NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS SECTION - Part 2

SEPTEMBER 2006  issue

 Editorial note:

This section contains items culled from various Internet news services, discussion lists and other announcements.  Unless specifically noted, I have not visited the sites, used any of the software, reviewed the literature, or written the news items.  I present this digest to you in good faith but cannot vouch for the accuracy of its content.

 Kerry Smith

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Internet2 Campus Expectations Task Force Report

asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]       

Tue 25/04/2006 8:10 PM         asis-l@asis.org; sigdl-l@asis.org

[Asis-l] FW: [CNI-ANNOUNCE] Internet2 Campus Expectations TaskForce ReporT

-----Original Message-----

From: CNI-ANNOUNCE -- News from the Coalition [mailto:CNI-ANNOUNCE@cni.org] On Behalf Of Clifford Lynch

Sent: Monday, April 24, 2006 8:36 PM

To: CNI-ANNOUNCE -- News from the Coalition

Subject: [CNI-ANNOUNCE] Internet2 Campus Expectations Task Force Report

The report of the Internet2 Campus Expectations Task Force is now available. See the announcement from Laurie Burns at I2 below. This is a very valuable report that I think can serve as a basis for important conversations with senior campus leadership and the broad campus community about roles, priorities and commitments for advanced information technology/cyberinfrastructure  in advancing the missions of the academy.

Note there's a webcast from the Internet2 meeting on Tuesday, April

25 discussing the report.

Clifford Lynch

Director, CNI

----------------------------------------

Dear Colleagues,

The Campus Expectations Task Force (CETF) was convened in February

2005 under the auspices of the Advisory Councils of Internet2, led by the Applications Strategy Council and the Network Planning and Policy Advisory Council.  The task force was asked to articulate a current set of expectations for what it means to be an Internet2 member campus, in light of the Internet2 community's goal to promote and enable advanced applications to further research and education.

Under the leadership of Bill Decker, Senior Associate Vice President for Research, University of Iowa, CETF members created a set of recommendations that illustrate how Internet2 member campuses can most effectively pursue the collaborative work that will enable higher ed to remain on the leading edge in today's international research and education environments.  By agreeing to strive for compliance in three areas: innovation, shared infrastructure, and community--member campuses demonstrate their mutual commitment to community and realize their goals.  To assist campuses in making a self-determination to measure their success in meeting these commitments, CETF proposes a system for self-assessment and promulgating best practices based on the identified areas of commitment.

Bill Decker will make a presentation on the complete recommendations of the CETF to the Internet2 membership during the Spring 2006

Internet2 Member Meeting.  Mr. Decker's presentation will also be netcast live on Tuesday, April 25 from 4:30-5:30pm EDT. See:

http://events.internet2.edu/2006/spring-mm/sessionDetails.cfm?session=2561&e

vent=242

A complete copy of the CETF report is available here:

http://www.internet2.edu/files/CETF-FinalReport.pdf

A full roster of task force members is available on the CETF website:

http://www.internet2.edu/cetf/

Please join us virtually in Arlington!

         Laurie

Laurie Burns

Executive Director, Member and Partner Relations

Internet2

www.internet2.edu

Main:  (734) 913-4251

Cell:  (734) 604-9558

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"ISBD: International Standard Bibliographic Description - 2006 consolidated edition." – review

Judith A Kuhagen [jkuh@loc.gov]          Tue 11/07/2006 1:54 AM           Ifla-l@infoserv.inist.fr

[IFLA-L] Consolidated ISBD - worldwide review

Dear colleagues,

      The IFLA Cataloguing Section invites you to review the draft of "ISBD: International Standard Bibliographic Description - 2006 consolidated edition."

      In the early 1990s, IFLA's Division of Bibliographic Control set up a Study Group on the Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR). Following adoption of the Study Group's recommendations, the ISBD Review Group was charged to initiate a full-scale review of the ISBDs. The objective of this project was to ensure conformity between the provisions of the ISBDs and FRBR's data requirements for the "basic level national bibliographic record" (BLNBR). Work was completed on several of the ISBDs in pursuit of this goal. However, in the course of this project, the ISBD Review Group decided to investigate an alternative approach, one that would concentrate on integration of the various ISBDs into a consolidated edition.

      Consequently, in 2003, the Review Group established the Study Group on Future Directions of the ISBDs. The Study Group determined that it was both feasible and useful to integrate the specialized ISBDs into one ISBD. The primary advantage of having a consolidated ISBD is seen as improved coordination of updating provisions as changes are identified for implementation. A consolidated edition will make it possible to make changes that are applicable to different types of resources and that previously could be made in only one ISBD at a time to apply to all types of resources at the same time. In response, the ISBD Review Group charged the Study Group to proceed to prepare a definitive text, and the result is now ready for World-Wide Review.

      For more information and for a link to the draft, see the invitation to comment posted on IFLANET (http://www.ifla.org/VII/s13/pubs/Invitation4WWreview07-2006.htm).

      Comments are due to Elena Escolano Rodriguez (chair, ISBD Review Group; elena.escolano@bne.es) and Dorothy McGarry (chair, Study Group on Future Directions of the ISBDs; dmcgarry@library.ucla.edu) by October 15, 2006.

            Regards,

                  Judy Kuhagen

                  Chair, Cataloguing Section

Judith A. Kuhagen

Senior Descriptive Cataloging Policy Specialist Cataloging Policy & Support Office Library of Congress Washington, D.C.  20540-4305

202-707-4381

202-707-6629 (fax)

jkuh@loc.gov

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JSTOR Announces "Open Africa" Initiative

Sjoerd Koopman [Sjoerd.Koopman@IFLA.nl]   Fri 14/07/2006 6:28 PM

IFLA-L      [IFLA-L] JSTOR Announces "Open Africa" Initiative

JSTOR Announces "Open Africa" Initiative

JSTOR officials this week announced that "all participation fees" will be waived for the JSTOR archive to any higher education, research, or not-for-profit institution on the continent of Africa. JSTOR will offer African institutions access to its entire archive of online journal literature, which now contains 13 collections, 620 journals, and more than 20 million pages of content. Fees will be waived for a minimum of three years, and will remain waived as long as "economic conditions dictate."

Officials said the Open Africa initiative will apply to both new participants as well as to the 40 institutions in 16 African nations that currently participating in JSTOR. Jason E. Phillips, associate director for International Library Relations at JSTOR called the program a "a small, but important step for JSTOR as we work to fulfil our mission of extending access to the JSTOR archive as broadly as possible."

Library Journal, July 6, 2006

Sjoerd Koopman (Mr)

Co-ordinator of Professional Activities

IFLA Headquarters

P.O. Box 95312

2509 CH The Hague

Netherlands

Phone: +31-70-3140884

Fax:     +31-70-3834827

sjoerd.koopman@ifla.org

www.ifla.org

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Key Cyberinfrastructure Documents and more

asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]        Fri 4/08/2006 8:08 PM            asis-l@asis.org; sigdl-l@asis.org            [Asis-l] FW: [CNI-ANNOUNCE] Key Cyberinfrastructure Documents and more       

[Forwarded.  Dick Hill]

_____

Richard B. Hill

Executive Director

American Society for Information Science and Technology 1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510 Silver Spring, MD  20910

Fax: (301) 495-0810

Voice: (301) 495-0900

-----Original Message-----

From: CNI-ANNOUNCE -- News from the Coalition [mailto:CNI-ANNOUNCE@cni.org] On Behalf Of Clifford Lynch

Sent: Friday, August 04, 2006 2:40 AM

To: CNI-ANNOUNCE -- News from the Coalition

Subject: [CNI-ANNOUNCE] Key Cyberinfrastructure Documents and more

Even though these documents have been out for a few days already, I wanted to be sure that CNI-announce readers were aware of them, as they are very important.

First, the NSF Office of Cyberinfrastructure has released version 7 of its Cyberinfrastructure Vision document, which establishes their agenda for the next few years. While earlier versions of this document have been circulated for public comment, this is the first full version to be available. You can find this at

http://www.nsf.gov/od/oci/ci-v7.pdf

or linked from the main Office of Cyberinfrastructure page at

http://www.nsf.gov/dir/index.jsp?org=OCI

where you can also now find a set of pointers to many of the NSF-sponsored cyberinfrastructure workshops that have taken place over the last few years.

In addition, the American Council of Learned Societies Commission on Cyberinfrastructure in the Humanities has released the final draft of their report, which can be found linked from their page at:

http://www.acls.org/cyberinfrastructure/

This is a major revision of the earlier draft report that was released last year (and discussed at the fall and spring CNI task force meetings, among other venues.) (Disclosure: I serve as an advisor to the Commission.)

In the UK, the Joint Information Systems Committee has released a draft 2007-2009 strategy for comment.  You can find the document, and informaiton on how to submit comments, here:

http://www.jisc.ac.uk/draft_strategy0709.html

I'm not sure these are exactly beach reading, but I hope you find them valuable.

Clifford Lynch

Director, CNI

[Forwarded.  Dick Hill]

_____

Richard B. Hill

Executive Director

American Society for Information Science and Technology 1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510 Silver Spring, MD  20910

Fax: (301) 495-0810

Voice: (301) 495-0900

-----Original Message-----

From: CNI-ANNOUNCE -- News from the Coalition [mailto:CNI-ANNOUNCE@cni.org] On Behalf Of Clifford Lynch

Sent: Friday, August 04, 2006 2:40 AM

To: CNI-ANNOUNCE -- News from the Coalition

Subject: [CNI-ANNOUNCE] Key Cyberinfrastructure Documents and more

Even though these documents have been out for a few days already, I wanted to be sure that CNI-announce readers were aware of them, as they are very important.

First, the NSF Office of Cyberinfrastructure has released version 7 of its Cyberinfrastructure Vision document, which establishes their agenda for the next few years. While earlier versions of this document have been circulated for public comment, this is the first full version to be available. You can find this at

http://www.nsf.gov/od/oci/ci-v7.pdf

or linked from the main Office of Cyberinfrastructure page at

http://www.nsf.gov/dir/index.jsp?org=OCI

where you can also now find a set of pointers to many of the NSF-sponsored cyberinfrastructure workshops that have taken place over the last few years.

In addition, the American Council of Learned Societies Commission on Cyberinfrastructure in the Humanities has released the final draft of their report, which can be found linked from their page at:

http://www.acls.org/cyberinfrastructure/

This is a major revision of the earlier draft report that was released last year (and discussed at the fall and spring CNI task force meetings, among other venues.) (Disclosure: I serve as an advisor to the Commission.)

In the UK, the Joint Information Systems Committee has released a draft 2007-2009 strategy for comment.  You can find the document, and informaiton on how to submit comments, here:

http://www.jisc.ac.uk/draft_strategy0709.html

I'm not sure these are exactly beach reading, but I hope you find them valuable.

Clifford Lynch

Director, CNI

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NCLIS Issues Report from Symposium on Mass Digitization

asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; Richard Hill [rhill@asis.org]        Fri 12/05/2006 11:59 PM        asis-l@asis.org; sigdl-l@asis.org; sigifp-l@asis.org

asis-l@asis.org; sigdl-l@asis.org; sigifp-l@asis.org

From: NCLISMedia-owner@nclis.gov [mailto:NCLISMedia-owner@nclis.gov] On Behalf Of Kim Miller

Sent: Friday, May 12, 2006 11:28 AM

To: NCLISMedia@nclis.gov; NCLIS-COSLA@nclis.gov; commissioners@nclis.gov; FormerCommissioners@nclis.gov; PLRSNet@nclis.gov

Cc: nclisstaff@nclis.gov

Subject: News Release: NCLIS Issues Report from Symposium on Mass Digitization - May 10, 2006

News Release: NCLIS Issues Report from Symposium on Mass Digitization - May 10, 2006, can also be viewed at the following url in pdf format:

http://www.nclis.gov/news/pressrelease/pr2006/MassDigitizationSymposium-repo

rt-2006-8.pdf

********************

News Release

Contact:

Information Officer

1 202 606 9200

info@nclis.gov

For Immediate Release

                             NCLIS Issues Report from Symposium on Mass Digitization

                                 Focus is on Implications for Information Policy

Washington DC May 10, 2006.  The Chairman of the U.S. National Commission on Libraries and Information Science (NCLIS), Dr. Beth Fitzsimmons, announced today the publication of a report from the symposium "Scholarship and Libraries in Transition: A Dialogue about the Impacts of Mass Digitization Projects."  The symposium was held at the University of Michigan on March 10-11, 2006.  The URL for the free 24-page report is http://www.nclis.gov/digitization/MassDigitizationSymposium-Report.pdf.

Persons wishing to request a hard copy of the report may send a request to info@nclis.gov.

The idea for the symposium was inspired by the announcement in December 2004 for a partnership between Google, Inc. and five major research libraries to digitize over 10 million unique titles.  This partnership launched a new era of large-scale digitization heretofore not imagined feasible or affordable.

However, the "Google 5" project has generated many questions about the legal, social, economic, and other impacts of this and similar projects that will inevitably follow Google's lead.  The symposium brought together scholars, librarians, publishers, government leaders to discuss their concerns and issues.  NCLIS co-sponsored the symposium, which was planned and organized by the University of Michigan Library staff and funded mainly by the University of Michigan.

After the symposium, because of their responsibility to address the information and learning needs of the American people, NCLIS Commissioners summed up nine major issues that have information policy implications and connected them to key points made during the symposium.  The nine issues or areas that the Commission identified to have potential impact on national information policy are:

1.    Copyright:  How should important aspects of copyright-fair use,

orphan works, opt-in vs. opt-out models-be handled in digitization projects?

2.    Quality: When is the quality of OCR good enough?  What about quality

of content and authentication?

3.    Libraries: What are the roles and priorities for libraries in the

digital age?

4.    Ownership and preservation:  Who will assume long-term ownership of

books and journals and other media?  Who will take responsibility for long-term preservation of books and journals and other media, and preserving the public record?

5.    Standardization and interoperability:  How can the silos of digital

initiatives communicate with each other?

6.    Publishers:  What are the roles of publishers and booksellers in the

digital age?

7.    Business models:  What business models are needed in the era of mass

digitization? How will the open access movement affect the economics of digitization?

8.    Information literacy: What should be done about information

illiteracy?

9.    Assessment:  What types of assessment are being used?  How will we

know if digitization and electronic access are meeting people's needs?

This report sums up the key points under each of these nine topics and concludes that finding workable solutions will have to involve authors, scholars, publishers, libraries, associations, and government agencies.  The solutions will involve education and awareness, policies, responsibility, standards, quality, cooperation, rights, sustainability, technology, and assessment.

The Webcast of the entire symposium may be found on the symposium Web page:

http://www.lib.umich.edu/mdp/symposium/.

ABOUT NCLIS

The U.S. National Commission on Libraries and Information Science (NCLIS) is a permanent, independent agency of the Federal government charged by Public Law 91-345 to advise the President and Congress on national and international library and information policies, to appraise and assess the adequacies and deficiencies of library and information resources and services, and to develop overall plans for meeting national library and information needs.

# # #

Kim A. Miller

Special Assistant - Technical

U.S. National Commission on Libraries and Information Science 1800 M Street, NW; Suite 350 North Tower Washington, DC 20036-5841 202-606-9200; Fax 202-606-9203 kmiller@nclis.gov www.nclis.gov <http://www.nclis.gov/>

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New Books by Pitt Faculty

Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU]; on behalf of; rjcox111@COMCAST.NET      Sat 2/09/2006 6:17 PM JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU   New Books by Pitt Faculty

New Books by Pitt Faculty

Rush Miller and Amy Knapp, faculty members at the University of Pittsburgh School of Information Sciences (Miller is Hillman University Librarian and Director of the University Library System at the University of Pittsburgh and Professor at SIS; Knapp is Assistant University Librarian at the University of Pittsburgh's University Library Systems and an adjunct faculty member at SIS) are co-authors with Elizabeth J. Wood (Bowling Green State University Library) of a new book on academic libraries.  Entitled Beyond Survival: Managing Academic Libraries in Transition and being published by Libraries Unlimited, the book is described by the publisher as “One part theory (borrowed from business world), one part practice (including detailed case studies of the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Arizona), one part inspiration: Beyond Survival offers ideas about how academic libraries can not only survive in the short term, but take advantage of emergent opportunities by j!

 udiciou

sly adopting the same organizational development tools and concepts espoused by the business world.”  The book’s official publication date is December 30, 2006.

Richard J. Cox, Professor and Chair of the Library and Information Science Program, is co-author with James M. O’Toole of Boston College of a new book published by the Society of American Archivists.  Entitled Understanding Archives and Manuscripts, this volume is a major revision and expansion of the 1990 edition of a book of the same title, and it is the capstone volume in the SAA’s Archival Fundamental Series II.  The book discusses Recording, Keeping, and Using Information; The Nature of Archives and the Archives Profession; The Archivist’s Perspective: Knowledge and Values; The Archivist’s Task: Responsibilities and Duties; Archivists and the Challenges of New Worlds.  The book also includes an extensive Bibliographic Essay. 

--

Richard J. Cox

Professor, Archival Studies

Chair, Library & Information Science Program Chair, Library & Information Science Doctoral Studies School of Information Sciences University of Pittsburgh Editor, Records & Information Management Report Pittsburgh, PA 15260

Voice:  412-624-3245

FAX:    412-648-7001

e-mail: rcox@mail.sis.pitt.edu

homepage: http://www2.sis.pitt.edu/%7Ercox/

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NHPRC Electronic Records Research Fellowship Program - 2006-2007 Fellows

Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU]; on behalf of; Helen Tibbo [tibbo@EMAIL.UNC.EDU]            Tue 8/08/2006 10:31 AM

JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU            NHPRC 2006-2007 Electronic Records Research Fellows Announced

The NHPRC Electronic Records Research Fellowship Program is extremely pleased to announce the 2006-2007 Fellows and their projects:

Daphne Arnaiz-DeLeon, Archives and Historical Services Division Director, New Mexico State Records Center and Archives Global XML Data Model - New Mexico Public Records

Don Chalfant, Archival Electronic Records & Special Media Coordinator, & Kathy Jordan, Electronic Resources Manager, The Library of Virginia Developing Processing Practices and Workflows for Electronic Archival Records

Kathryn Hammond Baker, Manager, Special Collections & Elizabeth Copenhagen, Records Manager, Countway Library, Harvard Medical School Metadata Models for Scientific Research Data

Erin O'Meara, University Records Manager, University of Oregon Libraries A Recordkeeping Framework for Social Scientists Conducting Data-Intensive Research

These researchers will receive $15,000 to conduct their project during the course of the next year. They will present their planned work at the 3rd annual NHPRC Electronic Records Research Symposium, Friday, October 6th at UNC-Chapel Hill and will report their results at the 2007 symposium at UNC next year.

-Helen

Dr. Helen R. Tibbo, Professor

School of Information and Library Science

201 Manning Hall

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3360 tibbo@ils.unc.edu

Tel: 919.962.8063

Fax: 919.962.8071

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On Acquisition and Collection Development - Some Select Titles  / EP2263T*/

kkagencies@vsnl.com; on behalf of; kkagencies [kka1996@vsnl.net]                   Tue 22/08/2006 4:57 PM            On Acquisition and Collection Development - Some Select Titles  / EP2263T*/

Dear Research/Information Specialist:

                                                     T*/Editor's Pick (EP):

2263

Here is a newly-added publication & other allied titles on Acquisition & Collection Development which could be of interest to you. We have a **special discounted price shown in our offer against 'Your Price'

applicable on all orders reaching us till 20 September 2006*:

Also, we _make all shipments by registered AIRMAIL with no additional charges_. You may give a reference to this bulletin while ordering. For ordering details please refer at the end.

JUST OUT!

           ----------------------------------------

Acquisition and Collection Development in Library Science / Edited by Dr.

K. G. Rastogi.  1st ed. New Delhi, Alfa Publications.  2006.  viii, 375 p.

23 cm.

List Price: $ 50.00     Your Price: $ 45.00

ISBN: 8189582305        KK-43734

           ----------------------------------------

"A good librarian keeps in view the need of all the departments of the colleges and the Universities and tries to purchase books for all the concerned departments. A good librarian tries to satisfy every section of the College and the University. A good librarian also needs to identify the needs of various departments and the Colleges and the Universities through personal discussion and through loans. This book dwells on all these aspects of acquisition and collection in the libraries. It is expected that the book will be of sufficient use to libraries and various heads of departments and Government officers who are concerned with the development of libraries."

                                                                               [from Blurb]

                                         Contents

Preface

1. Collection Development Policies

2. Selection Process in Practice

3. Producers of Information Materials

4. Cuyahoga County Public Library

5. Virginia State Library Development Branch

6. Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh

7. New York State Library State Department of Education

8. Fort Vancouver Regional Library

9. Department of Public Libraries City of Virginia Beach

10. Boise Public Library and Information Center

11. Lancaster County Library

Index

"Dr. K. G. Rastogi did his M.A. in Library Science form Sagar University, Madhya Pradesh. Later he did his Ph. D. from Coloumbia University, USA."

                                                                              [from Blurb]

                       ----------------------------------------

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ISBN: 8170003296        KK-16557

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ISBN: 8177551558        KK-14006

7. Information Technology at Work : A Collection of Managerial Experiences / Edited by Shivraj Kanungo.  1st ed. New Delhi, Hindustan Publishing Corporation.  1997.  xxxvi, 268 p. ills. 23 cm.  (Researches in Management in Asia Series - 2).

Proceedings of the National Seminar on Comparative Management of  Information Technology Practices in India, New Delhi, November 1996.

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ISBN: 8170750458        KK-06913

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9. Library Automated Acquisitions / Edited by Shyama Balakrishnan and P. K.

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16. Preservation of Library Collections / Edited by Shyama Balakrishnan and P. K. Paliwal.  1st ed. New Delhi, Anmol Publications Pvt.

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ISBN: 812610886X        KK-15225

17. Problems of Library Acquisitions / Dr. Tariq Ashraf.  1st ed. New Delhi, Anmol Publications Pvt. Ltd.  2004.  xvi, 326 p. ills. 23 cm.

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18. Video Acquisitions and Cataloguing / Edited by Shyama Balakrishnan and P. K. Paliwal.  1st ed. New Delhi, Anmol Publications Pvt.

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ISBN: 8126108991        KK-15511

                       ----------------------------------------

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Libraries & institutions may straight raise their purchase orders thru our website, e-mail, fax or post and pay routinely after receipt of materials & their corresponding invoices.

Individual orders may be pre-paid conveniently thru credit cards or their personal checks drawn in US dollars (favouring <K.K.AGENCIES>) and while so doing kindly select title/s in such a way that a one time order totals US $ 20 or above.

Our comprehensive catalog can be browsed at <www.kkagencies.com>.

We at KK are dedicated to making your experience with us more enjoyable and convenient.

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Open Access to S. R. Ranganathan at dLIST

Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU]; on behalf of; Michael May [MichaelMay.33421981@BLOGLINES.COM]          Tue 11/07/2006 12:46 PM                   JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU          Open Access to S. R. Ranganathan at dLIST

Open Access to S. R. Ranganathan at dLIST

The editors of dLIST, the Digital

Library of Information Science & Technology, are pleased to announce that the dLIST Classics Project has received permission  from the Sarada Ranganathan Endowment for Library Science (SRELS) to provide open electronic access to the following works by S. R. Ranganathan:

Five Laws of Library Science,

1931.

New Education and School Library, 1973.

Philosophy of Library Classification,

1950.

Prolegomena to Library Classification, 3rd ed., 1967.

Classification

and Communication, 1951.

Documentation: Genesis and Development, 1973.

Documentation

and Its Facets, 1963.

Library Book Selection, 2nd ed., 1966.

Reference Service,

2nd ed., 1961.

Shiyali Ramamrita Ranganathan (1892-1972) was a pioneer in the field of Library and Information Science. S.R. Ranganathan's The Five Laws of Library Science, the main premise of which is "books are for use,"

is arguably the most influential work in LIS to date. A preliminary scan of the prefatory matter and first chapter from the original 1931 edition of S.R.

Ranganathan's Five Laws is now available at dLIST:

http://dlist.sir.arizona.edu/1220/

dLIST editors thank the following individuals for making open access to S.R. Ranganathan's works possible: A. Neelameghan, K. N. Prasad, and K. S.

Raghavan (SRELS, Bangalore, India, and Documentation Research & Training Centre, Bangalore), and S. Arunachalam, dLIST Advisory Board Member (MS Swaminathan Research Foundation, Chennai, India).

dLIST is a cross-institutional, subject-based, open access digital archive for the Information Sciences. dLIST Classics is a new project that is making fundamental and leading Library and Information Science texts openly accessible in dLIST. For more information, please visit dLIST at:

http://dlist.sir.arizona.edu/

Michael May

dLIST Classics

Editor

michael.p.may@earthlink.net

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"Strong Copyright + DRM + Weak Net Neutrality = Digital Dystopia?" Preprint

asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; Charles W. Bailey, Jr. [cbailey@uh.edu]           

Thu 4/05/2006 2:39 AM          ASIS-L@asis.org         [Asis-l] "Strong Copyright + DRM + Weak Net Neutrality = Digital Dystopia?" Preprint

A preprint of my "Strong Copyright + DRM + Weak Net Neutrality = Digital Dystopia?" paper is now available.

http://www.digital-scholarship.com/cwb/DigitalDystopia.pdf

It will appear in Information Technology and Libraries 25, no. 3 (2006).

This quote from the paper's conclusion sums it up:

What this paper has said is simply this: three issues--a dramatic expansion of the scope, duration, and punitive nature of copyright laws; the ability of DRM to lock-down content in an unprecedented fashion; and the erosion of Net neutrality--bear careful scrutiny by those who believe that the Internet has fostered (and will continue to foster) a digital revolution that has resulted in an extraordinary explosion of innovation, creativity, and information dissemination. These issues may well determine whether the much-toted "information superhighway" lives up to its promise or simply becomes the "information toll road" of the future, ironically resembling the pre-Internet online services of the past.

For those who want a longer preview of the paper, here's the

introduction:

Blogs. Digital photo and video sharing. Podcasts.

Rip/Mix/Burn. Tagging. Vlogs. Wikis. These buzzwords point to a fundamental social change fueled by cheap PCs and servers, the Internet and its local wired/wireless feeder networks, and powerful, low-cost software:

citizens have morphed from passive media consumers to digital media producers and publishers.

Libraries and scholars have their own set of buzz words:

digital libraries, digital presses, e-prints, institutional repositories, and open access journals to name a few. They connote the same kind of change: a democratization of publishing and media production using digital technology.

It appears that we are on the brink of an exciting new era of Internet innovation: a kind of digital utopia.

Dr. Gary Flake of Microsoft has provided one striking vision of what could be (with a commercial twist) in a presentation entitled "How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Imminent Internet Singularity," and there are many other visions of possible future Internet advances.

When did this metamorphosis begin? It depends on who you ask. Let's say the late 1980's, when the Internet began to get serious traction and an early flowering of noncommercial digital publishing occurred.

In the subsequent twenty-odd years, publishing and media production went from being highly centralized, capital-intensive analog activities with limited and well-defined distribution channels to being diffuse, relatively low-cost digital activities with the global Internet as their distribution medium. Not to say that print and conventional media are dead, of course, but it is clear that their era of dominance is waning. The future is digital.

Nor is it to say that entertainment companies (e.g., film, music, radio, and television companies) and information companies (e.g., book, database, and serial

publishers) have ceded the digital content battlefield to the upstarts. Quite the contrary.

High-quality thousand-page-per-volume scientific journals and Hollywood blockbusters cannot be produced for pennies, even with digital wizardry. Information and entertainment companies still have an important role to play, and, even if they didn't, they hold the copyrights to a significant chunk of our cultural heritage.

Entertainment and information companies have understood for some time that they must adopt to the digital environment or die, but this change has not always been easy, especially when it involves concocting and embracing new business models. Nonetheless, they intend to thrive and prosper--and to do whatever it takes to succeed. As they should, since they have an obligation to their shareholders to do so.

The thing about the future is that it is rooted in the past. Culture, even digital culture, builds on what has gone before. Unconstrained access to past works helps determine the richness of future works. Inversely, when past works are inaccessible except to a privileged minority, it impoverishes future works.

This brings us to a second trend that stands in opposition to the first. Put simply, it is the view that intellectual works are "property"; that this property should be protected with the full force of civil and criminal law; that creators have perpetual, transferable property rights; and that contracts, rather than copyright law, should govern the use of intellectual works.

A third trend is also at play: the growing use of Digital Rights Management (DRM) technologies. When intellectual works were in paper form (or other tangible forms), they could only be controlled at the object-ownership or object-access levels (a library controlling the circulation of a copy of a book is an example of the second case). Physical possession of a work, such as a book, meant that the user had full use of it (e.g., the user could read the entire book and photocopy pages from it). When works are in digital form and they are protected by some types of DRM, this may no longer true. For example, a user may only be able to view a single chapter from a DRM-protected e-book and may not be able to print it.

The fourth and final trend deals with how the Internet functions at its most fundamental level. The Internet was designed to be content, application, and hardware "neutral." As long as certain standards were met, the network did not discriminate. One type of content was not given preferential delivery speed over another. One type of content was not charged for delivery while another wasn't. One type of content was not blocked (at least by the network) while another wasn't. In recent years, "network neutrality" has come under attack.

The collision of these trends has begun in courts, legislatures, and the marketplace. It is far from over.

As we shall see, it's outcome will determine what the future of digital culture looks like.

--

Best Regards,

Charles

Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Assistant Dean for Digital Library Planning and Development, University of Houston Libraries

E-Mail: cbailey@digital-scholarship.com

Publications: http://www.digital-scholarship.com/

(Provides access to DigitalKoans, Open Access Bibliography, Open Access Webliography, Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography, Scholarly Electronic Publishing Weblog, and others)

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UC libraries partner with Google to digitize books UC becomes the newest partner in the Google books library project

H-Net Network on Information and Information Institutions [H-INFO@H-NET.MSU.EDU]; on behalf of; Matthew Gilmore [vp-net@MAIL.H-NET.MSU.EDU]  Sat 19/08/2006 5:20 AM H-INFO@H-NET.MSU.EDU        

ANN: UC libraries partner with Google to digitize books

Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2006

Jennifer Colvin, California Digital Library (510) 287-3384 jennifer.colvin@ucop.edu

UC libraries partner with Google to digitize books UC becomes the newest partner in the Google books library project

The University of California libraries today (Wednesday) announced their partnership with Google to digitize books from the libraries' collections.

UC becomes the latest partner in the Google Books Library Project, which was launched in December 2004 to digitize books drawn from the libraries of the University of Michigan, Harvard University, Stanford University, Oxford University, and the New York Public Library.

The digitized books will be searchable through Google Book Search. Google respects copyright law and has specifically designed Book Search to comply with it. Anyone will be able to freely view, browse and read UC's public domain books, including many of the treasures in the libraries' historic and special collections.

For books protected by copyright, users just get basic background (such as the book's title and the author's name), at most a few lines of text related to their search, and information about where they can borrow or buy the book.

If publishers or authors don't want to have their books digitized, they will be excluded.

"The digitization project furthers UC's mission," said UC President Robert C. Dynes. "It greatly expands our ability to give scholars and the public access to the kinds of information and ideas that drive scholarly innovation and public knowledge and discourse."

"The academic enterprise is fundamentally about discovery," said John Oakley, chair of UC's systemwide Academic Senate and a UC Davis law professor. "We contribute to it immeasurably by unlocking the wealth of information maintained within our libraries and exposing it to the latest that search technologies have to offer.

"In this new world, our faculty, staff and students will make connections between information and ideas that were hitherto inaccessible, driving the pace of scholarly innovation, and enhancing the use that is made of our great libraries."

Brian E. C. Schottlaender, university librarian at UC San Diego, said the project will contribute significantly to the management of library collections that are built and maintained in the public trust.

"Tens of thousands of volumes entrusted to our care are printed on acid-rich paper and are crumbling into dust. In fact, all our holdings are chronically at risk, residing as they do in seismically unstable California."

"Anyone who doubts the potential impact that natural disaster can have, need look no further than the devastation wrought by Hurricane Katrina on our sister libraries in Louisiana and Mississippi. Digital copies tucked away safely in a preservation archive would have saved those libraries -- and indeed, the world -- from irrecoverable loss."

"Our library partners share our mission to help users all over the world discover the great works of history and culture -- simply by searching online," said Susan Wojcicki, vice president, Product Management at Google. "We're thrilled to begin working with the University of California libraries to include their incredible collection in Google Book Search."

Wyatt R. Hume, UC executive vice president and provost, said, "The Google partnership promises enormous benefits to the University of California and the communities it serves. Amongst them, of course, is the free and unfettered full-text access we can provide to our public domain holdings.

For a great civic institution of higher learning such as ours, the decision to join the Google library partnership was the right thing to do."

About the University of California libraries

More than 100 libraries on the 10 University of California campuses support the university's mission of teaching, research and public service.

Collectively, they comprise the largest research/academic library in the world and, with the California Digital Library, have taken a leadership role harnessing technology in support of new and innovative forms of scholarly communication.

# # #

Note:

response

from the Television Archiving blog

www.archival.tv

Google “Showtimes” the UC Library System August 13th, 2006

The University of California’s secret agreement with Google for book digitization promises to improve access to parts of its library collections, but the contractual restrictions UC has accepted may enrich Google’s shareholders at public expense. 

Digitizing the world’s books, films, video, sound recordings, maps, and other cultural artifacts could, to quote Internet Archive founder Brewster Kahle, provide “universal access to all human knowledge, within our lifetime.” So it’s troubling to see public institutions transfer cultural assets, accumulated with public funds, into private hands without disclosing the terms of the transaction.

Basic principles to govern mass digitization and safeguard the public interest have been developed by members of the American Library Association (forthcoming; see also http://litablog.org/?p=200), and by the Open Content Alliance. UC even signed on to the OCA principles

(disclosure: I’ve worked for the OCA), which are designed to provide a baseline for digitization projects, in its scanning agreements with Yahoo and Microsoft. Transparency is a primary value to both the OCA, and the ALA.

So problem one is that the terms of the UC / Google agreement are secret, and were arrived at with no public input. As an institution that receives state and federal funding, UC should expect and welcome public comment if its inventory is effectively being privatized. The president’s office says it expects that terms will only come out after it receives the equivalent of a FOIA request. Since when does it take a FOIA request to get information from the library?

But it isn’t just the public that is excluded–it’s the rest of the library community. Mass digitization is very complex (see Paul Courant’s brilliant new article in First Monday). Librarians must grapple with new and unfamiliar issues that can only be resolved through dialog with peers.

Google appears to be doing all it can to prevent this from happening, imposing NDAs on libraries at the start of discussions about mass digitization. By isolating librarians from each other, Google dramatically strengthens its negotiating position, and UC negates the goal of academic openness.

The second problem is more complex. Mass digitization is expensive. Public institutions that wish to digitize their holdings usually need to partner with private firms to get the work done. As described in Marketing Culture in the Digital Age, funded by the Mellon Foundation, and written by my colleague Peter Kaufman of Intelligent Television, commercial investment in digitization can be good for all concerned.

But private companies, at least profitable ones like Google, don’t work for free. So the public institutions need to pay for those services.

Typically, they can’t pay in cash, so they pay in other ways, with labor, facilities, and some type of rights agreement. In other words, public use of and access to the digitized cultural works is usually limited in some way to benefit the private firm. This has to be done in the open.

The recent Smithsonian/Showtime agreement is a case in point that clearly shows what can go wrong in such a process. To recap, Showtime convinced the Smithsonian to sign a secret 170 page, 30 year agreement which gives Showtime control of the Smithsonian’s film and video archive. This particular saga has been widely covered elsewhere, but the roots of catastrophe are in 1) secret negotiations 2) exclusivity 3) length of term.

UC’s agreement is probably not explicitly exclusive. But as a practical matter, scanning doesn’t happen twice; libraries learned this when their material was microfilmed (as an aside, the microfilming was sometimes done badly, and to this day microfilm users suffer from those quality problems). This deal will be costly for UC in staff time and other resources, and the chances that another vendor will come through and duplicate the work are slim.

In the absence of the text of the agreement, it’s difficult to know what specific clauses may affect the ability of California citizens to read online the books now in their libraries. But there is a plausible nightmare scenario that UC needs to act now to prevent.

From the University of Michigan agreement (obtained only as a result of public records laws in Michigan, and despite Google’s best efforts) it is clear there will be restrictions on what UC can do with the digital scans.

This is a critical issue. If this deal follows the pattern at Michigan, there will be limits determined by Google on how UC may share its digital holdings with other libraries.

If the scanning process is made efficient at all the universities now in Google’s orbit, a book already scanned at Harvard won’t be rescanned at Berkeley. So Berkeley may not receive a copy, and because of the restrictions on sharing its holdings, won’t have an easy time getting one from Harvard. The student of 2012 will have a choice: go to the complete digital library, owned by Google, or go to the partial digital library of his or her own university.

That extreme scenario may not come to pass, but there are many other questions about the Google / UC deal:

* What more might UC be able to do if its scanning project were funded by the legislature or foundations, rather than by Google?

* UC says the “digitized books will be searchable through Google Book Search.” Can anyone else build services that access this data? Or is it another case of “Google can crawl everyone else’s data, no one can crawl Google’s data?”

* What quality assurances will Google provide? How can we ensure this won’t be a repeat of the microfilm experience?

* Will UC have copies of the full, high quality scans, or will certain information, such as image positioning data needed for searching, be kept by Google alone?

* What restrictions will be placed on UC’s use of those scans?

* What will be the different treatments for material in copyright, or orphaned, or in the public domain?

* Is it reasonable to ask the public to pay a second time (or watch ads) for material already purchased, simply because it’s now necessary to convert the format in which it is stored?

* Why haven’t the Regents appointed a panel of advisors on this matter?

Clearly, UC’s high level goals are laudable. The Google people I’ve met believe in the company motto, “don’t be evil.” And it is not really in the public interest to side with the publishers who are the loudest voices now attacking Google, and a primary cause of the all the secrecy. Yet by acquiescing to Google’s demands for secrecy, UC has compromised the public interest, and set a dangerous precedent for the rest of the academic community.

--

Matthew Gilmore

H-Net Vice President, Networks

H-Net: Humanities & Social Sciences Online

202-459-7372

http://www.h-net.org

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