks, the Emerald Library Link newsletter.

1. Budding times

I will not get a better opportunity than this to tell you how thrilled I am to join the Emerald team and briefly introduce myself in these opening paragraphs.

My new role in Library Link will be entirely dedicated to providing you with fresh, interesting and relevant information about the hottest LIS related topics. I may also add, from time to time, my cosmopolitan French touch to the website.

I must highlight the fact that, despite my passion for books, reading and writing, I have had no Librarian or Information Professional experience until now. For this reason I have spent the last month frantically trying to get myself up to speed with what is happening in the industry.

I hope I am a quick learner.

To ensure that I am on the right track I will endeavour to work closely with you in the future. My aim will be to enhance your Emerald experience and to build a strong and vibrant LIS community you can rely upon as a premium source of information.

This budding time for me and for the website is equally a perfect opportunity for you to share your concerns, comments and expectations with me.

As my first selection of topics is based on my incipient knowledge of the Librarian and Information Professional universe I have focused my attention on subjects that seemed to stand out in all the literature I have read this past month.

I would therefore appreciate your feedback on the present content and perhaps suggestions on features you would like to see developed in the future.

Email me directly (criticism and praise alike):
mailto:apelle@emeraldinsight.com

2. What's news?

The press releases page of the news section has been updated and more articles will be added on a regular basis.

Please go to the following link to read all the new releases:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/press.htm

Come back at least once a week to read the latest stories.


3. Information management: online access for users with disabilities

This month, the "Library + Information Show" that took place in Birmingham
(UK) was the set up for a debate about the impact of the DDA (Disability Discrimination Act) on the library sector.

As Marcus Weisen, Health and Disability Advisor, Museums, Libraries and Archives Council (MLA) commented, the DDA has been greeted with fears that "hundreds of libraries in listed buildings may have to close because 'they don't comply with the DDA' ".

Whereas this has been the subject of an ongoing discussion in the United Kingdom in terms of physical accessibility of resources I wondered about electronic resources and how people could improve access to their Internet portals in the library sector globally.

Budget limitations often mean difficulties for libraries to develop adequate online resources and meet the requirements of the Disability Act.

In the article below Erica B. Lilly looks into "universal design and accessibility" of websites and lists useful resources in its appendix to make your online resources accessible to customers with disabilities.

Read the article: Creating accessible Web site: an introduction at following
link: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/~1091/v19n6/s3/p397

In the article below, Holly Yu makes a useful analysis of Web accessibility in conjunction with the law:

Read the article: Web accessibility and the law: recommendations for implementation at the following link:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/~1137/v20n4/s3/p406

Please mailto:apelle@emeraldinsight.com if you have attended the "Library + Information Show" in Birmingham and would like to send a report.

You can also mailto:apelle@emeraldinsight.com your comments on this subject


4. Marketing your library: weblogic

In February, Michael Gorman, president-elect of the ALA (American Library
Association) threw a cobblestone of an article entitled "Revenge of the Blog People" into the cyber pool of webloggers. Two months later, his vindictive tirade has contributed to placing the weblog phenomenon a little further at the forefront of the scene. The cyber pool has now grown into a lake and the ripples are still being felt.

However weblogs, or blogs, still remain some sort of UFOs of the Internet, or Unidentified Forum Objects. Their appeal is clear to see - the immediacy of communication, the proximity they create and the spontaneity they emulate on current issues - but the definition of what they should be used for is less clear. The very qualities displayed by blogs may also make their defects and attract spiteful comments such as Michael Gorman's.

I was left wondering if there was any specific logic behind weblogs and if they could perhaps be a valuable tool, for instance, to help promote your own Library or your online resources of information.

The articles below look into the weblog phenomenon and provide a few answers.

In the first article Laurel A. Clyde reviews weblogs in the context of libraries from their history to the functions they occupy.

Read the article: Weblogs - are you serious?
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/~1091/v22n5/s1/p390

In the next article Laurel A. Clyde again adopts a more statistical approach, offering quantitative and qualitative analyses of the weblog phenomenon.

Read the article: Library weblogs at the following link:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/~1149/v25n4/s3/p183


Does your library have its own blog?

If your library has its own blog I would like to hear from you. Let me know for instance if it has been a successful experience, how you have measured this success (in feedback, website traffic, etc.) and if you have any in-house rules or policy for editing your blog.

Please mailto:apelle@emeraldinsight.com your comments.


5. How to publish: "Publish, don't Perish!" by Rachel Singer Gordon.

Rachel Singer Gordon provides you with yet more precious advice on how to get past the threshold of the publishing house. This month's installment focuses on how to organise and manage your time to get writing regularly and consistently.

No matter how busy your lifestyle is you will have no more excuses!

Click and read installment 8: Time keeps on ticking... by going to the following URL:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/published/perish/april2005.htm


The past installments of Rachel's column make interesting reading too.
Click the following link to read them:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/published/perish.htm


6. More features: future events

A number of additions have been made to the list of forthcoming events:

"Information matters! A strategy for 2005-2008," to take place in London on June 23-24, 2005.

"The Umbrella Conference," organised by CILIP (Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals) to take place at the University of Manchester between June 30th and July 2nd, 2005.

"Digital Libraries à la Carte: Choices for the Future," to take place at Tilburg University (the Netherlands) on August 21-26, 2005.

For more details about these events please click below:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/news/events.htm


7. Subscriber information

Emerald Library Link is published by Emerald Group Publishing Limited, leading English language publisher of academic and professional literature in the fields of management and Library & Information services and is a globally recognized source of online management information.

For more information about anything included within the newsletter please
contact:

Arnaud Pellé,
Editor: Knowledge and Networks,
Emerald Group Publishing Limited,
60/62 Toller Lane,
Bradford,
West Yorkshire, England.
Tel: +44 (0) 1274 777700
mailto:apelle@emeraldinsight.com

Knowledge and Network is produced monthly and is free to members of Library Link.
To receive Knowledge and Networks on your desktop each month click on the li
nk:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/join.htm

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May 2005

Library Link [librarylink@emeraldinsight.com]          Fri 27/05/2005 10:26 PM          Library Link Newsletter - May 2005


Knowledge & Networks
May 2005

Dear all,

Welcome to the May edition of Knowledge and Networks, the Emerald Library Link newsletter.

This month's issue will be largely focused on digital resources for
librarians: where to publish, how Google Print is affecting libraries and a new monthly feature reviewing library blogs.

I hope you enjoy it.

1. Thank you!

First of all, my digital thanks to all the well wishers who made my days brighter after my first newsletter. Your messages of encouragement and support were very much appreciated indeed.

I also valued your input for possible subjects and what you would like to see featured on Library Link.

Keep dropping your ideas into my inbox, don't be afraid to get involved and I promise I will do my best to satisfy your will:
mailto:apelle@emeraldinsight.com


2. The world is your author:

I would very much like to post news from every corner of the world and I take this opportunity to call for your help in this endeavour.

If you think that a piece of news in your area is relevant to libraries on the rest of the planet please forward it to me.

You may want to raise awareness of a local issue, a national habit or some quirky event that may be best shared with the LIS community. Perhaps you would like to attract attention to new services or new initiatives that require support.

Whatever your reasons, there is but one way to go:
mailto:apelle@emeraldinsight.com

To keep on top of LIS news, don't forget to read our news section regularly
here:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/rpsv/librarylink/news/press.htm


3. Publish, don't Perish: Oh, the places you'll publish...

This month our renowned Librarian author Rachel Singer Gordon gives us a few short cuts on the road to being published.

Not everybody needs to follow the same signs and direction but you need to know your destination first.

Rachel reviews in detail the various publication outlets so you can find the one that is right for you.

Take first right for Rachel's column, here:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/published/perish/may2005.htm


If you have not yet read previous installments of Rachel's most useful advice on how to get published you can catch up here:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/published/perish.htm


4. Information Management: for whom the Google bell tolls?

Is Google discrediting the role of Librarians? Since its flotation on August 19th 2004, hardly a month goes by without a new Google service being launched, attracting various degrees of public interest. The colossal Google Print project announced in December 04, however, has grabbed the headlines.
Since then, as librarians risk being replaced by Internet technology at the Welsh University of Bangor and a European coalition has formed against the giant shadow of Google print, LIS professionals have been looking at Google initiatives with increasing adversity trying to decide whether Google may jeopardise their future.

Read the full article here:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/info/viewpoint.htm

If you would like to share any thoughts on the subject of digital libraries and Google print, please drop me a line: mailto:apelle@emeraldinsight.com


5. New feature: around the web in 80 blogs

Last month we looked at the exponential growth of weblogs and wondered whether there was any definite logic, structure or purpose to weblogs, at least the library ones.

Well, in order to uncover further the richness of what the "blog culture"
has to offer we have decided to take a tour of the Internet sphere in search of the best library blogs.

Every month we will review a new blog and highlight its key features.

For the first choice I simply picked a blog that I like to read on a regular basis myself.


Blog 1: Peter Scott's Library Blog

Content:
Peter Scott's Library Blog is ideal if you want to keep up with everything that's going on in the field: announcements, reports, news, newsletters, articles, meetings, etc.

All the information is meticulously reported on a daily basis with very little frills or superfluous comments. It provides direct links to the information and in some cases a quote on the piece of information in question.

Peter Scott's Library Blog goes straight to the essential points, which makes it an essential stop, if and when you review different sources of information on the Internet.

And the Friday "Brain teaser" is a nice stimulating touch.

Navigation:
Peter Scott's Library Blog is very clear and easy to navigate. The menu on the left hand side is useful. It offers a short but clear breakdown of topics and links to other relevant library blogs.

There is an extensive archive that can be consulted, dating back to February 2003. You can used the Google inbuilt search facility to look for specific information within the blog.

If you don't have time to visit the blog you can sign up to receive the blog updates by emails.

Go and have a look! You can find it here: http://blog.xrefer.com/


If you have a blog you would like to submit for review or you would like to let us know about your favourite blog please send me the link:
mailto:apelle@emeraldinsight.com

There are no specific selection criteria except that blogs must be LIS oriented in nature, obviously enough.

6. Events:

"IFLA ALP Course on Information Literacy and IT for Information Professionals in Asia and Oceania," this will take place in Wellington, New-Zealand, 14 Nov - 9 Dec 2005: Apply now!

See all the list of all forthcoming events and calls for papers here:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/rpsv/librarylink/news/events.htm

7. Subscriber information

Emerald Library Link is published by Emerald Group Publishing Limited, leading English language publisher of academic and professional literature in the fields of management and Library & Information services and is a globally recognized source of online management information.

For more information about anything included within the newsletter please
contact:

Arnaud Pellé, Editor: Knowledge and Networks, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 60/62 Toller Lane, Bradford, West Yorkshire, England.
Tel: +44 (0) 1274 777700
mailto:apelle@emeraldinsight.com

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June 2005

Emerald [librarylink@emeraldinsight.com]          Wed 22/06/2005 9:08 PM          Library Link Newsletter - June 2005

Knowledge & Networks
June 2005

Dear all,

Welcome to the June edition of Knowledge and Networks, the Emerald Library Link newsletter.

What’s all the Jazz this month?

Chicago is the first stop, where we find out what is on the programme of the ALA Conference, 23-29 June 2005.

Next, we will sweep the glitter in the trail of Emerald Literati Network Awards for Excellence winners.

We will also focus on a series of features containing practical marketing advice on how to improve the image of your library, both physically and electronically. It would not be that shallow to suggest that, for your library, image is almost everything.

Of course you will find our other regular features: ”Publish, don’t Perish!” the seminal monthly column by Rachel Singer Gordon, and “Around the Web in 80 blogs” with a Library Marketing special.

This is quite a glamorous edition.

I hope you will agree.


1. ALA 2005: Breakfast in Chicago

Join Emerald at the ALA Annual Conference Chicago, stand no. 4812.

An Emerald Breakfast Presentation will take place on Sunday 26th June from 8am until 9am at the Columbus Room, Sheraton Chicago Hotel & Towers, 301 E.North Water St, Chicago, 60611

There are a few places left so if you would like to attend the Breakfast event, please send us an email to register indicating your name, company and occupation before Friday 24th June: mailto:apelle@emeraldinsight.com


2. Emerald Literati Awards: “And the winners are…”

Like every year the Emerald Advisory Board has elected and announced the winners of the Emerald Literati Network Awards for Excellence.

Click here to read all “outstanding papers” in Information and Knowledge
Management:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/rpsv/literaticlub/winners/#5

Click here to read all “outstanding papers” in Library Management and Library Studies.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/rpsv/literaticlub/winners/#7

For more information about the Literati Network Awards, click here:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/rpsv/literaticlub/whatsnew/awards.htm


3. Publish, don’t Perish! Selling Your Work, Selling Yourself

When you have written the perfect article or book, and selected the right publisher, nothing but yourself stands in the way of your being published.

You are the last hurdle before the final print!

This month Rachel Singer Gordon gives effective advice on self promotion and how to get that publishing deal.

Read Rachel’s column here:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/rpsv/librarylink/published/perish/june2005.htm


To catch up with Rachel’s previous columns, click here:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/rpsv/librarylink/published/perish.htm


4. Six Electronic Branding Opportunities by Chris Olson:

Here are six essential “make-up” tips to enhance the image of your library website dramatically, so that your target customers keep you in mind.

Don’t miss this enlightening article by Library Marketing Guru and Publisher Chris Olson, borrowed from her electronic newsletter, Marketing
Treasures:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/rpsv/librarylink/marketing/curves/curves4.htm

 

5. Case Study: The Changing Image of Birmingham Libraries

This is the précis of an article originally published in New Library World (Volume 104 Number 9 2003 pp361-371).

Take an insightful look into the successful campaign to re-brand and ultimately increase the use of one of the biggest library services in the United Kingdom.

Follow the journey from integrating researh, planning and marketing to measuring performances and appreciating success:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/rpsv/librarylink/marketing/casestudies.htm


6. Around the Web in 80 blogs: Lib Talk

As we are leaning slightly on the marketing side of your library this month I have picked a Library blog that follows this trend: Lib Talk
(http://libtalk.blogspot.com)

Content:
It seems that Lib Talk has been the first blog dealing specifically with marketing issues for libraries. Its host, Ohio based Candi, is “the communications manager of an academic library consortium.”

Even though, in general, resources do not abound on this subject it is nonetheless part of libraries’ duty to promote their services. It is therefore very comforting to find useful tips and advice in the shape of this blog.

Browsing the site I found myself engrossed and hopping from one article to another. Whether or not you have a keen interest in the subject, you should definitely pay the blog a visit. You will find a plethora of useful tips and articles, from how to improve your writing skills to best PR techniques to approach journalists, and much more.

Some time tends to elapse between posts but this is understandable due to the nature of the blog. It is not a news blog, although marketing news are dutifully reported.

Navigation:
The look of the site is soft and simple and the navigation reflects exactly this.

Talk Blog is a minefield of useful reading so you will want to search the archives.

You can easily pick a subject of interest thanks to the headings of previous posts listed on the right hand side.

There are also useful links to other relevant blogs and websites.


7. News & events:

Call for papers:

Asia – Turkey: Türk-ANZAC conference

Johnnies and Mehmets side by side: Collaborative applications of technology in research and academic libraries – 24-27 April 2006


Seminar:

Europe – Denmark: Building the Info Grid: Digital Library Technologies and Services – Trends and Perspectives. Copenhagen, 26-27 September 2005


Symposium:

Oceania – Australia: 8th International Symposium on Electronic Theses and Dissertations. Sydney 28-30 September 2005

Quick, you are encouraged to register before the 27th June!


Conferences:

Asia – Russia: 9th International Conference and Exhibition Information Technologies, Computer Systems. Moscow, 14-18 November 2005

Europe – Austria: European Conference on Digital Libraries. Vienna, 18-23 September 2005


For more details on all these events and other forthcoming events, visit:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/rpsv/librarylink/news/events.htm


News:

Don’t forget to read all the latest LIS news here:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/rpsv/librarylink/news/press.htm

And keep sending me your very own LIS stories: apelle@emeraldinsight.com


8. Subscriber information

Emerald Library Link is published by Emerald Group Publishing Limited, leading English language publisher of academic and professional literature in the fields of management and Library & Information services and is a globally recognized source of online management information.

For more information about anything included within the newsletter please
contact:

Arnaud Pellé, Editor: Knowledge and Networks, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 60/62 Toller Lane, Bradford, West Yorkshire, England.
Tel: +44 (0) 1274 777700
mailto:apelle@emeraldinsight.com

Knowledge and Network is produced monthly and is free to members of Library Link. To receive Knowledge and Networks on your desktop each month click on the link: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/join.htm

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Preview Insight and get free access to all of Emerald’s 2004 content.

Insight is the name for Emerald’s new electronic publishing service offering greatly improved speed and enhanced features. Emerald is delighted to announce that Insight is now available for preview. To preview or get more information about Insight, please visit:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/freetrial

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July 2005

Emerald [librarylink@emeraldinsight.com]          Tue 2/08/2005 9:02 PM          Library Link Newsletter - July 2005

Knowledge & Networks
July 2005

Hello all,

Welcome to the July edition of Knowledge and Networks, the Emerald Library Link newsletter.

This month is a time to highlight inspiring humanitarian achievements. At the beginning of July the "Make Poverty History" coalition prompted world leaders at the G8 summit to act against world poverty. Librarians too can play a role in this battle. We bring the story and interview of Jane Kinney Meyers, an extraordinary woman who made a difference to children affected by AIDS in Africa by opening a library.

Rachel Singer Gordon's column and the monthly blog review tell you why and how to contribute to the library literature.

And finally, the body clock only just back to normal following Chicago's ALA conference, it's time to fly off again. Find out what Emerald is up to at IFLA 2005, in Oslo, Norway. We've got a Library Link Workshop for you!

Enjoy the journey.


1. Fountain of Hope: how a makeshift library in Zambia won a battle against AIDS and poverty

At the biennial Umbrella conference organised by CILIP in Manchester, United Kingdom, on July 1st, delegates "unanimously backed a resolution declaring their support for the [Make Poverty History] campaign and calling on the UK government to recognise and promote the essential role that library and information services would play."

If this role had yet to be demonstrated, then the experience of Jane Kinney Meyers in Africa would be enough to prove the point that libraries can indeed make a mighty difference in the fight against poverty. Her extraordinary adventure in Lusaka, the capital of Zambia, has changed the course of her life and the fates of hundreds of destitute children whose lives were devastated by the AIDS epidemic.

Read the full story here:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/rpsv/librarylink/info/case1.htm

2. Guru Interview with Jane Meyers - a special Librarian with a special
mission: the Lubuto Library Project.

Jane K. Meyers is the Executive Director of the Lubuto Library project, incorporated as a Non Profit Organisation on January 24, 2005. She lived in Malawi and Zambia for many years. Five years ago circumstances led her to open a makeshift library at the Fountain of Hope shelter for street children affected by AIDS, in Lusaka, Zambia. The impact was so great that it changed her life: "I felt it was my responsibility to make more libraries available for kids. That is the Lubuto Library Project."

I had the immense pleasure to talk to Jane Meyers. Her personality and her work illustrate perfectly the quote by French novelist André Malraux, "Humane people don't start revolutions, they open libraries."

Jane Meyers talks about her experience and what she is looking to achieve during the pilot year of the project with the same passion, I suspect, as when she was reading stories to the street kids of Lusaka.

Read the full interview here:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/rpsv/librarylink/info/guru.htm


3. Publish, don't Perish: Library Literature and the Gift Economy

When it comes to writing for the library literature there is much more to be earned than just money.

This month Rachel Singer Gordon explains why and how contributing to the professional library literature for free can leave you all the richer, in more ways than one:

Read Rachel's new column here:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/rpsv/librarylink/published/perish/july2005.htm

And it's probably time you go back to Rachel's past columns for a revision
session:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/rpsv/librarylink/published/perish.htm

 

4. Around the web in 80 blogs: A Library Writer's Blog.

Here is the ideal blog for you, now you have read Rachel Singer Gordon's advice and you feel motivated to contribute articles, reviews or other blog posts to the library world.

URL: http://librarywriting.blogspot.com

Content: A Library Writer's Blog is a giant listing of all the publishing opportunities currently available in the world of library and information science. Browse through the list of calls for papers, contributions, reviewers, journal articles, speakers, etc. There is bound to be a topic that suits your specific area of interest.

Equally this blog is a great resource if you need to send out a call for papers or articles.

Navigation: the navigation and design are boiled down to the bare minimum.
You will find no menu or links to other blogs in your path. Considering the nature of this blog it is understood that most posts will expire by a fixed deadline.

There is, however, an archive at the bottom of the page for you to browse.


5. IFLA 2005 in Oslo, Norway: a voyage of discovery and a Library Link workshop!

Emerald will be present at this year's IFLA conference in Norway and would like to invite you to the free Library Link Lunch, Workshop and Discussion.

The workshop will ask the question: what is the future of Publisher / Library relations?

Discussions will include:

- What are the implications of recent developments in Higher Education teaching and research for the Library?
- The implication of Google on the role of librarian
- Global perspectives in LIS journal literature
- Institutional repositories - what will the impact be?

The workshop will be held on Monday 15th August 2005, 12.00-15.00, at the Grand Hotel, Gerhardsen Room, Karl Johans gate 31, NO-0159 Oslo, Norway.
(http://www.grand.no)

To find out more about the workshop and to register, visit:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/rpsv/librarylink/workshops.htm

6. LIS Conferences highlights:

Europe - UK: Internet Librarian International 2005, Transcending boundaries:
Information, Technologies & Strategies for the 21st Century, Copthorne Tara Hotel, London, 10 -11 October 2005

Europe - Turkey: Knowledge Management in the e-World: New Models For Scholarly Communication, Yeditepe University, Instanbul, Turkey, 13 - 14 October 2005

North America - USA: VRD 2005 Conference: 7th Virtual Reference Desk Conference, San Francisco, 14-15 November 2005-07-29

For the complete list of forthcoming events, visit:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/rpsv/librarylink/news/events.htm

And of course for all the latest LIS news, visit:

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/rpsv/librarylink/news/press.htm


7. Subscriber information:

Emerald Library Link is published by Emerald Group Publishing Limited, leading English language publisher of academic and professional literature in the fields of management and Library & Information services and is a globally recognized source of online management information.

For more information about anything included within the newsletter please
contact:

Arnaud Pellé, Editor: Knowledge and Networks, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 60/62 Toller Lane, Bradford, West Yorkshire, England.
Tel: +44 (0) 1274 777700
mailto:apelle@emeraldinsight.com

Knowledge and Network is produced monthly and is free to members of Library Link.
To receive Knowledge and Networks on your desktop each month click on the
link:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/librarylink/join.htm

 

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Library Quarterly

Call for Papers

Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU]; on behalf of; p. mckenzie [pmckenzi@UWO.CA]
Tue 2/08/2005 2:08 AM          JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU          Reminder: Call for papers for Library Quarterly Special Issue on Discursive Approaches to Information Seeking in Context

Special issue on Discursive Approaches to Information Seeking in Context

Information seeking, like other human activities, arises not only out of behavior, but also out of the meanings and values that people attach to their practices and to the methods, means, and technologies available for locating information. In recent years, LIS researchers have begun to explore information practices by focusing on how people give accounts of their information behavior or construct the meanings of technical artefacts in work and everyday life. The issue of how information practice related topics, actors, and technologies are constructed in discourse and conversation is important for understanding information seeking and technology use from a broader sociological perspective. This special issue invites papers that apply constructionist, discourse, or conversation analytic methods and theories to information seeking in context research. In particular, we invite papers that explore information practices in interactional and collaborative settings, be they face-to-face or textual encounters.

Papers should be prepared in accordance with the Library Quarterly Instructions to Authors (http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/LQ/instruct.html) and submitted to Pam McKenzie, (Faculty of Information and Media Studies, North Campus Building, Room 240, University of Western Ontario, London, Ont. N6A 5B7, email
pmckenzi@uwo.ca) or Sanna Talja (Department of Information Studies FIN-33014 University of Tampere, Finland mail sanna.talja@uta.fi) no later than Jan. 1, 2006.


Pamela J. McKenzie
Assistant Professor
Programme in Library and Information Science Faculty of Information and Media Studies North Campus Building Room 225 The University of Western Ontario London, Ontario N6A 5B7
(519) 661-2111 ext. 88514
(519) 661-3506 (fax)
pmckenzi@uwo.ca

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Library Trends

Volume 53(4), Spring 2005

Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU]; on behalf of; GSLIS Publications Office [puboff@ALEXIA.LIS.UIUC.EDU]          Thu 14/07/2005 12:29 AM          JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU     New Library Trends Available

Just published by the University of Illinois Graduate School of Library and Information Science Publications Office:

Library Trends, 53(4), Spring 2005
"The Commercialized Web: Challenges for Libraries and Democracy" Edited by Bettina Fabos

Single copies are $23 for individuals and $33 for institutions. Order from The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2715 North Charles Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21218-4363; phone: 1-800-548-1784, Outside the U.S. and Canada call 410-516-6987; fax: 410-516-6968; email: jlorder@jhupress.jhu.edu.
More information, including subscription prices, is available at:
http://www.press.jhu.edu/journals.

The Global Brand of the Year in 2003 title did not go to Coca-Cola, Nike, or Starbucks, some of the most ubiquitous commercial names in our midst.
Instead, it went to Google, a highly used but lightly promoted search engine, which beat Apple for the second year in a row. To think of Google--the most popular searching tool on the Web--as a brand is important for this issue of Library Trends because it underscores how closely mainstream online information resources are tied to the commercial economy.

The Web has been a commercial medium since 1995, when the government quietly sold the Internet's backbone (previously controlled by the National Science Foundation) to private enterprise. Ten years ago we saw the beginning of a tremendous push--from the Clinton administration, Bill Gates, and the computer and telecommunication industries in general--to get schools and libraries wired. The push, it turns out, was not necessarily to bring the promised "universe of knowledge" (Clinton's
words) to all young and "lifelong" learners alike. Instead, the push was a careful public relations strategy to build up a user base so that the Web could become a viable commercial advertising medium. Indeed, the rhetoric and accompanying media campaign of the mid-1990s was successful: in just five short years, the Web (as part of the larger Internet) became a mass medium--faster than any communication medium before it.

--Excerpted from the Introduction, by Bettina Fabos

Articles and Authors Include:

"Links and Power: The Political Economy of Linking on the Web," Jill Walker

"On Their Own: Students’ Academic Use of the Commercialized Web," Samuel E. Ebersole

"Student Searching Behavior and the Web: Use of Academic Resources and Google," Jillian R. Griffiths and Peter Brophy

"Cyber-Democracy or Cyber-Hegemony? Exploring the Political and Economic Structures of the Internet as an Alternative Source of Information," Julie Frechette

"Current Developments and Future Trends for the OAI Protocol for Metadata Harvesting," Sarah L. Shreeves, Thomas G. Habing, Kat Hagedorn, and Jeffrey A. Young

"Lessons Learned with Arc, an OAI-PMH Service Provider," Xiaoming Liu, Kurt Maly, Michael L. Nelson, and Mohammad Zubair

"Collaboration Enabling Internet Resource Collection-Building Software and Technologies," Steve Mitchell

"Tools for Creating Your Own Resource Portal: CWIS and the Scout Portal Toolkit," Edward Almasy

"Gateway Standardization: A Quality Assurance Framework for Metadata,"
Brian Kelly, Amanda Closier, and Debra Hiom

"Strategies and Technologies of Sharing in Contributor-Run Archives," Paul Jones

The Publications Office
Graduate School of Library and Information Science University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
501 E. Daniel Street
Champaign, IL 61820-6211

(217) 333-1359 phone, (217) 244-7329 FAX puboff@alexia.lis.uiuc.edu http://www.lis.uiuc.edu/puboff

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RLG DigiNews
     
August 2005

From: Robin.Dale@rlg.org [mailto:Robin.Dale@rlg.org]
Sent: Tuesday, 16 August 2005 4:48 AM
To: imagelib@listserv.arizona.edu; padg@ala.org; consdist@lindy.stanford.edu; padiforum-l@nla.gov.au; DIGITAL-PRESERVATION@JISCMAIL.AC.UK; diglib@infoserv.inist.fr; rlg-diginews-announce@lists2.rlg.org
Subject: [padiforum-l] RLG DigiNews August issue now available

The August 2005 issue of RLG DigiNews is now available at

http://www.rlg.org/en/page.php?Page_ID=20744

Volume 9, Number 4 includes:

Feature Article 1
Developing Digital Preservation Programs: the Cornell Survey of
Institutional Readiness, 2003-2005 by Anne R. Kenney and Ellie Buckley

Feature Article 2
Watch This Space: Ten Promising Digital Preservation Initiatives by
the RLG DigiNews Staff

Highlighted Website
UK Web Archiving Consortium

FAQ
Predicting the Life Expectancy of Modern Tape and Optical Media by
Vivek Navale


Now in its ninth year of publication, RLG DigiNews is a bimonthly
web-based newsletter intended to:

* Focus on issues of particular interest and value to managers of
digital
initiatives with a preservation component or rationale.
* Provide filtered guidance and pointers to relevant projects to
improve
our awareness of evolving practices in image conversion and
digital
preservation.
* Announce publications (in any form) that will help staff attain a
deeper understanding of digital issues.

For more information about RLG or RLG's preservation community, please
contact:
Robin L. Dale
RLG Member Programs
2029 Stierlin Court, Suite 100
Mountain View, CA 94043-4684 USA

Ph: +1 (650) 691-2238
Fax: +1 650.964.0943
Email: Robin.Dale@rlg.org

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Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

Version 58

Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU]; on behalf of; Charles W. Bailey, Jr. [cbailey@UH.EDU]
Sat 11/06/2005 4:37 AM          PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU      Version 58, Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

Version 58 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography is now available. This selective bibliography presents over 2,420 articles, books, and other printed and electronic sources that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing efforts on the Internet.

http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html

http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf

The Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals, by the same author, provides much more in-depth coverage of the open access movement and related topics (e.g., disciplinary archives, e-prints, institutional repositories, open access journals, and the Open Archives Initiative) than SEPB does.

http://www.arl.org/pubscat/pubs/openaccess/


Changes in This Version

The bibliography has the following sections (revised sections are marked with an asterisk):

Table of Contents

  1. Economic Issues*
  2. Electronic Books and Texts

2.1 Case Studies and History*
2.2 General Works*
2.3 Library Issues*
3 Electronic Serials
3.1 Case Studies and History*
3.2 Critiques
3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals
3.4 General Works
3.5 Library Issues*
3.6 Research*

  1. General Works*
  2. Legal Issues

5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*
5.2 License Agreements
5.3 Other Legal Issues
6 Library Issues
6.1 Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*
6.2 Digital Libraries*
6.3 General Works*
6.4 Information Integrity and Preservation*

  1. New Publishing Models*
  2. Publisher Issues*

8.1 Digital Rights Management*
9 Repositories, E-Prints, and OAI*
Appendix A. Related Bibliographies
Appendix B. About the Author*

Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources includes the following sections:

Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata Digital Libraries* Electronic Books and Texts* Electronic Serials* General Electronic Publishing*
Images*
Legal*
Preservation
Publishers
Repositories, E-Prints, and OAI*
SGML and Related Standards

Further Information about SEPB

The HTML version of SEPB is designed for interactive use. Each major section is a separate file. There are links to sources that are freely available on the Internet. It can be can be searched using Boolean operators.

The HTML document includes three sections not found in the Acrobat file:

(1) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog (biweekly list of new resources; also available by mailing list--see second
URL)

http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepw.htm
http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepwlist.htm

(2) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources (directory of over 270 related Web sites)

http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepr.htm

(3) Archive (prior versions of the bibliography)

http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/archive/sepa.htm

The Acrobat file is designed for printing. The printed bibliography is about 200 pages long. The Acrobat file is over 470 KB.


Related Article

An article about the bibliography has been published in The Journal of Electronic Publishing:

http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/07-02/bailey.html


Best Regards,
Charles

Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Assistant Dean for Digital Library Planning and Development, University of Houston, Library Administration, 114 University Libraries, Houston, TX 77204-2000. E-mail: cbailey@uh.edu.
Voice: (713) 743-9804. Fax: (713) 743-9811.
DigitalKoans: http://www.escholarlypub.com/digitalkoans/
Open Access Bibliography: http://www.arl.org/pubscat/pubs/openaccess/
Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html
Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepw.htm

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Version 59

asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; Charles W. Bailey, Jr. [cbailey@uh.edu]          Fri 9/09/2005 11:10 AM     ASIS-L@asis.org
[Asis-l] Version 59, Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

Version 59 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography is now available. This selective bibliography presents over 2,480 articles, books, and other printed and electronic sources that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing efforts on the Internet.

http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html

http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.pdf

The Open Access Bibliography: Liberating Scholarly Literature with E-Prints and Open Access Journals, by the same author, provides much more in-depth coverage of the open access movement and related topics (e.g., disciplinary archives, e-prints, institutional repositories, open access journals, and the Open Archives Initiative) than SEPB does.

http://www.escholarlypub.com/oab/oab.htm

The Open Access Webliography (with Ho) complements the OAB, providing access to a number of Websites related to open access topics.

http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/oaw.htm


Changes in This Version

The bibliography has the following sections (revised sections are marked with an asterisk):

Table of Contents

  1. Economic Issues
  2. Electronic Books and Texts

2.1 Case Studies and History
2.2 General Works*
2.3 Library Issues
3 Electronic Serials
3.1 Case Studies and History*
3.2 Critiques
3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals
3.4 General Works*
3.5 Library Issues*
3.6 Research*

  1. General Works*
  2. Legal Issues

5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*
5.2 License Agreements*
5.3 Other Legal Issues
6 Library Issues
6.1 Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*
6.2 Digital Libraries*
6.3 General Works*
6.4 Information Integrity and Preservation*

  1. New Publishing Models*
  2. Publisher Issues*

8.1 Digital Rights Management
9 Repositories, E-Prints, and OAI*
Appendix A. Related Bibliographies*
Appendix B. About the Author*
Appendix C. SEPB Use Statistics

Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources includes the following sections:

Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata* Digital Libraries* Electronic Books and Texts* Electronic Serials* General Electronic Publishing* Images
Legal*
Preservation
Publishers
Repositories, E-Prints, and OAI*
SGML and Related Standards

Further Information about SEPB

The HTML version of SEPB is designed for interactive use. Each major section is a separate file. There are links to sources that are freely available on the Internet. It can be can be searched using Boolean operators.

The HTML document includes three sections not found in the Acrobat file:

(1) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog (biweekly list of new resources; also available by mailing list--see second URL--and RSS Feed--see third URL)

http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepw.htm
http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepwlist.htm
http://feeds.feedburner.com/ScholarlyElectronicPublishingWeblogrss

(2) Scholarly Electronic Publishing Resources (directory of over 270 related Web sites)

http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepr.htm

(3) Archive (prior versions of the bibliography)

http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/archive/sepa.htm

The Acrobat file is designed for printing. The printed bibliography is over 200 pages long. The Acrobat file is over 550 KB.


Related Article

An article about the bibliography has been published in The Journal of Electronic Publishing:

http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/07-02/bailey.html


Best Regards,
Charles

Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Assistant Dean for Digital Library Planning and Development, University of Houston Libraries
Home: http://www.escholarlypub.com/
DigitalKoans: http://www.escholarlypub.com/digitalkoans/
Open Access Bibliography: http://www.escholarlypub.com/oab/oab.htm
Open Access Webliography: http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/oaw.htm
Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepb.html
Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog: http://info.lib.uh.edu/sepb/sepw.htm


xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Webology

Volume 2, Number 1, April, 2005

Alireza Noruzi [anouruzi@yahoo.com]          Sat 14/05/2005 7:05 PM
eurchap@asis.org; DIG_REF@LISTSERV.SYR.EDU; lis-forum@ncsi.iisc.ernet.in; ifla-l@infoserv.inist.fr; diglib@infoserv.inist.fr; biblio-fr@cru.fr
[IFLA-L] Webology: Volume 2, Number 1, April, 2005
Dear All, apologies for cross-posting firstly.

We are pleased to inform you that the third issue of Webology, an OPEN ACCESS journal, is published and is available ONLINE now.
This issue contains:

--------------------------------------------

 

Editorial
-- Saeid Asadi
-- http://www.webology.ir/2005/v2n1/editorial3.html

--------------------------------------------


Information Search Strategies on the Internet: A critical component of new literacies
-- Laurie A. Henry
-- http://www.webology.ir/2005/v2n1/a9.html

--------------------------------------------


Information searching habits of Internet users: A case study on Medical Sciences University of Isfahan, Iran
-- Asefeh Asemi
-- http://www.webology.ir/2005/v2n1/a10.html

--------------------------------------------


Web Impact Factors for Iranian universities
-- Alireza Noruzi
-- http://www.webology.ir/2005/v2n1/a11.html

--------------------------------------------

Call for Papers: http://www.webology.ir/callforpapers.html

--------------------------------------------


Regards,
A. Noruzi
Department of Information Science
University of Paul Cezanne, France


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Volume 2, Number 2, August, 2005

asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; Alireza Noruzi [noruzi@crrm.u-3mrs.fr]          Fri 26/08/2005 7:34 PM
ASIS&T Special Interest Group on Metrics; asis-l@asis.org; sigtis-l@asis.org; siguse-l@asis.org; sigkm-l@asis.org; sigiii-l@asis.org; eurchap@asis.org; air-l@aoir.org; air-l-aoir.org@listserv.aoir.org
[Asis-l] Webology: Volume 2, Number 2, August, 2005

Dear All, Apologies for cross-posting firstly.

We are pleased to inform you that the fourth issue of Webology, an OPEN ACCESS journal, is published and is available ONLINE now.
This issue contains:

--------------------------------------------

Editorial
-- Alireza Noruzi
-- http://www.webology.ir/2005/v2n1/editorial4.html

--------------------------------------------


Precision and Recall of Five Search Engines for Retrieval of Scholarly
Information in the Field of Biotechnology
-- Dr. S. M. Shafi & Rafiq A. Rather
-- http://www.webology.ir/2005/v2n2/a12.html

--------------------------------------------


Search Engines and Resource Discovery on the Web: Is Metadata an
Impact Factor?
-- Mehdi Safari
-- http://www.webology.ir/2005/v2n2/a13.html

--------------------------------------------


Resource Gleaning, From Earlier Times to the Information Age
-- Dr. William W. Bostock
-- http://www.webology.ir/2005/v2n2/a14.html

--------------------------------------------


The Past, Present and Future of Web Search Research: An Interview
with Dr. Amanda Spink
-- Yazdan Mansourian
-- http://www.webology.ir/2005/v2n2/a15.html


--------------------------------------------

Call for Papers: http://www.webology.ir/callforpapers.html

--------------------------------------------


Regards,
A. Noruzi
Dep. of Information Science
University of Paul Cezanne
France

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