NEWS FROM OTHER JOURNALS SECTION

MARCH 2006  ISSUE

 Editorial note:

This section contains items culled from various Internet news services, discussion lists and other announcements.  Unless specifically noted, I have not visited the sites, used any of the software, reviewed the literature, or written the news items.  I present this digest to you in good faith but cannot vouch for the accuracy of its content.  

Kerry Smith

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ARIADNE

October 2005, issue 45

Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU]; on behalf of; R Waller [lisrw@UKOLN.AC.UK]                      Thu 3/11/2005 4:32 AM           PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU          Re: Ariadne issue 45  (October 2005) now available

Issue 45 of  Ariadne was published on 30 October 2005:

http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/

Main Articles:

*  Web 2.0: Building the New Library

-   Paul Miller explores some of the recent buzz around the concept of 'Web 2.0'

    and asks what it means for libraries and related organisations.

*  Putting the Library into the Institution:

    Using JSR 168 and WSRP to Enable Search within Portal Frameworks

-   Chris Awre, Ian Dolphin, Stewart Waller, Jon Allen, Matthew J Dovey and

Jon Hunter and  describe the investigations and technical development undertaken within the JISC-funded Contextual Resource Evaluation Environment (CREE)Project to enable the presentation of existing search tools within portal frameworks using the JSR 168 and WSRP portlet standards.

*  Looking for More than Text?

-   Balviar Notay and Catherine Grout give an overview of developments

in digitisation programmes, online delivery services and specialised search engines which cater for searching and locating still images and time-based media and consider the issues that surround their use,focusing particularly on JISC developments.

*  Online Repositories for Learning Materials: The User Perspective

-   Amber Thomas and Andrew Rothery explore how online repositories are being

used to store and share e-learning content, and show how taking the user perspective might challenge the emerging approaches to repository development.

*  A Recipe for Cream of Science: Special Content Recruitment for Dutch Institutional Repositories

-    Martin Feijen and Annemiek van der Kuil describe the Cream of Science

Project, part of the DARE Programme, which generated a Web site offering open access to almost 25,000 publications by 207 prominent scholars across the Netherlands.

*  DAEDALUS: Delivering the Glasgow ePrints Service

-    Morag Greig and William Nixon describe the key aims and findings of the

DAEDALUS Project and the Glasgow ePrints Service.

*  Repositories, Copyright and Creative Commons for Scholarly Communication

-    Esther Hoorn considers ways librarians can support scholars in managing

the demands of copyright so as to respond to the needs of scholarly communication.

Get Tooled Up:

*   Improving DSpace@OSU with a Usability Study of the ET/D Submission Process

-    Michael Boock discusses the ease and usefulness of conducting a usability

study and provides an example of usability testing at Oregon State University undertaken to improve the DSpace Electronic Thesis and Dissertation submission process.

Workshop and Conference Reports: At the Event:

*  Distributed Services Registry Workshop

-   John Gilby reports on the UKOLN/IESR two-day workshop at Scarman House,

University of Warwick in July 2005.

*  DC 2005

-   Robina Clayphan reports on the International Conference on Dublin Core

and Metadata Applications: Vocabularies in Practice held in Madrid in September 2005.

*  Digital Curation: Where Do We Go From Here?

-    Peter Kerr, Fiona Reddington and Max Wilkinson report on the 1st

International Digital Curation Conference held in Bath in September 2005.

*  Building the Info Grid

-   Wolfram Horstmann, Liv Fugl and Jessica Lindholm report on the conference

Building the Info Grid on trends and perspectives in digital library technology  and services held in Copenhagen in September.

Ariadne Reviews:

*  Cataloging and Organizing Digital Resources:

a how-to-do-it manual for librarians

-   Sarah Higgins learns how to incorporate online resources into a library

catalogue using AACR2 and MARC, but wonders why the wider issue of organising and describing a full range of digital resources is not addressed.

*  Managing Acquisitions in Library and Information Services

-   Bruce Royan welcomes a new edition of the standard text in the

acquisitions field.

*  Annual Review of Information Science and Technology, Volume 38, 2004

-   Michael Day reviews a recent volume of this key annual publication on

information science and technology.

..Plus our regular columns and newsline.

Please send proposals for articles to our regular contact point:

ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk

Kindly send books for review to the Editor's address (below),

Best regards,

Richard Waller

Editor Ariadne

UKOLN

The Library

University of Bath

Bath BA2 7AY

UK

tel +44 (0) 1225 383570

fax +44 (0) 1225 386838

Email ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk

Web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/

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February 2006, issue 46

Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU]; on behalf of; Richard Waller [lisrw@UKOLN.AC.UK]

Mon 13/02/2006 6:08 PM        PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU          Re: Ariadne Issue 46 (February 2006) now available

With apologies for any cross-posting:

The Decennial Issue, no. 46, of  Ariadne has now been published:

http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/

Main Articles:

* Projects into Services: The UK Experience

- Peter Brophy reviews the experience of the UK academic sector in turning digital library projects into sustainable services.

* What Users Want: An Academic 'Hybrid' Library Perspective

-  Reg Carr reflects on the development of a user-centred approach in academic libraries over recent decades and into the era of the hybrid library.

* The (Digital) Library Environment: Ten Years After

-  Lorcan Dempsey considers how the digital library environment has changed in the ten years since Ariadne was first published.

* Delivering Open Access: From Promise to Practice

-  Derek Law predicts how the open access agenda will develop over the next ten years.

*Research Libraries Engage the Digital World: A US-UK Comparative Examination of Recent History and Future Prospects

- Clifford Lynch looks at how the emergence of e-research has changed our thinking about the future of research libraries on both sides of the Atlantic.

*Google Challenges for Academic Libraries

- John MacColl analyses the reactions many academic libraries are having to the range of tools Google is currently rolling out and outlines a strategy for institutions in the face of such potentially radical developments.

* Excuse Me . Some Digital Preservation Fallacies?

- Chris Rusbridge argues with himself about some of the assumptions behind digital preservation thinking.

Get Tooled Up:

* Accessibility Testing and Reporting with TAW3

-  Patrick Lauke gives a run-down of the free TAW3 tool to aid in accessibility testing of Web pages.

Workshop and Conference Reports: At the Event:

* C21st Curation Summer 2005 Public Lecture Series

- Neil Beagrie and Helen Forde report on the public lecture series 'C21st Curation: working with digital assets in the new Millennium - challenges and opportunities' held at University College London over May and June 2005, and on plans for a second series in 2006.

* Digital Curation and Preservation: Defining the Research Agenda for the Next Decade

- Philip Pothen reports on this two-day conference at Warwick University over 7-8 November 2005.

* JISC and SURF international workshop on electronic theses

- Neil Jacobs reports on a JISC-SURF-CURL-sponsored event at the Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, over 19-20 January 2006.

* Joint Workshop on Future-proofing Institutional Websites

- Maureen Pennock reports on a two-day workshop on Future-Proofing Web Sites, organised by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) and the Wellcome Library at the Wellcome Library, London, over 19-20 January 2006.

Ariadne Reviews:

* The History and Heritage of Scientific and Technological Information Systems

- Charles Oppenheim takes a look at this series of personal and researched historical analyses of the history of computerised information retrieval systems, and finds it makes fascinating reading if you are interested in such things.

*ARIST 39 : Annual Review of Information Science and Technology

- Michael Day reviews another recent volume of this key annual publication on information science and technology.

* Memory Bytes: History, Technology, and Digital Culture

-  Ingrid Mason takes a look at this collection of essays and analyses how these authors contribute to our understanding of digital culture by placing digital technology in an historical context.

*Managing Electronic Records

- Lise Foster finds much to think about in this wide-ranging collection of essays on the fast-developing field of electronic records management.

*E-metrics for Library and Information Professionals

- Elizabeth McHugh learns about the importance of locally produced e-metrics and how they could be produced using available technologies.

*Delivering Digital Services: A handbook for public libraries and learning centres

- Towards the end of the Pantomime season, Bruce Royan finds a golden egg among the goose droppings.

*Developing the New Learning Environment: The changing role of the academic librarian

- Stephen Town welcomes this new text on a key issue for the future of academic librarians, and suggests some broader questions for consideration.

- plus the Ariadne newsline of events and news items

Contributions to Ariadne issue 47 are being arranged and prepared; please send proposals for articles to me at our regular contact point:

  ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk

Kindly send books for review to the Editor's address (below).

  Best regards,

  Richard Waller

  Editor Ariadne

  UKOLN

  The Library

  University of Bath

  Bath BA2 7AY

  UK

  tel +44 (0) 1225 383570

  fax +44 (0) 1225 386838

  Email ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk

  Web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/

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CANADIAN JOURNAL OF INFORMATION & LIBRARY SCIENCE

Call for papers: special issue

Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU]; on behalf of; Paulette Rothbauer [paulette.rothbauer@UTORONTO.CA]          Wed 19/10/2005 2:31 AM       JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU         

Call for Papers

Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science

LGBTQ Special Issue: Studies of information needs, practices and services

Canadian scholars have pioneered the study of the information practices of lesbian, gay, bisexual and queer people. Yet, the first article to report on the information needs of adult lesbians, written by Janet Creelman and Roma Harris, was published only fifteen years ago in 1990.

Since then, in both Canadian and non-Canadian contexts, we have a slowly growing accumulation of studies that examine the information needs and information practices of other people who claim lesbian, gay, bisexual and queer sexual identities and sexual orientations. Such studies include investigations of library use (and non-use), the role of bookstores and other community sources of information, the role of human intermediaries, the use of information resources and services including barriers of access to information, as well as of reading and readers. While much attention has been focused on LGBQ users whose identities affect their needs for information and their modes of access to information, some research has emphasized the role of information systems, collection practices and classification schemes in the provision of LGBQ information. Other important work has garnered visibility for LGBTQ literature through the publication of booklists and bibliographies. So, while there is now a solid foundation on which to continue scholarship in areas that intersect with the study of information, sexual identity and sexual orientation, there are many threads of inquiry that might be picked up.

Given what some see as increased levels of acceptance of LGBTQ people in Canadian society, how have things changed since the early 1990s?

Does ease of access to information come with mainstream acceptance? Are there new barriers to information? As the concept of sexual identity takes on multiple and shifting meanings, how do information services respond? What is the role of the Internet and online communities? Given the invisibility of trans identity in LIS contexts, papers that address aspects of trans identity and culture are particularly welcome.

Non-Canadian topics are also invited.

Articles that broadly address aspects of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans- and queer sexual identities in relation to information practices, information needs and information services are invited for Volume 31, Number 1 (Winter 2007) of the journal. The deadline for submissions is June 30, 2006.

Please send articles to:

                                Paulette Rothbauer, Guest Editor, CJILS

                                Faculty of Information Studies

                                140 St. George Street, University of Toronto

                                Toronto, ON M5S 3G6 Canada

                                paulette.rothbauer@utoronto.ca

For manuscript guidelines please refer to “Notice to Contributors” that is included in each issue and is available from the journal website (http://www.cais-acsi.ca/journal/guidelines.htm).

Paulette Rothbauer, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

Faculty of Information Studies

University of Toronto

140 St. George Street

Toronto, ON M5S 3G6

t: 416 978-5460 f: 416 971 1399 (shared)

e: paulette.rothbauer@utoronto.ca

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CURRENT CITES

September 2005

Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU]; on behalf of; Roy Tennant [roy.tennant@UCOP.EDU]

Fri 30/09/2005 1:13 AM           PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU                      [CurrentCites] Current Cites, September 2005

Current Cites <http://lists.webjunction.org/currentcites/>

Current Cites, September 2005

Edited by Roy Tennant <http://roytennant.com/>

Contributors: Charles W. Bailey, Jr. <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm> , Shirl Kennedy <http://www.uncagedlibrarian.com/> , Leo Robert Klein <http://leoklein.com/> , Jim Ronningen, Roy Tennant <http://roytennant.com/

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"In Depth: Libraries <http://chronicle.com/indepth/libraries/> " Chronicle of Higher Education <http://chronicle.com/>  (30 September 2005)(http://chronicle.com/indepth/libraries/). - This is a special Chronicle supplement on libraries containing a package of stories, most of which are available to subscribers only: Thoughtful Designs: "As they renovate old libraries and plan new ones, colleges consider the purpose of the buildings -- and how to make them popular."Evolving Roles: "Today's reference librarians need IT and pedagogical skills. Institutions are adapting in various ways, says W. Lee Hisle." The Beauty of Browsing: "Fred D. White doesn't want stacks closed and mechanized. He wants to hold books in his hand and see where they take him." Should Librarians Get Tenure? Yes, It's Crucial to Their Jobs: "College librarians are crucial partners in teaching and research, and they should be eligible for tenure like their faculty colleagues, says Catherine Murray-Rust." (This one is available free to non-subscribers.) Should Librarians Get Tenure? No, It Can Hamper Their Roles: "Librarians should be involved in college governance, but, writes Deborah A. Carver, they don't face the academic-freedom issues that professors do, and don't need tenure." (This one is available free to non-subscribers.) - SK <http://www.uncagedlibrarian.com/>

Band, Jonathan."The Google Print Library Project: A Copyright Analysis <http://www.policybandwidth.com/doc/googleprint.pdf> " E-Commerce Law & Policy <http://www.e-comlaw.com/lp/index.asp>  7(8)(2005)(http://www.policybandwidth.com/doc/googleprint.pdf). - This analysis by a noted copyright lawyer examines how the Google Print program works and dissects its copyright implications. It concludes: "By limiting the search results to a few sentences before and after the search term, the program will not conflict with the normal exploitation of works nor unreasonably prejudice the legitimate interests of rightsholders. To the contrary, it often will often increase demand for copyrighted works." (The article link is to a preprint.) - CB <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm>

Cole, Louise."A Journey into E-Resource Administration Hell" Serials Librarian <http://www.haworthpressinc.com/store/product.asp?sku=J123>  49(1/2)(2005):141-154. - Hair-raising jaunt through the "horrors" of managing e-resources, primarily subscription-based, that face an academic library in the 21st Century. The author's tongue-in-cheek style makes palatable what otherwise must be a challenging situation. On display is a system so complicated that vendors can't tell what they hold, whether you're subscribed to it and, er, when it's expected to come back online. - LRK <http://leoklein.com/>

Farkas, Meredith."Survey of the Biblioblogosphere: Results <http://meredith.wolfwater.com/wordpress/index.php/2005/09/12/survey-of-the-biblioblogosphere-results/> " Information Wants to Be Free <http://meredith.wolfwater.com/wordpress/index.php>  (12 September 2005)(http://meredith.wolfwater.com/wordpress/index.php/2005/09/12/survey-of-the-biblioblogosphere-results/). - Who are the library bloggers? If you think they are mainly under 30, the results of this survey may surprise you. For example, 16.4% were 41 to 50, 8.5% were 51 to 60, and 3% were over 60. OK, the research design may not pass JASIST standards, but this is a fascinating glimpse into what is going on in the biblioblogosphere in terms of blogger demographics, attitudes, behaviors, and motivations. - CB <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm>

Lavoie, Brian, Lynn Silipigni Connaway, and Lorcan Dempsey."Anatomy of Aggregate Collections: The Example of Google Print for Libraries <http://www.dlib.org/dlib/september05/lavoie/09lavoie.html> " D-Lib Magazine <http://www.dlib.org/>  11(9)(September 2005)(http://www.dlib.org/dlib/september05/lavoie/09lavoie.html). - Google's plan to digitize parts of the collections of four large research libraries, and the entire collection of one has certainly raised some important questions. In this interesting piece, OCLC staff looks at five aspects of the project based on what they know of the collections from information in WorldCat: coverage, language, copyright, works, and convergence. They found that the combined collections of the 'Google 5' libraries cover approximately one-third of the items in the entire WorldCat database. Of that one-third, 61% of the items were held by only only library of the Google 5; only 3% were held by all five. There are other intriguing findings, not the least of which is that over 80% of the books to be digitized are still under copyright. This piece is essential reading for anyone interested in the Google Library project. - RT <http://roytennant.com/>

Rosenthal, David S. H., Thomas Robertson, and Tom Lipkis, et. al."Requirements for Digital Preservation Systems: A Bottom-Up Approach <http://www.arxiv.org/abs/cs.DL/0509018> " (September 2005)(http://www.arxiv.org/abs/cs.DL/0509018). - This paper inspects threats to digital preservation repositories from internal issues such as the failure of storage media, hardware, software, operator error, natural disaster, external attack, economic failure, organizational failure, and others. The authors then suggest strategies to address these issues, such as replication, transparency, migration, diversity, audit, sloth (yes, sloth), and others. The paper ends with some specific recommendations for repositories, many of them focused on open disclosure of internal policies and procedures. - RT <http://roytennant.com/>

Seaman, Scott."Another Great Dissolution? The Privatization of Public Universities and the Academic Library" Journal of Academic Librarianship 31(4)(July 2005):305-309. - Grim tidings are portrayed on the financial front as States gradually disengage from supporting institutions of higher learning. The changing financial environment, from public to private sources, begins then to change the nature and priorities of the institutions themselves. Needless to say, libraries are left with the short end of the stick. - LRK <http://leoklein.com/>

Smallwood, Robert."DRM in ERM: Know Your Rights Providers <http://www.econtentmag.com/?ArticleID=13481> " EContent: Digital Content Strategies & Solutions <http://www.econtentmag.com/>  28(9)(September 2005):34-41. (http://www.econtentmag.com/?ArticleID=13481). - Digital rights management is a hot-button issue among information providers, discussed in the same context as fair use, and the author points out that it usually refers to "protections of digital entertainment files in the business-to-consumer marketplace." Though DRM and ERM, or enterprise rights management, aren't entirely distinct from each other, ERM is the subject here so we're looking at the management and protection of confidential information both inside and outside an organization's firewall. IT managers, CIOs and others with the responsibility for securing intellectual property will benefit from Smallwood's overview of current security tools and the companies which are developing them. He provides context, relating the systems to platforms and commonly used office software, and interesting sidelights such as the particular hoops to jump through in China, where encryption may be illegal but business information theft is on the rise. For those of us who have to be more concerned with defending access to what the public has a right to, perhaps "know your enemy" is a bit strong, but the article increases awareness of what may need to be monitored for inappropriate use or overuse. There are two sidebars, one describing recent developments in standards for DRM/ERM software, and the other profiling the holders of patents behind some of the products described in the main body of the article. - JR

Sullivan, Danny."End Of Size Wars? Google Says Most Comprehensive But Drops Home Page Count <http://searchenginewatch.com/searchday/article.php/3551586> " SearchEngineWatch <http://searchenginewatch.com/>  (27 September 2005)(http://searchenginewatch.com/searchday/article.php/3551586). - Sullivan reports that Google has removed the "page count" figure from its home page, although it still claims to offer "the most comprehensive collection of web documents available to searchers." Since, as he points out, this move "divorces the notion of page counting as a way to 'prove' comprehensiveness," it will help to quell, somewhat, the ongoing "search engine wars." Search engines have touted the size of their databases "as a quick, effective way to give the impression they were more relevant," which is simply not true. As every information profession knows, bigger is not always better; relevancy of search results is what really counts. Another important factor is duplication of content. What good, really, is a huge database that returns a large percentage of duplicate results. Sullivan provides an overview of some of the more recent battles in the ongoing search engine war, as well as reviewing some studies on the accuracy (or lack thereof) of invididual search engine database size claims. And there is considerable question how worthwhile these sort of comparisons are, anyhow. "Quality includes comprehensiveness. So if someone devises a test of real queries, things that don't involve rare words but instead rare information on the web, that's of interest." - SK <http://www.uncagedlibrarian.com/>

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October 2005

Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU]; on behalf of; Roy Tennant [roy.tennant@UCOP.EDU]     Tue 1/11/2005 4:36 AM                       PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU            [CurrentCites] Current Cites, October 2005


Current Cites <http://lists.webjunction.org/currentcites/>

Current Cites, October 2005

Edited by Roy Tennant <http://roytennant.com/>

Contributors: Charles W. Bailey, Jr. <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm> , Shirl Kennedy <http://www.uncagedlibrarian.com/> , Leo Robert Klein <http://leoklein.com/> , Roy Tennant <http://roytennant.com/

________________________________

Asaravala, Amit."Putting AJAX to Work <http://www.infoworld.com/infoworld/article/05/10/17/42FEajaxcase_1.html> " InfoWorld <http://www.infoworld.com/>  (42)(October 17, 2005)(http://www.infoworld.com/infoworld/article/05/10/17/42FEajaxcase_1.html). - If you're coo-coo for AJAX (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML), you're likely to wolf down any article on the subject. AJAX is a set of technologies that combines behind-the-scenes server requests with changes in information on web pages that don't require a complete rewrite of the screen. If you've ever selected an item on a dropdown menu and, based on this selection, more options show up magically on the screen, you may have already seen AJAX at work. This article from a recent edition of InfoWorld looks at the technology from the perspective of "enterprise applications". If you can build an email application based on AJAX, can an OPAC be far behind? - LRK <http://leoklein.com/>

Covey, Denise Troll.Acquiring Copyright Permission to Digitize and Provide Open Access to Books <http://www.clir.org/pubs/abstract/pub134abst.html>  Washington, DC: Council on Library and Information Resources, October 2005.(http://www.clir.org/pubs/abstract/pub134abst.html). - As anyone who has tried to do it knows, obtaining the right to digitize a work under copyright can be mind-blowingly difficult. This CLIR study makes it clear just out difficult it can be, based on the experiences of Carnegie-Mellon University to acquire the rights to digitize books and provide open access to them on the web. This paper is particularly interesting in light of Google's position that they can digitize books and make "snippets" of the text freely available on the web without violating copyright. The outcome of the pending court cases will be watched with interest by many. - RT <http://roytennant.com/>

Gandel, Paul B.."Libraries: Standing at the Wrong Platform, Waiting for the Wrong Train? <http://www.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/erm05610.pdf> " EDUCAUSE <http://www.educause.edu/>  (November/December 2005)(http://www.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/erm05610.pdf). - The issue of whether libraries have been rendered obsolete in the digital world is not a new one. Recently, it's surfaced again in the wake of the University of Texas announcing that it would expel the books from its undergraduate library <http://chronicle.com/free/v51/i43/43a02701.htm>  and turn it into an "information commons." And, of course, there is the 800-pound gorilla -- Google Print <http://print.google.com/> . Gandel <http://istweb.syr.edu/facstaff/facultymember.asp?id=584>  -- Vice President for Information Technology and CIO at Syracuse University -- points out in this article that "the relationship between collections, consumers, and the library as mediator remains." However, as he points out here, "the Web is affecting the very core areas of library services: (1) collections, (2) preservation, and (3) reference." He explores each of these area in depth, discussing commercial information aggregators, digitization and e-books, and Google...which "has become the most widely used tool for addressing all sorts of questions," virtually supplanting the reference librarian at the local public library. Libraries have tried to rise to the occasion, he says, with such initiatives as virtual reference services. "But it is not clear whether these redesigned services can compete with the rapidly growing commercial services available on the Web." Although libraries have largely adapted to incorporate new technologies, the role of the librarian hangs in a sort of limbo. "It is not hard to imagine a scenario in which colleges and universities will shift their resources to pay for a national information service customized to the needs of the individual institution rather than support their own local library reference service." Provocative article. - SK <http://www.uncagedlibrarian.com/>

Kahle, Brewster.The Open Library <http://www.openlibrary.org/details/openlibrary>  San Francisco: Internet Archive, October 2005.(http://www.openlibrary.org/details/openlibrary). - This digital "book" was created for the unveiling of the Open Content Alliance <http://www.opencontentalliance.org/> , a collaborative project to digitize public domain works held by libraries and other cultural institutions around the world. "The Open Library website was created by the Internet Archive to demonstrate a way that books can be represented online." This book is one of the first, although there are other "real" books at the site that demonstrates one way these books can be put online. But it's important to point out that there can, and will be, other online depictions of these books, since the files can all be freely downloaded by anyone. - RT <http://roytennant.com/>

Plutchak, T. Scott."The Impact of Open Access <http://www.pubmedcentral.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1250314> " Journal of the Medical Library Association <http://www.pubmedcentral.gov/tocrender.fcgi?journal=93&action=archive>  93(4)(2005):419-421. (http://www.pubmedcentral.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1250314). - Plutchak, editor of the Journal of the Medical Library Association, was "astonished" when he looked at this open access journal's 6/04-5/05 use statistics: it had had over 20,000 unique users visit the journal even though the Medical Library Association, which publishes the journal, only has around 4,500 members. Thinking that the number was inflated because of technical reasons, he contacted PubMed Central, who hosts the journal, and was told if anything the number was low: 30,000 was more likely. Plutchak credits the journal's over four-year-old open access policy with raising JMLA's visibility, and he recounts other interesting facts that demonstrate it. He then discusses the impact of open access on subscriptions and MLA membership (including some interesting data about ad trends), then summarizes an informal online member survey probing attitudes towards free access and membership renewal and a survey of MLA Board members about publication options if open access ceases to be viable. This is a fascinating look at one professional society editor's view of the real-world impact of open access on his journal. - CB <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm>

Suber, Peter."Does Google Library Violate Copyright? <http://www.earlham.edu/%7Epeters/fos/newsletter/10-02-05.htm#google> " SPARC Open Access Newsletter <http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/index.htm>  (90)(2005)(http://www.earlham.edu/%7Epeters/fos/newsletter/10-02-05.htm#google). - After drawing the distinction between the two components of Google Print <http://print.google.com/>  (Google Library <http://print.google.com/googleprint/library.html>  and Google Publisher <http://print.google.com/googleprint/publisher.html> ), Suber proceeds to clearly analyze the case both for and against the Authors Guild's lawsuit <http://www.authorsguild.org/news/sues_google_citing.htm>  against Google Library. Weighing four arguments for copyright violation and six against it, he concludes: "The authorsand the publishers who share the same grievanceare getting far too much mileage from the claim that Google's opt-out policy turns the usual copyright rule on its head. This claim has a deceptive strength. It's strong because it would be valid for most full-text copying. It's deceptive because it assumes without proof that the Google copying is not fair use. Hence it begs the question at the heart of the lawsuit. If the Google copying is fair use, then no prior permission is needed and the opt-out policy is justified. Moreover, Google has several good arguments that its copying really is fair use, most notably its argument that its indexing will enhance rather than diminish book sales and its analogy to long-accepted opt-out policies for search-engine indexing of other copyrighted content." For those readers who really want to dig into the Google Library controversy, my recent bibliography <http://www.escholarlypub.com/digitalkoans/2005/10/25/the-google-print-controversy-a-bibliography/>  on this subject may also be of interest. - CB <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm>

Xiang, Xiaorong, and Eric Lease Morgan."Exploiting 'Light-weight' Protocols and Open Source Tools to Implement Digital Library Collections and Services <http://www.dlib.org/dlib/october05/morgan/10morgan.html> " D-Lib Magazine <http://www.dlib.org/>  11(10)(October 2005)(http://www.dlib.org/dlib/october05/morgan/10morgan.html). - This article demonstrates that doing new, innovative things in libraries doesn't require inventing new technologies -- all one must do is to combine existing protocols and technologies in new ways. Using a combination of protocols such as OAI-PMH and SRU, along with tools like Perl and Swish-e, Xiang and Morgan describe how they created two new library services. - RT <http://roytennant.com/>

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Current Cites, November 2005

Edited by Roy Tennant <http://roytennant.com/>

Contributors: Charles W. Bailey, Jr. <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm> , Terry Huwe <http://iir.berkeley.edu/faculty/huwe/> , Leo Robert Klein <http://leoklein.com/> , Jim Ronningen, Roy Tennant <http://roytennant.com/

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            Editor's Note: I'm happy to announce that Current Cites is slouching into the 21st century by finally adding an RSS feed <http://lists.webjunction.org/currentcites/cites.xml> . We now have three channels by which Cites can be consumed: the web, email, and RSS. Just pick your preferred flavor (or all three! they're free). We have also recovered searching <http://lists.webjunction.org/currentcites/>  of our citation database, from July 2002 (when we began marking up cites in XML) to the present.

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Abram, Stephen."32 Tips to Inspire Innovation for You and Your Library <http://www.imakenews.com/sirsi/e_article000458643.cfm> " SirsiDynix OneSource <http://www.imakenews.com/sirsi/>  (October 2005)(http://www.imakenews.com/sirsi/e_article000458643.cfm). - I'm cheating a bit on this cite, which points you to the final part of a three-part series that stretched from July to October. I did this since only the third part points you to the two previous parts. Enough of the mechanics, as usual Stephen Abram rocks in this pithy, well-written and inspiring set of tips. Each tip is a phrase such as "Iteration is everything" and "Good not perfect", accompanied by an explanatory paragraph. Those who keep up with business literature may find some tips familiar, but such street wisdom is unfortunately much less prevalent in the library literature. So if you don't get out much, and even if you do, don't make the mistake of overlooking this series simply because it is a vendor's newsletter. Feel free to overlook the obligatory references to SirsiDynix products. This is certifiably great stuff, period. - RT <http://roytennant.com/>

Boeder, Pieter."Habermas' Heritage: The Future of the Public Sphere in the Network Society <http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_9/boeder/> " First Monday <http://www.firstmonday.org/>  10(9)(5 September 2005)(http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_9/boeder/). - I've always enjoyed a well-constructed attempt to update philosophy and sociology in the context of the current digital era, which is unfolding as we write. In this piece, Boeder offers a lively (if dense) analysis of public discourse and its importance to society in the Web era. Drawing on the work of Habermas, he charts the Internet's growth, the ongoing consolidation of media, and the growing need for an independent sphere of public discourse in the face of these massive forces. He is not a pessimist, though; the public sphere was never a static state, whatever media it relied upon, which have ranged from coffee houses to editorial pages. Habermas argued that as mass media has mutated into monopoly capitalist forms, the role of public debate has shifted from the "dissemination of reliable information to the formation of public opinion." Arguably, this is exactly what MoveOn.Org has been doing, and countless Blogs and Podcasts as well. This article is interesting because it serves as a reminder that the forces that shape society weren't created just yesterday, and that a fresh look at classic philosophy and sociology is not only a good idea, but can actually help us understand the subtle changes the Internet has begun in our public lives. - TH <http://iir.berkeley.edu/faculty/huwe/>

Fichter, Darlene."Web Development Over the Past 10 Years" Online <http://www.onlinemag.net/>  29(6)(Nov/Dec 2005):48-50. - The fruit of ten years' experience, Darlene Fichter lays out a number of important guidelines for designing websites. Noteworthy advice includes having to make "tough choices" as to what the user sees first and foremost, how help screens aren't all that helpful and that we ignore website conventions at our peril. I was particularly heartened to see her inclusion of "aesthetics matter", something that back in the old days used to get scant attention, perhaps because it was so hard to measure. I'd tone down the Jacob-worship myself but who wouldn't agree that we've learned a lot in 10 years? - LRK <http://leoklein.com/>

Geist, Michael."Sony's Long-Term Rootkit CD Woes <http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/4456970.stm> " BBC News <http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/default.stm>  (21 November 2005)(http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/4456970.stm). - In this article, Michael Geist, Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law at the University of Ottawa, overviews the Sony BMG "rootkit" fiasco. In this sad tale, one of the planet's largest entertainment companies deploys digital rights protection software from First4Internet on some of its music CDs. Noted computer security expert Mark Russinovich discovers this, is alarmed about the risks involved, and posts "Sony, Rootkits and Digital Rights Management Gone Too Far <http://www.sysinternals.com/blog/2005/10/Sony-rootkits-and-digital-rights.html> ," which triggers a firestorm of subsequent criticism against Sony. The rootkit, which has no uninstaller, proves very difficult to remove, and it has security holes that hackers start to exploit (e.g., see "First Trojan Using Sony DRM Spotted <http://www.theregister.co.uk/2005/11/10/sony_drm_trojan/> "). Making matters worse, the EFF posts an analysis of the 3,000+ word license <http://www.eff.org/deeplinks/archives/004145.php>  that governs use of the protected CDs, which has novel provisions such as: "If you file for bankruptcy, you have to delete all the music on your computer" (EFF's wording). Then came the lawsuits (e.g., see "Sony Sued For Rootkit Copy Protection <http://www.informationweek.com/story/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=173601761&tid=5978> " and "SonyBMG Litigation and Rootkit Info <http://www.eff.org/IP/DRM/Sony-BMG/> "). Sony BMG stopped production (see "Sony Halts Production of 'Rootkit' CDs <http://news.com.com/Sony+halts+production+of+rootkit+CDs/2100-1029_3-5946825.html?tag=nl> "); however, it planned to continue using a second DRM software package from SunnComm on CDs that some analysts feel is spyware (yes, they were using two: see "Sony Shipping Spyware from SunnComm, Too <http://www.freedom-to-tinker.com/?p=925> "). The IT industry ramped up efforts to eradicate the rootkit (e.g., see "Microsoft Will Wipe Sony's 'Rootkit' <http://news.com.com/Microsoft+will+wipe+Sonys+rootkit/2100-1002_3-5949041.html> "), and Sony BMG offered a First4Internet uninstaller. Unfortunately, the Sony BMG uninstaller created new security holes (see "Sony's Web-Based Uninstaller Opens a Big Security Hole; Sony to Recall Discs <http://www.freedom-to-tinker.com/?p=927> "). And the uninstaller for the SunnComm MediaMax RRM system also opened security holes (see "Not Again! Uninstaller for Other Sony DRM Also Opens Huge Security Hole <http://www.freedom-to-tinker.com/?p=931

> "). To top it off, Sony BMG's rootkit may be violating some copyrights (see "Does Sony's Copy Protection Infringe Copyrights? <http://www.freedom-to-tinker.com/?p=933> "), and Sony BMG may have known about security issues before in advance of the Russinovich disclosure (see "Sony BMG's Costly Silence <http://www.businessweek.com/technology/content/nov2005/tc20051129_938966.htm> "). Believe it or not, there's more to the story. Geist's recap is the best I've seen so far. While the focus has been on the inadequacies of the DRM technologies Sony BMG deployed, don't lose sight of this: music CDs are now being licensed by major companies. Bye bye first sale rights. Bye bye fair use rights. The license rules. (If you want to see if you have bought a rootkit CD, check out the Sony BMG list <http://cp.sonybmg.com/xcp/english/titles.html> .) - CB <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm>

Hiltz, Starr Roxanne, and Murray Turoff."Education Goes Digital: the Evolution of Online Learning and the Revolution in Higher Education" Communications of the ACM <http://www.acm.org/pubs/cacm/>  48(10)(October 2005):59-64. - With so many articles about digital technology's role in higher education, one hesitates to recommend another, but this is worth a look for its plausible thesis that a transformation will occur through a gradual process of substitution. Blending face-to-face and online learning is already occurring in many courses, and the authors project that digital methods which were first used to augment lecture will be adopted eventually for delivery of core content. They do take for granted a point which is currently the subject of heated debate - the effectiveness of computer-mediated education being equal to that of human interaction - but win or lose that argument, they make a convincing case that the tools are there and will be used in ways that will increase accessibility to higher education and are likely to revolutionize teaching. This October issue is themed "The Digital Society" and includes many thoughtful pieces on the social impacts of computing and communications. - JR

Jacso, Peter."As We May Search - Comparison of Major Features of the Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar Citation-Based and Citation-Enhanced Databases <http://www.ias.ac.in/currsci/nov102005/1537.pdf> " Current Science <http://www.ias.ac.in/currsci/>  89(10)(25 November 2005):1537-1547. (http://www.ias.ac.in/currsci/nov102005/1537.pdf). - Announced to wide acclaim a year ago, Google Scholar remains a bit of an enigma. The scholarly search service provides little or no information that can be used to evaluate it as an information source, and therefore people such as the author of this article are left to do the best they can to determine the coverage of the service, its accuracy, and user options. Jacso has published previous evaluations of Google Scholar, but this one is the most in-depth review I've seen, and the comparison with similar commercial services is also instructive. If you have read Jacso's earlier articles, his criticism of Scholar will comes as no surprise. But anyone who is pointing users to Scholar or who use it themselves would do well to read this article. - RT <http://roytennant.com/>

Jones, Steve, and Camille Johnson-Yale."Professors Online: The Internet's Impact on College Faculty <http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_9/jones/> " First Monday <http://www.firstmonday.org/>  10(9)(5 September 2005)(http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_9/jones/). - The authors assess the findings of a nationwide survey of Internet use by American professors. The goals of the survey were to find out about the impact of the Internet on the professional lives of faculty -- not just in the classroom, but in research contexts, personal information use, etc. As such, it covered wide terrain: email, instant messaging, Web use, and instructional technologies. Unsurprisingly, college-based academics like the Internet and use it heavily, but the survey also reveals some perennial concerns. Infrastructure is a constant issues, and it's hard to stay current when technologies change fast, and are costly. Professional development is more important than ever, but is also a high-ticket fringe benefit in higher education. Finally, teaching and research are influenced in both obvious and subtle ways by the Internet; there's a need for more study on how to optimize the challenge of integrating the Internet into academic culture. - TH <http://iir.berkeley.edu/faculty/huwe/>

Martell, Charles R.."The Ubiquitous User: A Reexamination of Carlson's Deserted Library <http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/v005/5.4martell.html> " portal: Libraries and the Academy <http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/pla/>  5(4)(October 2005):441-453. (http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/v005/5.4martell.html). - Sober look at the decline in traditional library stats (e.g. circ., gate counts, reserve) at a number of academic institutions. The author believes things will plateau out though the declines in his view "have the earmarkings of a bona fide crisis". In such circumstances, he argues, it's essential to clearly distinguish between traditional and electronic use so administrators will know where best to direct resources. While the terrain is changing, the author points out that "our users need our assistance as never before." He goes on, "our challenge is to discover the roles we must develop in order to be of greatest benefit to them and to society." - LRK <http://leoklein.com/>

Miller, Paul."Web 2.0: Building the New Library <http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/miller/> " Ariadne <http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/>  (45)(30 October 2005)(http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/miller/). - If you haven't noticed already, we're living in a Web 2.0 world. The network is our platform, information is disparate, the user has control. The author of this article readily acknowledges the hype but still sees characteristics that are significant for libraries. More than anything, the article serves as a jumping-off point for considering how exactly libraries are going to fit in. - LRK <http://leoklein.com/>

Minielli, Maureen C., and S. Pixy Ferris."Electronic Courseware in Higher Education <http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_9/minielli/> " First Monday <http://www.firstmonday.org/>  10(9)(5 September 2005)(http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_9/minielli/). - The authors analyze electronic courseware with two objectives: first, to explain, define and chart the components for those who might not know all there is to know about it, and second, to call for a systematic, pedagogical evaluation of how best to use such software. Their topic is timely, since the rising cost of higher education has fomented an ongoing exploration of "online universities." The change from "space-and-time bound institutions" to purportedly cost-effective online degree programs may not be such a simple task, if considered as a social experiment. But the focus here is on what formats new courseware programs might take, not their social impact. The authors argue that in order to utilize electronic courseware in the classroom, educators need to conduct research and analysis that would help practitioners learn and adapt their teaching styles to an online medium. - TH <http://iir.berkeley.edu/faculty/huwe/>

Surratt, Brian E.."ETD Release Policies in American ARL Institutions: A Preliminary Study <http://txspace.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/2483> " (2005)(http://txspace.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/2483). - This interesting eprint of a paper presented at the ETD2005 Conference at the University of New South Wales examines the policies at US ARL institutions that govern the accessibility of electronic theses and dissertations. Surratt looks at 28 such policies that are Web accessible, and he groups them into six categories based on whether ETDs are available through either open access or restricted access or they are withheld. In addition to his paper, Surratt makes available the Powerpoint of his presentation and both an Excel spreadsheet and an Access database with his data. This is a unique, valuable resource that will be of special interest to those engaged in developing ETD policies and procedures. - CB <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm>

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Current Cites, December 2005

Edited by Roy Tennant <http://roytennant.com/>

Contributors: Charles W. Bailey, Jr. <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm> , Terry Huwe <http://iir.berkeley.edu/faculty/huwe/> , Leo Robert Klein <http://leoklein.com/> , Roy Tennant <http://roytennant.com/

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Perceptions of Libraries and Information Resources <http://www.oclc.org/reports/2005perceptions.htm>  Dublin, OH: OCLC, December 2005.(http://www.oclc.org/reports/2005perceptions.htm). - This report "summarizes findings of an international study on information-seeking habits and preferences." The survey was an attempt to learn more about library use, awareness of and use of library electronic resources, and the library "brand", among other things. "The findings indicate," states the report, "that information consumers view libraries as places to borrow print books, but they are unaware of the rich electronic content they can access through libraries." Although there are some bright spots, the report finds a rather depressing set of opinions about libraries. We clearly need to do better on a variety of fronts, but certainly with customer service and the marketing of our services to our users. - RT <http://roytennant.com/>

IEEE Technical Committee on Digital Libraries Bulletin <http://www.ieee-tcdl.org/Bulletin/v2n1/>  2(1)(2005) - This special issue of the IEEE TCDL Bulletin presents brief summaries of poster sessions and demos from the Joint Conference on Digital Libraries (JCDL 2005). Example articles include "aDORe, A Modular and Standards-Based Digital Object Repository at the Los Alamos National Laboratory <http://www.ieee-tcdl.org/Bulletin/v2n1/bekaert/bekaert.html> ," "If You Harvest arXiv.org, Will They Come? <http://www.ieee-tcdl.org/Bulletin/v2n1/nelson/nelson.html> ," "Metadata for Phonograph Records: Facilitating New Forms of Use and Access to Analog Sound Recordings <http://www.ieee-tcdl.org/Bulletin/v2n1/lai/lai.html> ," "The Musica Colonial Project <http://www.ieee-tcdl.org/Bulletin/v2n1/gan/gan.html> ," and "Video Recommendations for the Open Video Project <http://www.ieee-tcdl.org/Bulletin/v2n1/bollen/bollen.html> ." This issue is a good way to get a quick look at current developments in the digital library field. - CB <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm>

Coyle, Karen."Descriptive Metadata for Copyright Status <http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_10/coyle/> " First Monday <http://www.firstmonday.org/>  10(10)(3 October 2005)(http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_10/coyle/). - The author, a well-known commentator on digital library issues, has taken up a bite-sized topic: metadata for the copyright status of items in digital libraries. She delivers a succinct, but complete proposed strategy, complete with tables, grids and comparative information that buttresses her arguments. She comments that the discussion of intellectual property rights has heretofore focused on access and usage, which lie in the hands of the rights holder. It would be useful, she argues, to have a corresponding set of descriptive data that outline copyright status. She proposes a manageably-sized set of descriptive data elements that might accompany digital materials to inform potential users of the copyright status of the item. She suggests that it is possible to expand upon the well-articulated language of such sources as the Open Digital Rights Language of the Open Mobile Alliance, and the Creative Commons. The absence of well-articulated statements that define the full parameters of access places a heavier burden on users who seek to know what they can -- and cannot do. Digital rights management has focused a lot on the copyright "don'ts" -- Coyle presents a modest, but powerful argument for making the copyright "dos" easier to find and understand. - TH <http://iir.berkeley.edu/faculty/huwe/>

Goedeken, Edward A."The Serials Librarian: A Brief History and Assessment" Serials Librarian <http://www.haworthpressinc.com/store/product.asp?sku=J123>  49 (4)(2005):159-175. - Serious navel-gazing is going on by the journal, The Serials Librarian, as it features this study of its own articles from 1976 to the present day. The author of the study tabulates subjects covered, authors, geographic areas, etc. Perennial favorites as far as topics are concerned, include collection development and cataloging. Other topics seem to come and go. In the beginning there was much interest in bibliographic utilities like OCLC and RLIN; automation was also popular though interest seemed to wane as "librarians became more comfortable with computers and their role in libraries." Not surprisingly, E-journals, once a "curiosity", now demand closer attention. This is a good look at the continuity of serials librarianship from a statistical point of view. - LRK <http://leoklein.com/>

Kroski, Ellyssa."The Hive Mind: Folksonomies and User-Based Tagging <http://infotangle.blogsome.com/2005/12/07/the-hive-mind-folksonomies-and-user-based-tagging/> " Infotangle [Blog] <http://infotangle.blogsome.com/>  (7 December 2005)(http://infotangle.blogsome.com/2005/12/07/the-hive-mind-folksonomies-and-user-based-tagging/). - "Folksonomies" (loose taxonomies created by uncoordinated individuals) have been getting a lot of press lately, what with sites like Flickr.com <http://flickr.com/> , del.icio.us <http://del.icio.us/> , and others <http://unalog.com/>  allowing their users to "tag" photos or bookmarks with whatever descriptive terms come into their head. The idea is that this practice can lead to a taxonomy of sorts generated simply through usage. In other words, it's an idiotic idea whose time has apparently come. But setting aside my personal biases, this piece is one of the best I've seen on both the good and the bad of folksonomies. Although this is a blog posting (the first by this author), it is written much more like a journal article, and like such it has a rather awesome list of references. - RT <http://roytennant.com/>

Liu, Ziming."Reading Behavior in the Digital Environment: Changes in Reading Behavior Over the Past Ten Years" Journal of Documentation <http://www.emeraldinsight.com/info/journals/jd/jd.jsp>  61(6)(2005):700-712. - Interesting study on the changes in reading behavior due to increased use of digital information. People highlight less but search more; people read linearly less but show intense concentration once sections are found that interest them. While considerably more research is needed, this article is a good introduction to the field. - LRK <http://leoklein.com/>

Noveck, Beth Simone."A Democracy of Groups <http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_11/noveck/> " First Monday <http://www.firstmonday.org/>  10(11)(7 November 2005)(http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_11/noveck/). - Noveck argues that the critical mass of new display technologies and collaborative software has reached a point where small groups of like-minded persons can work together with much greater impact on work and society. With these new visual display technologies, groups can now create meaningful online community, and utilize much-improved self-governance tools. While the mainstream of cultural and media researchers are interested in the relationship between the individual and the state, there is far less attention given to the rapidly evolving relationship of collaborative, grass-roots democracy in the online sphere of public life. Noveck makes two arguments, which fuel an interesting analysis of the state of online community in 2005. First, she argues that technologies of collaboration will increasingly fuel collective action (think of moveon.org). But the pace of growth will accelerate because of emerging tools for "collective visualization:" the ability to hold full-scale meetings in cyberspace. Her second argument flows from the first, calling for a legislative overhaul that empowers the process of decentralized, group-based decision making. Groups can now have "body" as well as "soul" -- in essence, following the principles of the law of corporations. - TH <http://iir.berkeley.edu/faculty/huwe/>

Sale, Arthur."Comparison of IR Content Policies in Australia <http://eprints.comp.utas.edu.au:81/archive/00000230/> " (2005)(http://eprints.comp.utas.edu.au:81/archive/00000230/). - In this e-print, Arthur Sale, Professor of Computing at the University of Tasmania, analyzes e-print deposit activity at seven Australian universities for 2004 and 2005 publications (there is partial 2005 data through early December). In brief, he found that mandating deposit resulted in much higher levels of activity than either voluntary deposit without special support for authors by repository staff or with such support. The one university with mandated deposit (Queensland University of Technology) had four times the deposit rate of the closest voluntary deposit university for 2005 publications. No voluntary deposit university had a rate higher than 10% for 2005 publications; QUT's rate is about 40%, and it is projected to be near 60% by the end of 2005. The author concludes: "It is well overdue for DEST to rule that postprints of all research that Australian universities report to DEST must be deposited in an institutional repository, to take effect say for 2007. The costs to the universities are ridiculously small; the benefits from increased global research impact, and enabling Australians to access the research they fund through the public purse, are enormous." (DEST is the Australian Department of Science Education and Technology.) - CB <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm>

Sandler, Mark."Disruptive Beneficence: The Google Print Program and the Future of Libraries " Internet Reference Services Quarterly <http://www.haworthpressinc.com/store/product.asp?sku=J136>  10(3/4)(2005):5-22. - One of several articles in this special issue looking at the impact, for better or worse, both pro and contra, of Google on Libraries. In this piece we have the Collection Development Officer of UMich, a Google-Print Library, explaining the agreement between it and Google as a "work in progress, not fully formed in anyone's mind". Nevertheless, it's important, argues the author, to focus not on Google but on libraries and what they want to do with digitized material, the goal being at Michigan as elsewhere "to provide online access in perpetuity to its collections". Google can't do everything anyway. This includes local collections and other specialized material. "At best," the author observes, "Google Print will be a massive collection of undifferentiated books." Libraries will still be needed to fill in the gaps and to provide innovative services online and in-person that the competition, including Google, simply can't supply. - LRK <http://leoklein.com/>

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Current Cites, January 2006

Edited by Roy Tennant <http://roytennant.com/>

http://lists.webjunction.org/currentcites/2006/cc06.17.1.html

Contributors: Charles W. Bailey, Jr. <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm> , Shirl Kennedy <http://www.uncagedlibrarian.com/> , Leo Robert Klein <http://leoklein.com/> , Roy Tennant <http://roytennant.com/

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"Google Free to Cache: Court <http://www.redherring.com/Article.aspx?a=15493&hed=Google+Free+to+Cache%3A+Court&sector=Industries&subsector=InternetAndServices#> " Red Herring <http://www.redherring.com/ArticlesHome.aspx>  (26 January 2006)(http://www.redherring.com/Article.aspx?a=15493&hed=Google+Free+to+Cache%3A+Court&sector=Industries&subsector=InternetAndServices#). - Guess what? It's not the end of the world as we know it. A federal district court in Nevada has ruled <http://www.eff.org/IP/blake_v_google/google_nevada_order.pdf>  in Field v. Google that Google's Website indexing practices don't violate copyright law. Just imagine if the ruling had gone the other way. Time to get permission from billions of Websites' owners (and any other copyright owners with material on those Websites) before indexing them. Ouch! In a related press release from EFF <http://www.eff.org/news/archives/2006_01.php#004345> , Fred von Lohmann, senior staff attorney, says: "The ruling should also help Google in defending against the lawsuit brought by book publishers over its Google Library Project, as well as assisting organizations like the Internet Archive that rely on caching." I don't know about you, but I feel fine about this copyright ruling (for a change). - CB <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm>

Crawford, Walt."Library 2.0 and 'Library 2.0' <http://cites.boisestate.edu/civ6i2.pdf> " Cites & Insights: Crawford at Large <http://cites.boisestate.edu/>  6(2)(2006):1-32. (http://cites.boisestate.edu/civ6i2.pdf). - Library 2.0 is all the buzz, but what is it really? That's the question that Walt Crawford set out to answer. The result is a 32-page essay that includes 62 views, 7 definitions, many perspectives by library bloggers and others, and, of course, Crawford's incisive analysis of it all. By far, this is the definitive piece on this rather amorphous topic. Crawford draws a distinction between Library 2.0, the conceptual aggregate that embodies a variety of software and service innovations, and "Library 2.0," the "bandwagon." He favors the former, but feels the latter "carries too much baggage." This is Crawford at his best, and, love it or hate it, it's a stimulating article that informs and provokes serious thought. (See also his follow-up article <http://cites.boisestate.edu/v6i3a.htm> .) - CB <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm>

Glazer, Becky."Digital Library Curriculum Project <http://www.collegiatetimes.com/news/1/ARTICLE/6358/2006-01-26.html?sid=945afea211a7d357e7fa7b5878cf28c6> " Collegiate Times <http://www.collegiatetimes.com/>  (26 January 2006)(http://www.collegiatetimes.com/news/1/ARTICLE/6358/2006-01-26.html?sid=945afea211a7d357e7fa7b5878cf28c6). - Digital libraries have such a high profile in our profession these days that it is sometimes easy to forget how new this concept is. Which means, as this article points out, that there really is a dearth of adequately trained individuals to build and maintain these repositories. This year, however, the University of North Carolina and Virginia Tech are jointly developing "a quality educational curriculum on the development and preservation of digital libraries," thanks to three years' worth of funding from a National Science Foundation grant. Virginia Tech has a top-quality computer science program <http://www.cs.vt.edu/site_pages/home/>  and UNC's SLIS <http://sils.unc.edu/>  is ranked number one by U.S. News and World Report <http://www.usnews.com/usnews/edu/grad/rankings/lib/brief/lib_brief.php> , which should make for an excellent collaboration. The project includes the development of both online and off-line course modules as well as supplementary course materials. - SK <http://www.uncagedlibrarian.com/>

Guy, Marieke, and Emma Tonkin."Folksonomies: Tidying Up Tags? <http://www.dlib.org/dlib/january06/guy/01guy.html> " D-Lib Magazine <http://www.dlib.org/>  12(1)(http://www.dlib.org/dlib/january06/guy/01guy.html). - Short "seat-of-the-pants" examination of user-generated folksonomies as practiced at del.icio.us and flikr. The authors identify a "natural tendency towards the convergence of tags". That said, there seems to be a great variation in spelling and use of punctuation with upwards of a third of the terms. The authors discuss ways to improve both the system and the practices of people using the system. At the same time, they're mindful of the benefits that an open system despite its irregularities can have. - LRK <http://leoklein.com/>

Rubino, Ken."Self-Publishing: The Internet Makes It Easier to Go from Idea to Print <http://www.infotoday.com/linkup/lud011506-rubino.shtml> " Link-Up Digital <http://www.infotoday.com/linkup/default.shtml>  (15 January 2006)(http://www.infotoday.com/linkup/lud011506-rubino.shtml). - One of my staff recently sent a customer my way. A lieutenant colonel on the cusp of retirement. He wanted to write a book. My new book <http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0790613166/ref=ase_shirlkennedys-20/103-9470518-7698232?v=glance&s=books>  came out recently. Therefore I could help this man, right? Actually I could -- since I'd just stumbled across this article on the Information Today website. Lots of people want to write books. Most of them will never get around to it. And of those who do come up with a completed manuscript, relatively few will make it over the hurdles of the traditional publishing process. But that doesn't matter nearly as much as it used to; self-publishing flourishes in myriad forms on the Internet, as this article points out. From the humble weblog to full-service self-publishing companies -- the opportunities are out there, waiting for the aspiring author to click on them. Naturally, there are caveats; Rubino, "a professional photographer and occasional freelance writer" discusses some of them, offers advice about what to look for when choosing a self-publishing company and provides websites you can browse for more information. He recommends Books Just Books <http://www.booksjustbooks.com/>  as a good starting point for the would-be self-published author. - SK <http://www.uncagedlibrarian.com/>

Sadeh, Tamar."Google Scholar Versus Metasearch Systems <http://library.cern.ch/HEPLW/12/papers/1/> " HEP Libraries Webzine <http://library.cern.ch/HEPLW/>  (12)(February 2006)(http://library.cern.ch/HEPLW/12/papers/1/). - The advent of Google Scholar <http://scholar.google.com/>  has made many question whether libraries need expensive metasearching systems to unify searching of multiple sources. This thoughtful and informative article addresses this question, and even attempts to clarify the confusing terminology by drawing clear distinctions between "metasearching" (just-in-time unification such as most library metasearch tools) and "federated searching" (just-in-case unification like Google Scholar). Although the author is an employee of ExLibris (vendor of the MetaLib metasearching tool), and naturally uses MetaLib as an example system, what she discusses is generally applicable to the metasearching environment as a whole. She also reviews other metasearching efforts such as Elsevier's Scirus system. Those who are knowledgeable about the isssues will not be surprised that Sadeh does not come down on the side of Google, nor against it. Rather, she acknowledges the utility of both Google Scholar and library-based metasearch services when each is appropriate, as well as carefully watching developments in industry as a whole. This is altogether the best overview of Google Scholar, other large federated search systems such as Scirus, and library-based metasearch tools I've seen. Full disclosure: as a MetaLib customer I have worked with Ms. Sadeh and some of my work is cited in her article. - RT <http://roytennant.com/>

Suber, Peter."The U.S. CURES Act Would Mandate OA <http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/newsletter/01-02-06.htm#cures> " SPARC Open Access Newsletter <http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/newsletter/archive.htm>  (93)(2006)(http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/newsletter/01-02-06.htm#cures). - In this article, Suber overviews and analyzes the American Center for CURES Act of 2005 <http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/bdquery/z?d109:s.02104:>  (S.2104). This important bill would mandate open access to all research funded in whole or part by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which is roughly half of all non-classified federally funded research. Deposit of the final, peer-reviewed versions of articles would be required when they were accepted, and any access embargo periods could only last six months. Non-compliance by grantees could result in the denial of future funding. Government employees' articles would also covered by the bill. - CB <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm>

Teachout, Terry."A Hundred Books in Your Pocket <http://online.wsj.com/public/article/SB113779027926552261.html?mod=todays_free_feature> " The Wall Street Journal <http://online.wsj.com/>  (21 January 2006)(http://online.wsj.com/public/article/SB113779027926552261.html?mod=todays_free_feature). - As you can probably guess from the title, this article is about e-books -- more specifically, Sony's announcement of a new paperback-sized e-book reader that will use E Ink <http://www.eink.com/> , a state-of-the-art display technology that is supposed to be like reading from paper (obviously the gold standard). Even more interesting, perhaps, is Sony's intention to open a new iTunes-like store for downloadable e-books. Three major publishers -- HarperCollins, Random House and Simon & Schuster -- have signed on; "HarperCollins and Simon & Schuster are plan to make their entire backlists available for downloading as soon as they negotiate royalty rights with the authors." The author thinks this will be what causes Sony's reader -- due for release this spring -- to take off. Like the wiildly popular iPod and iTunes, this is "what marketers call an 'end to end' solution to the problem of the e-book" -- one-stop shopping for content, as it were. The author seem to feel quite strongly that the printed book, as "a technology," is circling the drain. "Like all technologies," he says, "it has a finite life span, and its time is almost up." - SK <http://www.uncagedlibrarian.com/>

University of California Libraries Bibliographic Services Task Force. Rethinking How We Provide Bibliographic Services for the University of California <http://libraries.universityofcalifornia.edu/sopag/BSTF/Final.pdf>  Oakland, CA: University of California, December 2005.(http://libraries.universityofcalifornia.edu/sopag/BSTF/Final.pdf). - In a no-holds-barred report by this University of California task force, much of the existing library bibliographic insfrastructure is blasted as being out-of-date and inadequate. "The current Library catalog," states the report, "is poorly designed for the tasks of finding, discovering, and selecting the growing set of resources available in our libraries." But it doesn't stop there, in either uncovering deficiencies nor in recommending potentially fruitful directions. The thrust of the report can perhaps be perceived by the headings under which the recommendations for futher action are grouped: "Enhancing Search and Retrieval," "Rearchitecting the OPAC," "Adopting New Cataloging Practices," and "Supporting Continuing Improvement." Although this report is specific to the UC environment, I suspect that many institutions find themselves in a similar situation and therefore reviewing this report carefully is likely to be instructive. Full disclosure: I am a UC employee and was interviewed by the task force in the process of producing this report. - RT <http://roytennant.com/>

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Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU]; on behalf of; Roy Tennant [roy.tennant@UCOP.EDU]     Wed 1/03/2006 8:43 AM                     PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU            [CurrentCites] Current Cites, February 2006

Current Cites <http://lists.webjunction.org/currentcites/>

Current Cites, February 2006

Edited by Roy Tennant <http://roytennant.com/>

http://lists.webjunction.org/currentcites/2006/cc06.17.2.html

Contributors: Charles W. Bailey, Jr. <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm> , Shirl Kennedy <http://www.uncagedlibrarian.com/> , Leo Robert Klein <http://leoklein.com/> , Roy Tennant <http://roytennant.com/

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code4lib Conference 2006 <http://www.code4lib.org/2006/schedule/>  Corvallis, OR: code4lib, 15-17 February 2006.(http://www.code4lib.org/2006/schedule/). - The code4lib Conference was put together by a group of tech-savvy librarians who hang out in the code4lib <http://www.code4lib.org/>  chatroom and mailing list in literally a matter of a few months. This is the first in what they hope to be an annual event, aimed at those with a need for a more technical conference than the usual library fare. Here you can see what these folks are thinking about, what they use, and what they think is good and bad, and perhaps get an early taste of what's to come in your own library someday. Given that the conference only occurred a matter of days before this publication went to press, not all the presentations are yet available. But more will be added in the coming days, and several of the program descriptions link out to web sites that provide more information. Full disclosure: I was on the program committee. - RT <http://roytennant.com/>

Bailey, Jr., Charles W. "What is Open Access? <http://www.digital-scholarship.com/cwb/WhatIsOA.pdf> " Open Access: Key Strategic, Technical, and Economic Aspects (7 February 2006)(http://www.digital-scholarship.com/cwb/WhatIsOA.pdf). - In this preprint of a book chapter to be published by Chandos Publishing this year, Current Cites' own Charles W. Bailey, Jr. explains and summarizes the "Open Access" movement within the scholarly and research communities of higher education. Bailey begins with defining open access by reference to definitions from several key documents such as the Budapest Open Acess Initiative. Following this is a definition of the subset of open access activities called "self-archiving" by its main proponent Stevan Harnad. The next section deals with open access journals. For more information, readers are directed to the author's Open Access Webliography <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/oaw.htm> , an essential resource in the field. Given the goals of this particular book chapter, those familiar with the open access movement will be familiar with much of what Bailey covers, but for someone new to the issue it is an excellent summary of key issues. - RT <http://roytennant.com/>

Dean, John W. "Why Should Anyone Worry About Whose Communications Bush and Cheney Are Intercepting, If It Helps To Find Terrorists? <http://writ.news.findlaw.com/dean/20060224.html> " FindLaw <http://public.findlaw.com/>  (24 February 2006)(http://writ.news.findlaw.com/dean/20060224.html). - According to a statistic quoted in this column, "The NSA is now eavesdropping on as many as five hundred people in the United States at any given time." That is one heck of a lot of data; experts assume the NSA is indulging in data mining, which the author defines as "the use of computer algorithms to search automatically through massive amounts of data." A huge problem with data mining, of course, is the number of false positives. Which ups the potential for innocent people to get caught in the net. Maybe you're one of those folks who isn't worried about things like this because you "have nothing to hide." But the very idea of the government amassing huge amounts of personal data on its citizens is troubling. Says the author, "Many people trust the government not to abuse or misuse this information. Based on experience, I don't." He knows from whence he speaks. If you're old enough to remember Watergate, you likely remember John Dean as counsel to President Nixon. - SK <http://www.uncagedlibrarian.com/>

Garrett, Jeffrey."KWIC and Dirty? Human Cognition and the Claims of Full-Text Searching <http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.3336451.0009.106> " Journal of Electronic Publishing <http://www.hti.umich.edu/j/jep/>  9(1)(February 2006)(http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.3336451.0009.106). - Diatribe against the evils of keyword searching. Complaints include not allowing for context or metaphor. Works are like "organisms" and plucking out KWICs is to deracinate them and to "carry them away from their native settings with some additional word material still clinging to them, like dirt to roots." Keyword results produce a lack of coherence "fundamentally at odds with natural patterns of knowledge acquisition." The facts are disassociated and resemble "garbage heaps" of knowledge. You may not agree with the proposition but you'll be swept off your feet by the literary allusions, and that ought to count for something. One of several articles in the newly resuscitated Journal of Electronic Publishing. The journal is now published by UMich's "Scholarly Publishing Office" and the article <http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.3336451.0009.102>  by Maria Bonn on their model of scholarly publishing is also worth a read. - LRK <http://leoklein.com/>

Hahn, Karla."The State of the Large Publisher Bundle: Findings from an ARL Member Survey <http://www.arl.org/newsltr/245/bundle.html> " ARL Bimonthly Report <http://www.arl.org/newsltr/>  (245)(April 2006)(http://www.arl.org/newsltr/245/bundle.html). - Academic libraries have long been familiar which what has been termed "the big deal" (most notably by Kenneth Frazier in a 2001 D-Lib Magazine article <http://www.dlib.org/dlib/march01/frazier/03frazier.html> ) -- large conglomerations of electronic resources sold as a bundle. This means libraries either get everything or nothing from a particular publisher. Such an inability to cancel individual titles puts additional pressure on libraries to cancel unbundled titles to compensate. Therefore, to find out more about the big deal and libraries response to it, ARL conducted a survey in 2005. There is much of interest here for anyone interested in licensing resources for academic libraries, but in a nutshell ARL believes that libraries can advocate for better license terms without unduly reducing publisher profit. - RT <http://roytennant.com/>

Jacobs, Neil."Digital Repositories in UK Universities and Colleges <http://www.freepint.com/issues/160206.htm#feature> " FreePint <http://www.freepint.com/>  (200)(2006)(http://www.freepint.com/issues/160206.htm#feature). - In 1993, the UK did a smart thing: it established the UK Joint Information Systems Committee (or JISC <http://www.jisc.ac.uk/>  for short). Since then, JISC-funded technology projects have kept UK academic libraries on the cutting edge of innovative networked services and technologies. Little wonder then that UK libraries have been leaders in the rapidly evolving movement to develop institutional repositories and other types of digital archives. As the manager the JISC Digital Repositories development programme, Neil Jacobs knows this important work well, and, in this article, he provides a link-packed, amazingly compact bird's-eye view of it that is authoritative and highly readable. Don't just zip through the short text. Rather, take the time to explore the numerous project links. You'll be glad that you did. - CB <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm>

Rusbridge, Chris."Excuse Me... Some Digital Preservation Fallacies? <http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/rusbridge/> " Ariadne <http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/>  (46)(February 2006)(http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/rusbridge/). - In this tenth-anniversary issue, Rusbridge takes on some digital preservation assertions or assumptions that he believes underlies many of the preservation discussions happening today. They are: 1) digital preservation is very expensive, 2) file formats become obsolete very rapidly, 3) interventions must occur frequently, 4) digital preservation repositories should have very long timescale aspirations, 5) 'Internet-age' expectations are such that the preserved object must be easily and instantly accessible in the format de jour, and 6) the preserved object must be faithful to the original in all respects. After arguing with these assumptions, he restates them at the end of the piece as: 1) digital preservation is comparatively inexpensive, compared to preservation in the print world, 2) file formats become obsolete rather more slowly than we thought, 3) interventions can occur rather infrequently, ensuring that continuing costs remain containable, 4) digital preservation repositories should have timescale aspirations adjusted to their funding and business case, but should be prepared for their succession, 5) "Internet-age" expectations cannot be met by most digital repositories; and, 6) only desiccated versions of the preserved object need be easily and instantly accessible in the format de jour, although the original bit-stream and good preservation metadata or documentation should be available for those who wish to invest in extracting extra information or capability." - RT <http://roytennant.com/>

Sohn, Gigi."Don't Blow It, Congress <http://news.com.com/Dont+blow+it%2C+Congress/2010-1023_3-6035094.html?tag=fd_carsl> " CNET News.com <http://news.com.com/2001-1_3-0.html>  (6 February 2006)(http://news.com.com/Dont+blow+it%2C+Congress/2010-1023_3-6035094.html?tag=fd_carsl). - "Net neutrality" isn't exactly a phrase that immediately stirs the blood. In fact, it might evoke a "so what?" mental yawn. But, a closer look suggests that the future of the Internet as a digital medium that supports vigorous innovation and free-flowing information may be at stake. Here's how EDUCAUSE defines the term in its useful Net Neutrality <http://www.educause.edu/netneutrality>  Web page: "'Net neutrality' is the term used to describe the concept of keeping the Internet open to all lawful content, information, applications, and equipment. There is increasing concern that the owners of the local broadband connections (usually either the cable or telephone company) may block or discriminate against certain Internet users or applications in order to give an advantage to their own services." In this article, Gigi Sohn, President of Public Knowledge <http://www.publicknowledge.org/> , lays out the case for Congress to enact legislation that will ensure Net neutrality in a rapidly changing telecommunications landscape. Will Congress enact such legislation? Maybe not, in spite of Vint Cerf, one of the fathers of the Internet, saying that without Net neutrality: "We risk losing the Internet as a catalyst for consumer choice, for economic growth, for technological innovation and for global competitiveness" (see "Politicos Divided on Need for 'Net Neutrality' Mandate <http://news.com.com/Politicos+divided+on+need+for+net+neutrality+mandate/2100-1028_3-6036231.html> "). Noted legal scholar Lawrence Lessig <http://www.lessig.org/>  has also weighed in on the issue in his Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation testimony <http://www.lessig.org/blog/archives/Lessig_Testimony_2.pdf> , which is also well worth reading. - CB <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm>

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Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU]; on behalf of; Roy Tennant [roy.tennant@UCOP.EDU]     Wed 29/03/2006 6:51 AM       PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU          [CurrentCites] Current Cites, March 2006

Current Cites <http://lists.webjunction.org/currentcites/>

Current Cites, March 2006

Edited by Roy Tennant <http://roytennant.com/>

http://lists.webjunction.org/currentcites/2006/cc06.17.3.html

Contributors: Charles W. Bailey, Jr. <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm> , Leo Robert Klein <http://leoklein.com/> , Jim Ronningen, Roy Tennant <http://roytennant.com/

________________________________

DLF-Aquifer Services Institutional Survey Report <http://www.diglib.org/aquifer/SWGisrfinal.pdf>  Washington, DC: Digital Library Federation, 9 March 2006.(http://www.diglib.org/aquifer/SWGisrfinal.pdf). - This 45-page report from the Digital Library Federation (DFL) Aquifer Services Working Group consists of summarized responses from DLF members "to discover user-services assessment efforts and to assess what services are desired by en users and institutions and how the Acquifer project <http://www.diglib.org/aquifer/>  might potentially meet these needs. Key findings of the survey include: 1) Use of digital collections and services is often assessed at the point of introduction or update, rather than systematically over time, 2) searching is the most common way that digital collections are used, 3) metadata standardization is the most commonly reported strategy for supporting digital collections, 4) budgetary, time, and personnel constraints challenge the ability of institutions to develop needed services, and 5) institutions and users desire cross-resource discovery tools and greater ability to personalize service options. A very useful feature of this report is the list of user studies undertaken by DLF institutions, with abstracts for each. - RT <http://roytennant.com/>

Cohen, Daniel J. "From Babel to Knowledge: Data Mining Large Digital Collections <http://www.dlib.org/dlib/march06/cohen/03cohen.html> " D-Lib Magazine <http://www.dlib.org/>  12(3)(March 2006)(http://www.dlib.org/dlib/march06/cohen/03cohen.html). - This is a fascinating account of how you can construct a search engine optimized for specific tasks such as finding course syllabi using simple technologies, access to such resources as Google's application program interface (API), and intelligent post-processing. A few conclusions from the author's research include: 1) More emphasis needs to be placed on creating APIs for digital collections, 2) Resources that are free to use in any way, even if they are imperfect, are more valuable than those that are gated or use-restricted, even if those resources are qualitatively better, and 3) Quantity may make up for a lack of quality. For explanations and justifications of these points see the article, which anyone building search systems should definitely do. - RT <http://roytennant.com/>

Harnad, Stevan."Maximizing Research Impact through Institutional and National Open-Access Self-Archiving Mandates <http://eprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/12093/> " (2006)(http://eprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/12093/). - A recent study by Tom Wilson ("Institutional Open Archives: Where Are We Now? <http://www.cilip.org.uk/NR/rdonlyres/7E2C4BAD-1F83-460A-B2A5-B50AD060C4D0/0/TomWilson.pdf> ") investigates item deposit rates at most UK institutional repositories (excluding ETDs where possible). After reviewing his findings, Wilson states: "By any measure it can hardly be claimed that the concept of open archiving has taken off in British universities and I don't think that any of its protagonists would claim otherwise. The movement is at an early stage, with something in the order of 12 per cent of UK universities involved and with a minuscule proportion of the total research output covered by the IOA [Institutional Open Archives]." Little wonder then that open access proponent Stevan Harnad <http://www.ecs.soton.ac.uk/~harnad/intpub.html>  has come to advocate mandatory self-archiving at the institutional and national levels as a solution to low institutional repository deposit rates. (Harnad suggests that there is "a spontaneous 15% baseline rate" for institutional repository deposits.) One might imagine that researchers would resist mandatory deposit; however, Harnad notes that a 2005 study <http://eprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/10999/01/jisc2.pdf>  by Alma Swan and Sheridan Brown found that only 5% of researchers would refuse to do so. He further notes that in the three institutions and one department (CERN <http://archives.eprints.org/eprints.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcdsweb.cern.ch%2F> , Queensland University of Technology <http://archives.eprints.org/eprints.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Feprints.qut.edu.au%2F> , the University of Minho <http://archives.eprints.org/eprints.php?url=https%3A%2F%2Frepositorium.sdum.uminho.pt> , and the University of Southampton's Department of Electronics and Computer Science <http://archives.eprints.org/eprints.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Feprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk%2F> ) that have mandated deposit, the strategy appears to be working. Will publishers allow self-archiving? Harnad indicates that only 7% of publishers <http://romeo.eprints.org/stats.php>  do not allow self-archiving. Why do it? Harnad deftly recaps the open access research impact argument <http://opcit.eprints.org/oacitation-biblio.html> . With possible national-level deposit mandates in the works, such as the American Center for CURES Act of 2005 <http://lieberman.senate.gov/documents/bills/051207curessectionbysection.pdf>  and the Research Councils UK's Position Statement on Access to Research Outputs <http://www.rcuk.ac.uk/access/index.asp> , mandatory deposit is a hot topic, and Harnad's heavily linked paper provides a good summary of the pro-mandate position. - CB <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm>

Levy, Stephen, and Brad Stone."The New Wisdom of the Web <http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12015774/site/newsweek/> " Newsweek <http://www.newsweek.com>  (April 3, 2006)(http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12015774/site/newsweek/). - The living web, web 2.0, online community - however you refer to the phenomenon of the web as a world forum, the simplicity and timeliness of publishing whatever you want is nothing short of revolutionary. This overview article is probably most valuable for those non-participants who'll read it in paper form later this week; bloggers and others are already critiquing it online, basically treating it as just another post, one opinion among many. In fact, while its content does provide a nice sampling of current web community trends and efforts to capitalize on them, the impact of the changes described in it is really driven home when you take the article as a lesson in itself about the current state of the infosphere. It used to be that a news weekly could start a debate when it introduced to the general population a topic previously known only to a few; today, numerous forums already exist in which aspects of web community are being discussed by countless individuals (not to mention many, many more simply using the web to share comments, images, audio and video, without the theorizing). Those of us engaged in this are already learning something from 'the wisdom of crowds' about the nature of what we're doing as we do it, and don't have much use for a snapshot of the ocean when we can wade in and swim whenever we want to. - JR

St. Laurent, Simon."The Next Web? <http://www.xml.com/pub/a/2006/03/15/next-web-xhtml2-ajax.html> " XML.com <http://www.xml.com>  (March 15, 2006)(http://www.xml.com/pub/a/2006/03/15/next-web-xhtml2-ajax.html). - "You could always go home, Dorothy," is the underlying theme of this review of popular web technologies that haven't yet lived up to their promise. Web veteran Simon St. Laurent briefly goes over the XML Web, the Semantic Web, XHTML and Web Services, explaining that each required substantial new infrastructure to implement and for that reason "never quite made it to mainstream web development". In contrast he points to the success of Ajax where the parts, namely JavaScript and HTML, have been around for ages. "After waiting for all of those promises of better tools to come," he concludes, "it seems that developers looked at the parts they had available, and chose the ones they could use today. It can be annoyingly hard work, but the results are impressive." - LRK <http://leoklein.com/>

Stanger, Nigel, and Graham McGregor.Hitting the Ground Running: Building New Zealand's First Publicly Available Institutional Repository <http://eprints.otago.ac.nz/274/>  Dunedin, NZ: University of Otago, March 2006.(http://eprints.otago.ac.nz/274/). - This paper describes the rapid implementation of an institutional repository using open source software. Although they get high marks for rapidity out of the gate, and for a promising beginning, the paper is light on such details as to how the initial success will be sustained. The reader is also left to wonder how they plan on taking this pilot project for one of the university's schools and deploying it university-wide, if indeed they intend to do so. But those concerns aside, this can be a useful article for demonstrating how little it takes technically to get a repository launched and for achieving early success in terms of paper discovery and downloading. - RT <http://roytennant.com/>

Suber, Peter."Three Gathering Storms That Could Cause Collateral Damage for Open Access <http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/newsletter/03-02-06.htm#collateral> " SPARC Open Access Newsletter <http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/newsletter/archive.htm>  (95)(2006)(http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/newsletter/03-02-06.htm#collateral). - The Internet is a-changin', and those changes may make old timers long for the days when it was an obscure, purely noncommercial enterprise. In this paper, noted open acces advocate Peter Suber previews three potential changes that you should be aware of: (1) the WIPO <http://www.wipo.int/portal/index.html.en>  "Treaty on the Protection of Broadcasting Organizations <http://www.eff.org/IP/WIPO/broadcasting_treaty/> ," (2) threats to Net neutrality <http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/03/24/AR2006032400256.html> , and (3) fees for bulk e-mailers <http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/opinion/14023726.htm>  to circumvent major e-mail services' spam filters. These potential changes may not sound alarming, but they are harbingers of deeper changes in the fundamental nature of the Internet that may have significant long-term implications. Let's take one of them as an example: AOL and Yahoo want to charge bulk e-mailers to avoid spam filters. The implications? Here's what Suber says: "The program is insidious and would lead almost everyone to pay the fees if they could--account holders at Yahoo and AOL and the bulk mailers who send to Yahoo and AOL addresses. It would also lead other email providers to adopt similar policies or fear that they were leaving money on the table. This would harm everyone who sends or receives non-spam mass mailings. This newsletter is an example but only one of many. The program would harm every form of OA content delivered by email, from emailed eprints and listserv postings to journal current-awareness messages like tables of contents and the results of stored searches. It would hurt non-profit groups and informal communities that network by email, including academic and political groups. Cash-strapped operations relying on email for distribution would either be forced to shut down or face higher costs that threaten their stability." - CB <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm>

Wakimotoa, Jina Choi, David S. Walker, and Katherine S. Dabboura."The Myths and Realities of SFX in Academic Libraries" The Journal of Academic Librarianship <http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00991333>  32(2)(March 2006):127-136. - The report of a three-fold study ("end-user survey, librarian focus group interviews, and sample SFX statistics and tests") to answer these questions regarding the use and effectiveness of an OpenURL resolver (SFX from ExLibris) in an academic setting: "How successful is the system in actually meeting the research needs of librarians and library users? Do undergraduate students, who have increasingly high expectations of online resources, think that SFX lives up to their expectations? Do librarians feel comfortable relying on SFX for accurate and consistent linking? Do the perceptions of librarians and library end-users reflect the reality of SFX usage?" Their conclusions? "Ultimately, this study showed that end-user expectations were slightly higher than their actual experiences of obtaining full text. The majority of the librarians were positive, however, reporting that SFX worked most of the time. Both groups had complaints about SFX and saw areas for improvement, but they still rely heavily on it for their research." - RT <http://roytennant.com/>

________________________________

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CURRENT SCIENCE, 89(9), 1502-1554. NOVEMBER 10, 2005

Special Section: 50 Years of Citation Indexing.

Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [JESSE@listserv.utk.edu]; on behalf of; Sloan, Bernie [bernies@UILLINOIS.EDU]     Thu 9/03/2006 11:43 P JESSE@listserv.utk.edu       Current Science: 50 Years of Citation Indexing

Special Section: 50 Years of Citation Indexing. Current Science, 89(9), 1502-1554. November 10, 2005.

http://www.ias.ac.in/currsci/nov102005/contents.htm

Bernie Sloan

Senior Information Systems Consultant

Consortium of Academic & Research Libraries in Illinois

616 E. Green Street, Suite 213

Champaign, IL  61820-5752

Phone: (217) 333-4895

Fax:   (217) 265-0454

E-mail: bernies@uillinois.edu

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DIGICULT

Issue 10

digicult-forum@digicult.info                Fri 23/12/2005 4:53 PM                       digicult-forum              [DIGICULT] DigiCULT.Info Issue 10 is now available

Seasons Greetings,

DigiCULT.Info Issue 10 is now available at http://www.digicult.info/pages/newsletter.php

This tenth issue was produced by the DigiCULT partner University of Glasgow, HATII, to fulfil publication commitments and report on the latest developments and projects within the cultural heritage field in 2005.

A sample of the articles may illustrate the broad scope of themes and

contributions:

*The Prototype Process: Ideas turned into Experiences* (A.Spinazzč), *LIFEPLUS Project: Real-time Virtual Humans in Augmented Reality Sites* (N.Magnenat-Thalmann and P.Trahanias), *The Historical Archive of the Aegean 'Ergani': Preserving Historical Memory on the Semantic Web* (E.Mavrikas, national correspondent, Greece), *Disposal and Archiving of Electronic Records: The DOMEA Concept in

Germany* (A.Hänger),

*Digitisation and Archiving from a Technological Perspective* (K.Ferenc), *The VICODI Project: Creating a Semantic Web Application for Historians* (E.Acton, R.Deswarte, J.Boulton, T.Kirk and J.Oosthoek), ... plus many more.

The EU funding phase of the DigiCULT project (http://www.digicult.info) ended 31. December 2004. As part of our quest to continue the activities of DigiCULT beyond its funding period we conducted a market survey to gauge the willingness of users to pay for future services and products.

A summary of the results as well as the opportunity to provide your own thoughts is now available on the Salzburg Research eCulture website blog http://eculture.salzburgresearch.at/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogsection&id=9&Itemid=30&lang=en

Yours Sincerely,

John Pereira

Salzburg Research

eCulture Group

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D-LIB

October 2005

dlib-subscribers-admin@dlib.org; on behalf of; Bonnie Wilson [bwilson@cnri.reston.va.us]           Tue 18/10/2005 2:45 AM           DLib-subscribers        [Dlib-subscribers] The October 2005 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

The October 2005 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now available.

This issue contains six articles, the 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  The Featured Collection for the October issue is ARKive contributed by Hamish MacCall, Wildscreen.

The articles include:

The CREE Project: Investigating User Requirements for Searching within Institutional Environments Chris Awre and Ian Dolphin, University of Hull; Gabriel Hanganu and Tony Brett, Oxford University; and Caroline Ingram, CSI Consultancy

Using Machine Learning to Support Quality Judgments Myra Custard and Tamara Sumner, University of Colorado at Boulder

Hierarchical Catalog Records: Implementing a FRBR Catalog David Mimno, University of Massachusetts, Amherst; and Gregory Crane and Alison Jones, Tufts University

Development and Assessment of a Public Discovery and Delivery Interface for a Fedora Repository Leslie Johnston, University of Virginia

Exploiting "Light-weight" Protocols and Open Source Tools to Implement Digital Library Collections and Services Xiaorong Xiang and Eric Lease Morgan, University of Notre Dame

Lund Virtual Medical Journal Makes Self-Archiving Attractive and Easy for Authors Yvonne Hultman Özek, Lund University

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England

http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

http://dlib.anu.edu.au/

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen,

Goettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina

http://www.dlib.org.ar

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

BN - National Library of Portugal, Portugal

http://purl.pt/302/1

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the October 2005

issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is

a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States

and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

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November 2005

Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU]; on behalf of; Bonnie Wilson [bwilson@CNRI.RESTON.VA.US]                 Wed 16/11/2005 4:19 AM                   PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU           

The November 2005 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

Greetings:

The November 2005 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now available.

This issue contains an opinion piece, a commentary, two articles, five conference or workshop reports, the 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  This month D-Lib features the Historic Pittsburgh Image Collections, with description contributed by Ed Galloway, University of Pittsburgh.

The Opinion is:

Public Domain Art in an Age of Easier Mechanical Reproducibility Kenneth Hamma, J. Paul Getty Trust

The Commentary is:

What Is a Digital Library Anymore, Anyway? Beyond Search and Access in the NSDL   Carl Lagoze, Dean B. Krafft, and Sandy Payette, Cornell University; and Susan Jesuroga, UCAR-NSDL

The articles include:

Requirements for Digital Preservation Systems: A Bottom-Up Approach David S. H. Rosenthal, Thomas Robertson, Tom Lipkis, Vicky Reich, and Seth Morabito, Stanford University

Questions & Challenges Arising in Building the Collection of a Digital Library for Education: Lessons from Five Years of DLESE Kim Kastens, Columbia University; Barbara DeFelice, Dartmouth College; Holly Devaul and Kathryn Ginger, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research; Christopher DiLeonardo, Foothill College; Suzanne Larsen, University of Colorado; David Mogk, Montana State University; and Sharon Tahirkheli, American Geological Institute

The Conference and Worskhop Reports include:

NSF / NSDL Workshop on Scientific Markup Languages Laura M. Bartolo, Kent State University; Timothy W. Cole, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Sarah Giersch, Association of Research Libraries; and Michael Wright, UCAR - DLESE Program Center

Report on the 9th European Conference on Research and Advanced Technology for Digital Libraries: September 18 - 23, 2005, Vienna, Austria Dagobert Soergel, University of Maryland

HDL 2005 - the 3rd Healthcare Digital Libraries Workshop: Held in Conjunction with ECDL 2005 Vienna, Austria, 22 September 2005 Patty Kostkova, City University, London; and Anne Adams, University College London

Report on the 4th European Networked Knowledge Organization Systems/Services (NKOS) Workshop: Mapping Knowledge Organization Systems Doug Tudhope, University of Glamorgan

Report on the 5th International Web Archiving Workshop (IWAW) Andreas Aschenbrenner, SAT Research Studio; Olaf Brandt SUB Göttingen; and Stephan Strodl, Vienna University of Technology

D-Lib has mirror sites at the following locations:

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia http://dlib.anu.edu.au/

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen, Goettingen, Germany http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

BN - National Library of Portugal, Portugal

http://purl.pt/302/1

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the November 2005 issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

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December 2005

dlib-subscribers-admin@dlib.org; on behalf of; Bonnie Wilson [bwilson@cnri.reston.va.us]           Fri 16/12/2005 2:39 AM

DLib-subscribers                    [Dlib-subscribers] The December 2005 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

Greetings:

The December 2005 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now available.

This issue contains seven articles, the 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  This month D-Lib features the Library of Congress Global Gateway: World Culture and Resources.

The articles include:

AIHT: Conceptual Issues from Practical Tests Clay Shirky, New York University

Harvard's Perspective on the Archive Ingest and Handling Test Stephen Abrams, Stephen Chapman, Dale Flecker, Sue Kreigsman, Julian Marinus, Gary McGath, and Robin Wendler, Harvard University

The Archive Ingest and Handling Test: The Johns Hopkins University Report Tim DiLauro, Mark Patton, David Reynolds, and G. Sayeed Choudhury, The Johns Hopkins University

Archive Ingest and Handling Test: The Old Dominion University Approach Michael L. Nelson, Johan Bollen, Giridhar Manepalli, and Rabia Haq, Old Dominion University

The AIHT at Stanford University: Automated Preservation Assessment of Heterogeneous Digital Collections Richard Anderson, Hannah Frost, Nancy Hoebelheinrich, and Keith Johnson,

Parallel Worlds: Online Games and Digital Information Services John Kirriemuir, Silversprite

Open Access Federation for Library and Information Science: dLIST and DL-Harvest Anita Coleman and Joseph Roback, University of Arizona

(Incidentally, another periodical I edit (The IEEE TCDL Bulletin

http://www.ieee-tcdl.org/Bulletin/current/) has just been released this week as well. It features 31 of the posters and demonstrations from JCDL

2005.)

D-Lib Magazine has mirror sites at the following locations:

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia http://dlib.anu.edu.au/

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen, Goettingen, Germany http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

BN - National Library of Portugal, Portugal

http://purl.pt/302/1

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the December 2005 issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

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January 2006

Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU]; on behalf of; Bonnie Wilson [bwilson@CNRI.RESTON.VA.US]    

Tue 17/01/2006 4:44 AM         PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU          The January 2006 Issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

Greetings:

The January 2006 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now available.

This issue contains a commentary, four articles, the 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  This month D-Lib features the Smithsonian Institution Libraries Galaxy of Knowledge: Art and Design.

This month's Commentary is:

Folksonomies: Tidying Up Tags?

Marieke Guy and Emma Tonkin, UKOLN

The articles include:

UKWAC: Building the UK's First Public Web Archive Steve Bailey, JISC and Dave Thompson, Wellcome Library

Don't Leave the Data in the Dark: Issues in Digitizing Print Statistical Publications Julie Linden, Yale University and Ann Green, Digital Life Cycle Research and Consulting

Automated Capture of Thumbnails and Thumbshots for Use by Metadata Aggregation Services Muriel Foulonneau, Thomas G. Habing, and Timothy W. Cole, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

The Digital Library for Earth System Education Provides Individualized Reports for Teachers on the Effectiveness of Educational Resources in Their Own Classrooms Kim A. Kastens and Neil Holzman, Columbia University

D-Lib Magazine has mirror sites at the following locations:

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia http://dlib.anu.edu.au/

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen, Goettingen, Germany http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

BN - National Library of Portugal, Portugal

http://purl.pt/302/1

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the January 2006 issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

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February 2006 

dlib-subscribers-admin@dlib.org; on behalf of; Bonnie Wilson [bwilson@cnri.reston.va.us]                       Thu 16/02/2006 7:56 AM    DLib-subscribers        [Dlib-subscribers] The February 2006 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

Greetings:

The February 2006 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now available.

This issue contains a commentary, five articles, the 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  This month D-Lib features the Lilly Library at Indiana University.

This month's Commentary is:

Facilitating Scholarly Communication in African Studies Titia van der Werf-Davelaar, African Studies Centre, Leiden

The articles include:

ADL-R: The First Instance of a CORDRA Registry Henry Jerez, Giridhar Manepalli, Christophe Blanchi, and Laurence W.

Lannom, Corporation for National Research Intiatives

FeDCOR: An Institutional CORDRA Registry Giridhar Manepalli and Henry Jerez, Corporation for National Research Initiatives; and Michael L. Nelson, Old Dominion University

A Research Library Based on the Historical Collections of the Internet Archive William Y. Arms, Selcuk Aya, Pavel Dmitriev, Blazej Kot, Ruth Mitchell, and Lucia Walle, Cornell University

Observed Web Robot Behavior on Decaying Web Subsites Joan A. Smith, Frank McCown, and Michael L. Nelson, Old Dominion University

Copyright Issues in Open Access Research Journals: The Authors Perspective Esther Hoorn, University of Groningen, Faculty of Law and Maurits van der Graaf, Pleiade Management & Consultancy

D-Lib Magazine has mirror sites at the following locations:

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England

http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

http://dlib.anu.edu.au/

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen,

Goettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina

http://www.dlib.org.ar

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

BN - National Library of Portugal, Portugal

http://purl.pt/302/1

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the February 2006

issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is

a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States

and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

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March 2006 

Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU]; on behalf of; Bonnie Wilson [bwilson@CNRI.RESTON.VA.US]    

Thu 16/03/2006 1:13 AM         PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU          The March 2006 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

Greetings:

The March 2006 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now available.

This is a special issue on the theme of "Digital Library Evolution" with guest editor, Gregory Crane, Tufts University. The issue contains six articles, a conference report, the 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  This month, in conjunction with the special theme of this month's issue, D-Lib features the Perseus Digital Library 19th-Century American Collection.

The articles include:

What Do You Do with a Million Books?

Gregory Crane, Tufts University

Early Modern Culture in a Comprehensive Digital Library Wolfgang Schibel, University of Mannheim, and Jeffrey A. Rydberg-Cox, University of Missouri - Kansas City

 From Babel to Knowledge: Data Mining Large Digital Collections Daniel J. Cohen, George Mason University

Document Recognition for a Million Books G. Sayeed Choudhury, Tim DiLauro, Robert Ferguson, Johns Hopkins University; Michael Droettboom, Hillcrest Labs; and Ichiro Fujinaga, McGill University

Debabelizing Libraries: Machine Translation by and for Digital Collections David A. Smith, Johns Hopkins University

Text, Information, Knowledge and the Evolving Record of Humanity Gregory Crane and Alison Jones, Tufts University

The Conference Report is:

WebWise 2006 Inspiring Discovery - Unlocking Collections: Conference Report Stuart L. Weibel, OCLC Research

D-Lib Magazine has mirror sites at the following locations:

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia http://dlib.anu.edu.au/

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen, Goettingen, Germany http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

BN - National Library of Portugal, Portugal

http://purl.pt/302/1

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the March 2006 issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

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DPC/PADI

Issue 11

From: Marian Hanley [mailto:mhanley@nla.gov.au]

Sent: Friday, 28 October 2005 7:02 AM

To: LForward padiforum-l

Subject: [padiforum-l] DPC/PADI What's New in Digital Preservation - Issue 11 available

Issue no. 11 (June - September 2005) of the DPC/PADI "What's New in Digital Preservation" bulletin is now available from the Digital Preservation Coalition Web site and the National Library of Australia's PADI Web site:

National Library of Australia:

http://www.nla.gov.au/padi/qdigest/sep2005.html

Digital Preservation Coalition:

http://www.dpconline.org/graphics/whatsnew/

"What's New" is a summary of selected recent activity in the field of digital preservation, compiled by Deb Woodyard-Robinson for the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC) and Marian Hanley of the National Library of Australia. Items are compiled from the Preserving Access to Digital Information (PADI) Gateway and the digital-preservation and padiforum-l mailing lists, although additional or related items of interest may also be included.

Issue 11 features news on projects funded by the Digital Curation Centre, the Museums, Libraries and Archives Council (UK), Digital Preservation Coalition, (DPC),  Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration (US), Long-Lived Data Collections Task Force (US),  Center for International Earth Science Information Network, the Daniel Langlois Foundation for Art, Science and Technology (Canada) and the National Consultation on Access to Scientific Research Data (Canada).

The bulletin also includes summaries of recent publications on the themes of digital preservation research and directions, digital preservation readiness, digital repositories, web archiving, e-prints, preservation metadata, standards, personal archiving, storage media and digital preservation training.  Summaries of other selected recent publications and information on past and forthcoming events are also provided.

Best wishes,

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Marian Hanley

PADI Administrator

National Library of Australia

Canberra ACT 2600

AUSTRALIA

padi@nla.gov.au

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