NEWS FROM OTHER JOURNALS SECTION

MARCH 2010 ISSUE

 Editorial note:

This section contains items culled from various Internet news services, discussion lists and other announcements.  Unless specifically noted, I have not visited the sites, used any of the software, reviewed the literature, or written the news items.  I present this digest to you in good faith but cannot vouch for the accuracy of its content.  

Kerry Smith

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Ariadne

            Issue 61

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [mailto:PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU] On Behalf Of Richard Waller
Sent: Wednesday, 25 November 2009 12:20 AM
To: PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU
Subject: Re: [ariadne] Re: Issue 61 of Ariadne available

 

Apologies for cross-posting:

Issue 61 of Ariadne was published recently:

http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/

 

In this issue the main articles are as follows:

http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/#main-articles

 

*How to Publish Data Using Overlay Journals: The OJIMS Project - Sarah Callaghan, Sam Pepler, Fiona Hewer, Paul Hardaker and Alan Gadian describe the implementation details that can be used to create overlay journals for data publishing in the meteorological sciences.

 

*Enhancing Scientific Communication through Aggregated Publications - Arjan Hogenaar describes changes in the publication and communication process in which the role of authors will become more dominant.

 

*Why Are Users So Useful?: User Engagement and the Experience of the JISC Digitisation Programme - Paola Marchionni discusses the importance of user engagement in the creation of digitised scholarly resources with case studies from the JISC Digitisation Programme.

 

*UK Institutional Repository Search: Innovation and Discovery - Vic Lyte, Sophia Jones, Sophia Ananiadou and Linda Kerr describe an innovative tool to showcase UK research output through advanced discovery and retrieval facilities.

 

*Share. Collaborate. Innovate. Building an Oranisational Approach to Web 2.0 - Paul Bevan outlines the National Library of Wales’ development of

a strategic approach to meeting user needs in a post-Web 2.0 world.

 

*Learning to YODL: Building York’s Digital Library - Peri Stracchino and Yankui Feng describe a year’s progress in building the digital library infrastructure outlined by Julie Allinson and Elizabeth Harbord in their article last issue.

 

*Search Engines: Real-time Search - Phil Bradley looks at the concept of real-time search and points to some of the functionality that users can and should expect to find when exploring these engines.

 

*Cautionary Tales: Archives 2.0 and the Diplomatic Historian - Michael Kennedy discusses the value of Archives 2.0 to the online version of Ireland's 'Documents on Irish Foreign Policy' series.

 

At the Event reports:  http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/#at-the-event

 

*The RSP Goes “Back To School”

- Stephanie Taylor reports on the three-day residential school for repository managers run by the Repositories Support Project (RSP), held in September 2009 in Northumberland.

 

*Internet Librarian International 2009 - Katherine Allen reports on Internet Librarian International 2009 which took place in London in October.

 

*Live Blogging @ IWMW 2009 - Kirsty McGill provides a live blogger perspective on the three-day Institutional Web Managers Workshop, held by UKOLN at the University of Essex, Colchester, in July 2009.

 

News and Reviews:     http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/#news

*Newsline: News and events

 

*Ajax in Oracle JDeveloper - Pete Cliff finds aspects of this work useful and interesting, but he also expresses some serious reservations.

 

*Information Tomorrow: Reflections on Technology and the Future of Public and Academic Libraries - Lina Coelho is delighted by this pick-and-mix collection of reflections on the technological future of libraries.

 

*M-Libraries: Libraries on the move to provide virtual access - Simon Speight reviews a collection of papers from the First International M-Libraries Conference, which examined potential library uses of mobile phones and other portable technology.

 

-----------

Contributions to Ariadne issue 62 and beyond are being arranged and

prepared; please send proposals for articles to me at our regular

contact point:

ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk

 

Kindly send review copies to the Editor's address (below).

 

Please note that an RSS feed for Ariadne is available:  see http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/

 

I hope you will enjoy the new issue. If you would like to discuss making a contribution yourself, do contact me on:

ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk

 

Best regards,

Richard

--

Richard Waller

Editor Ariadne

UKOLN

The Library

University of Bath

Bath BA2 7AY

UK

tel +44 (0) 1225 383570

fax +44 (0) 1225 386838

email ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk

web http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/

web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/

 

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      Issue 62

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [mailto:PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU] On Behalf Of Richard Waller
Sent: Thursday, 18 February 2010 1:53 AM
To: PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU
Subject: Issue 62 of Ariadne Available

 

Apologies for cross-posting:

 

Issue 62 of Ariadne is now available:

 

In this issue the main articles are as follows:

http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/#main-articles

 

*Towards a Toolkit for Implementing Application Profiles - Talat Chaudhri, Julian Cheal, Richard Jones, Mahendra Mahey and

Emma Tonkin propose a user-driven methodology for the iterative development, testing and implementation of Dublin Core Application

Profiles in diverse repository software environments.

 

*Moving Targets: Web Preservation and Reference Management - Richard Davis discusses the role of Web preservation in reference

management. in an article based on a presentation given at the Innovations in Reference Management workshop, January 2010.

 

*'An attack on professionalism and scholarship'?: Democratising Archives and the Production of Knowledge

- Andrew Flinn describes some recent developments in democratising the archive and asks whether these developments really deserve to be viewed as a threat to professional and academic standards.

 

*Get Tooled Up: Xerxes at Royal Holloway, University of London - Anna Grigson, Peter Kiely, Graham Seaman  and Tim Wales describe

the implementation of an open source front end to the MetaLib federated search tool.

 

*Uncovering User Perceptions of Research Activity Data - Cecilia Loureiro-Koechlin discusses the outcomes and lessons

learned from user tests performed on the Oxford Blue Pages, a tool designed to display information about researchers and their

activities at the University of Oxford.

 

*A Research Revolution: The Impact of Digital Technologies - Dicky Maidment-Otlet and Judy Redfearn describe a new JISC

activity to highlight how digital technologies are changing research.

 

*Abstract Modelling of Digital Identifiers - Nick Nicholas, Nigel Ward and Kerry Blinco present an information

model of digital identifiers, to help bring clarity to the vocabulary debates from which this field has suffered.

 

*eBooks: Tipping or Vanishing Point?  - Emma Tonkin investigates ebooks and takes a look at recent

technological and business developments in this area.

 

* Intranet Management: Divine Comedy or Strategic Imperative?  - Martin White suggests that a failure to recognise the value of

intranets is a symptom of a failure to recognise information as a strategic asset.

 

At the Event reports:

http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/#at-the-event

 

*Fedora UK & Ireland / EU Joint User Group Meeting

- Chris Awre reports on the first coming together of two regional user groups for the Fedora digital repository system, hosted by the University of Oxford in December 2009.

 

*The Future of Interoperability and Standards in Education:

A JISC CETIS Event - Sarah Currier reports on an international working meeting involving a range of educational interoperability standards bodies and communities, organised by JISC CETIS.

 

*The Digital Preservation Roadshow 2009-10: The Incomplete Diaries of Optimistic Travellers - William Kilbride and Malcolm Todd report on the Digital Preservation Roadshow - an eleven-month tour of the UK and Ireland designed to provide archivists and record managers with practical advice and support in managing digital resources.

 

*Subject Repositories: European Collaboration in the International Context - Dave Puplett reports on the conference Subject Repositories: European Collaboration in the International Context held at the British Library in January 2010. The conference launched Economists Online (EO), an innovative economics subject repository.

 

News and Reviews

http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/#news

 

*Newsline: News and events

 

*Delete: The Virtue of Forgetting in the Digital Age

- Pete Cliff hopes he'll not forget this marvellous book, even

when the author seems to suggest it might be better if he did!

 

*Copyright: Interpreting the law for libraries, archives and

information services

- Charles Oppenheim sees much to like in the new edition of

this work by a well-known authority but identifies one

potentially major drawback.

 

*My Word! Plagiarism and College Culture

- Brian Whalley reviews a look at this problem from an American

anthropologist and finds there is more in it than just a

consideration of plagiarism.

 

-----------

Contributions to Ariadne issue 63 and beyond are being arranged and

prepared; please send proposals for articles to me at our regular

contact point:

ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk

 

Kindly send review copies to the Editor's address (below).

 

Please note that an RSS feed for Ariadne is available:

see http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/

 

I hope you will enjoy the new issue. If you would like to discuss

making a contribution yourself, do contact me on:

ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk

 

Best regards,

Richard

--

Richard Waller

Editor Ariadne

UKOLN

The Library

University of Bath

Bath BA2 7AY

UK

tel +44 (0) 1225 383570

fax +44 (0) 1225 386838

email ariadne@ukoln.ac.uk

web http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/

web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/

 

 

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ASIS&T Bulletin

            Feb/March 2010

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [mailto:JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU] On Behalf Of Richard Hill
Sent: Thursday, 4 February 2010 2:28 AM
To: JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU
Subject: Feb/March 2010 ASIS&T Bulletin TOC

 

Note:  Bulletin home is http://www.asis.org/bulletin.html.  All articles

have links to HTML or PDF versions.

 

Link to PDF of entire issue: 

http://www.asis.org/Bulletin/Feb-10/Bulletin_FebMar10_Final.pdf  (7 mb)

 

  ANNUAL MEETING COVERAGE

 

Inside ASIS&T

A Look at ASIS&T 2009 | Photo Montage

2009 ASIS&T Award Winners

 

Features | ASIS&T 2009 Plenary Sessions

Tim Bray Encourages Innovation

by Steve Hardin

 

Diversity in Digital Information Environments:  Opportunity or Chaos?  A Pecha-Kucha Presentation by Steve Hardin

 

Special Section

Introduction | A Decade of SIG/USE: Celebrating SIG/USE and Information Behavior Research

by Crystal Fulton, Guest Editor

 

Fifty Years of Information Behavior Research by T.D. Wilson

 

Early Information Behavior Research by Barbara M. Wildemuth and Donald O. Case

 

Collaborative Information Seeking and Sharing: The 9th Symposium of SIG/USE by Nadia Caidi, Soo Young Rieh and Guillermo Oyarce

 

SIG/USE Live in Second Life at ASIS&T 2009 by Diane Nahl

 

Forecasting the Next 10 Years in Information Behavior Research:  A Fish Bowl Dialogue by Gary Burnett and Sanda Erdelez

 

  FEATURE

 

Perspectives on DRM:  Between Digital Rights Management and Digital Restrictions Management by Rafal Kasprowski

 

  COLUMNS

 

IA Column:  Attending to Performance by Thom Haller

 

What's New:  Selected Abstracts from JASIST

 

  DEPARTMENTS

 

Letter to the Editor

 

Editor's Desktop

by Irene Travis

 

President's Page

by Gary Marchionini

 

Inside ASIS&T

 

_____

Richard B. Hill

Executive Director

American Society for Information Science and Technology

1320 Fenwick Lane, Suite 510

Silver Spring, MD  20910

Fax: (301) 495-0810

Voice: (301) 495-0900

 

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Current Cites
            November 2009

 

From: Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [mailto:PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU] On Behalf Of Roy Tennant
Sent: Tuesday, 1 December 2009 2:52 AM
To: PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU
Subject: [CurrentCites] Current Cites, November 2009

 

                              Current Cites

                               November 2009

                         Edited by [2]Roy Tennant

       http://lists.webjunction.org/currentcites/2009/cc09.20.11.html

   Contributors: [3]Charles W. Bailey, Jr., [4]Warren Cheetham, [5]Alison    Cody, [6]Susan Gibbons, [7]Peter Hirtle, [8]Leo Robert Klein, [9]Roy    Tennant
            _____________________________________________________

   Berkman Center for Internet & Society. [10]Next Generation    Connectivity: A review of broadband Internet transitions and policy    from around the world [draft]  Boston, MA.: Berkman Center for Internet    & Society, October   2009.  (http://www.fcc.gov/stage/pdf/Berkman_Center_Broadband_Study_13Oct    09.pdf). - Commonly known as the "Broadband Study", the purpose of this
   report was to look at "broadband deployment and usage throughout the    world" for the FCC. The results are in and unfortunately we didn't do    particularly well. In fact, the U.S. was relegated to
   "middle-of-the-pack performer" status, behind industrialized countries    in Europe and Asia where the practice of "open access" to broadband    networks by third party competitors is more prevalent. There's a    [11]good discussion of the results by Nate Anderson over at Ars  Technica for those who don't have time to wade through the study's 200+    pages. In a [12]press release following the closing of the FCC comment    period, the communications people over at the Berkman Center wryly    comment, "it seems as though our report created a mini stimulus act for    telecommunications lawyers and consultants". - [13]LRK

   Bhatnagar, Alka. "[14]Web Analytics for Business Intelligence: Beyond    Hits and Sessions"  [15]Online  33(6)(Nov/Dec 2009): 32-35.      (http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/infotoday/access/1895898461.html?dids=1895     898461:1895898461:1895898461&FMT=ABS&FMTS=ABS:FT:PAGE&type=current&date=Nov%2FDec+2009&author=Alka+Bhatnagar&pub=Online&edition=&startpage=32&    desc=Web+Analytics+for+Business+Intelligence). - The world of web    analytics is truly bustling as anyone who has ever toyed around with    products like Google Analytics can tell you. The depth of information    and what you can do with it are breathtaking. This isn't your father's    Webalizer. But how do these metrics related to libraries? That's what    the author asks and then proceeds to answer in this engaging    introduction to the subject. - [16]LRK

   Jansen, Bernard J., Mimi  Zhang, and Kate  Sobel, et. al."[17]Twitter    Power: Tweets as Electronic Word of Mouth"  [18]Journal of the American    Society for Information Science and  T Technology  60(11)(November    2009): 2169-2188.     (http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/117946195/grouphome/home.html ). - Many libraries have jumped into social networking, using a
   variety of platforms to reach out to their patrons with news and    information. Some have already started using the microblogging service    Twitter, while others are still contemplating its usefulness. In this    article, the authors look at how corporations can use Twitter as an    extension of their branding activities. The authors used a variety of methods to analyze tweets from 50 brands over a three-month period.     They found that on a weekly basis, most tweets about the brands were    positive (60%) and about a quarter were negative sentiments. However,    looking at the data for the entire time period, the researchers found    that more than 80% of tweets mentioning these brands did not contain a    sentiment. They were tweets that asked for or offered information, or    mentioned the brand in passing. To more closely examine this    phenomenon, the authors looked specifically at Starbucks' Twitter    activity, and found that there was very little conversation between the    Starbucks account and those of their followers (usually fewer than four    tweets). While this demonstrates that Twitter may not be a medium for    close management of customer relationships, it is a way for a company    (or library) to find out how patrons are feeling about the library, and    to reach out to those who post questions, complaints or compliments. -    [19]AC

   Lascarides, Michael. "[20]Infomaki: An Open Source, Lightweight    Usability Testing Tool"  [21]http://journal.code4lib.org/  (21    September 2009)(http://journal.code4lib.org/articles/2099). - Usability
   testing is a lot like exercise -- we all know it is good for us and yet    many of us seem not to find the time to do it. Meanwhile, our user    community is also likely not happy when faced with online surveys that    can take a significant period of time to complete. These reasons make    Infomaki a perfect solution for usability testing without pain for    either the organization or the user. Infomaki is an infrastructure that    enables organizations to create and manage a database of survey    questions and replies. Questions can be served up as one at a time and    the user decides when they have had enough. Users can select to answer    only one question or several. They New York Public Library, which    developed the application, has been using it to gather thousands of    replies to usability questions and has released their code as open    source. - [22]RT

   Lavoie, Brian, and Lorcan  Dempsey. "[23]Beyond 1923: Characteristics    of Potentially In-copyright Print Books in Library Collections"    [24]D-Lib Magazine  15(11/12)(November/December
   2009)(http://www.dlib.org/dlib/november09/lavoie/11lavoie.html ). – As   copyright term has lengthened and more and more works remain protected    by copyright, interest in the scope and nature of those works has    increased. For example, Michael Cairns tried [25]calculating the number    of "orphan works" using data from Books in Print. Lavoie and Dempsey    have the Worldcat database at their fingertips, and in this article    they categorize the nature of the books printed since 1923 found in the    database. They found lots of neat information, such as that there are    3.7 million unique authors of books published in the US since 1923,    with children books author Carole Marsh being second to William    Shakespeare in print manifestations. Until Google releases data on the    books it has scanned, Lavoie and Dempsey's article provides the best    suggestion of what the scope of the Google database may be. For    students of publishing and library history, it offers a fascinating    snapshot of twentieth-century practices. - [26]PH

   Pace, Andrew. "[27]21st Century Library Systems"  [28]Journal of    Library Administration  49(6)(August 2009): 641-650.     (http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all~content=a915763651). -
   If you are embarking on the search for a new library management system,    electronic resource management system, federated search tool or    anything else in the library technology family, be sure to wave this    paper under the nose of your non-techie library manager, and/or your    non-library IT manager. It will provide a good introduction to where    computerised library systems have come from over the last several    decades, the current state of affairs (both in libraries and the    general IT world) and some thoughts about the future. Be prepared to    follow up with some other readings and information about some of the    things Pace touches on, like Cloud Computing and software-as-a-service    (SaaS). - [29]WC

   Samuelson, Pamela. "[30]New Google Book Settlement Aims Only to Placate    Governments"  [31]The Huffington Post  (17 November    2009)(http://www.huffingtonpost.com/pamela-samuelson/new-google-book-settlemen_b_358544.html). - The amended Google Book Search settlement    ([32]Zip file) has hardly silenced the deal's critics. In this article,    [33]Samuelson, who is a Professor at the University of California at    Berkeley's Law School and its School of Information, outlines and    critiques the major changes in the settlement, which she says "were    overwhelmingly made to placate the governments of France and Germany,    as well as the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ)." Whether these parties    are placated or not, Samuelson still has significant objections to the    settlement. For example, she says that: "Google will still get a de    facto monopoly right to commercialize all out-of-print books, including    the orphans, through the class action settlement process. No one else
   can get a comparable license, and hence no one else can offer a    comprehensive database of books to allow competition in the market for    institutional subscriptions." For further analysis of the amended    settlement, see Jonathan Band's [34]A Guide for the Perplexed Part III:    The Amended Settlement Agreement, Larry Downes' upbeat "[35]Two Cheers    for Google Books," and Fred von Lohmann's series of posts on the    DeepLinks blog ([36]1, [37]2, [38]3, and [39]4). - [40]CB

   Smith, Shannon D., Gail  Salaway, and Judith B.  Caruso. [41]The ECAR    Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2009    Boulder, CO: EDUCAUSE,
   2009.(http://www.educause.edu/Resources/TheECARStudyofUndergraduateStu/187215 ). - Since 2004, the EDUCAUSE Center for Applied Research (ECAR)    has been publishing annual studies of undergraduate students and    information technology. If this annual publication is not yet required    and anticipated reading, it really should be. This year's study    represents the participation of 30,616 students from 115 U.S. colleges  and universities. The study provides quantitative confirmation of    trends that you may have already been observing or have encountered
   through anecdotes. For example, more than half of the responding    students own an Internet-capable mobile device or that student computer  ownership has quickly shifted from desktops to laptops. The complete    report, which is just over 100 pages, is an easy read, but if time is   short, there is a 13-page summary available as well. - [42]SG

   Suber, Peter. "[43]Knowledge as a Public Good"  [44]SPARC Open Access   Newsletter   (139)(2009) (http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/newsletter/11-02-09.htm#publicgood

 ). - A key argument for open access is that knowledge is a   "public good." But what is a public good? Suber identifies two primary   features of a public good: (1) it is "non-rivalrous," and (2) it is   "non-excludable." A good is non-rivalrous when users can consume it   "without depleting it or becoming 'rivals'." A good is "non-excludable"   when "consumption is available to all, and attempts to prevent   consumption are generally ineffective." Suber then argues that   knowledge inherently has these characteristics and that scholarly   digital texts that embody knowledge could have them: "With the right   equipment we can all have copies of the same digital text without   having to take turns, block one another, multiply our costs, or deplete   our resources. . . . For the first time in the history of writing, we   can record our non-rivalrous knowledge without turning it into a   rivalrous material object." However, copyright law and copyright-holder   access restrictions limit the promise of digital texts as public goods   unless there is copyright-holder consent to make them freely available.   Retention of copyright and self-archiving by scholarly authors as well   as funder and institutional open access mandates help achieve this promise. A restructuring of scholarly publishing to a model where   publishers provide open access based remuneration that covers their   costs plus a reasonable profit margin also helps achieve this promise:   "As the PLoS [Public Library of Science] analogy of publishers as   midwives always suggested, the idea is to stop the midwife from keeping   the baby, not to avoid paying for services rendered." - [45]CB

   Wyld, David C. [46]Moving to the Cloud: An Introduction to Cloud   Computing in Government  Washington, DC: IBM Center for The Business of   Government,   2009.(http://www.businessofgovernment.org/pdfs/WyldCloudReport.pdf ). -   The concept of "cloud computing" has been much in the news lately and    yet it is easily misunderstood. This report, although aimed at a government audience, can serve as useful introduction to this concept   for anyone. The first 15 pages or so are all that would be needed to   get up to speed on what cloud computing is and why it might be an   important development for virtually any organization. Those wishing to   go deeper can read about the ten "major challenges" facing government   implementation of cloud computing and the author's assessment of the   future of cloud computing in government, including ten specific   predictions. A tip for those printing this -- unless you want to study
   the references, only print the first 60 and skip the final 20. - [47]RT
     __________________________________________________________________

   Current Cites - ISSN: 1060-2356 is hosted by the community at
   WebJunction.org. (c) Copyright 2009 by Roy Tennant
   [51]Creative Commons License

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  50.
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  51.
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xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

            December 2009

 

From: Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [mailto:PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU] On Behalf Of Roy Tennant
Sent: Thursday, 24 December 2009 6:51 AM
To: PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU
Subject: [CurrentCites] Current Cites, December 2009

 

                                 Current Cites

                                December 2009

                           Edited by [2]Roy Tennant

       http://lists.webjunction.org/currentcites/2009/cc09.20.12.html

   Contributors: [3]Charles W. Bailey, Jr., [4]Warren Cheetham, [5]Alison
   Cody, [6]Peter Hirtle, [7]Roy Tennant
            _____________________________________________________

   "[8]Read All About It"  [9]The Economist: Technology Quarterly  (12     December 2009): 13-14.       (http://www.economist.com/search/displaystory.cfm?story_id=15048695). -
   Between Amazon putting the holiday hard sell on their Kindle family of    e-book readers and Barnes and Noble attempting to launch their entry    into this space (the "Nook"), you're probably just about as fed up with   e-book reader hype as I am. But just when you thought you had had   enough, here comes an article that runs through most, if not all, of   the current and near-term future technologies for e-book screen   displays. Most are jaw-droppingly bizarre, from tiny balls full of   charged black and white particles to tiny groups of three mirrors. "One   way or another," asserts The Economist, "inexpensive colour e-readers   with video are on their way." So which of these strange technologies   will power tomorrow's displays? It's anyone's guess, and those who   guess right will make a bundle. - [10]RT

   Eaton, Kit. "[11]How the OLPC Version 3 Predicts the Future of PCs"    [12]Fast Company  (23 December   2009)(http://www.fastcompany.com/blog/kit-eaton/technomix/does-olpc-ver
   sion-3-predict-future-pcs?partner=homepage_newsletter
). - The [13]One   Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project undoubtedly changed the landscape of   low-end laptops, and now their vision for the third iteration of the   device, planned for 2012, seems similarly poised to redefine the field.   Envisioned as a very thin, roughly letter-sized plastic tablet, it is   designed to be hung from the belt and steadied with a plastic thumb   loop at one corner. It seems apparent that if they are able to achieve   anything close to this at anywhere close to the target pricepoint   ($75!) it will be stunning. Check out the photos of the device at this   blog post to see what they have in mind. - [14]RT

   Erway, Ricky. "[15]A View on Europeana from the US Perspective"   [16]Liber Quarterly   19(2)(2009)(http://liber.library.uu.nl/publish/articles/000472/). -    Ricky Erway was presented with an impossible task at a conference in   October, 2009: critique the rapidly evolving Europeana digital library   before its sponsors and creators. She gracefully accepted the   challenge, and the result is an article that will be of value to anyone   engaged in a collaborative digitization project. Erway describes the   major issues that confront digitization projects, identifies   state-of-the-art projects from around the world that are addressing   these issues, and asks how Europeana measures up in each area.   Measuring oneself against Erways's categories is an exercise that all   digitization projects would do well to undertake. And if nothing else,   the article includes links to interesting digitization projects that   may not be widely known in the U.S. (And kudos to Liber Quarterly for   getting the text, which could age quickly, into print so quickly after   the conference.) - [17]PH

   Griggs, Kim, Laurie M.  Bridges, and Hannah Gascho   Rempel. "[18]library/mobile: Tips on Designing and Developing Mobile   Web Sites"  [19]The Code4Lib Journal  (8)(21 September
   2009)(http://journal.code4lib.org/articles/2055). - The opening section   of this paper gives more than enough evidence as to why libraries of   all types need to develop mobile phone applications and interfaces to   library services. Some libraries are already taking great steps in this   direction, and these initiatives are highlighted. It goes on to outline   three important considerations when developing mobile applications, and   makes the distinction that mobile developers need to move beyond   shrinking content to fit small screens, and instead use the mobile   experience as a new way to connect with patrons. The bulk of the   article outlines the efforts of the Oregon State University Library to   develop mobile applications. It covers some coding which helps to   detect whether a person is using a mobile device to connect to an   application, and if so, point their device to the appropriate mobile   application. The list of ten design recommendations for designing for   small screens is very useful, as is the explanation of their testing   and validating processes. - [20]WC

   Hadro, Josh. "[21]White House Signals Interest in Open Access with   Public Call for Comments"  [22]Library Journal  (17 December   2009)(http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA6712223.html). - It's big
   news when the White House shows interest in open access, so the Office   of Science and Technology Policy's [23]call in the Federal Register for   "input from the community regarding enhancing public access to archived   publications resulting from research funded by Federal science and   technology agencies" raised the hopes of U.S. open access advocates.   Subsequently, OSTP began to post discussion items on its blog for   comment. The first post was "[24]Policy Forum on Public Access to   Federally Funded Research: Implementation," the current post is   "[25]Policy Forum on Public Access to Federally Funded Research:   Features and Technology," and the third, which will be about   management, will be posted on January 1. The "[26]Archive for the   'Public Access Policy' Category" page provides access to all the posts   and comments. You must [27]register and [28]login to post comments.   (Comments can also be e-mailed to publicaccess@ostp.gov.) Initially,   OSTP said that all comments must be received by January 7, 2010;   however, that deadline has been extended to January 21, 2010, with a   more detailed discussion of the three topics occurring between January   7, 2010 and that date. - [29]CB

   Head, Alison J., and Michael B.  Eisenberg. [30]Lessons Learned: How   College Students Seek Information in the Digital Age  Seattle, WA:   School of Information, University of Washington, 1 December   2009.(http://projectinfolit.org/pdfs/PIL_Fall2009_Year1Report_12_2009.pdf). - This progress report from [31]Project Information Literacy is a    report of the "findings from 2,318 respondents to a survey carried out   among college students on six campuses distributed across the U.S. in   the spring of 2009". The abstract summarizes the findings, but there  are many juicy tidbits in the full report. "Respondents, while curious   in the beginning stages of research, employed a consistent and   predictable research strategy for finding information, whether they   were conducting course-related or everyday life research. Almost all of   the respondents turned to the same set of tried and true information   resources in the initial stages of research, regardless of their   information goals. Almost all students used course readings and Google   first for course-related research and Google and Wikipedia for everyday   life research. Most students used library resources, especially   scholarly databases for course-related research and far fewer, in   comparison, used library services that required interacting with   librarians. The findings suggest that students conceptualize research,   especially tasks associated with seeking information, as a competency   learned by rote, rather than as an opportunity to learn, develop, or   expand upon an information-gathering strategy which leverages the wide   range of resources available to them in the digital age." - [32]RT

   Pennenberg, Adam. "[33]Forget E-Books: The Future of the Book Is Far   More Interesting"  [34]Fast Company  (23 December   2009)(http://www.fastcompany.com/blog/adam-penenberg/penenberg-post/say-so-long-book-we-know-it?partner=homepage_newsletter). - The tag line   of this piece serves as the thumbnail summary of it: "Coming soon...   It's the end of the book as we know it, and you'll be just fine. But it   won't be replaced by the e-book, which is, at best, a stopgap measure."   In other words, the post is mostly a rehash of what has long been the   visionary replacement of the book -- a digital mashup of virtually any   type of digital resource (e.g., video) or service (e.g., annotation) --   thereby characterizing today's "e-book in name but not substance" as a   stopgap measure similar to the early days of film, where cameras were   simply pointed at stage plays. But the author uses some useful   metaphors to make his case and the comments the post has begun to   accumulate are thoughtful and worth your time. - [35]RT

   Shelton, Jill T., Emily M.  Elliott, and Sharon D.  Eaves, et.   al."[36]The Distracting Effects of a Ringing Cell Phone: An   Investigation of the Laboratory and the Classroom Setting"  [37]Journal   of Environmental Psychology  29(4)(December 2009): 513-521.   (http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0272494409000231). -   Every instructional librarian has had a session interrupted by a
   student's ringing cell phone. But have you ever wondered exactly how   distracting this phenomenon is? In this study the authors set out to   answer this question. They conducted a series of four experiments --   two in the laboratory and two in real classrooms -- that measured the   impact of a ringing cell phone on students' attention. The laboratory   experiments used three different sounds, and measured how much and for   how long those sounds diverted the participants' attention. While the   findings of the laboratory experiments were interesting, the classroom   experiments were particularly informative. In both of them, a student  was planted in the classroom with the ability to set off a cell phone   in her bag at a specific point in the lecture. For the first trial, she   spent 30 seconds pretending to try and find the phone in her bag; for   the second she just let it ring. In both cases the students were then   tested on the facts that were delivered during the point in the lecture   when the phone rang. In both classes, the students performed poorly on   the quiz questions relating to the lecture material that was delivered   during the distraction. However, in the class where the student also   searched for the phone, performance was even worse, indicating that the   distracting effects of the ring are compounded by the visual   distraction of the phone's owner trying to locate it. The findings of   these four experiments indicate that continuing to conduct class while   a phone is going off is a poor choice. Rather than ignoring the phone,   instructors would do better to wait for the phone to be silenced, or at
   least make a point of reviewing the information presented at that point   later in the class. - [38]AC
     __________________________________________________________________

   Current Cites - ISSN: 1060-2356 is hosted by the community at   WebJunction.org.?(c) Copyright 2009 by Roy Tennant
   [42]Creative Commons License

References

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Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

                January 2010

 

From: Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [mailto:PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU] On Behalf Of Roy Tennant
Sent: Monday, 1 February 2010 7:52 AM
To: PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU
Subject: [CurrentCites] CurrentCites, January 2010

 

                                 Current Cites

                                  January 2010

                            Edited by [2]Roy Tennant

        http://lists.webjunction.org/currentcites/2010/cc10.21.1.html

   Contributors: [3]Charles W. Bailey, Jr., [4]Susan Gibbons, [5]Peter
   Hirtle, [6]Leo Robert Klein, [7]Roy Tennant
            _____________________________________________________

   [8]2010 Horizon Report  Austin, TX: The New Media Consortium, January    2010.(http://www.educause.edu/ELI/2010HorizonReport/195400). - "The    annual Horizon Report is a collaborative effort between the EDUCAUSE   Learning Initiative (ELI) and the New Media Consortium (NMC). Each   year, the report identifies and describes six areas of emerging   technology likely to have a significant impact on teaching, learning,   or creative expression in higher education within three adoption   horizons: a year or less, two to three years, and four to five years.   The areas of emerging technology cited for 2010 are: Time to adoption:   One Year or Less: Mobile Computing and Open Content; Time to adoption:   Two to Three Years: Electronic Books and Simple Augmented Reality; Time   to adoption: Four to Five Years: Gesture-based Computing and Visual   Data Analysis." Sorry, but I really couldn't improve on that. Now go   get the report and see what they say about these technologies and their   potential impacts on teaching and learning. - [9]RT

   Delcore, Hank D., James  Mullooly, and Michael  Scroggins. [10]The   Library Study at Fresno State  Fresno, CA: Institute of Public   Anthropology, California State University, Fresno,   2009.(http://www.csufresno.edu/anthropology/ipa/TheLibraryStudy(DelcoreMulloolyScroggins).pdf). - This 58-page report is the result of a   7-month study of students and the library at California State   University, Fresno. Two anthropologists, a field project director, and   a cadre of student enrolled in two ethnographic methods classes used a   wide array of anthropological and ethnographic methods to study the   students at Fresno State to discover ways to improve and increase   library usage. The results are very insightful glimpses of the   "taskscapes" for students at Fresno State and how the library   facilities and serves fit or not. The report includes student drawings,   photographs and even links to videos of student skits about the   library, paper writing, and the stress of being a student. The   excellent work of Delcore and his colleagues adds additional techniques   to the growing toolkit of methodologies that library staff can use to   better understand and serve their users. Moreover, it highlights some   of the unique challenges faced by first generation college students and   those from relatively low income families. The authors' practical   recommendations for the Fresno library include facility, web design,   outreach and service suggestions; some of which merit consideration by   any academic library. - [11]SG

   Eschenfelder, Kristin R. , and Grace  Agnew. "[12]Technologies Employed   to Control Access to or Use of Digital Cultural Collections: Controlled   Online Collections"  [13]D-Lib Magazine  16(1/2)(January/February    2010)(http://www.dlib.org/dlib/january10/eschenfelder/01eschenfelder.html       - Kristin Eschenfelder and Grace Agnew contribute to the ongoing    debate about the effort of cultural institutions to control digitized   resources by conducting a survey of how institutions are controlling   access to and use of digital collections. They found that the most   commonly used tools are also among the oldest: resolution limits and   authentication and authorization systems. They don't discuss the   efficacy of the deployed systems to regulate user behavior, nor do they   discuss the broader problem of whether institutions legally can or   should be controlling access to and use of their collections. Kenneth   D. Crews and Melissa A. Brown of Columbia University's [14]Copyright   Advisory Office have just released an introduction to this later issue   in [15]Control of Museum Art Images: The Reach and Limits of Copyright   and Licensing, with more detailed studies promised for the future. -
   [16]PH

   Holley, Rose. "[17]Tagging Full Text Searchable Articles: An Overview   of Social Tagging Activity in Historic Australian Newspapers August   2008 -- August 2009"  [18]D-Lib agazine  16(1/2)(January/February
   2010)(http://www.dlib.org/dlib/january10/holley/01holley.html). -   Holley reports on the experience of the Australian Newspaper project   with regards to user tagging. The project also includes the ability to   correct OCR'd text, but this article focuses on the tagging aspect. The   article includes a great deal of data on user tagging over a 15-month   period, as well as interesting insights into how users tag full text   collections. Of particular interest to me was when the National Library   of Australia did not impose any tagging rules or guidelines "they   clearly developed their own unwritten rules." In summary, Holley   writes, "The experience of the National Library of Australia shows that   tagging is a good thing, users want it, and it adds more information to   data. It costs little to nothing and is relatively easy to implement;   therefore, more libraries and archives should just implement it across   their entire collections." Highly recommended for anyone interested in   tagging, or indeed any type of user-contributed content. - [19]RT

   Kenney, Anne. "[20]The Collaborative Imperative: Special Collections in   the Digital Age"  [21]Research Library Issues  (267)(December   2009)(http://publications.arl.org/pageview/prvp3/21). - In this piece   Kenney proposes nine "Principles to Guide Large-Scale Digitization of   Special Collections,": "1) Distinct collections demand extra vigilance   in digitization; 2) Libraries must respect any donor-imposed
   restrictions on the digitization and use of materials; 3) Libraries   should seek the broadest possible user access to digitized content.   This includes patrons of other libraries and unaffiliated researchers;
   4) Libraries should receive copies of all digital files generated from   their collections, with the option for complete local access to the   files (to the extent that copyright law allows); 5) Any enhancements or   improvements to the digitized content should be shared on a regular   basis with the supplying library; 6) Restrictions on external access to   copies of works digitized from a library's holding should be of limited   duration; 7) Libraries should refrain from signing nondisclosure   agreements (NDAs) as part of digitization negotiations; 8) Libraries   should ensure that the confidentiality of users is protected in the   vendor's products; 9) Libraries should refrain from charging fees or   royalties for access to or non-commercial use of public domain   materials held in their collections." It should be noted that Peter
   Hirtle of Cornell, and a Current Cites contributor, assisted in   drafting these principles. - [22]RT

   Prescott, Melissa Kalpin, and Jerilyn R  Veldof . "[23]A Process   Approach to Defining Services for Undergraduates"  [24]portal:   Libraries in the Academy  10(1)(January   2010)(http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/v01 0/10.1.prescott.html). - The goal was to make a significant impact on   the learning experience of undergraduates at UMINN through new or   revamped library initiatives. How they went about this, how they   identified needs and prioritized solutions, makes up the heart of this   article. They started with focus groups. They analyzed data. They   brainstormed solutions. What they finally came up with, 12 top   initiatives, was reduced to five through a final survey of students.   While the process was admittedly elaborate, the authors conclude that   is was also transparent, well publicized and ultimately almost 100%   fully funded. - [25]LRK

   Samuelson, Pamela. "[26]Google Book Search and the Future of Books in   Cyberspace"  [27]Social Science Research Network  (13 January   2010)(http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1535067). -   [28]Pamela Samuelson, Richard M. Sherman Distinguished Professor of Law   at the UC Berkeley School of Law, is a well-known critic of the highly   controversial [29]Google Book Settlement. In this preprint, Samuelson   takes an in-depth look at the Google Book Settlement (GBS), including   the [30]Amended Settlement Agreement reached in November 2009. After an
   overview, Samuelson discusses the possible future impacts of the GBS if  approved. A section on optimistic predictions is followed by a six-part   section on pessimistic predictions, whose titles often include the word   "nightmares." Of particular interest are the "Library and Academic   Researcher Nightmares" and "Nightmares for Readers" subsections. A   summary is followed by a new section on "Other Possible Futures for   Books in Cyberspace," which includes subsections on what could happen   if the GBS is rejected and on a proposed alternative publicly funded   book mass digitization project. For another important recent critical   perspective on the GBS, see Lawrence Lessig's The New Republic article   "[31]For the Love of Culture: Google, Copyright, and Our Future." -   [32]CB
     __________________________________________________________________

   Current Cites - ISSN: 1060-2356 is hosted by the community at
   WebJunction.org. (c) Copyright 2010 by Roy Tennant
   [36]Creative Commons License

References

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xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

 

February 2010

 

 

From: Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [mailto:PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU] On Behalf Of Roy Tennant
Sent: Monday, 1 March 2010 3:56 AM
To: PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU
Subject: [CurrentCites] Current Cites, February 2010

 

                                Current Cites

                                 February 2010

                            Edited by [2]Roy Tennant

        http://lists.webjunction.org/currentcites/2010/cc10.21.2.html

   Contributors: [3]Charles W. Bailey, Jr., Keri Cascio, [4]Frank Cervone,   [5]Alison Cody, [6]Susan Gibbons, [7]Peter Hirtle, [8]Leo Robert Klein,   [9]Roy Tennant
            _____________________________________________________

   Edgar, Brian D., and John  Willinsky. "[10]A Survey of the Scholarly   Journals Using Open Journal Systems"  [11]Public Knowledge Project   (2010)(http://pkp.sfu.ca/files/OJS%20Journal%20Survey.pdf). - In this   eprint, the authors present the results of a survey of 998 scholarly   journals that use the Open Journal Systems software, an open source   system that is freely available from the Public Knowledge Project. This   is a particularly interesting study because it provides insight into   the operations of open access journals that are not published by   corporations, such as BioMed Central. There has been a long history of   conflicting data about journal production costs, with conventional   publishers and open access advocates often presenting significantly   different figures. More often than not, this has been a "compare apples   and oranges" problem, since the operations of journals that are similar   to the majority of ones in this study are very different from those of   commercial publishers. For example, here are the number of journals in   the study that spent nothing on selected journal publishing functions:   editorship, 522; management, 474; article layout, 454; proofreading,   504; website, 457; customization, 545; technical, 494; and promotion,   536. Regarding costs, the authors note: "The challenge posed by this   set of journals becomes starkly apparent, whether the one compares the   first copy costs from this journal sample of $188.39 per article, at   roughly a tenth of the industry standard over the last decade. . ., or   the annual budget for the majority of these journals, which stands at   less than what are held to be the "fixed" costs ($3,800) of a single   article . . ." - [12]CB

   Harley, Diane, Sophia K  Acord, and Sarah  Earl-Novell, et.   al.[13]Assessing the Future Landscape of Scholarly Communication: An   Exploration of Faculty Values and Needs in Seven Disciplines  Berkeley,
   CA: UC Berkeley: Center for Studies in Higher Education, January   2010.(http://escholarship.org/uc/cshe_fsc). - Under the auspices of The   Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the [14]Center for Studies in Higher   Education at Berkeley has undertaken an exhaustive review of how   faculty in seven selected academic fields (archaeology, astrophysics,   biology, economics, history, music, and political science) view   traditional and emerging forms of scholarly communication. Their   findings highlight the importance of traditional models of scholarly   communications in most fields, and suggest that the opportunities   provided by new technologies are not soon going to replace the   published scholarly article or peer-reviewed monograph. They did   identify 5 areas, however, that require further attention in academia:   more nuanced tenure and promotion practices; a reexamination of peer   review; more high quality and affordable journals and monograph   publishing platforms; new models of publishing that accommodate   different types of material; and support for managing and preserving   new research methods and products. All academic librarians should read   the executive summary and first chapter in order to better understand   the environment in which we work. Specialists in each of the subject   areas will want to read the detailed discussion of their fields as   well. - [15]PH

   Jacs?, P?ter. "[16]Metadata mega mess in Google Scholar"  [17]Online   Information Review  34(1)(2010): 175-191.   (http://emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/14684521011024191). - Google Scholar
   has many uses but "bibliometric" searches, say, by name of author or   journal is not one of them. In fact, in this strongly argued piece,   authors are routinely "robbed" of credit because chapter headings,
   journal names and even menu settings are misidentified as content   creators. The parsers doing this are "under-educated" and most problems   originate from "a mix of incompetence, carelessness and reckless   negligence in essential quality control tests". Reading this litany,   it's hard to understand why the company that gave us Wave and Buzz   can't do a better job with structured data. That said, it's also hard   to see why anyone would use it for "bibliometric" searches in the first   place. - [18]LRK

   King, Julia. "[19]Beyond CRM: SaaS Slips into the Mainstream"    [20]Computerworld  44(4)(February 22, 2010): 16-20.   (http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/346619/Beyond_CRM_SaaS_Slips_In
   to_Mainstream).
- Cloud computing is one of the hottest topics in   information technology today. The most prevalent model of cloud   computing is currently centered around SaaS (software as a service). In   this article, King explores both the pros and cons of implementing   software as a service as well as the motivations behind some of these   SaaS implmentations. While not specifically directed at the library   community, the issues in this article are applicable to libraries as   they consider how they will implement their systems in the future. For   those not familiar with the ins-and-outs of cloud computing and   software as a service, this is definitely recommended reading before   your next meeting with IT. - [21]FC

   Library Copyright Alliance. [22]Issue Brief: Streaming of Films for   Education Purposes  Washington, D.C.: Library Copyright Alliance,   February   2010.(http://www.librarycopyrightalliance.org/bm~doc/ibstreamingfilms_021810.pdf). - Ever since Inside Higher Educations broke the story, a   lot of attention has been paid to the threat of a lawsuit against UCLA   for streaming videos for educational use. The coverage by [23]Kevin   Smith, [24]Peggy Hoon, and [25]Steve Worona has been particularly   helpful. Now a group of lawyers (Jonathan Band, Brandon Butler, Kenneth   Crews, and Peter Jaszi) have prepared for the Library Copyright   Alliance a ringing endorsement of educational use of streamed videos as   an educational fair use. They also consider whether the educational   performance exceptions might apply as well. We don't know how a court   would rule, but the document is a good reminder that we should not   accept at face value the interpretations of copyright law offered by   those with a vested interest in licensing work. As the authors   conclude, "Educational institutions should know and exercise their   rights to use copyrighted works to extend and enrich the classroom   experience." - [26]PH

   Maron, Nancy L. "[27]Capitalising on Crowdsourcing: Lessons From   eBird"  [28]Digital Content Quarterly (DCQ)  (1)(Winter 2009): 5.   (http://sca.jiscinvolve.org/files/2010/01/sca_dcquarterly_01_dec09-final.pdf). - This one-page piece in the inaugural issue of Digital Content   Quarterly (DCQ) from the JISC Strategic Content Alliance, highlights a   few useful points on how to be successful in attracting and effectively   using user-contributed content. Written by a Strategic Services Analyst   for [29]Ithaka in relation to the online resource [30]"eBird" that   encourages contributions from amateur birders, Maron points out such   lessons as: "1) Where's the `candy'? Users are unlikely to contribute   content or time purely to help you achieve your mission...2) `Free'   user-generated content often carries its own costs...3) Once content is   in, what is required to make it useful?" Although the brevity of this   piece may leave you desiring more, the article includes links to more   complete treatments of the topic. If you have Acrobat 9, be sure to   check out the [31]interactive version of this publication, which   includes embedded video. - [32]RT

   McSherry, Corynne, and Cindy  Cohn. "[33]Digital Books and Your Rights:   A Checklist for Readers"  [34]Electronic Frontier Foundation  (February   2010)(https://www.eff.org/files/eff-digital-books.pdf). - In a new   whitepaper, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) encourages readers   to understand their rights when purchasing and using digital books. It   gives readers questions to ask, and why these questions are important.   Topics include privacy, licensing and ownership, digital rights   management (DRM), censorship, and compatibility. The whitepaper   introduces readers to the concepts of the first sale doctrine, the ways   companies can track (and share) your reading habits, and the open EPUB   format. A must read for libraries and readers alike. - KC

   Tapscott, Don, and Anthony D.  Williams. "[35]Innovating the   21st-Century University: It's Time!"  [36]EDUCAUSE Review   45(1)(Jan/Feb 2010): 16-29.
   (http://www.educause.edu/EDUCAUSE+Review/EDUCAUSEReviewMagazineVolume45     /Innovatingthe21stCenturyUniver/195370). - The theme of the Jan/Feb   issue of EDUCAUSE Review is "rethinking the future of higher   education." Among the many interesting articles is a piece by Don   Tapscott (author of Growing Up Digital) and Anthony D. Williams   (co-author of Wikinomics). The authors join a growing chorus of   warnings that higher education is overdue for a radical paradigm shift.   Collaborative learning and collaborative knowledge production are at   the heart of what Tapscott and Williams believe will be the   21st-century model of higher education. Open access content, open   courseware and social networking ("a Facebook for faculty") are some of   the necessary elements of a more flexible and pedagogically-sound   education system. While we have been hearing elements of this   University 2.0 concept for several years now, the disruption,   dislocation, confusion and uncertainty of the paradigm shift needs   another push or two because the stakeholders are far too entrenched to   willingly consider change; a situation, which the authors and others,
   liken to health care reform (augh!). - [37]SG


   Vandenbark, R. Todd. "[38]Tending a Wild Garden: Library Web Design for   Persons with Disabilities"  [39]Information Technology and Libraries   29(1)(March 2010): 23-29.
   (http://ezp.lndlibrary.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.   aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=48049875&site=ehost-live). - This article   provides an overview of guidelines for creating a website accessible to   patrons with disabilities. The author breaks down the major   requirements of Section 508 (added to the 1973 Rehabilitation Act in   1998), which requires local and state government agencies to provide   accessible versions of all materials on their website. The guidelines   include instruction on ensuring that there are alternative means of   accessing all of the non-text portions of a page -- descriptions of   images, transcripts of videos, and the like -- as well as other   concerns for patrons with a variety of disabilities. After discussing   these regulations, the author makes suggestions of how library   webmasters can begin to implement them. These include starting out by   trying to access the existing site using a variety of assistive   technologies, in order to gain a better understanding of what works and   what doesn't. The author also points out the benefits of   fully-accessible sites -- they are easier to use for all patrons, and   easier for the webmaster to maintain. The author notes that it is
   generally easier to build an accessible website from scratch rather   than retrofit an existing site. This article is a great introduction to   the topic for a new library webmaster, or anyone who needs a quick
   refresher on the main requirements of Section 508. - [40]AC
     __________________________________________________________________

   Current Cites - ISSN: 1060-2356 is hosted by the community at    WebJunction.org. (c) Copyright 2010 by Roy Tennant   [44]Creative Commons License

References

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http://leoklein.com/
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http://pkp.sfu.ca/
  12.
http://www.digital-scholarship.org/
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http://escholarship.org/uc/cshe_fsc
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http://cshe.berkeley.edu/
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http://vivo.cornell.edu/individual/vivo/individual23436
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http://emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/14684521011024191
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http://emeraldinsight.com/1468-4527.htm
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http://www.computerworld.com/
  21.
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  22.
http://www.librarycopyrightalliance.org/bm~doc/ibstreamingfilms_021810.pdf
  23.
http://library.duke.edu/blogs/scholcomm/2010/01/27/can-we-stream-digital-video/
  24.
http://chaucer.umuc.edu/blogcip/collectanea/2010/02/more_on_streaming_video.html
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http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/lita/ital/italinformation.cfm
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Digital Ethnographies - Cosmopolitan Civil Societies: An Interdisciplinary Journal

 

 

 

From: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [mailto:JESSE@listserv.utk.edu] On Behalf Of Michael Olsson
Sent: Thursday, 25 March 2010 9:23 AM
To: JESSE@listserv.utk.edu
Subject: Special Issue: Digital Ethnographies - Cosmopolitan Civil Societies: An Interdisciplinary Journal

 

The rise of new information and communication technologies (ICTs) has radically transformed contemporary civil society. The advent of cyberspace has radically transformed the personal, professional and creative practices of people around the globe. It has led to the birth of new ‘born digital’ communities and caused many existing communities to re-invent themselves. It has given rise to notions of an ‘Information Society’.

 

It has also brought new challenges and opportunities for researchers across the information and social sciences. This special issue of Cosmopolitan Civil Societies devoted to ‘Digital Ethnographies’ provides an opportunity for researchers in the burgeoning field of digital ethnographies to share their findings and approaches with a diverse international via an open-access e-journal. We particularly invite submissions from less experienced authors. The issue will be edited by Professor  Heather Goodall,  Social and Political Change Group, and Dr Michael Olsson, Journalism Information & Media Studies Group, of the Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences at the University of Technology, Sydney.

 

Cosmopolitan Civil Societies: An Interdisciplinary Journal  is concerned with developing a better understanding of social change and cultural cohesion in Australia and other cosmopolitan societies. Researchers engaged in interdisciplinary and/or multidisciplinary work are encouraged to contribute. Guidelines for Authors can be found here. The closing date for submission to the special issue is 30 June 2010. Any enquiries should be directed via email to Dr Michael Olsson at Michael.Olsson@uts.edu.au .

 

 

Dr Michael Olsson
Graduate Coordinator

Lecturer, Information and Knowledge Management
University of Technology, Sydney
ph:  +61 2 9514 2722
Fax: +61 2 9514 2723

 

 

 

 

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D-Lib Magazine

            November/December 2009

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Public-Access Computer Systems Publications [mailto:PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU] On Behalf Of Bonnie Wilson
Sent: Tuesday, 17 November 2009 2:25 AM
To: PACS-P@LISTSERV.UH.EDU
Subject: The November/December 2009 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

 

Greetings:

 

The November/December 2009 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now available.

 

This issue contains six articles, nine conference and workshop reports, the 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news of

upcoming conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  This month, D-Lib features Historic Costumes and Textiles

Collection, courtesy of Leta Hendricks, Ohio State University.

 

 

The articles include:

 

Beyond 1923: Characteristics of Potentially In-copyright Print Books in  Library Collections

Brian Lavoie and Lorcan Dempsey, OCLC Online Computer Library Center

 

Service-Oriented Models for Educational Resource Federations Daniel R. Rehak, LSAL; and Nick Nicholas and Nigel Ward, Link

Affiliates, Australia

 

 From TIFF to JPEG 2000? Preservation Planning at the Bavarian State Library Using a Collection of Digitized 16th Century Printings

Hannes Kulovits and Andreas Rauber, Vienna University of Technology; and Anna Kugler, Markus Brantl, Tobias Beinert, Astrid Schoger, Bavarian

State Library

 

A Low Cost, Low Memory Footprint, SQL and Servlet-based Solution for Searching Archived Images and Documents in Digital Collections

 

Measuring Citation Advantages of Open Accessibility Samson C. Soong, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

 

The Importance of Digital Libraries in Joint Educational Programmes: A Case Study of a Master of Science Programme Involving Organizations in

Ghana and the Netherlands

 

The Conference and Workshop Reports are:

 

ECDL 2009: Enhancing Digital Libraries Users' Experience Maria Cassella, University of Turin; and Licia Calvi, University of Applied Sciences, Breda

 

Report on the Workshop on Digital Curation in the Human Sciences at ECDL 2009 : Corfu, 30 September - 1 October 2009 Costis Dallas, Athena Research Centre; and Peter Doorn, Data Archiving and Networked Service (DANS)

 

Report on the First DL.org Workshop on Digital Library Interoperability, Best Practices and Modelling Foundations Perla Innocenti, University of Glasgow; Eleni Toli, University of Athens; and Leonardo Candela, Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologie dell'Informazione

 

Report on the Workshop on Harvesting Metadata - Practices and Challenges: Held September 30 2009, Corfu, Greece Laszlo Karman, Monguz Ltd.

 

Report on the 8th European Networked Knowledge Organization Systems/Services (NKOS) Workshop Traugott Koch, Max Planck Digital Library, Berlin

 

Second Workshop on Very Large Digital Libraries 2009: Held In conjunction with the European Conference on Digital Libraries, Corfu, Greece, 2nd of October 2009 Yannis Ioannidis, University of Athens; and Paolo Manghi and Pasquale Pagano, Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologie dell'Informazion, Consiglio

Nazionale delle Ricerche (ISTI-CNR)

 

Report on WEMIS 2009: ECDL Workshop on Exploring Musical Information Spaces, Corfu 1-2 October 2009Nicola Orio, University of Padova; Andreas Rauber, Vienna University of Technology; and David Rizo, University of Alicante

 

Cross-Language Evaluation Forum Celebrates Tenth Birthday Carol Peters, Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologie dell'Informazion,

Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (ISTI-CNR)

 

Report on the International Web Archiving Workshop (IWAW) 2009 Andreas Rauber, Vienna University of Technology; Julien Masanes, European Archive Foundation; and Marc Spaniol, Max Planck Institute, Germany

 

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Bonnie Wilson

Editor

D-Lib Magazine

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            January/February 2010

-----Original Message-----
From: dlib-subscribers-admin@dlib.org [mailto:dlib-subscribers-admin@dlib.org] On Behalf Of Larry Lannom
Sent: Wednesday, 20 January 2010 3:53 AM
To: dlib-subscribers@dlib.org
Subject: [Dlib-subscribers] The January/February 2010 issue of D-Lib Magazine is now available

 

Greetings:

 

The January/February 2010 issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now available.

 

This issue contains eight articles, two conference reports, the 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and news of upcoming conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'. This month, D-Lib features The Swingle Plant Anatomy Reference Collection, a historical collection of plant anatomical microscope slides, courtesy of University of Miami Libraries.

 

The Articles are:

 

Digital Object Repository Server: A Component of the Digital Object Architecture by Sean Reilly and Robert Tupelo-Schneck, Corporation for National Research Initiatives

http://dx.doi.org/10.1045/january2010-reilly

 

Technologies Employed to Control Access to or Use of Digital Cultural Collections: Controlled Online Collections by Kristin R. Eschenfelder, University of Wisconsin-Madison and Grace Agnew, Rutgers University

http://dx.doi.org/10.1045/january2010-eschenfelder

 

The Use of Metadata for Educational Resources in Digital Repositories: Practices and Perspectives by Dimitrios A. Koutsomitropoulos, Andreas D. Alexopoulos, Georgia D. Solomou, and Theodore S. Papatheodorou, University of Patras

http://dx.doi.org/10.1045/january2010-koutsomitropoulos

 

RDA Vocabularies: Process, Outcome, Use by Diane Hillmann, Information Institute of Syracuse, Metadata Management Associates; Karen Coyle, kcoyle.net; Jon Phipps, JES & Co., Metadata Management Associates; Gordon Dunsire, University of Strathclyde

http://dx.doi.org/10.1045/january2010-hillmann

 

D-Lib Magazine: Its First 13 Years by Taemin Kim Park, Indiana University Libraries

http://dx.doi.org/10.1045/january2010-park

 

Tagging Full Text Searchable Articles: An Overview of Social Tagging Activity in Historic Australian Newspapers August 2008 - August 2009 by Rose Holley, Australian Newspapers Digitisation Program (ANDP), National Library of Australia

http://dx.doi.org/10.1045/january2010-holley

 

FERPA and Student Work: Considerations for Electronic Theses and Dissertations by Marisa Ramirez, California Polytechnic State University - San Luis Obispo and Gail McMillan, Virginia Tech

http://dx.doi.org/10.1045/january2010-ramirez

 

The Virtual Journals of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics by Richard H. Cyburt, Sam M. Austin, Timothy C. Beers, Alfredo Estrade, Ryan M. Ferguson, Alexander Sakharuk, Hendrik Schatz, Karl Smith, and Scott Warren, Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA)

http://dx.doi.org/10.1045/january2010-cyburt

 

The Conference and Workshop Reports are:

 

e-Science for Musicology Workshop Report by Richard Lewis, Goldsmiths College, University of London

http://dx.doi.org/10.1045/january2010-lewis

 

Cloud Computing, Big Data, and Open Access at EDUCAUSE 2009 by Carol Minton Morris, DuraSpace and Cornell University

http://dx.doi.org/10.1045/january2010-morris

 

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BN - National Library of Portugal, Portugal

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(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the January/February 2010 issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later.  There is a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United States and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

 

Laurence Lannom

Editor-in-Chief

D-Lib Magazine

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            March/April 2010

-----Original Message-----
From: dlib-subscribers-admin@dlib.org [mailto:dlib-subscribers-admin@dlib.org] On Behalf Of Bonnie Wilson
Sent: Tuesday, 16 March 2010 9:18 PM
To: DLib-subscribers
Subject: [Dlib-subscribers] The March/April 2010 issue of D-LIb Magazine is now available

 

Greetings:

 

The March/April issue of D-Lib Magazine (http://www.dlib.org/) is now available.

 

This issue contains four articles, one opinion piece and one conference report, the 'In Brief' column, excerpts from recent press releases, and

news of upcoming conferences and other items of interest in 'Clips and Pointers'.  This month, D-Lib features the WADP Numbering System (a

postal stamp website and database), courtesy of Ujwala Nawlakhe, Library Intern, Sarwajanik Wachanalaya, Bhandara, India; Sulbha Thengadi, LIS

Post Graduate, Waijeshwar ward, Pauni, District Bhandara, India; and Anil Nawlakhe, Lecturer in Physics, J.M.Patel College, Bhandara, India..

 

 

The articles include:

 

Realizing and Maintaining Aggregative Digital Library Systems: D-NET Software Toolkit and OAIster System by Paolo Manghi, Marko Mikulicic, Leonardo Candela, Donatella Castelli and Pasquale Pagano, Instituto di Scienza e Tecnologie dell'Informazione "Alessandro Faedo", Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche

 

Using Omeka to Build Digital Collections: The METRO Case Study by Jason Kucsma, Metropolitan New York Library Council, and Kevin Reiss

and Angela Sidman, City University of New York

 

Museum Data Exchange: Learning How to Share by Gunter Waibel, Ralph LeVan and Bruce Washburn, OCLC Online Computer Library Center

 

Crowdsourcing: How and Why Should Libraries Do It? by Rose Holley, National Library of Australia

 

The opinion piece is:

 

An Approach to Open Access Author Payment by Donald W. King, University of North Carolina

 

The Conference Report is:

 

Berlin 7: Open Access Reaching Diverse Communities by Elena Giglia, University of Turin

 

 

D-Lib Magazine has mirror sites at the following locations:

 

UKOLN, University of Bath, Bath, England

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The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

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State Library of Lower Saxony and the University Library of Goettingen,

Goettingen,

Germany

http://webdoc.sub.gwdg.de/edoc/aw/d-lib/

 

Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

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BN - National Library of Portugal, Portugal

http://purl.pt/302/1

 

(If the mirror site closest to you is not displaying the March/April

2010 issue of D-Lib Magazine at this time, please check back later. 

There is a delay between the time the magazine is released in the United

States and the time when the mirroring process has been completed.)

 

Bonnie Wilson

Contributing Editor

D-Lib Magazine

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Education Libraries

            Winter 2009

-----Original Message-----
From: jacqueline.snider@act.org [mailto:jacqueline.snider@act.org]
Sent: Thursday, 12 November 2009 11:46 PM
To: SLA Solo Division
Subject: [sla-dsol] New issue of Education Libraries

 

 Hello,

 

 The Winter 2009 issue of Education Libraries, peer-reviewed journal from  SLA's Education Division, is now available via the URLs below. Please keep

 in mind that we are always looking for submissions and book reviewers.

 

  All the best,

 

 Jacqueline Snider

 Education Libraries, Co-editor

 

 

 http://units.sla.org/division/ded/educationlibraries/32-2.pdf

 

 On http://units.sla.org/division/ded/education_libraries.html

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The Electronic Library

            Digital preservation management and technology

 

From: Emerald Group Publishing Limited [mailto:replies@emeraldinsight.com]
Sent: Friday, 11 December 2009 8:58 PM
To: Kerry Smith
Subject: A new outlet for publishing in Digital Preservation Management and Technology

Digital Preservation Management and Technology

New section in The Electronic Library

Section Co-editors: Dr Gillian Oliver and Professor G E Gorman Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Digital preservation management and technology are two inter-related issues confronting all memory institutions: libraries, archives, galleries and museums. Such institutions are addressing very similar questions regarding the management of preservation activities and of preserved artefacts, as well as the technologies required to preserve, disseminate and access these artefacts. For many, this has been the unexpected consequence of rushing to reformat existing collections to enable digital accessibility. Resourcing issues (shortage of expertise, limited availability of funding) are forcing collaborative activity to an unprecedented degree between the distinctly different collecting paradigms represented by these institution types. As the functionality of web technologies and social media software increasingly influence the ways in which these institutions operate, the focus on DPMT, on collaboration between technologists and managers, and on inter-institutional collaboration will increase. It is therefore timely to consider devoting a significant section of an existing journal (The Electronic Library) to capture interest and research in this sector.

In time, Digital Preservation Management and Technology may become a full journal, the focus of which will be research in the broad field of digital preservation management and related technologies in this cross-sectoral domain, which includes academic, corporate, government, scientific and commercial contexts. It will address issues relating to the continuity of digital information, including digital objects, metadata and the context of their creation, management and use. It will encompass all purposes for which information is managed by the different occupational groups: as evidence, for accountability, for knowledge and awareness and for pleasure and entertainment. Coverage is intentionally international. The emphasis will be on research and conceptual papers in these fields.

Articles should be either conceptual papers or research papers in the region of 3000-6000 words.

All submissions will be double-blind peer reviewed. by members of the Editorial Advisory Board.

There will be an international Editorial Advisory Board whose specific task will be to double blind peer review submissions. The 20-30 Board members will be from North America, the UK, Australasia, Asia and elsewhere.

Submissions please, to Digital Preservation Management and Technology at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/tel

Kind regards,

Sarah Baxter
Assistant Publisher
Emerald Group Publishing Limited

sbaxter@emeraldinsight.com
http://www.emeraldinsight.com

Emerald Group Publishing Limited hope that you enjoyed reading this message. However, if you do not wish to be contacted in future please send us an 'Unsubscribe' request via the below link.

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Evidence Based Library and Information Practice (EBLIP),

            Call for papers

 

From: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [mailto:JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU] On Behalf Of Evidence Based Library
Sent: Friday, 12 February 2010 2:52 AM
To: JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU
Subject: EBLIP Call for Papers - Classics

 

EBLIP call for Classic submissions

Evidence Based Library and Information Practice (EBLIP), a peer-reviewed, open access journal published since 2006, seeks nominations and contributors for its "Classic Research Studies" section.

Contributions to the EBLIP "Classics" section follow a structured format designed to highlight, summarize and critically appraise research studies that have stood the test of time and that have had (and continue to have) an impact on library and information practice. Previous "Classics" have included the work of William Postell, Constance Mellon, Carol Kuhlthau, Joanne Marshall, and Robert Taylor. For an example of a "Classic" summary, see
<http://ejournals.library.ualberta.ca/index.php/EBLIP/article/view/1760/3331>.

If you can identify such a study, articulate its value to LIS practice, and are willing to write a summary and appraisal of that study in order to make EBLIP readers aware of this "Classic," we would like to hear from you.

Information about Evidence Based Library and Information Practice is available at: <http://ejournals.library.ualberta.ca/index.php/EBLIP/index>.

Access to EBLIP Evidence Summaries and Classics by subject is available at:
<http://www.newcastle.edu.au/service/library/gosford/ebl/toolkit/classicstudies.html>

EBLIP wants to continue to highlight past research that is important and bring that research to the attention of new readers. Please consider nominating a great research article to be featured in EBLIP.

For more information, or to nominate a research article, please contact Jonathan Eldredge, <jeldredge@salud.unm.edu>, Associate Editor (Classics). Nominations should be accompanied by a full bibliographic citation and an explanation of the contribution of the research to the field of library and information practice. If the article is selected, a schedule for publication and submission deadlines will be arranged with the Editor.

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First Monday

            December 2009

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Readership of First Monday [mailto:FIRSTMONDAY@LISTSERV.UIC.EDU] On Behalf Of Valauskas, Edward J.
Sent: Monday, 14 December 2009 9:22 PM
To: FIRSTMONDAY@LISTSERV.UIC.EDU
Subject: First Monday December 2009

 

Readers:

 

First Monday has just published the December 2009 (volume 14, number 12) issue at http://www.uic.edu/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/issue/current.

 

The following papers are included in this month's issue:

 

First Monday

Volume 14, number 12 - 7 December 2009

 

Political protest Italian-style: The blogosphere and mainstream media in the promotion and coverage of Beppe Grillo's V-day by Alberto Pepe and Corinna di Gennaro http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2740/2406

 

Search engine use behavior of students and faculty: User perceptions and implications for future research by Oya Y. Rieger

http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2716/2385

 

The self-Googling phenomenon: Investigating the performance of personalized information resources by Thomas Nicolai, Lars Kirchhoff, Axel Bruns, Jason Wilson, and Barry Saunders

http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2683/2409

 

Three strands in a braid: Identity interaction in social software by Cynthia F. Kurtz

http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2746/2408

 

Public lives and private communities: The terms of service agreement and life in virtual worlds by Debora J. Halbert

http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2601/2405

 

Use of social networking by undergraduate psychology majors by Caleb W. Lack, Lisa Beck, and Danielle Hoover

http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2540/2407

 

Thanks for your continuing interest in our work,

 

Edward J Valauskas

Chief Editor, First Monday

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            January 2010

-----Original Message-----
From: Readership of First Monday [mailto:FIRSTMONDAY@LISTSERV.UIC.EDU] On Behalf Of Valauskas, Edward J.
Sent: Wednesday, 6 January 2010 11:19 AM
To: FIRSTMONDAY@LISTSERV.UIC.EDU
Subject: First Monday January 2010

 

Readers:

 

First Monday has just published the January 2010 (volume 15, number 1) issue at http://www.uic.edu/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/issue/current.

 

The following papers are included in this month's issue:

 

First Monday

Volume 15, number 1 - 5 January 2010

 

A persistence paradox by Fang Wu and Bernardo A. Huberman

http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2776/2427

 

Detecting spam in a Twitter network by Sarita Yardi, Daniel Romero, Grant Schoenebeck, and danah boyd

http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2793/2431

 

Beyond the legacy of the Enlightenment? Online encyclopaedias as digital heterotopias by Jutta Haider and Olof Sundin

http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2744/2428

 

Aliases, creeping, and wall cleaning: Understanding privacy in the age of Facebook by Kate Raynes-Goldie

http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2775/2432

 

Looking for you: An analysis of video blogs by Maggie Griffith and Zizi Papacharissi

http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2769/2430

 

Thanks for your continuing interest in our work,

 

Edward J Valauskas

Chief Editor, First Monday

ejv@uic.ed

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            February 2010

-----Original Message-----
From: Readership of First Monday [mailto:FIRSTMONDAY@LISTSERV.UIC.EDU] On Behalf Of Valauskas, Edward J.
Sent: Thursday, 11 February 2010 1:36 AM
To: FIRSTMONDAY@LISTSERV.UIC.EDU
Subject: First Monday February 2010

 

Readers:

 

First Monday has just published the February 2010 (volume 15, number 2) issue at http://www.uic.edu/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/issue/current.

 

The following papers are included in this month's issue:

 

First Monday

Volume 15, number 2 - 1 February 2010

 

Motivations of cybervolunteers in an applied distributed computing environment: MalariaControl.net as an example by Viola Krebs

http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2783/2452

 

In search of prosumption: Youth and the new media in Hong Kong by Donna Chu

http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2772/2451

 

The dangers of Webcrawled datasets by Graeme Baxter Bell

http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2739/2456

 

Sociological implications of scientific publishing: Open access, science, society, democracy, and the digital divide by Ulrich Herb

http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2599/2404

 

Electronic portfolio use in Thailand by Noppadol Prammanee and Mahmoud Moussa

http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2835/2453

 

Thanks for your continuing interest in our work,

 

Edward J Valauskas

Chief Editor, First Monday

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            March 2010

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Readership of First Monday [mailto:FIRSTMONDAY@LISTSERV.UIC.EDU] On Behalf Of Valauskas, Edward J.
Sent: Tuesday, 16 March 2010 1:34 AM
To: FIRSTMONDAY@LISTSERV.UIC.EDU
Subject: First Monday March 2010

 

Readers:

 

First Monday has just published the March 2010 (volume 15, number 3) issue

at http://www.uic.edu/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/issue/current.

 

The following papers are included in this month's issue:

 

First Monday

Volume 15, number 3 - 1 March 2010

 

Individual focus and knowledge contribution by Lada A. Adamic, Xiao Wei, Jiang Yang, Sean Gerrish, Kevin K. Nam, and Gavin S. Clarkson

http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2841/2475

 

How today’s college students use Wikipedia for course-related research by Alison J. Head and Michael B. Eisenberg

http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2830/2476

 

Identifying and understanding the problems of Wikipedia’s peer governance:The case of inclusionists versus deletionists by Vasilis Kostakis

http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2613/2479

 

The role of advertising in financing open access journals by Jan Erik Frantsvag

http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2777/2478

 

Vanguard, laggard or relic? The possible futures of higher education after the Epistemic Revolution by Dion Dennis and Jabbar Al-Obaidi

http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2629/2480

 

Thanks for your continuing interest in our work,

 

Edward J Valauskas

Chief Editor, First Monday

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GreyNet Newsletter

           

            Volume 1, Number 6

 

-----Original Message-----
From: GreyNet [mailto:info@greynet.org]
Sent: Tuesday, 1 December 2009 2:07 PM
To: GreyNet
Subject: Newsletter, Volume 1, Issue 6 - November/December 2009

 

GreyNet Newsletter

Volume 1, Number 6

Bimonthly, November/December 2009

ISSN 1877-6140 (PDF)

 

 

Contents: http://www.greynet.org/greynetnewsletter.html          

 

. Conference Reception in Whittall Pavilion of the Jefferson Building

 

. Japan Science and Technology Agency, JST Co-Sponsors GL11

 

. GL11 Conference Schedule - Monday, 14 December 2009

 

. GL11 Conference Schedule - Tuesday, 15 December 2009

 

. Advertisements: FLICC/FEDLINK, J-STAGE, Refdoc.fr, The Grey Journal

 

. About GreyNet Newsletter

 

 

GreyNet

Grey Literature Network Service

Javastraat 194-HS

1095 CP Amsterdam

Netherlands

 

T/F +31-(0)20 331 2420

Email: info@greynet.org

Url: http://www.greynet.org

 

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     Volume 2, Issue 1

 

-----Original Message-----
From: GreyNet [mailto:info@greynet.org]
Sent: Wednesday, 3 February 2010 5:05 PM
To: GreyNet
Subject: Newsletter, Volume 2, Issue 1 - January/February 2010

 

GreyNet Newsletter

Volume 2, Issue 1

Bimonthly, January/February 2010

ISSN 1877-6140 (PDF)

 

 

Contents: http://www.greynet.org/greynetnewsletter.html             

 

. Twelfth International Conference on Grey Literature (Pre-Announcement)

 

. Czech National Technical Library, New GreyNet Associate Member

 

. OpenSIGLE Feasibility Study, FP7 Proposal INFRA-2010-3.3

 

. Annual Review of GreyNet's Milestones and Deliverables

 

. In Advocacy of Grey Literature, Now in the line of IPCC fire

 

. Advertisements: NTK, J-STAGE, Refdoc.fr, IIA Inc.

 

. About GreyNet Newsletter

 

 

GreyNet International

Grey Literature Network Service

Javastraat 194-HS

1095 CP Amsterdam

Netherlands

 

T/F +31-(0)20 331 2420

Email: info@greynet.org

Url: http://www.greynet.org

 

"GreyNet is dedicated to Research, Publication, Open Access, and Education

in the field of Grey Literature"

 

 

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Volume 2, Issue 2

 

 

From: GreyNet [mailto:info@greynet.org]
Sent: Friday, 26 March 2010 4:21 PM
To: GreyNet
Subject: Newsletter March/April 2010, Volume 2, Issue 2

 

GreyNet Newsletter

Volume 2, Issue 2

Bimonthly, March/April 2010

ISSN 1877-6140 (PDF)

 

 

Contents: http://www.greynet.org/greynetnewsletter.html                 

 

• Transparency in Grey Literature - GL12 Conference Announcement

 

• Grey Tech Approaches to High Tech Issues – GL12 Call for Papers

 

• GL11 Conference Proceedings - Now in Print

 

• Government Alliance to Grey Literature – Forthcoming Spring 2010

 

GreyNet Collections 1995-2009 in the OpenSIGLE Repository

 

• Encyclopedia of Library and Information Sciences, Third Edition

 

• ICSTI’s 2010 Helsinki Conference 'From Information to Innovation'

 

• Tear Sheets on Grey Literature - Collection Based Content

 

• Advertisements: NTK, J-STAGE, Refdoc.fr, IIA Inc.

 

• About GreyNet’s Newsletter

 

 

GreyNet International

Grey Literature Network Service

Javastraat 194-HS

1095 CP Amsterdam

Netherlands

 

T/F +31-(0)20 331 2420

Email: info@greynet.org

Url: http://www.greynet.org

 

"GreyNet is dedicated to Research, Publication, Open Access, and Education in the field of Grey Literature"

 

 

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Information Research

            Vol 14, no 4, December 2009Vol

-----Original Message-----
From: asis-l-bounces@asis.org [mailto:asis-l-bounces@asis.org] On Behalf Of Tom Wilson
Sent
: Wednesday, 16 December 2009 4:41 AM
To: ASIST; Jean Jones
Subject: [Asis-l] New issue of Information Research

 

The new issue of Information Research will be online by tomorrow – the files are usually uploaded from the intermediary server at about 10:30

GMT every day.

 

For an overview of the issue, read the Editorial at http://InformationR.net/ir/14-4/editor144.html

 

Some of the papers were rather complex on this occasion and demanded a great deal of final editing, as a result, not all of the glitches have

been ironed out, but this will be done over the next few days.

 

--

Professor Tom Wilson, PhD, Ph.D.(h.c.),

Publisher and Editor-in-Chief

Information Research: an international electronic journal

Website: http://InformationR.net/

E-mail: wilsontd@gmail.com

 

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            Volume 15 No. 1

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Information and/or Library Studies in the UK [mailto:LIS-BAILER@JISCMAIL.AC.UK] On Behalf Of Prof. Tom Wilson
Sent
: Thursday, 18 March 2010 7:17 AM
To: LIS-BAILER@JISCMAIL.AC.UK
Subject: New Issue of Information Research

 

Volume 15 No. 1 of Information Research is now online.  Read the editorial at:

 

http://InformationR.net/ir/15-1/editor151.html

 

Professor T.D. Wilson, PhD, Hon.PhD

Publisher/Editor in Chief

Information Research

InformationR.net

e-mail: t.d.wilson@shef.ac.uk

Web site: http://InformationR.net/

 

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International Journal of Information Communication Technologies and Human Development (IJICTHD)

From: asis-l-bounces@asis.org [mailto:asis-l-bounces@asis.org] On Behalf Of Dr. Susheel Chhabra
Sent: Friday, 20 November 2009 6:31 PM
To: asis-l@asis.org
Subject: [Asis-l] The contents of the latest issue of: International Journal of Information Communication Technologies and Human Development (IJICTHD)

 

The contents of the latest issue of:

 

International Journal of Information Communication Technologies and Human Development (IJICTHD)

Official Publication of the Information Resources Management Association

Volume 1, Issue 4, October-December 2009

Published: Quarterly in Print and Electronically

ISSN: 1935-5661 EISSN: 1935-567X 

Published by IGI Publishing, Hershey-New York, USA

www.igi-global.com/ijicthd

 

Editors-in-Chief:

Susheel Chhabra, Lal Bahadur Shastri Institute of Management, India

Hakikur Rahman, University of Minho, Portugal

 

PAPER ONE

 

Technology Education: Empirical Evidence from Osun State in Nigeria

 

Nancy Bertaux, Xavier University, USA

Adekunle Okunoye, Xavier University, USA

Abiodun O. Bada, The George Washington University, USA

 

In developing countries, information technology education is associated with high cost and is not typically available outside urban areas. Seeking IT education might not be on the priority list of countries battling numerous problems related to healthcare, housing, nutrition, and other basic needs of life; however, IT education is an increasingly important aspect of human resource development, as well as economic development. This article presents a case where the provision of IT education differs from the conventional emphasis on urban dwellers. The authors discuss the case of Summit Computers in a rural community in Nigeria. The authors discuss the important factors to benefit and enhance the sustainability of IT education in rural communities.

 

To obtain a copy of the entire article, click on the link below.

http://www.infosci-on-demand.com/content/details.asp?ID=35223

 

PAPER TWO

 

Strategic Metamorphoses of ICT Sector for Human Development in India

 

Meeta Mathur, University of Rajasthan, India

Sangeeta Sharma, University of Rajasthan, India

 

As Indian economy gets integrated to the global economy and strives to improve in terms of human development indicators, a special role exists for information and communication technologies (ICTs) in this process. The strategic metamorphoses and the resultant expansion of ICTs linked telecommunication services in India have favorably influenced the effort to accelerate the pace of human development by enabling equality in access to information, creation of employment, improving the quality of life, better livelihood opportunities in rural areas, growth of agriculture, impetus to business development, environmental management, and many more. After the initiation of economic planning in India, telecom services are assumed to be a natural monopoly and are provided by one entity without competition. The government launched ambitious ICT infrastructure initiatives, radically changing its communication policy framework.

 

To obtain a copy of the entire article, click on the link below.

http://www.infosci-on-demand.com/content/details.asp?ID=35224

 

PAPER THREE

 

Users’ Perception of Internet Characteristics in the Academic Environment

 

Abdullah Almobarraz, Imam University, Saudi Arabia

 

In this article, the author examines the characteristics of the Internet that motivates faculty members of Imam Muhammad Bin Saud University (IMSU) in Saudi Arabia to utilize the Internet in their research and instructional activities. The framework of the study is attributed of innovations offered by Rogers. The author adopts a modified instrument to collect the data and measure the attributes.

 

To obtain a copy of the entire article, click on the link below.

http://www.infosci-on-demand.com/content/details.asp?ID=35225

 

PAPER FOUR

 

Trust and Technology in Inter-Organizational Business Relations

 

Muneesh Kumar, University of Delhi South Campus, India and ESC-PAU, France

Mamta Sareen, University of Delhi, India

 

The emergence of inter-organizational systems has facilitated easy and fast flow of information among the trading partners. This has affected the business relations among the trading parties involved. Though the inter-organizational systems have helped a lot in improving the business relations, the vulnerability and the virtual environment of such systems raise the issues of trust that may affect the long-term business relations. In this article, the authors empirically examine the relationship between the levels of assurance with regard to deployment and implementation of relevant technology tools in addressing the identified technology-related trust issues. This article presented the empirical evidence, based on a survey of 106 Indian companies using inter-organizational systems for managing their business relations.

 

To obtain a copy of the entire article, click on the link below.

http://www.infosci-on-demand.com/content/details.asp?ID=35226

 

PAPER FIVE

 

Enhancing Service Quality in Hospitals: Mining Multiple Data Sources

 

Anirban Chakraborty, Lal Bahadur Shastri Institute of Management, India

Sonal G Rawat, Lal Bahadur Shastri Institute of Management, India

Susheel Chhabra, Lal Bahadur Shastri Institute of Management, India

 

Large organizations use multiple data sources and centralize processing in these organizations require analysis of huge database originating from various locations. Data mining association rules help perform exploration and analysis of large amounts of data to discover meaningful patterns which can facilitate effective decision-making. This article is to enhance service quality in a hospital using data mining. The improvement in service quality helps create hygienic environment and enhance technical competence among staff members. The authors propose a weighting model to identify valid rules among large number of forwarded rules from various data sources. This model is applied to rank the rules based on patient perceived service parameters in a hospital.

 

To obtain a copy of the entire article, click on the link below.

http://www.infosci-on-demand.com/content/details.asp?ID=35227

 

*******************************************************************

For full copies of the above articles, check for this issue of the International Journal of Information Communication Technologies and Human Development (IJICTHD) in your institution's library.  This journal is also included in the IGI Global aggregated "InfoSci-Journals" database:  www.infosci-journals.com.

********************************************************************

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

MISSION OF IJICTHD:

 

The mission of the International Journal of Information Communication Technologies and Human Development (IJICTHD) is to create awareness of how ICTs can contribute to human development in several areas. IJICTHD describes the link between ICTs and human development (which includes economic, social and political development), identifies the potential applications of ICTs for the development of human beings, and provides insightful analysis about those factors (also contextual and institutional ones) that affect ICTs for human development initiatives. This journal also proposes strategies (to both governments and international cooperation organizations) to move forward and to address future challenges.

 

COVERAGE OF IJICTHD:

 

Topics to be discussed in this journal include (but are not limited to) the following:

 

Digital divide

ICTs and agriculture

ICTs and citizen participation

ICTs and commerce

ICTs and culture

ICTs and disasters management

ICTs and economic development

ICTs and education

ICTs and ethics

ICTs and gender equality

ICTs and governance

ICTs and health

ICTs and human empowerment

ICTs and human rights

ICTs and international cooperation

ICTs and poverty alleviation

ICTs and the environment

Knowledge for development

Policy making with regard to ICTs for development

 

Interested authors should consult the journal’s manuscript submission guidelines at www.igi-global.com/ijicthd.

 

All inquiries and submissions should be sent to:

Editor-in-Chief:  Susheel Chhabra at susheel_chhabra@hotmail.com

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Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship

           

            Fall 2009

 

From: geonet-bounces@lists.purdue.edu [mailto:geonet-bounces@lists.purdue.edu] On Behalf Of Andrea Duda
Sent: Wednesday, 16 December 2009 3:11 AM
To: geonet
Subject: [Geonet] Fall 2009 ISTL now available

 

The Fall 2009 issue of Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship is now available at:
     http://www.istl.org/

CONTENTS

Articles

Preparing Science Librarians for Success: An Evaluation of Position Advertisements and Recommendations for Library Science Curricula
by A.R. DeArmond, A.D. Oster, E.A. Overhauser, M.K. Palos, S.M. Powell, K.K. Sago, and L.R. Schelling, Indiana University
 
A Season of Change: How Science Librarians Can Remain Relevant with Open Access and Scholarly Communications Initiatives
by Elizabeth Brown, Binghamton University
 
E-Books in the Sciences: If We Buy It Will They Use It?
by Rajiv Nariani, York University
 
How to Read Scientific Research Articles: A Hands-On Classroom Exercise
by Roxanne Bogucka, University of Texas and Emily Wood, Pierce College Fort Steilacoom
 

Refereed Articles
 
A Framework for Evaluating Science and Technology Electronic Reference Books: A Comparison of Five Platforms in Chemistry
by Meghan Lafferty, University of Minnesota
 
Electronic Scientific Data & Literature Aggregation: A Review for Librarians
by Barbara Losoff, University of Colorado at Boulder
 
Determining the Scope of Collection Development and Research Assistance for Cross-Disciplinary Areas: A Case Study of Two Contrasting Areas, Nanotechnology and Transportation Engineering
by Jeanine M. Williamson, Lee D. Han, and Monica Colon-Aguirre, University of Tennessee
 
Researching Climate Change: Trends in US Government Publications Distributed By the Government Printing Office
by Kari Kozak, University of Iowa, and Laura Sare, Texas A&M University


Science and Technology Resources on the Internet

International Year of Astronomy (IYA 2009): Selected Resources
by Mandy Taha, Bibliotheca Alexandrina, and Joseph R. Kraus, University of Denver


Tips from the Experts

Author Identification Systems
by A. Ben Wagner, University at Buffalo
 

Viewpoints

I Am Not Captain Dunsel! A (Former) Head of an Academic Branch Library Replies to Steven Bell
by Susanne J. Redalje, University of Washington

Andrea L. Duda
Davidson Library
University of California
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9010

 

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Winter 2010

 

 

From: geonet-bounces@lists.purdue.edu [mailto:geonet-bounces@lists.purdue.edu] On Behalf Of Andrea Duda
Sent: Tuesday, 16 March 2010 2:30 AM
To: geonet
Subject: [Geonet] New Issue of Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship

 

The Winter 2010 issue of Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship is now available at www.istl.org


CONTENTS

Board Accepted Articles

Evaluation of an Audience Response System in Library Orientations for Engineering students / Denise A. Brush, Rowan University

Open Access Citation Advantage: An Annotated Bibliography / A. Ben Wagner, University at Buffalo


Refereed Articles

Information Portals: A New Tool for Teaching Information Literacy Skills / Debra Kolah, Rice University and Michael Fosmire, Purdue University

Are Article Influence Scores Comparable across Scientific Fields? / Julie Arendt, Southern Illinois University Carbondale

Using Course Syllabi to Assess Research Expectations of Biology Majors: Implications for Further Development of Information Literacy Skills in the Curriculum / Andrea L. Dinkelman, Iowa State University

Developing the Oregon ExplorerTM -- a Natural Resources Digital Library / Janine Salwasser and Bonnie Avery, Oregon State University


Book Reviews

Virtual Research Environments: From Portals to Science Gateways / Phoebe Ayers, University of California, Davis

Historical Dictionary of Environmentalism / Melissa L. Gold, Millersville University


Science and Technology Resources on the Internet

End-User Patent Searching Using Open Access Sources / Pat LaCourse, Alfred University

Selected Internet Resources on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) / Erin O'Toole, University of North Texas

 
Tips from the Experts

Five Minute Screencasts -- The Super Tool for Science and Engineering Librarians / Olivia Bautista Sparks, Arizona State University

 
Viewpoints

The Future of arXiv / Robert Michaelson, Northwestern University



Andrea L. Duda
Davidson Library
University of California
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9010

duda@library.ucsb.edu
805-893-2647



duda@library.ucsb.edu
805-893-2647

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Journal of Education for Library and Information Science  (JELIS)

           

            Call for papers  special section: digital library and digital curation curricula

 

From: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [mailto:JESSE@listserv.utk.edu] On Behalf Of JELIS
Sent: Wednesday, 3 March 2010 12:26 AM
To: JESSE@listserv.utk.edu
Subject: [Call For Papers] JELIS Special Issue: Digital Library and Digital Curation Curricula

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

JOURNAL OF EDUCATION FOR LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE

SPECIAL SECTION: DIGITAL LIBRARY AND DIGITAL CURATION CURRICULA

(Winter 2011)
Abstract Submission Deadline: April 30, 2010
 
Guest Editor

Jeffrey Pomerantz
School of Information and Library Science

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

Introduction
Enormous quantities of data are constantly being produced and stored electronically: the volume of born-digital data far outstrips print, mass digitization efforts are being launched by institutions of all kinds, and personal devices that can capture images and video are commonplace. In this new environment, it is becoming increasingly clear that libraries, archives, and museums – indeed, cultural heritage institutions of all types – face shared challenges. In response, these disciplines – library and information science, archival studies, and museum studies – increasingly share overlapping educational goals. Only in the past five years or so, however, have significant efforts been launched in these programs to develop curricula to identify and meet these educational goals. We encourage researchers and educators in any of these or related disciplines to discuss the development, implementation, or evaluation of entire curricula, individual courses, or professional development programs to meet these educational goals, in the Winter 2011 issue of JELIS (Volume 52, no. 1).

 

Submission Procedure

Authors are invited to submit an abstract for the paper on or before April 30, 2010.  Both research and conceptual papers are welcome. Abstracts should not exceed 150 words, and should succinctly state the scope, objectives, and conclusions of the paper, as well as methodology and results, as appropriate. The guest editor will review the abstracts and provide suggestions and feedback by May 15, 2010.  The deadline for submission of full manuscripts will be June 30, 2010. The JELIS submission guidelines are available at http://jelis.org/for-authors/. Full manuscripts will be reviewed using the double-blind review process. Authors will be notified of the referees’ decisions by September 1, 2010, and final revisions will be due October 1, 2010. Selected papers will be published in the Volume 52, no. 1 in Winter 2011.

 

Inquiries and abstract submissions can be forwarded electronically to

 

Jeffrey Pomerantz

School of Information and Library Science

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

E-mail: jeliseditors@gmail.com

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Journal of Information Architecture

           

            Issue #2, 2009

 

From: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [mailto:JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU] On Behalf Of Katriina Byström
Sent: Tuesday, 5 January 2010 10:03 PM
To: JESSE@LISTSERV.UTK.EDU
Subject: Journal of Information Architecture, Issue #2, 2009

 

Issue 2 of the Journal of Information Architecture came out in December 09.

 

If you not done so yet, read all about it at http://journalofia.org/ and please spread the news!

 

Happy New Year!

 

Katriina Byström

 

 

************************************************************
Katriina Byström, Fil.Dr / Ph.D
Docent, Universitetslektor/Associate Professor
www.adm.hb.se/~kbm/index.htm

Programansvarig för Informationsarkitektutbildningen/

Director of Information Architect Programme

www.itsomyrke.nu/ia

Associate Editor, Journal of Information Architecture

www.journalofia.org/


+46 - (0)33 - 435 43 77  / +46 - (0)702 - 771 661

Högskolan i Borås                                                 
Biblioteks- och Informationsvetenskap/
Bibliotekshögskolan
501 90 Borås                       

Swedish School of Library and Information Science
at Göteborg University and Högskolan i Borås
SE-501 90  Borås
Sweden

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Journal of Library Metadata

           

            Call for papers

 

From: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [mailto:JESSE@listserv.utk.edu] On Behalf Of Jung-Ran Park
Sent: Tuesday, 23 February 2010 11:57 PM
To: JESSE@listserv.utk.edu
Subject: Call for papers-Journal of Library Metadata

 

[Excuses for cross-posting]
 
CALL FOR PAPERS: JOURNAL OF LIBRARY METADATA

The Journal of Library Metadata, a peer-reviewed journal, marks the growing importance of metadata in libraries and other institutions. As libraries collect, produce, distribute and publish more information than ever before, the metadata that describes these resources becomes more critical for digital resource management and discovery. The Journal of Library Metadata is the exclusive forum for the latest research, innovations, news, and expert views about all aspects of metadata applications and about the role of metadata in information retrieval. The journal is published quarterly by Routledge/Taylor & Francis.

The journal covers all aspects of metadata applications including (but not limited to):
 
·        Application profiles
·        Best practices
·        Controlled vocabularies
·        Crosswalking of metadata and interoperability
·        Digital libraries and metadata
·        Federated repositories
·        Federated searching
·        Folksonomies
·        Individual metadata schemes
·        Institutional repository metadata
·        Metadata content standards
·        Metadata harvesting
·        Ontologies
·        Preservation metadata
·        Resource Description Framework
·        Resource discovery and metadata
·        Search engines and metadata
·        SKOS
·        Tagging and tag clouds
·        Topic maps
·        Visual image and moving image metadata
 
The journal publishes three categories of articles: standard, peer-reviewed articles; shorter, non-peer reviewed articles and short viewpoint articles. 
 
* Peer-reviewed articles (original research): 10-50 double-spaced pages.
* Short, non-peer-reviewed articles, often practical in nature: 500-2,000 words with limited citations. 
* Upbeat viewpoint articles giving the author's opinion on a timely topic related to metadata applications: 500-2,000 words with or without citations. Focus should be on improvements or solutions instead of negative aspects of an existing system, standard or service. 
 
For more information please visit the submission instructions: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~db=all~content=t792306902~tab=submit~mode=paper_submission_instructions
 
Please direct all inquiries and articles to the journal editor below:
 

Dr. Jung-ran Park

Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Library Metadata

(http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t792306902~link=cover)

Assistant Professor

The iSchool at Drexel

College of Information Science and Technology

Email: jung-ran.park@ischool.drexel.edu

Phone: 215-895-1669

Fax: 215-895-2494

Homepage: http://www.cis.drexel.edu/faculty/jpark/index.html

 

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Journal of Organisational Transformation & Social Change

               Call for papers:  "Renewing libraries"

From: isef-bounces@listserv.csu.edu.au [mailto:isef-bounces@listserv.csu.edu.au] On Behalf Of Helen Partridge
Sent: Wednesday, 10 March 2010 12:13 PM
To: isef@listserv.csu.edu.au
Subject: [Isef] Journal of Organisational Transformation & Social Change - "Renewing libraries" due May 1 2010

 

CALL FOR PAPERS: Journal of Organisational Transformation and Social Change

 

Special issue: Renewing libraries: organizational transformation for social change

 

Guest Editors: Simon Shurville & Helen Partridge

Contact: Helen Partridge Email: h.partridge@qut.edu.au

 

IMPORTANT DATES:

Abstract submission: May 10 2010

Author notification: June 1 2010

Full articles due: September 1 2010

Authors Receive Reviews: November 1 2010

Final Articles: December 31 2010

Publication of special issue: Early 2011

 

THE JOURNAL

First published in 1994 the Journal of Organisational Transformation and Social Change is an international peer reviewed scholarly journal. It is dedicated to exploring the developments in social and organisational structures. The journal encompasses the social sciences, including organisational and management science, management systems/operational research and cybernetics, social psychology, sociology, anthropology, political science, psychohistory, as well as economics, law, mathematics and matters relating to the information or knowledge society. It is read by academics working in the area of management, organisational behavior, social psychology, organisational anthropology, human resource development. It is relevant to business schools and university departments across the world, including Europe and the USA. It is also directed towards those who make policy and their advisors, and to managers. Further information on the journal can be found at http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Journal,id=128/view,page=0 

 

ISSUE FOCUS

This special issue of the Journal of Organisational Transformation and Social Change will identify and share evidence of successful organisational transformations in which librarians and libraries have demonstrated themselves to be adaptable and responsive to the particular threats and opportunities presented by the new technologies and services of the mass digitized age while maintaining the core values of librarianship. Authors are invited to submit articles which address how libraries are transforming themselves to better serve the knowledge society. The following is a suggested list of topics:

 

·         Adopting new business processes and technologies:

o    Accommodating industrial dynamics for library products

o    Digital rights management

o    Federating mass digitization

o    Ontologies and the semantic web

o    Social networking and Web 2.0

 

·         Developing librarians of the future:

o    Adjusting to new workforce demographics

o    Continuing professional development and work-based learning for librarians

o    Developing collaborative capacity between librarians and other information management professions

o    Executive education for librarians

o    Globalized tertiary education for librarians

o    Opening new pathways to professional status for librarians

o    Transforming professional bodies

o    Updating curricula and qualifications for librarians

 

·         Management and organizational structures:

o    Eliminating silos without sacrificing expertise

o    Establishing federations, joint ventures and public/private partnerships

o    E-transformation of library processes

o    Leading multicultural and multidisciplinary teams

o    Organizational learning

o    Managing agility, change and innovation

o    Strategic workforce planning

 

·         Promoting digital literacy and social inclusion:

o    Accommodating demographic change of library clients

o    Digital archiving and preservation

o    Educating the population in digital literacy

o    Ensuring access to knowledge for those with disabilities

o    Promoting immediate and equitable access to knowledge

o    Supporting flexible and lifelong learning

o    Sustaining communities of practice

 

·         Renewing library infrastructure:

o    Information architectures to facilitate federations and partnerships

o    Integrating innovative physical and virtual spaces

o    Joint libraries

o    Remote access to library services

o    Sustainable infrastructure

o    Virtual libraries

 

·         Supporting research:

o    Federating search: political and technical issues

o    Implementing institutional repositories

o    Integrating digital and physical knowledge sources

 

Interdisciplinary approaches to documenting the transformation of libraries are strongly encouraged. Articles which integrate a selection of these topics will be especially welcome. Appropriate methodologies and traditions include action research, anthropology, change management, cybernetics, education, ethnomethodology, human resource management, innovation management, information management, information systems, knowledge management, organisational psychology, organisational theory, social psychology, strategic workforce management and technology management.

 

FORMAT FOR SUBMISSIONS

Prospective authors should submit a 500 word abstract which includes key words and references. These abstracts will be reviewed by the guest editors and successful authors will be notified by e-mail. The successful authors will be invited to submit their full articles of up to 6,000 words which adhere to the style guide from the publishers (available at http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/misc/contributornotes.pdf). All articles will be double-blind reviewed. The copyright of all material published will be vested with the journal.

 

Please submit abstracts to: h.partridge@qut.edu.au

 

 

Associate Professor Helen Partridge | Coordinator Library & Information Science Education

Faculty of Science and Technology | Information Sciences Discipline | QUT | 2 George St. Brisbane Q. 4000

h.partridge@qut.edu.au | 07 3138 9047 | 07 3138 1214 (fax) | Margaret St Level 9 Rm 918 

Eprint collection: http://eprints.qut.edu.au/view/person/Partridge,_Helen.html 

The LIS Education Project http://liseducation.wordpress.com

Reconceptualising and repositioning Australian Library and Information Science Education Project http://www.liseducation.org.au 

CRICOS No 00213J

 

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Library and Information Science Critique:  Journal of the Sciences of Information Recorded in Documents

http://critica.bibliotecologica.googlepages.com/secondissue

 

Library and Information Science Critique:  

Journal of the Sciences of Information Recorded in Documents

ISSN: in progress                                                           [ Spanish version ]

Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, MEXICO

Welcome!!!

Last news

November 25, 2009

 Library & Information Science Critique has launched its SECOND ISSUE, and you can download it here, in full, free, free of charge, unhampered, democratic and Open Access here, but if you wish we can also send it by e-mail and you can also contact us if you have any problems to access the articles, or queries, or if you like to send us contributions for the next number, our contact here: critica.bibliotecologica@gmail.com

 Deadline for contributions for the 3rd number: December 15, 2009

 Date of publication 3rd number: January 30, 2010

 Deadline for contributions for the 4th number:  February 28, 2010

 Date of publication 4th number:  March 30, 2010

 Deadline for contributions for 5th number:  May 30, 2010

Date of publication of 4th number:  June 30, 2010

  Current Issue

Instructions for authors

Manifesto about the rights of authors

 About the journal

 Editorial Board

Proofreaders

Founders

Director and Editor-in-chief

Vice-director and Adjunct editor

 Archive

Contact us

 


website updated December 10, 2009. Webmasters: Zapopan Muela & Jose Antonio Torres 

Second Issue

 (Vol. 2, No.1, Jan-Jun 2009)

of the journal: 

Library and Information Science Critique: Journal of the Sciences of Information Recorded in Documents

Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico, November 25, 2009

 [Ir

 a la versión en español

]

 

Table of Contents

Open Access free of charge and direct of the full issue

  | PDF | [Only in Spanish] [139 pp.] [+3MB]

http://eprints.rclis.org/17230/1/critica.bibliotecologica.vol.2.no.1.pdf

Editorial

 

Library and Information Science Critique launches its second number reloaded, by: Zapopan Martín Muela Meza (MEXICO)

p. 4. PDF open access to full text, only in Spanish 

http://eprints.rclis.org/17292/1/CB.v2.n1._Editorial.pdf

 

ENGLISH VERSION below:

 Dear reader,

 

Library and Information Science: The Journal of the Sciences of Information Recorded in Documents brings you its second number. We want to give you a non solicited apology beforehand, because it took us some more months to launch it than planned, but we call for your understanding since our editorial project is an independent Open Access project made possible with a collective efforts of volunteers. Hence, it is not excepted from the vicissitudes of its participants. However, there you have the second number, well alive, kicking, and reloaded.

 

Library and Information Science Critique maintains firmly its editorial policy against censorship and intellectual impostures within the sciences of information recorded in documents, and at the same time it maintains its editorial quality through a rigorous process of double blinded peer reviewing through its editorial board comprising 21 experts in the  theory and  practice in various sciences of information recorded in documents, and from different parts of the world: Germany (1); Argentina (2); Brazil (1); Colombia (1); U.S.A. (1); Spain (2); India (1); Italy (1); Kenya (1); Mexico (3); Nicaragua (1); Peru (2); Portugal (1); Serbia (1); South Africa (1); Venezuela (1).

 

What are the new features of the second issue of LIS Critique? Since this second number these sections have been discontinued: Academic papers, and Literature space, and a new one has been added: Documents, which includes documents of solidarity with leftist political movements within the sciences of information recorded in documents that have been submitted by the authors to the editors’ consideration, or that the latter have requested the former authorization for its publication by considering them relevant. Hence, the new sections are: Articles, Essays, Documents, and Book reviews.

 

What will you find in this second issue of LIS Critique? You will find in this number 11 contributions (7 articles, and 2 documents) submitted by 17 authors (3 Mexicans, 2 Venezuelans, 1 from the USA, and 2 Spanish) since 12 August 2009 when it closed the last call for papers. At the end of this number you will find a biographic summary of the authors who contributed in this issue.

 

José Antonio Torres Reyes (MEXICO) begins the critical debates in the Articles section with his contribution: “A bibliometric analysis of the scientific development of the social sciences in Mexico: 1997-2006,” where he presents the results of a research project conducted in the area of social sciences in Mexico from the period 1997-2006, in order to know the relevant characteristics such as its historic evolution, and scientific productivity (Research + Development) through the volume of documents generated, language of publication, index of chronological productivity, thematic, and through federative entity, patterns of national and international authorship and co-authorship, citation and co-citation amongst publications, institutions, and scientific sub-disciplines (research fronts), amongst others, employing to such end the research documental technique: bibliometric analysis. In his critical analysis he highlights diverse bibliometric bias found in the database Social Science Citation Index of the Institute of Scientific Information (ISI). It is remarkable that his article is part of the results, analyses, conclusions, and


recommendations of his doctoral thesis from his PhD program in Scientific Information from the University of Granada, Spain (2004-2009).

 

 

Zapopan Martín Muela Meza (MEXICO) continues the critical debates of this number with his article: “For a critique  of  the copyright  system  and  of  the role of  copyright  police     as it affects      librarians,” where he tracks the origins of copyright in the England of the 16th century as a instrument of the monarchy for the monopoly of the nascent editorial industry, and above all, as an organism of systematic control and censorship of the government against the governed. He clarifies the difference between copyright (right of copy) and the moral rights of authors, where the latter are hampered from usufructing their own right. He argues that librarians adopt a role of police of copyright in benefit of company owners of copyright versus the role of a librarian affirming the adoption of a policy in benefit of offering free, and unhampered access to information recorded in documents in all the institutions of documental information such as libraries. This idea that helped him as a conducting thread of his analysis is taken from the debates of the Copy/South Research Group from its first workshop held in Canterbury, Kent, England in 2005, cf. THE COPY/SOUTH DOSSIER: Issues in the Economics, Politics, and Ideology of Copyright in the Global South (May 2006), attended by the author and 22 other critical academics from various disciplines, among them 6 more librarians. The author takes a position in favour of the role of a librarian to offer free and unhampered access to information and against the role of  police, and it invites the worldwide librarianship community to declare itself as opposed to such a police role.

 

Felipe Meneses Tello (MEXICO) continues the critical debates in his article The defense referencing the free use of the bibliographic-librarian-documentary patrimony in a democratic state.” In this he proposes a defense of the public goods and services offered by diverse public institutions--bibliographical-librarian-documentary--as that of facing a problematic, one that implies the phenomenon of privatization, a practice of neoliberal policies that tries to impel and to favor the benefit of private interests. He draws the attention of the different political and social actors in order to bring them to awareness and to adhere to an intelligent critique. He also puts forth as an argument concerning the problematic of “library public service” that it is a matter to be brought up within the framework of a national cultural policy, a problem of state public policy, wherein is invoked the free use of library collections and services and of information, mainly those that are financed with the taxes derived from public funds.

 

Silvia Graciela Fois (ARGENTINA), in her article “Theoretical reflections on library professional practice,” conducts an interesting critique regarding the role of the librarian and libraries in society; to rethink this role and function in the light of the readings and analysis of the concepts of social theories raised during the seminar of the bachelor's degree program in librarianship: "Social theory, a tool for analysis of social reality and professional practice." She attempts, from the choice of working concepts studied, to review some of the issues affecting the professional profile of the librarian as agent of transformation and generator of change in the volatile Information Society and, most recently, in the Knowledge Society. It reviews anew some texts of social theory as applied to librarianship, but now with a certain clarity regarding some concepts discussed by colleagues in forums and meetings on social librarianship. It makes a small contribution of summing up the critques directed at entrenched positions that are so much a part of our imagination and to revise them based on enriched theory and on everyday practice. It brings to consideration the development of works and of some concepts relating to power, in particular taking into account the contributions of Bordieu [variant spelling: Bourdieu, Pierre]. Finally, it analyzes with this theoretical construct the sociological impact of the Internet and the responsibility for professionals in Librarianship in the use of this tool that "goes beyond the mere fact of being a means."

 

The Venezuelans Johann Pirela Morillo and Lisbeth Portillo in their article “Cooperative technology: a methodology for the design of profiles by competencies of the Information Professional,”


construct and validate the profile by competencies for the Information Professional for the School of Librarianship and Archival Studies of the University of Zulia [Maracaibo, Venezuela], based on the design and realization of a methodology--Cooperative Technology--oriented fundamentally to stimulate and bring about through a permanent dialogue with Society the active participation not only of the actors who comprise curricular dynamics (professors, students, graduates, and the designers and planners of the curriculum), but of strategic representatives of the distinct social sectors. They conclude that it is only possible to guarantee the relevance of the professional profiles based on competencies if these are constructed over a base of interactive participation within society.  

 

The Argentinian Claudio Agosto, Vanesa Berasa, Tatiana Carsen, Marcela Curiale, Lía Salas, and the GESBI (Group of Social Studies in Librarianship and Documentation), in their article “The infinite page:  the comic strip from paper to the digital media,” review some critical aspects of the digital media, specifically with the object of dealing with the problematics of the digital comic book, contextualized within the Information Society and the Digital Divide. Then they deal with the impact of digital technologies affecting the modes of reading as regards the differences between the reading of books and the reading of digital texts.  They also review the contributions of those libraries that were able to facilitate the recovery and difusion of printed comics for recreatioin and popular education.  Finally, as a manner of conclusions, they convene a dialog between authors and publishers of comics and librarians in order to strengthen/fortify this narrative genre.

 

Xiangming Mu (U.S.A.), closes the sectionn Articles with his contribution. Virtual reference is a library service that uses the Internet to provide remote reference services. The benefit of virtual reference service is to provide help  anytime, anywhere. One challenge for  a  current virtual reference service, however, is the low rate of usage. Towards this problem, we proposed a new interactive Virtual Reference (iVR) model. Instead of working inside the circle of the VR process, we focused on the user's  actions before  “initializing the VR service process.” As a result, our interactive virtual reference model enables VR librarians to identify the “troubled” patron and then to offer  prompt help. The help is automatically triggered by a set of criteria that are predefined in the system. A simple “no match” factor is selected to be implemented in our iVR prototype system. Other criteria are also analyzed based on our survey of 47 libraries. Two comparison studies using different iVR interfaces were conducted to evaluate their performance in terms of system helpfulness and interface satisfaction. Patrons’ concerns concerns over  potential privacy violation and intrusion were also investigated. We found that our pop-up interface design was helpful but should more fully consider users’ concerns about the intrusion. 

 

Javier Gimeno Perelló (ESPAÑA), Felipe Meneses Tello (MÉXICO), Graciela Dillet (ARGENTINA) y Pedro López López (ESPAÑA) inician la sección de Documentos con su contribuciónSolidaridad con el pueblo palestino. ¡Alto a los ataques del ejército de Israel con el pueblo palestino!” haciendo una denuncia y condena enérgica contra el gobierno de Israel por los bombardeos perpetrados contra el pueblo palestino en la franja de Gaza. Dicho comunicado es suscrito por 48 profesionales de la información documental y un colectivo de diversas partes del mundo.

 

Felipe Meneses Tello (MÉXICO) y Javier Gimeno Perelló (ESPAÑA) en su documentoDeclaración Universal de Derechos Humanos: 1948-2008” hacen un llamado a los profesionales de la información documental del mundo a tomar conciencia de la gran relevancia de dicha declaración para preservar las libertades de pensamiento, conciencia, religión, opinión, expresión, entre otras de tipo social, cultural, jurídico, político e ideológico, para reivindicarlos como derechos humanos universales para vencer prejuicios y sentimientos discriminatorios en la investigación y práctica en el amplio seno de las ciencias de la información documental. Dicho comunicado es suscrito por 83 profesionales de la información documental de diversas partes del mundo. Con su documento terminan las contribuciones de este segundo número.

 

Sin más prolegómenos, te dejamos con este gran esfuerzo colectivo e internacional para que lo sometas a tu rigurosa crítica y análisis y esperamos que en el tercer número nos envíes tus contribuciones críticas. CB

 

 

Articles

Bibliometric analysis of the scientific development of the Social Sciences in Mexico: 1997-2006, by: Jose Antonio Torres Reyes (MEXICO) , p. 7.   PDF open access to full text, only in Spanish

http://eprints.rclis.org/17294/1/CB.v2.n1.Articulo1.jatr.pdf

In this work are presented the results of a study concerning research productivity within Mexico during theperiod 1997-2006, to learn more about some important features concerning this country's historical development and scientific productivity (R & D) through the volume of documents generated, language of publication, the productivity index chronologically, thematically and by state, the patterns of authorship and national and international co-authorship, citation and co-citation between publications, institutions and sub-disciplines in science (research fronts), among other such indicators--using the technique of documentary research: bibliometric analysis. For scientific production within the studied period, the field of Social Sciences represented 8% of the total of the Mexican production ; the field of Humanities  represented 1,50% ; and the field of Applied Sciences  represented 90,5% . These were results derived according to estimations made through the Citation Index data bases of the ISI.

 

Keywords

Mexico; Scientific production; Scientific collaboration; Coauthorship;  Bibliometric analysis;  Scientific journals; Bibliometry; Research assessment; Cienciometry; Bibliometric indicators; Unidimensional indicators; Multidimensional indicators; Multivariate  analysis; Correspondence analysis; Multidimensional Scaling. 

 

 

For a critique  of  the copyright  system 

  and  of  the role of  copyright  police as it affects      librarians by: Zapopan Martin Muela Meza (MEXICO), p. 42. PDF open access to full text, only in Spanish

http://eprints.rclis.org/17293/1/CB.v2.n1.Articulo2.zmmm.pdf

Abstract

This paper,  entitled“For a critique  of  the copyright  system  and  of  the role of  copyright  police     as it affects      librarians,” tracks the origins of the copyright system from the England of the 16th century as a monarchical instrument for the commercial monopoly of the nascent publishing industry, and above all as an organism of the government for the systematic censorship and control of printing and publishing against citizens. It clarifies the difference between copyright and the moral rights of authors, where the latter are hampered from usufructing their own right. The idea that librarians adopt a role of police of copyright in benefit of company owners of copyright versus the role of a librarian affirming the adoption of a policy in benefit of offering free, and unhampered access to information recorded in documents in all the institutions of documental information, is taken from the debates of the Copy/South Research Group from its first workshop held in Canterbury, Kent, England in 2005, cf. THE COPY/SOUTH DOSSIER: Issues in the Economics, Politics, and Ideology of Copyright in the Global South (May 2006), attended by the author and 22 other critical academics from various disciplines, among them 6 more librarians. It gives examples of how various librarians adopt a role of police of copyright contrasted with the librarian role of giving free access to information recorded in documents. It takes a position in favour of the role of a librarian to offer free and unhampered access to information and against the role of  police, and it invites the worldwide librarianship community to declare itself as opposed to such a police role.

 

Keywords

Copyright; rights of authors; police; censorship; Copy/South Research Group; libraries; institutions of information recorded in documents; librarians and copyright; Public domain; International copyright; Fair use (copyright).

 

 

The defense referencing the free use of the bibliographic-librarian-documentary patrimony in a democratic state, by: Felipe Meneses Tello (MEXICO), p. 53. PDF open access to full text, only in Spanish

 http://eprints.rclis.org/17307/1/CB.v2.n1.Articulo3.Meneses.pdf

Abstract

English title of article: “The defense referencing the free use of the bibliographic-librarian-documentary patrimony in a democratic state.” From a critical perspective, one may put forth a defense of public goods and services offered by diverse public institutions--bibliographical-librarian-documentary--as that of facing a problematic, one that implies the phenomenon of privatization, a practice of neoliberal policies that tries to impel and to favor the benefit of private interests. Confronting this, one needs to specify that it is necessary to draw the attention of the different political and social actors in order to bring them to awareness and to adhere to a critical intelligence. It is put forth as an argument concerning the problematic of “library public service” that it is a matter to be brought up within the framework of a national cultural policy, a problem of state public policy, wherein is invoked the free use of library collections and services and of information, mainly those that are financed with the taxes derived from public funds. .

 

Keywords

Libraries and state.    Free use of library services.    Libraries and national cultural policy.   Defense of cultural patrimony.    Library legislation.    Library public service

Theoretical reflections on library professional practice, pby: Silvia Graciela Fois (ARGENTINA), p. 64. PDF open access to full text, only in Spanish

 http://critica.bibliotecologica.googlepages.com/CB.v2.n1.Art4.Fois.pdf

Abstract

This work (“Theoretical reflections on library professional practice”) intends to perform a reflexive synthesis regarding the role of the librarian and libraries in society; to rethink this role and function in the light of the readings and analysis of the concepts of social theories raised during the seminar of the bachelor's degree program in librarianship: "Social theory, a tool for analysis of social reality and professional practice." It attempts, from the choice of working concepts studied, to review some of the issues affecting the professional profile of the librarian as agent of transformation and generator of change in the volatile Information Society and, most recently, in the Knowledge Society. It reviews anew some texts of social theory as applied to librarianship, but now with a certain clarity regarding some concepts discussed by colleagues in forums and meetings on social librarianship. It makes a small contribution of summing up the critques directed at entrenched positions that are so much a part of our imagination and to revise them based on enriched theory and on everyday practice. It brings to consideration the development of works and of some concepts relating to power, in particular taking into account the contributions of Bordieu [variant spelling: Bourdieu, Pierre]. Finally, it analyzes with this theoretical construct the sociological impact of the Internet and the responsibility for professionals in Librarianship in the use of this tool that "goes beyond the mere fact of being a means."

 

Keywords

Social librarianship;  Social theory of professional practice;  Agents of change;  Library professional practice.      

 

 

Cooperative technology: a methodology for the design of profiles by competencies of the Information Professional, by: Johann Pirela Morillo y Lisbeth Portillo (VENEZUELA), p. 76

.PDF open access to full text, only in Spanish 

 http://critica.bibliotecologica.googlepages.com/CB.v2.n1.Art5.Pirela.pdf

Abstract

Title of article: “Cooperative technology: a methodology for the design of profiles by competencies of the Information Professional.” Where it is constructed and confirmed a profile of competencies for the Information Professional for the School of Librarianship and Archival Studies of the University of Zulia [Maracaibo, Venezuela]. Based on the design and realization of a methodology--Cooperative Technology--oriented fundamentally to stimulate and bring about through a permanent dialogue with Society the active participation not only of the actors who comprise curricular dynamics (professors, students, graduates, and the designers and planners of the curriculum), but of strategic representatives of the distinct social sectors. This methodology operates by means of the development of three stages: 1)  Conceptual architecture, founded on present-day currents and tendencies which guide changes in the higher education of the 21st century, mainly as concerns the conception of the curriculum principally with respect to the fusion of the pedagogical theories raised by Inciarte (2005), and of the Cooperative Curricular [Model] Integrated in Society, as proposed by Rincones (2007).  2)  Advice of the core actors, that with this phase one is able to obtain the vision and contributions of the diverse actors from society relating to the training of Information Professionals.  3)  Revision of marketing studies, which would detect the real needs, potential and emergent, of the labor market in several countries of Latin America. As a result of the application of this methodology the profile of the Information Professional attending to the four fields of competencies: that of the management of knowledge, that of the mediation of information, that of the organization and representation of information and knowledge, and that of sociocultural promotion.  One concludes that it is only possible to guarantee the relevance of the professional profiles based on competencies if these are constructed over a base of interactive participation within society.  

 

Keywords

Professional profiles by competencies; Information Professional competencies; Cooperation as theoretical support for a curricular model; Relevance in professional training.  

 

 

The infinite page:  the comic strip from paper to the digital media, by: Claudio Agosto, Vanesa Berasa, Tatiana Carsen, Marcela Curiale, Lía Salas, and GESBI (Grupo de Estudios Sociales en Bibliotecología y Documentación) (ARGENTINA), p. 88.

PDF open access to full text, in Spanish only

http://critica.bibliotecologica.googlepages.com/CB.v2.n1.Art5.Pirela.pdf

 

Abstract

In this work (“The infinite page:  the comic strip from paper to the digital media will be reviewed, very briefly, some aspects to consider whenever we refer to digital media, specifically with the object of dealing with the problematics of the digital comic book. This will be contextualized within the Information Society and the Digital Divide.  Then it will deal with the impact of digital technologies affecting the modes of reading as regards the differences between the reading of books and the reading of digital texts.  We will review the origin of the comic book and the characteristics of its formats, and how this affects its passage from paper to digital medium.  Some considerations are made concerning the digitalization and the creation of digital comics.  We will review the contributions of those libraries that were able to facilitate the recovery and difusion of printed comics for recreatioin and popular education.  Finally, we will advance some preliminary conclusions in order to convene a dialog between authors and publishers of comics and librarians in order to strengthen/fortify this narrative genre.

 

Keywords

Comic strips; Digital media; Graphic narrative; Popular literatura; Libraries and digital media.

 

 

Balance between more effectiveness and less intrusion: Will interactive Virtual Reference model work?, by: Xiangming Mu (U.S.A.), p. 99. Full Access to PDF file, only in English

Abstract

Virtual reference is a library service that uses the Internet to provide remote reference services. The benefit of virtual reference service is to provide help  anytime, anywhere. One challenge for  a  current virtual reference service, however, is the low rate of usage. Towards this problem, we proposed a new interactive Virtual Reference (iVR) model. Instead of working inside the circle of the VR process, we focused on the user's  actions before  “initializing the VR service process.” As a result, our interactive virtual reference model enables VR librarians to identify the “troubled” patron and then to offer  prompt help. The help is automatically triggered by a set of criteria that are predefined in the system. A simple “no match” factor is selected to be implemented in our iVR prototype system. Other criteria are also analyzed based on our survey of 47 libraries. Two comparison studies using different iVR interfaces were conducted to evaluate their performance in terms of system helpfulness and interface satisfaction. Patrons’ concerns concerns over  potential privacy violation and intrusion were also investigated. We found that our pop-up interface design was helpful but should more fully consider users’ concerns about the intrusion. 

 

Keywords

Electronic reference services; Virtual reference desk; User privacy; Patron digital privacy; Prompt helps in interface design.

 


Documents, p. 118.

 

Solidarity with the Palestinian people. Stop the attacks of the Isreal army against the Palestinian people!, by: Javier Gimeno Perello (SPAIN), Felipe Meneses Tello (MEXICO), Graciela Dillet (ARGENTINA), Pedro Lopez Lopez (SPAIN), p. 118.

PDF open access to full text, only in Spanish

 

Declaration of the Human Universal Rights: 1948-2008, by: Felipe Meneses Tello (MEXICO), Javier Gimeno Perello (SPAIN), p. 120.

PDF open access to full text, in Spanish only

 

Authors, p. 123.

Acceso al  Texto  Completo en PDF

--
Zapopan Muela

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Library Review

              

               Call for papers: open source in libraries

-----Original Message-----
From: Research and evaluation across all LIS sectors [mailto:LIS-LIRG@JISCMAIL.AC.UK] On Behalf Of Alan Poulter
Sent: Monday, 8 March 2010 9:24 PM
To: LIS-LIRG@JISCMAIL.AC.UK
Subject: Library Review call for papers: open source in libraries

An upcoming issue of Library Review will feature papers from a conference held last year in London, Breaking the Barriers 2009

(http://www.openlibraries.eu/?page_id=48). We are interested in getting other perspectives on the applications of open source software in

libraries: case studies, new applications, cost-benefit studies etc. Please get in contact with anyproposals for papers you may have.

For details about Library Review itself please see:  http://info.emeraldinsight.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=lr

Alan Poulter - Associate Editor

Dept of Computer and Information Sciences

University of Strathclyde

mailto:alan.poulter@cis.strath.ac.uk

http://www.cis.strath.ac.uk/cis/staff/index.php?uid=ap

tel: 0141 548 3911

The University of Strathclyde is a charitable body, registered in

Scotland, with registration number SC015263

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Library Trends

              

               Issue on Vital Role of School Libraries in LIS Research

From: Open Lib/Info Sci Education Forum [mailto:JESSE@listserv.utk.edu] On Behalf Of Branciforte, Robert
Sent: Friday, 13 November 2009 5:23 AM
To: JESSE@listserv.utk.edu
Subject: FSU Assistant Professor Edits Library Trends Issue on Vital Role of School Libraries in LIS Research

FSU Assistant Professor Edits Library Trends Issue on Vital Role of School Libraries in LIS Research

Assistant Professor Marcia Mardis of the Florida State University College of Communication & Information edited the new issue of Library Trends (vol. 58, no. 1, summer 2009) entitled Important to Us All: School Libraries and LIS Research. This issue was Library Trends’ first to focus on school libraries in over 40 years. In addition to being the Issue Editor, Dr. Mardis wrote the introductory article overview "A Gentle Manifesto on the Relevance and Obscurity of School Libraries in LIS Research," and co-wrote (with Ellen Hoffman) the final article in the issue, "A Decade of Promises: Discourses on Twenty-first Century Schools in Library Policy and Research."

The overarching theme of the issue is the tension between the low status the study of school libraries is often given in LIS research and the enduring relevance of school libraries to the research and practice. The issue focuses on connection points between popular areas of information science and school libraries such as organizational culture; information policy; community informatics; child development; technology-mediated change; informal learning; and intellectual property

Dr. Mardis has an established interdisciplinary research career based on school libraries. Her related work encompasses digital libraries, broadband utilization, educator change, and science learning with multimodal resources. This Library Trends issue builds on relationships and work conducted internationally and includes contributors from Australia and Canada, where Dr. Mardis served as a Fulbright Senior Specialist in 2008.

“I am so pleased about it. I have longed for an issue that helps to demonstrate why we should continue to nurture our school librarian preparation programs. I think this issue has the potential to make great changes in LIS.” Mardis said. “I’m hoping it will raise awareness in other programs that school library components have very relevant research and theories to contribute to LIS.”

The School of Library & Information Studies at Florida State’s College of Communication & Information has demonstrated excellence in information use and behavior research in K-12 organizations. The School Media Specialization within the Master’s program is ranked 3rd by U.S. News and World Report and prepares students to meet the information needs of children and young adults in various settings.

Bob Branciforte, MLIS

Creative Director

College of Communication & Information

The Florida State University

Bob.Branciforte@cci.fsu.edu      E-MAIL

(850) 644-3391                      PHONE

(850) 644-9253                      FAX

Florida State University           ADDRESS

Room 021 LSB

142 Collegiate Loop

PO Box 3062100

Tallahassee, Florida 32306-2100

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Pakistan Journal of Library and Information Science [PJLIS]

              
               Call for Papers

 -----Original Message-----
From: Dr. Khalid Mahmood [mailto:khalidmahmood@yahoo.com]
Sent: Wednesday, 6 January 2010 3:21 PM
To: ifla-l@infoserv.inist.fr
Subject: [IFLA-L] PJLIS -- Call for Papers

Dear Professional Colleagues,

The Department of Library and Information Science, University of the

Punjab, Lahore publishes “Pakistan Journal of Library and Information

Science [PJLIS]” on annual basis. The PJLIS is a refereed scholarly

journal committed to publish original and scholarly critiques,

theoretical, conceptual and research articles that contribute to the

understanding of issues and problems in all areas of librarianship and

information services at local, national and international level.

The journal, however, prefers to publish articles reporting the research

studies reflecting Pakistani perspective. All research papers submitted to

the PJLIS are double-blind peer reviewed by a panel of reviewers.

Please have a look at the PJLIS Website for previous full text issues.

http://www.pu.edu.pk/dlis/pjlis/index.html

We invite you to please send your paper for the next issue to be published

in June 2010.

Best wishes,

Prof. Dr. Khalid Mahmood

Chief Editor PJLIS

Department of Library & Information Science

University of the Punjab, Lahore, PAKISTAN

Phone & Fax: 92-42-9231224 Mobile: 92-333-4271285

Email: khalid@dlis.pu.edu.pk and khalidmahmood@yahoo.com

Internet: http://pu.edu.pk/faculty/descriptions.asp?faculty=10006

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Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

           

            Version 77            

-----Original Message-----
From: asis-l-bounces@asis.org [mailto:asis-l-bounces@asis.org] On Behalf Of Charles W. Bailey, Jr.
Sent: Tuesday, 15 December 2009 8:12 AM
To: ASIS-L@asis.org
Subject: [Asis-l] Version 77, Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography

Version 77 of the Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography is now available from Digital Scholarship.  This selective bibliography presents over 3,620 articles, books, and other printed and electronic sources that are useful in understanding scholarly electronic publishing efforts on the Internet.

http://www.digital-scholarship.org/sepb/sepb.html

The Scholarly Electronic Publishing Bibliography: 2008 Annual Edition is available as a paperback book and as a Kindle e-book.

http://digital-scholarship.org/sepb/annual/sepb2008.htm

For a discussion of the numerous changes in my digital publications since my resignation from the University of Houston Libraries (http://bit.ly/GW4Ih), see:   http://www.digital-scholarship.org/cwb/dsoverview.htm

Changes in This Version

The bibliography has the following sections (revised sections are marked with an asterisk):

Table of Contents

Dedication

1 Economic Issues*

2 Electronic Books and Texts

     2.1 Case Studies and History*

     2.2 General Works*

     2.3 Library Issues*

3  Electronic Serials

     3.1 Case Studies and History*

     3.2 Critiques

     3.3 Electronic Distribution of Printed Journals

     3.4 General Works*

     3.5 Library Issues*

     3.6 Research*

4 General Works*

5 Legal Issues

     5.1 Intellectual Property Rights*

     5.2 License Agreements*

6  Library Issues

     6.1 Cataloging, Identifiers, Linking, and Metadata*

     6.2 Digital Libraries*

     6.3 General Works*

     6.4 Information Integrity and Preservation*

7 New Publishing Models*

8 Publisher Issues

     8.1 Digital Rights Management and User Authentication*

9 Repositories, E-Prints, and OAI*

Appendix A. Related Bibliographies*

Appendix B. About the Author*

Appendix C. SEPB Use Statistics

The following recent Digital Scholarship publications may

also be of interest:

(1) Electronic Theses and Dissertations Bibliography,

Version 4 (7/15/2009)

http://digital-scholarship.org/etdb/etdb.htm

(2) Google Book Search Bibliography, Version 5

(9/14/2009)

http://digital-scholarship.org/gbsb/gbsb.htm

(3) Institutional Repository Bibliography, Version 1

(10/19/2009)

http://digital-scholarship.org/irb/irb.html

--

Best Regards,

Charles

Charles W. Bailey, Jr.

Publisher, Digital Scholarship

http://bit.ly/Z6HFx

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END