NEWS FROM OTHER JOURNALS SECTION

MARCH 2007  ISSUE

 Editorial note:

This section contains items culled from various Internet news services, discussion lists and other announcements.  Unless specifically noted, I have not visited the sites, used any of the software, reviewed the literature, or written the news items.  I present this digest to you in good faith but cannot vouch for the accuracy of its content.  

Kerry Smith

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AoIR Newsletter

First issue

asis-l-bounces@asis.org; on behalf of; Michel J. Menou [Michel.Menou@wanadoo.fr]             Mon 22/01/2007 11:19 PM                        asis-l@asis.org; eurchap; Euro_Student_ASIST@yahoogroups.com                 [Asis-l] Fwd.: Association of Internet Researchers starts a Biannual  Newsletter

 Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2007 18:59:40 -0000

 From: "O'Riordan, Kate" <k.oriordan@lancaster.ac.uk>

 Subject: [Air-l] Welcome to the first AoIR Newsletter!

 To: <air-l@listserv.aoir.org>

 Dear AoIR-L

 I would like to offer a very warm welcome to you all to the first edition of the AoIR Newsletter which is now available on the AoIR web site here:

 http://aoir.org/newsletter/

 I hope you will all be able to find time to take a look at this and that you find the first edition useful and enjoyable. 

 I would like to thank everyone on the existing newsletter team for all their hard work - and to thank the contributors to the current issue - as well as the exec for their support.  Like almost all AoIR activity this was developed by a collective of volunteers who put in lots of time and effort. 

 This newsletter is primarily is intended to be a resource for AoIR members and for there to be collective ownership of it, and we hope will it will develop these aims further over time. The first issue focuses on the last conference although this kind of focus will no doubt change in the future.

 Please let me know if you find this useful and enjoyable, but also feel free to let me know how we could do better next time too!  If you would like to contribute to future editions, and if you have comments about the structure, content or anything else please contact me.  The newsletter team is open to more volunteers and feedback and content for the next edition is welcome!

 Many, many thanks to the current team - Karine Barzilai-Nahon; Sandra Bavasso Roffo; Mark Bell; Andrew Cox; Eliezer Ferreira; Deanya Lattimore; Denise Rall; Pedro Oiarzabal; Jamie Switzer; Monica Whitty.

 Welcome again and I hope you all find this enjoyable, I look forward to feedback and contributions in the future.

 All the best

 Kate O'Riordan

  University of Sussex and CESAGen

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Ariadne

Autumn Issue no.49

Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU]; on behalf of; Richard Waller [lisrw@UKOLN.AC.UK]                    Fri 3/11/2006 11:36 PM

PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU                      Re: Autumn Issue 2006  of Ariadne now available

The Autumn Issue no.49 of Ariadne is now available:

http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/

Main Articles in Issue 49:

*Creative Commons Licences in Higher and Further Education:

Do We Care?

-Naomi Korn and Charles Oppenheim discuss the history and merits of using Creative Commons licences while questioning whether these licences are indeed a panacea.

*From Nought to a Thousand: The HUSCAP Project -SUZUKI Masako and SUGITA Shigeki describe Hokkaido University's efforts to populate its institutional repository with journal articles.

*Considering a Marketing and Communications Approach for an Institutional Repository -Heleen Gierveld proposes a market-oriented approach to increase the rate of deposit to an institutional repository.

*e-Books for the Future: Here but Hiding?

-Brian Whalley outlines some developments in e-book technologies and links them to existing ways of presenting textbook information.

*GROW: Building a High-quality Civil Engineering Learning Object Repository and Portal -Yan Han provides a general overview of the Geotechnical, Rock and Water Digital Library (GROW), a learning object repository and peer-reviewed civil engineering Web portal.

*Wiki or Won't He? A Tale of Public Sector Wikis -Marieke Guy revisits a topic receiving considerable attention these days and reflects on wiki use by public organisations.

*Video Streaming of Events

-Greg Tourte and Emma Tonkin describe the set-up and use of video streaming technology at the IWMW 2006 event.

*RDA: A New International Standard

-Ann Chapman describes work on the new cataloguing code, Resource Description and Access (RDA), based on the Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules (AACR).

*Search Engines: Is Google Building on Shaky Foundations?

-Phil Bradley takes an in-depth look at Google and its competition and wonders if things are looking slightly worrying for the search giant.

Workshop and Conference Reports: At the Event:

*DC 2006: Metadata for Knowledge and Learning -Julie Allinson, Rachel Heery, Pete Johnston and Rosemary Russell report on DC 2006, the sixth international conference on Dublin Core and Metadata Applications, held 3 - 6 October 2006.

*e-Collaboration Workshop: Access Grid, Portals and other VREs for the Social Sciences -Rob Allan, Rob Crouchley and Michael Daw cover a one-day workshop reporting on the latest developments in e-Collaboration technology and applications.

*Immaculate Catalogues, Indexes and Monsters Too..

-David E. Bennett reports on the three day residential CILIP Cataloguing and Indexing Group Annual Conference, University of East Anglia, during September 2006.

*Workshop on e-Research, Digital Repositories and Portals -Rob Allan, Rob Crouchley and Caroline Ingram report on a two-day workshop held at University of Lancaster over 6-7 September 2006.

Ariadne Reviews:

*Essential Law for Information Professionals -Stuart Hannabuss picks another winner but wonders whether legal essentialism is enough for information professionals.

*Ambient Findability

-Emma Tonkin reviews a book with interesting content despite a few rough edges.

*Teach Beyond Your Reach

-Lina Coelho looks at this Instructor's guide to developing and running successful distance learning classes, workshops, training sessions and more.

- plus the Ariadne newsline of events and news items.

Note that since issue 47 the content of the current issue is also available as an RSS feed.

Contributions to Ariadne issue 50 are being arranged and prepared; please send proposals for articles to me at our regular contact point:

ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk

Kindly send books for review to the Editor's address (below).

Best regards,

--

Richard Waller

Editor Ariadne

UKOLN

The Library

University of Bath

Bath BA2 7AY

UK

tel +44 (0) 1225 383570

fax +44 (0) 1225 386838

email ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk

web http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/

web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/

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Issue no.50, 30 January 2007

Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU]; on behalf of; Richard Waller [lisrw@UKOLN.AC.UK]         

Sat 3/02/2007 12:38 AM        PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU        Ariadne Issue no.50 was published on 30 January 2007

Ariadne Issue no.50 was published on 30 January 2007 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/

Main Articles

*ONIX for Licensing Terms: Standards for the Electronic Communication of Usage Terms

- Francis Cave, Brian Green and David Martin describe the purpose, development and potential of standards for the electronic communication of licensing terms between publishers, libraries and other licensees.

*What Happens When We Mash the Library?

- Paul Miller looks at recent attempts to make library resources more appealing, including the Talis competition to build library mashups in which a large number of US and Canadian entrants took part.

*A Dublin Core Application Profile for Scholarly Works

- Julie Allinson, Pete Johnston and Andy Powell describe a Dublin Core

  application profile for describing scholarly works that makes use of FRBR and the DCMI Abstract Model.

*Models of Early Adoption of ICT Innovations in Higher Education

- Melanie Bates, Sue Manuel and Charles Oppenheim provide an overview of some considerations for change agents attempting to introduce an innovative new information communication technology service into Higher Education institutions.

*Web Curator Tool

- Philip Beresford tells the story (from The British Library's

perspective) of the development of new software to aid all stages of harvesting Web sites for preservation.

*New Search Engines in 2006

- Phil Bradley takes a look at some of the search engines that he noticed in 2006 and provides quick assessments.

*Collecting Born Digital Archives at the Wellcome Library

- Chris Hilton and Dave Thompson discuss plans for work with born digital archival material at the Wellcome Library.

*Limits to Information Transfer: The Boundary Problem

- Jon E. Lervik, Mark Easterby-Smith, Kathryn Fahy and Carole Elliott discuss the challenges in integrating knowledge across boundaries between specialised knowledge communities within an organisation.

At the Event

*Take a Peek Beneath the EPrints v3 Wrappers With v3 officially launched at the Open Repositories Conference in San Antonio last week, William Nixon and Peter Millington report on the EPrints 3 pre-launch briefing in London, 8 December 2006.

*Wikido: Exploiting the Potential of Wikis

- Marieke Guy reports on a one-day workshop, held in Birmingham in November 2006, which took a closer look at the potential of Wikis for educational institutions.

*JISC CETIS Conference, 2006

Paul Walk reports on the third annual CETIS conference held in Salford, Manchester, over 14 -15 November 2006.

*2nd International DCC Conference 2006:

  Digital Data Curation in Practice

- Alexander Ball and Manjula Patel provide an overview of the second annual conference of the Digital Curation Centre.

*Cultural Heritage Online: The Challenge of Accessibility and Preservation

- Alastair Dunning reports on a conference in Florence about the preservation and accessibility of cultural heritage material.

Ariadne Reviews

*Digital Libraries: Integrating Content and Systems

- Chris Awre finds a useful toolset to guide librarians and LIS students on the future use of IT to deliver their services.

*Digital Preservation

- Maureen Pennock reviews a recent release in Facet's Digital Futures series.

*Google Hacks

- Phil Bradley looks at a work offering programming know-how to create resources that will do things with the search engine that might otherwise prove difficult or impossible.

*Stephen Johnson on Digital Photography

- Nigel Goldsmith reviews a new book on digital photography by the accomplished American landscape photographer Stephen Johnson.

Plus News and Events from the Ariadne Newsline

Note that since issue 47 the content of the current issue is also available as an RSS feed.

Contributions to Ariadne issue 51 are being arranged and prepared; please send proposals for articles to me at our regular contact point:

ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk

Kindly send books for review to the Editor's address (below).

Best regards,

--

Richard Waller

Editor Ariadne

UKOLN

The Library

University of Bath

Bath BA2 7AY

UK

tel +44 (0) 1225 383570

fax +44 (0) 1225 386838

email ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk

web http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/

web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/

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Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science

Call for Papers

Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU]; on behalf of; Heidi Julien [Heidi.Julien@UALBERTA.CA]                      Wed 15/11/2006 4:51 AM

JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU                      Call for Papers – CJILS

Call for Papers

Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science

The Global Challenge of Information Literacy

In his speech to the 1999 graduating class at the University of Toronto, Anthony Comper, then President of the Bank of Montreal, stated: “Whatever else you bring to the 21st century workplace, however great your technical skills and however attractive your attitude and however deep your commitment to excellence, the bottom line is that to be successful, you need to acquire a high level of information literacy. What we need in the knowledge industries are people who know how to absorb and analyze and integrate and create and effectively convey information­and who know how to use information to bring real value to everything they undertake.”

Indeed, full engagement in our “information society” is impossible without some level of information literacy. Success in school, postsecondary education, the workplace, and everyday life is dependent to some degree on information literacy. This dependency crosses all geographic and demographic contexts; information literacy truly is a global concern.

However, information literacy is a complex and often misunderstood concept, encompassing a range of skills, processes, attitudes, and understandings about information.

As Shapiro and Hughes (1996) note, “… information literacy should … be conceived … as a new liberal art that extends from knowing how to use computers and access information to critical reflection on the nature of information itself, its technical infrastructure, and its social, cultural and even philosophical context and impact - as essential to the mental framework of the educated information-age citizen as the trivium of basic liberal arts (grammar, logic and rhetoric) was to the educated person in medieval society.”

Given the recognized importance of information literacy, what is its place on the policy agenda? What are the outstanding theoretical issues with respect to information literacy that should be debated? Who is being tasked with developing information literacy among citizens, and how are these efforts being resourced and promoted? Many stakeholders have responsibility for information literacy promotion and education, including governments, librarians, teachers, and parents­how should relationships among these various groups be managed? What are best practices for information literacy instruction? How can we effectively measure the impact of education for information literacy?

Articles related to any aspect of information literacy are invited for Vol. 32, Number 1 (Winter 2008) of the Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science (CJILS). The deadline for submission is June 29, 2007. Complete manuscripts of approximately 5000 words should be sent to Heidi Julien, School of Library & Information Studies, University of Alberta, 3-20 Rutherford South, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2J4. For manuscript guidelines please refer to “Notice to Contributors” which is included in each issue of the CJILS and on the journal’s website ( http://www.cais-acsi.ca/journal/guidelines.htm <http://www.cais-acsi.ca/journal/guidelines.htm> ).

*****************************************

Heidi Julien, Ph.D.

School of Library and Information Studies University of Alberta 3-20 Rutherford South, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J4

Ph: 780 492 3934  Fax: 780 492 2430

Email: Heidi.Julien@ualberta.ca

Web: http://www.ualberta.ca/~hjulien/heidi.htm <http://www.ualberta.ca/~hjulien/heidi.htm>

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Current Cites

November 2006

Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU]; on behalf of; Roy Tennant [roy.tennant@UCOP.EDU]                              Wed 6/12/2006 9:22 AM

PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU                                  [CurrentCites] Current Cites, November 2006

Current Cites <http://lists.webjunction.org/currentcites/>

    Current Cites, November 2006

        Edited by Roy Tennant <http://roytennant.com/>

http://lists.webjunction.org/currentcites/2006/cc06.17.11.html

*Contributors: Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

<http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm>, Leo Robert Klein <http://leoklein.com/>, Roy Tennant <http://roytennant.com/>*

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igital Library Federation/Aquifer Implementation Guidelines for Shareable MODS Records <http://www.diglib.org/aquifer/dlfmodsimplementationguidelines_finalnov2006.

pdf>///

Washington, DC: Digital Library Federation, November 2006.(http://www.diglib.org/aquifer/dlfmodsimplementationguidelines_finalnov

2006.pdf).

- Although this document is specifically aimed at participants in the Digital Library Federation Aquifer project <http://www.diglib.org/aquifer/>, it is chock full of good advice for any organization wanting to expose or share their metadata to other institutions -- for example, via the Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting <http://openarchives.org/> (OAI-PMH). Note, however, that this document is quite specific to how metadata should be encoded using the Metadata Object Description Schema <http://www.loc.gov/standards/mods/> (MODS) format. Related (and more generally applicable) work can be found at the Digital Library Federation and NSDL OAI and Shareable Metadata Best Practices Working Group <http://oai-best.comm.nsdl.org/> web site. - RT <http://roytennant.com/>

Brogan, Martha L. /Contexts and Contributions: Building the Distributed Library <http://www.diglib.org/pubs/dlf106/>///  Washington, DC: Digital Library Federation, November 2006.(http://www.diglib.org/pubs/dlf106/).

- This rather massive report (the PDF version runs 282 pages) covers a lot of ground. This is at it should be, since these days there are a very large number of potentially interesting digital library projects.

But therein also lies the difficulty. Although the broad sweep that Brogan lays out for us is amazing in itself, it is deucedly difficult to draw any generalized conclusions from such an exercise. There are many threads of activity that are advancing at varying rates of speed and with sometimes parallel, sometimes congruent, and sometimes tangential arcs. Making sense of all this is perhaps an exercise in frustration, at least for those of puny intellect such as myself. Nope, probably best to look at it as a wild ride through an amazing array of interesting projects and glean from it what you can. My guess is that like the blind men encountering the elephant, our perception of this report will depend greatly on the part to which we affix our grasp. Full disclosure: a couple projects in which I am a participant or manager are highlighted.

- RT <http://roytennant.com/>

Frumkin, Jeremy. "In Our Cages with Golden Bars"  /OCLC Systems & Services/ <http://www.emeraldinsight.com/oclc.htm>

22(4)(2006): 247-248. - This is a short piece about doing away with the "golden bars" of a cage that Frumkin believes we impose on ourselves when developing new systems. It's about expertise and where to position it. As Frumkin says, "We need to forgo our own need to push our library expertise onto our users, and instead use that expertise to do the heavy lifting for our users." - LRK <http://leoklein.com/>

Gierveld, Heleen. "Considering a Marketing and Communications Approach for an Institutional Repository <http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/gierveld/>"  /Ariadne/ <http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/>  (49)(October 2006)(http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/gierveld/). - Anyone who has been involved with an institutional repository project knows that you can build it, but it doesn't mean they will come. The technical hurdles are nothing compared to getting people to actually deposit content in it. So this article by Gierveld is useful and timely, in that the number of institutions creating repositories is already large and is increasing.

Gierveld offers the "8 P's" strategy of marketing: Product, Price, Promotion, Place, Public, Partnership, Policy, and Purse String. For each of these, she offers examples specific to an institutional repository, and follows up with specific marketing strategies institutions can take to increase the take up and use of their repository. Recommended reading for any institution that has a repository or is hoping to create one. - RT <http://roytennant.com/>

McDonald, Robert H., and Chuck  Thomas. "Disconnects between Library Culture and Millennial Generation Values <http://www.educause.edu/apps/eq/eqm06/eqm0640.asp?bhcp=1>"  /EDUCAUSE Quarterly/ <http://www.educause.edu/apps/eq/index.asp>

29(4)(2006): 4-6.

(http://www.educause.edu/apps/eq/eqm06/eqm0640.asp?bhcp=1). - Are research libraries reaching Millennials? The authors don't think so, and they examine how current library cultural values, technologies, and policies are barriers to libraries seizing new opportunities to serve this important user group. For example, they note: "Dogmatic library protection of privacy inhibits library support for file-sharing, work-sharing, and online trust-based transactions that are increasingly common in online environments, thus limiting seamless integration of Web-based services." Whether you agree or not, this article is worth a read. - CB <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm>

Sale, Arthur. "The Patchwork Mandate <http://eprints.utas.edu.au/410/>"

/UTas ePrints/ <http://eprints.utas.edu.au/> (2006)(http://eprints.utas.edu.au/410/). - You can't get your university administration to mandate deposit of e-prints in your institutional repository. There are voluntary deposit strategies, but Sale notes: "The 'everything else' policies are not worth talking about for long. In the absence of mandates, every encouragement policy known to Man fails to convince more than 15% to 20% of researchers to invest the 5 minutes of time needed to deposit their publications. The percentage does not grow with time." What to do? The answer: work to get departmental mandates. - CB <http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm>

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December 2006

Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU]; on behalf of; Roy Tennant [roy.tennant@UCOP.EDU]           

Thu 21/12/2006 2:49 AM        PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU        [CurrentCites] Current Cites, December 2006

[1]Current Cites

Current Cites, December 2006

Edited by [2]Roy Tennant

       http://lists.webjunction.org/currentcites/2006/cc06.17.12.html

   Contributors: [3]Charles W. Bailey, Jr., [4]Leo Robert Klein, [5] Roy

   Tennant

            _____________________________________________________

   Editor's Note: I can't let it go by without remarking that this month's

   issue of RLG DigiNews announces the end, with the February 2007 issue,

   of the long-standing collaboration between the Cornell University

   Library and the Research Libraries Group (now part of OCLC) to produce

   that publication. As they say in their [6]message to readers DigiNews

   will continue to be published by the OCLC Office of Programs and

   Research, but without the collaboration of the Cornell University

   Library. Anne R. Kenney deserves a great deal of credit for the

   reputation that this publication has achieved, as do her Cornell

   colleagues who have had their excellent work cited here and elsewhere.

   Thank you!

   Coyle, Karen. "[7]Mass Digitization of Books"  [8]The Journal of

   Academic Librarianship  32(6)(November 2006): 641-645.

   (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6W50-4M877GM-1/2/9167396

   7ebebaf384a277c5579164041). - A very well done overview of mass and

   near-mass digitization of books by Google, the Open Content Alliance,

   Microsoft, Project Gutenberg, and many library-based projects. Coyle

   touches on issues such as workflow, output and book structure, user

   interface, standards, preservation, and scoping the project. If you're

   interested in this topic, this is the single best overview currently

   available. Highly recommended. - [9]RT

   Edwards, Cliff , and Moon  Ihlwan. "[10]Upward Mobility"

   [11]BusinessWeek  (4 December 2006): 68-82.

   (http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/06_49/b4012071.htm?chan=t

   op+news_top+news+index_technology). - If you think that the US is full

   of mobile communications junkies now, just wait. South Korea and Japan

   are leading the way to a new level of mobile service, and Motorola

   Chief Executive Ed Zander has taken to calling handsets "the device

   formerly known as the cell phone." The technological keys to this new

   kingdom will be WiMAX, fuel cell batteries, OLED screens, and

   near-field communications. Say what? Read the article to find out what

   these terms mean. - [12]CB

   Entlich, Richard. "[13]The Missing Dimension in Web-based Museum

   Exhibitions: Obstacles to Adding Depth to Digital Data"  [14]RLG

   DigiNews  10(6)(15 December

   2006)(http://www.rlg.org/en/page.php?Page_ID=20999#article5). - This

   "FAQ" feature in RLG DigiNews "provides a brief discussion about the

   development of 3D technology on the World Wide Web, its adoption by

   museums, and the obstacles that continue to keep the creation,

   dissemination, and management of 3D imagery via the Web from becoming a

   fully mainstreamed activity." It provides a useful summary of 3D

   technologies such as VRML, QuickTime-VR, Shockwave3D, and others, along

   with examples of them in use. Although there have been various

   obstacles to the wide adoption of 3D technologies, the piece ends on a

   hopeful note with standards being solidified, high-capacity networks

   more widespread, and end-user computers gaining in capability for

   graphic rendering. - [15]RT

   Holt, Glen E. "[16]Fitting Library Services Into the Lives of the

   Poor"  [17]Bottom Line  19(4)(2006): 179-186.

   (http://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=A

   rticle&contentId=1576561). - As the title suggests, this relatively

   short article looks at delivering library services to the poor. This is

   the very definition of an underserved and underprivileged user group.

   For this reason, it's not enough to put library services on offer but

   rather to reach out and accommodate as much as possible the particular

   needs of low-income users. Hence the word "fitting" in the title. The

   author suggests a number of ways of doing this: convenient hours,

   points of service outside of the library, partnerships with other

   community organizations, spreading the word though PSA's and visibility

   at community events. There are limits to how far an institution can go

   but the author strongly suggests that more can be done. - [18]LRK

   Norman, Don. "[19]Simplicity Is Highly Overrated"  [20]JND.org

   (2007)(http://www.jnd.org/dn.mss/simplicity_is_highly.html). - This

   article has been making the rounds. It's by one of the great figures of

   design, Don Norman. His basic message is that cutting down on features

   is a losing proposition, that people want all the bells and whistles. I

   think the perspective is interesting and ought to be understood as a

   reaction to the "KISS" mantra made famous by everyone from usability

   guru Steve Krug to minimalist design firms like 37signals. That said,

   it's hard to say what impact this approach should have on design

   decisions, particularly on the Web. We're not buying products for

   ourselves after all but making them for others. If features in this

   context were so attractive, then 'Advanced Search' would be the first

   stop of even our most neophyte users. - [21]LRK

   Shirky, Clay. "[22]Second Life : A Story Too Good to Check"

   [23]Valleywag  (12 December

   2006)(http://www.valleywag.com/tech/second-life/a-story-too-good-to-che

   ck-221252.php). - A less than enthusiastic appraisal of the virtual

   world known as [24]Second Life. Clay Shirky has been writing about the

   web for at least 10 years and he uses his experience to great effect as

   he challenges the greenhorns in his profession with lines like: "[T]he

   tech beat is an intake valve for the young. Most reporters don't

   remember that anyone has ever wrongly predicted a bright future for

   immersive worlds or flythrough 3D spaces in the past, so they have no

   skepticism triggered by the historical failure of things like LambdaMOO

   or VRML." This wealth of experience makes for an article that

   transcends a critique of a single phenomena, in this case Second Life,

   becoming instead an almost classic deconstruction of (in this case an

   Internet) mania. Having argued that participation in this online

   environment is far less than meets the eye, he concludes with one last

   eminently quotable line, "there's nothing wrong with a service that

   appeals to tens of thousands of people, but in a billion-person

   internet, that population is also a rounding error." - [25]LRK

   Suber, Peter. "[26]Predictions for 2007"  [27]SPARC Open Access

   Newsletter

   (104)(2006)(http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/newsletter/12-02-06.htm#

   predictions). - Peter Suber has issued his 2007 open access

   predictions, and, as usual, they are well worth a read. Among his

   predictions: OA archiving policies by funding agencies and universities

   as well as institutional repositories will be unstoppable trends,

   reluctant publishers will be pushed to allow self-archiving at the same

   time that publishers who already permit it may try to dampen

   self-archiving activity with fees and/or embargoes, and new copyright

   problems will emerge (e.g., "Do machine-generated paraphrases of

   copyrighted texts infringe copyright?"). - [28]CB

   Weber, Jonathan. "[29]Evergreen: Your Homegrown ILS"  [30]Library

   Journal  (15 December

   2006)(http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA6396354.html). - A quiet

   revolution occurred this past Labor Day. Well over 200 Georgia

   libraries, all part of the [31]PINES regional consortium, began using

   an open source integrated library system for the first time. The new

   system, dubbed Evergreen, was built from scratch by PINES programmers.

   The numbers are impressive -- the consortium has over 8 million items

   and over 1.5 million borrowers. Amazing enough, they can handle the

   load with approximately $250,000 of hardware -- which by their

   calculation is only a fraction of what a typical commercial system

   would require. This article by a contributor to the project introduces

   the system, its history, and its potential future. Its future may even

   include you, since it is being released as open source. - [32]RT

     __________________________________________________________________

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   Current Cites - ISSN: 1060-2356 is hosted by the community at

   WebJunction.org.

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References

   1. http://lists.webjunction.org/currentcites/

   2. http://roytennant.com/

   3. http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm

   4. http://leoklein.com/

   5. http://roytennant.com/

   6. http://www.rlg.org/en/page.php?Page_ID=20999#article8

   7.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6W50-4M877GM-1/2/91673967ebeba

f384a277c5579164041

   8. http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jacalib

   9. http://roytennant.com/

  10.

http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/06_49/b4012071.htm?chan=top+new

s_top+news+index_technology

  11. http://www.businessweek.com/index.html

  12. http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm

  13. http://www.rlg.org/en/page.php?Page_ID=20999#article5

  14. http://www.rlg.org/en/page.php?Page_ID=12081

  15. http://roytennant.com/

  16.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Article

&contentId=1576561

  17. http://clorinda.emeraldinsight.com/bl.htm

  18. http://leoklein.com/

  19. http://www.jnd.org/dn.mss/simplicity_is_highly.html

  20. http://jnd.org/

  21. http://leoklein.com/

  22.

http://www.valleywag.com/tech/second-life/a-story-too-good-to-check-221252.p

hp

  23. http://www.valleywag.com/

  24. http://secondlife.com/

  25. http://leoklein.com/

  26. http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/newsletter/12-02-06.htm#predictions

  27. http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/newsletter/archive.htm

  28. http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm

  29. http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA6396354.html

  30. http://www.libraryjournal.com/

  31. http://www.gapines.org/

  32. http://roytennant.com/

  33. http://validator.w3.org/check?uri=referer

  34. http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/check/referer

  35. http://webjunction.org/

  36. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

January 2007

Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU]; on behalf of; Roy Tennant [roy.tennant@UCOP.EDU]                  Thu 1/02/2007 1:25 AM

PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU                      [CurrentCites] Current Cites, January 2007

[1]Current Cites

Current Cites, January 2007

Edited by [2]Roy Tennant

        http://lists.webjunction.org/currentcites/2007/cc07.18.1.html

   Contributors: [3]Leo Robert Klein, Jim Ronningen, [4]Roy Tennant

            _____________________________________________________

   Cochrane, Lynn Scott. "[5]If the Academic Library Ceased to Exist,

   Would We Have to Invent It?"  [6]EDUCAUSE Review

   42(1)(January/February 2007): 6-7.

   (http://www.educause.edu/apps/er/erm07/erm0714.asp). - Nightmare

   scenarios concerning a make-believe College in 2010 that does away with

   its campus library only to find that obtaining research material any

   other way is less reliable and more expensive. While the author focuses

   on materials, thus leaving out such vital services as Reference, she

   still makes a good case that institutions get good value out of their

   libraries and ought to continue supporting them. - [7]LRK

   Coyle, Karen. "[8]Mass Digitization of Books"  [9]The Journal of

   Academic Librarianship  32(6)(November 2006): 641-645.

   (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6W50-4M877GM-1/2/9167396

   7ebebaf384a277c5579164041). - This is a good high-level overview

   article on mass digitization projects such as the Google Library

   project. Mass digitization is contrasted with "non-mass" digitization

   and "large-scale" digitization in addition to issues such as workflow,

   output and book structure, user interface, standards, preservation, and

   scoping. Readers interested in exploring the copyright implications of

   mass digitization should not look here, but rather to the many

   contributions on the topic that can be found almost anywhere you care

   to look. - [10]RT

   Coyle, Karen, and Diane  Hillmann. "[11]Resource Description and Access

   (RDA): Cataloging Rules for the 20th Century"  [12]D-Lib Magazine

   13(1/2)(January/February

   2007)(http://dlib.org/dlib/january07/coyle/01coyle.html). - This

   prosaically titled essay is not the dispassionate exposition of the

   effort to remake the Anglo-American Cataloging Rules (AACR) that you

   might expect. Rather, it is an expos? of a process that appears,

   according to the authors, to be too concerned with an easy transition

   for libraries. Far better, they argue, to forge a new path that is more

   revolutionary (and probably more painful initially) and likely to be

   more effective in an Internet age. "Members of our profession," they

   assert, "who have embraced the present information technologies and are

   looking forward to what the future will bring are particularly dismayed

   at the creation of another set of cataloging rules based on

   technologies that are now decades past." If the future of bibliographic

   description -- or even the future of libraries -- is important to you,

   consider this piece to be your wake-up call. - [13]RT

   Garman, Nancy. "[14]That Was Then -- This Is Now "  [15]ONLINE

   31(1)(January/February

   2007)(http://www.infotoday.com/online/jan07/Garman.shtml). - ONLINE

   celebrates its 30th Anniversary with this trip down Memory Lane by

   Nancy Garman. Important highlights featured in the magazine include the

   introduction of CD-ROMs (1984), expansion of the Internet (1993) and of

   course, the introduction of the World Wide Web (1995). This is just one

   of several articles looking at the magazine's past and the state of

   technology over the 30 years of its existence. - [16]LRK

   Lenhart, Amanda, and Mary  Madden. "[17]Social Networking Websites and

   Teens: An Overview"  [18]Pew Internet & American Life Project  (7

   January 2007

   )(http://www.pewinternet.org/PPF/r/198/report_display.asp). - This

   paper reports on the wide use of "social networks" such as MySpace or

   Facebook by teenagers. Based on survey results, over half of the

   respondents said they had a profile and slightly less than half (48%)

   said they frequented the sites every day. The vast majority of them use

   the sites to "manage their friendships" or in other words to

   communicate with friends. This communication, as the report makes

   clear, takes the form of everything from blog entries and comments to

   in-network email. If ever there were a promising area for library

   outreach, it's this! - [19]LRK

   Markey, Karen. "[20]The Online Library Catalog: Paradise Lost and

   Paradise Regained?"  [21]D-Lib Magazine  13(1/2)(January/February

   2007)(http://dlib.org/dlib/january07/markey/01markey.html). - Markey

   throws down the gauntlet and challenges libraries to remake library

   catalogs partly in the model of Google (embrace "post-Boolean"

   probabilistic searching), partly in the model of classic library

   strategies (embrace subject cataloging), and partly something entirely

   new (expand with qualification metadata). She precedes her proposed

   solution to library catalog woes with a brief litany of failure and an

   examination of why people use Google. Even if you don't agree with all

   of her points, there is plenty to ponder and discuss and (hopefully)

   lead to experimentation and implementation. My only criticism is that

   our gaze needs to encompass more than library catalogs at this point or

   else we're toast before we begin. - [22]RT

   Rethlefsen, Melissa L. "[23]Chief Thingamabrarian"  [24]netConnect

   (Winter 2007)(http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA6403633.html). -

   You probably would have to have been living in a cave to not know about

   [25]LibraryThing.com. So if you have only recently left your mountain

   domicile, stop reading this and go try it out. We'll meet you back here

   when you're done. Yes, that's right, who knew cataloging was fun? And

   that you could actually get just about anyone to do copy cataloging?

   Well, Tim Spaulding knew it, or at least he suspected it, and the

   success of LibraryThing is no small matter. This interview with him

   provides an interesting insight into not just the LibraryThing world,

   but also tagging, potential linkages with library catalogs, and more. -

   [26]RT

   Smith, Susan Sharpless. [27]Web-Based Instruction: a Guide for

   Libraries  Chicago: American Library Association,

   2006.(http://alastore.ala.org/SiteSolution.taf?_sn=catalog2&_pn=product

   _detail&_op=1856). - Broad but not too deep, this is a great first

   resource to turn to for anyone looking at using Web functions for

   library instruction. This second edition has been greatly expanded with

   information about the many developments which arose during the four

   years since the first edition came out, and begins with a new chapter

   on pedagogy and learning styles. The many options to consider

   throughout the entire process which begins with a need and ends with a

   final product are included, with concrete examples given and

   recommended tools named. The lack of depth is a problem with some

   topics which librarians are intensely interested in now, such how we

   can best use web 2.0 spaces: readers find less than a page each for

   blogs and wikis, for example. But the audience for this book is one

   which knows how to get further information, so the quibble is minor. -

   JR

   Toobin, Jeffrey. "[28]Google's Moon Shot"  [29]The New Yorker  (5

   February 2007)

   (http://www.newyorker.com/fact/content/articles/070205fa_fact_toobin).

   - One of the most even-handed and informative articles on the Google

   Library (and Books) Project I've seen. You won't find any major new

   revelations here, but you will find a good overview of some of the

   issues and identification of some of the main players. Unlike many

   accounts that either swallow Google's kool-aid, or else provide

   knee-jerk style objections, Toobin cleaves to the middle in what might

   be considered a picture-perfect example of expository writing. One

   example: after quoting the Google engineer responsible for the scanning

   operation talking about a future where all the world's information is

   available online, Toobin states "Such messianism cannot obscure the

   central truth about Google Book Search: it's a business." Indeed. -

   [30]RT

     __________________________________________________________________

   [31]Valid XHTML 1.0! [32]Valid CSS!

   [33]WebJunction.org

   Current Cites - ISSN: 1060-2356 is hosted by the community at

   WebJunction.org.

   ? Copyright 2006 by Roy Tennant

   [34]Creative Commons License

References

   Visible links

   1. http://lists.webjunction.org/currentcites/

   2. http://roytennant.com/

   3. http://leoklein.com/

   4. http://roytennant.com/

   5. http://www.educause.edu/apps/er/erm07/erm0714.asp

   6. http://www.educause.edu/pub/er/

   7. http://leoklein.com/

   8.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6W50-4M877GM-1/2/91673967ebeba

f384a277c5579164041

   9. http://www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/620207

  10. http://roytennant.com/

  11. http://dlib.org/dlib/january07/coyle/01coyle.html

  12. http://dlib.org/

  13. http://roytennant.com/

  14. http://www.infotoday.com/online/jan07/Garman.shtml

  15. http://www.infotoday.com/online

  16. http://leoklein.com/

  17. http://www.pewinternet.org/PPF/r/198/report_display.asp

  18. http://www.pewinternet.org/

  19. http://leoklein.com/

  20. http://dlib.org/dlib/january07/markey/01markey.html

  21. http://dlib.org/

  22. http://roytennant.com/

  23. http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA6403633.html

  24. http://www.libraryjournal.com/index.asp?layout=netConnect

  25. http://librarything.com/

  26. http://roytennant.com/

  27.

http://alastore.ala.org/SiteSolution.taf?_sn=catalog2&_pn=product_detail&_op

=1856

  28. http://www.newyorker.com/fact/content/articles/070205fa_fact_toobin

  29. http://www.newyorker.com/

  30. http://roytennant.com/

  31. http://validator.w3.org/check?uri=referer

  32. http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/check/referer

  33. http://webjunction.org/

  34. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

February 2007

Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU]; on behalf of; Roy Tennant [roy.tennant@UCOP.EDU]                  Tue 27/02/2007 1:06 PM

PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU                      [CurrentCites] Current Cites, February 2007

Current Cites

                             February 2007

                        Edited by [2]Roy Tennant

        http://lists.webjunction.org/currentcites/2007/cc07.18.2.html

   Contributors: [3]Charles W. Bailey, Jr., [4]Leo Robert Klein, Jim

   Ronningen, [5]Roy Tennant

            _____________________________________________________

   Coyle, Karen. "Future of Library Systems, Seen from the Past"

   [6]Journal of Academic Librarianship  33(1)(January 2007): 138-140. -

   It's always a healthy exercise when evaluating predictions of the

   future to see what past performance in the prediction business has been

   like. This is what Karen Coyle does in a relatively short article on

   predictions of library systems from 1949 to 1984. She goes from what

   most commentators got right to what most commentators either got wrong

   or missed. Oftentimes what they missed was due to developments outside

   of librarianship (e.g. the computer industry) that they didn't pay

   enough attention to. It's important to take the larger context into

   consideration, Coyle concludes, when attempting to do long-range

   planning. - [7]LRK

   Follett, Jonathan. "[8]Envisioning the Whole Digital Person"

   [9]UXmatters  (20 February

   2007)(http://www.uxmatters.com/MT/archives/000171.php). - This article

   looks at the growing mass of digital artifacts that we accumulate from

   cradle to grave and wonders how to deal with it from the user

   experience or designer's point of view. The material in question

   includes everything from email to photos and is likely to be around far

   longer than we. The suggestions on what to do as "user experience

   practitioners" will sound familiar to librarians: "...we can advocate

   for data portability, accessibility, and standardization and prepare

   ourselves and our customers to manage our new digital lives." - [10]LRK

   Johnson, Richard K. "[11]In Google's Broad Wake: Taking Responsibility

   for Shaping the Global Digital Library"  [12]ARL: A Bimonthly Report

   (250)(February 2007)(http://www.arl.org/resources/pubs/br/br250.shtml).

   - Johnson begins by reviewing projects to massively digitize research

   library collections by Google, the Open Content Alliance, and others.

   The bulk of this special issue, however, is comprised of a recounting

   of various mass digitization policy recommendations from ALA, the

   Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Francophone National Libraries, the

   Committee on Institutional Cooperation, OCLC's Programs and Research

   Division, and others. Johnson then summarizes the common themes and

   provides a "negotiation checklist" for libraries to review when

   negotiating a contract for digitization. While this may be too late for

   a number of institutions, contracts announced very recently seem to

   indicate that there are still libraries that can benefit from this

   review of principles and policies. - [13]RT

   Markey, Karen, Soo Young  Rieh, and Beth  St. Jean, et. al.[14]Census

   of Institutional Repositories in the United States : MIRACLE Project

   Research Findings  Washington, DC: Council on Library and Information

   Resources, February

   2007.(http://www.clir.org/pubs/abstract/pub140abst.html). - This report

   summarizes the findings of the first phase of the IMLS-funded MIRACLE

   Project to investigate institutional repositories in higher education.

   At a survey response rate of about 21% of the 2,147 academic library

   directors and senior library administrators contacted, only 10.8% had

   implemented a repository. An additional 36.3% were planning to

   implement or were pilot testing an institutional repository. There is

   much to consider in this report, but the diversity of organizational

   situations, repository software options, and implementation models

   makes it difficult and even erroneous to make sweeping generalizations.

   Rather, those who are interested in this issue would do well to spend

   some time digesting the findings for what can inform their particular

   situation. - [15]RT

   Mugridge, Rebecca L. [16]Managing Digitization Activities. SPEC Kit

   294  Washington, DC: Association of Research Libraries,

   2006.(http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/spec294web.pdf). - With a response rate

   of 55% (68 libraries out of 123), this survey provides a snapshot of

   ARL libraries digitization efforts as of early 2006. Here is a quick

   summary of the survey's scope from the introduction: "This SPEC survey

   was designed to identify the purposes of ARL member libraries'

   digitization efforts, the organizational structures these libraries use

   to manage digital initiatives, whether and how staff have been

   reassigned to support digitization activities, where funding to sustain

   digital activities originated and how that funding is allocated, how

   priorities are determined, whether libraries are outsourcing any

   digitization work, and how the success of libraries' digital activities

   has been assessed. The focus of the survey was on the digitization of

   existing library materials, rather than the creation of born-digital

   objects." Overall, the survey suggests that digitization is still a

   fledgeling activity at many ARL libraries: only 19 respondents (30%)

   had a dedicated budget for both start-up and ongoing operations and

   only 6 (9.5%) had a dedicated start-up budget, but no dedicated ongoing

   budget. Only 28 of a total of 188 librarians from 48 reporting

   libraries who did digitization work did so full-time, with the rest

   dedicating "only a small portion of their time on this activity." The

   few reported budgets had wide ranges, resulting in means of $97,027 for

   start-up budgets and $303,916 for ongoing budgets. - [17]CB

   Rochkind, Jonathan. "[18]( Meta)search Like Google"  [19]Library

   Journal  (17 February

   2007)(http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA6413442.html). - The

   author contrasts the current flawed state of metasearch (searching more

   than one database through a single interface) with what could be

   achieved were libraries to adopt local indexing methods such as those

   used by Google. Instead of the user waiting for the interface to

   cross-search each source database at the time of request and merge the

   results, often resulting in a less than satisfactory 'dumbed down' set

   which may not be adequately relevancy-ranked, deduplicated, or

   custom-sorted, the user could receive a more efficient, value-added set

   thanks to the prior harvesting of metadata (and sometimes content

   elements) arranged in a local index which is what was actually searched

   when the query was made. Rochkind explains the technology clearly with

   minimal jargon and lists the challenges that libraries face, such as

   asking for licensing agreements with vendors which allow for metadata

   and content harvesting for the purpose of index-building. Disclaimer:

   Current Cites editor Roy Tennant was consulted and is quoted in the

   article. - JR

     __________________________________________________________________

References

   Visible links

   1. http://lists.webjunction.org/currentcites/

   2. http://roytennant.com/

   3. http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm

   4. http://leoklein.com/

   5. http://roytennant.com/

   6. http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jacalib

   7. http://leoklein.com/

   8. http://www.uxmatters.com/MT/archives/000171.php

   9. http://www.uxmatters.com/

  10. http://leoklein.com/

  11. http://www.arl.org/resources/pubs/br/br250.shtml

  12. http://www.arl.org/resources/pubs/br/

  13. http://roytennant.com/

  14. http://www.clir.org/pubs/abstract/pub140abst.html

  15. http://roytennant.com/

  16. http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/spec294web.pdf

  17. http://www.escholarlypub.com/cwb/bailey.htm

  18. http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA6413442.html

  19. http://www.libraryjournal.com/

  20. http://validator.w3.org/check?uri=referer

  21. http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/check/referer

  22. http://webjunction.org/

  23. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

D-Lib Magazine

October 2006

dlib-subscribers-admin@dlib.org; on behalf of; Bonnie Wilson [bwilson@cnri.reston.va.us]                   Tue 17/10/2006 3:04 AM                      DLib-subscribers                     

[Dlib-subscribers] The October 2006 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

The October 2006 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now available.

This issue contains four articles, seven reports from the ECDL 2006 conference, the 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  This month's featured collection is "Digital Collections at the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,"

contributed by Judith M. Panitch, UNC-Chapel Hill.

The articles include:

DLF-Aquifer Asset Actions Experiment: Demonstrating Value of Actionable URLs Robert Chavez, Tufts University; Timothy W. Cole, Muriel Foulonneau, and Thomas G. Habing, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Jon Dunn, Indiana University; William Parod, Northwestern University; and Thornton Staples, University of Virginia

An Interoperable Fabric for Scholarly Value Chains Herbert Van de Sompel and Xiaoming Liu, Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carl Lagoze, Sandy Payette, and Simeon Warner, Cornell University; and Jeroen Bekaert, Ghent University

Strategies and Frameworks for Institutional Repositories and the New Support Infrastructure for Scholarly Communications Tyler O. Walters, Georgia Institute of Technology

Measuring Total Reading of Journal Articles Donald W. King, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Carol Tenopir, University of Tennessee, Knoxville; and Michael Clarke, American Academy of Pediatrics

The conference reports include:

ECDL 2006: A Conference Report Based on a Travel Log in Context Eric Lease Morgan, University of Notre Dame

Cross-Language Evaluation Forum - CLEF 2006 Carol Peters, ISTI-CNR

Report on the 5th European Networked Knowledge Organization Systems/Services (NKOS) Workshop Traugott Koch, UKOLN, University of Bath

ECDL 2006 Workshop Report: The Use of Digital Object Repository Systems in Digital Libraries (DORSDL) Gert Schmeltz Pedersen, Technical University of Denmark; Kostas Saidis, University of Athens; and Hans Pfeiffenberger, Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research

Digital Library Goes e-Science (DLSci06): Workshop Held in Conjunction with ECDL 2006, September 17-22, 2006. Alicante, Spain Rachel Heery, UKOLN, University of Bath

Report on the Workshop of Learning Object Repositories as Digital

Libraries: September 22, 2006, Alicante, Spain Miguel R. Artacho, UNED University; and Erik Duval, K.U.Leuven

Report on the 1st International Critical Success Factors for Institutional Change Workshop (CSFIC): 22 September, Alicante, Spain Karen Fill, University of Southampton

D-Lib Magazine has mirror sites at the following locations:

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia http://dlib.anu.edu.au/

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen, Goettingen, Germany http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

BN - National Library of Portugal , Portugal

http://purl.pt/302/1

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the October 2006 issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

November 2006

dlib-subscribers-admin@dlib.org; on behalf of; Bonnie Wilson [bwilson@cnri.reston.va.us]                   Thu 16/11/2006 12:58 AM                    DLib-subscribers

[Dlib-subscribers] The November 2006 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available.

The November 2006 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now available.

This issue contains four articles, a commentary, the 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  This month's featured collection is "Digital Library at Villanova University"

contributed by Michael Foight, Villanova University.

The articles include:

The Core: Digital Library Education in Library and Information Science Programs Jeffrey Pomerantz, Sanghee Oh, and Barbara M. Wildemuth, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill; and Seungwon Yang and Edward A. Fox, Virginia Tech

Author Addenda: An Examination of Five Alternatives Peter B. Hirtle, Cornell University

Download Statistics - What Do They Tell Us?: The Example of Research Online, the Open Access Institutional Repository at the University of Wollongong, Australia Michael Organ, University of Wollongong, Australia

E-Content Awards: An Initiative for Bridging the Digital Divide in India and Worldwide Mangala Hirwade, Shivaji Science College and D. Rajyalakshmi, RTM Nagpur University

The commentary is:

Beneath the Metadata: Some Philosophical Problems with Folksonomy Elaine Peterson, Montana State University

D-Lib Magazine has mirror sites at the following locations:

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia http://dlib.anu.edu.au/

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen, Goettingen, Germany http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

BN - National Library of Portugal , Portugal

http://purl.pt/302/1

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the November 2006 issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

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December 2006

dlib-subscribers-admin@dlib.org; on behalf of; Bonnie Wilson [bwilson@cnri.reston.va.us]                   Sat 16/12/2006 12:44 AM                    DLib-subscribers

[Dlib-subscribers] The December 2006 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

Greetings:

The December 2006 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now available.

This issue contains three articles, an opinion piece, three conference reports, the 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  This month's featured collection is "The Complete Work of Charles Darwin Online" contributed by John van Wyhe, University of Cambridge.

The articles include:

Using the Audit Checklist for the Certification of a Trusted Digital Repository as a Framework for Evaluating Repository Software

Applications: A Progress Report

Joanne Kaczmarek, Patricia Hswe, Janet Eke, and Thomas G. Habing, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Digital Library as Network and Community Center: A Successful Model for Contribution and Use Cathryn A. Manduca, Sean Fox, and Ellen R. Iverson, Carleton College

The Melvyl Recommender Project: Developing Library Recommendation Services Colleen Whitney and Lisa Schiff, California Digital Library

The opinion is:

Jean-Noel Jeanneney's Critique of Google: Private Sector Book Digitization and Digital Library Policy David Bearman, Archives & Museum Informatics

The conference reports include:

Snapshots of the National Science Digital Library Annual Meeting:

October 18 - 20, 2006, Washington, DC

Brad Edmondson, ePodunk.com, and Carol Minton Morris, Cornell University

The Music Information Retrieval Evaluation eXchange (MIREX) J. Stephen Downie, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

IPRES 2006 Conference Report: Digital Preservation Takes Off in the E-Environment Cindy Boeke, The American Society for Cell Biology

D-Lib Magazine has mirror sites at the following locations:

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia http://dlib.anu.edu.au/

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen, Goettingen, Germany http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

BN - National Library of Portugal , Portugal

http://purl.pt/302/1

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the December 2006 issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

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January/February 2007

dlib-subscribers-admin@dlib.org; on behalf of; Bonnie Wilson [bwilson@cnri.reston.va.us]                   Tue 16/01/2007 5:53 AM                      DLib-subscribers

[Dlib-subscribers] The January/February 2007 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

Greetings:

The January/February 2007 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now available.

This issue contains two articles, four opinion pieces, and one conference report, the 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  This month's featured collection is

"Lincoln/Net: Abraham Lincoln Historical Digitization Project"

contributed by Drew VandeCreek, Northern Illinois University Libraries.

The articles include:

Copyright, Publishing, and Scholarship: The "Zwolle Group" Initiative for the Advancement of Higher Education Kenneth D. Crews, Indiana University School of Law-Indianapolis, and Gerard van Westrienen, SURF Foundation

Distinguishing Content from Carrier: The RDA/ONIX Framework for Resource Categorization Gorden Dunsire, University of Strathclyde

The opinion pieces are:

Resource Description and Access (RDA): Cataloging Rules for the 20th Century Karen Coyle, kcoyle.net, and Diane Hillmann, Cornell University

The Online Library Catalog: Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained?

Karen Markey, University of Michigan

The Patchwork Mandate

Arthur Sale, University of Tasmania

Digital Preservation in a National Context: Questions and Views of an Outsider H.M. Gladney, HMG Consulting

The conference report is:

Report on CORDRA @ Work: Held November 13-14, 2006, in Memphis, Tennessee Nigel Ward, Australian ADL Partnership Laboratory and Heather E. Walls, Workforce Advanced Distributed Learning Co-Laboratory

D-Lib Magazine has mirror sites at the following locations:

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia http://dlib.anu.edu.au/

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen, Goettingen, Germany http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

BN - National Library of Portugal , Portugal

http://purl.pt/302/1

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the January/February 2007 issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States and the time when the mirroring process has been

completed.)

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March/April 2007

dlib-subscribers-admin@dlib.org; on behalf of; Bonnie Wilson [bwilson@cnri.reston.va.us]                   Tue 13/03/2007 4:13 AM                      DLib-subscribers

[Dlib-subscribers] The March/April 2007 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

Greetings:

The March/April 2007 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now available.

This issue contains four articles, a commentary, and one conference report, the 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  This month, D-Lib features the " University of Wisconsin Digital Collections," contributed by Melissa McLimans, University of Wisconsin Digital Collections Center.

The articles include:

Toward an Effective Understanding of Website Users: Advantages and Pitfalls of Linking Transaction Log Analyses and Online Surveys Diane Harley and Jonathan Henke, University of California, Berkeley

Institutional Repositories: Evaluating the Reasons for Non-use of Cornell University's Installation of DSpace Philip M. Davis and Matthew J.L. Connolly, Cornell University

Linking Service to Open Access Repositories Shigeki Sugita, Kunie Horikoshi and Masako Suzuki, Hokkaido University; Shin Kataoka, Kyushu University; E. S. Hellman, Openly Informatics Division, OCLC; and Keiji Suzuki, Independent Consultant

Setting the Foundations of Digital Libraries: The DELOS Manifesto Leonardo Candela, Donatella Castelli, Pasquale Pagano, and Constantino Thanos, Italian National Research Council (CNR); Yannis Ioannidis and Georgia Koutrika, University of Athens; Seamus Ross, University of Glasgow; Hans-Jorg Schek, University of Konstanz; and Heiko Schuldt, University of Basel

The commentary is:

A Proposed Standard for the Scholarly Citation of Quantitative Data Micah Altman and Gary King, Harvard University

And the conference report is:

Road Report: Second Annual Open Repositories Conference (OR07) in San Antonio Carol Minton Morris

D-Lib Magazine has mirror sites at the following locations:

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England http://mirrored.ukoln.ac.uk/lis-journals/dlib/

The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia http://dlib.anu.edu.au/

State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen, Goettingen, Germany http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

Universidad de Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina http://www.dlib.org.ar

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

http://dlib.ejournal.ascc.net/

BN - National Library of Portugal , Portugal

http://purl.pt/302/1

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the March/April

2007 issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later. 

There is a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

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